robertogreco + tutorials   312

The Creative Independent: How to make a zine
"A guide to ideating, publishing, and distributing a DIY zine, written by Rona Akbari and illustrated by Somnath Bhatt."
zines  howto  classideas  tutorials  somnathbhatt  ronaakbari  publishing  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Wikipedia:The Wikipedia Adventure - Wikipedia
"Learn to edit Wikipedia in under an hour! Come on a journey full of real skills, tips, helpers, rewards, and support."



"Mission 1
Say Hello to the World

Mission 2
An Invitation to Earth

Mission 3
Small Changes, Big Impact

Mission 4
The Neutral Point of View

Mission 5
The Veil of Verifiability

Mission 6
The Civility Code

Mission 7
Looking Good Together

Get Help
Hang out in the Interstellar Lounge"
wikipedia  howto  tutorials  onlinetoolkit  classideas 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Resistance School – Practical Skills to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Reimagine America
[See also: https://www.resistanceschool.com/courses/ ]

"Turn your online outrage into offline action

The first free digital training platform for civic engagement and community organizing.

Learn
Access video lessons from leading academics and practitioners to gain the skills you need to organize and mobilize effectively.

Engage
Dive in with supporting resources — readings, quizzes, and tools — and join discussions with other learners in an online forum.

Act
Connect to local, state, and national organizations that are leading the charge for progressive change."
resistance  politics  organizing  howto  tutorials 
july 2018 by robertogreco
How to make a book
"Anyone who has ever attempted to write a book knows that the job requires a lot of you—for instance, a cat, Diet Coke, an onion, an emotional crisis, avoiding all socialization for at least four weeks, or, better yet, disappearing into the Mariana Trench until further notice. Of course, you must know when to stop. Also, it’s best if you “don’t try.”

There is a lot of writing advice out there, but I don’t find much of it especially helpful. I do not mean that it’s “inaccurate”; I only want to note that a lot of it suggests that there are only a few “correct” methods, and that can endanger the process, or at least make it a lot less fruitful. Writing a book is an individual endeavor, an expression of a writer’s unique and thoughtful approach to inspiration, process, and refinement. The way a book is written is part of what makes it so singular. This guide points to a few approaches that have worked for some writers.

Like writing a book, there are many ways to publish one. For the sake of this guide, I’ll be referring to books sold through the trade marketplace—that is, books that are edited, designed, and printed by a publishing house like MCD x FSG, where I work, and distributed to bookstores and online retailers. This guide provides some practical advice from writers on how to find an agent, working with an editor, and engaging with your audience—crucial parts of trade publishing.

To demystify the process of writing and publishing books, I sought advice from some of the authors of MCD x FSG—Jace Clayton, Araminta Hall, Bruce Holbert, Liska Jacobs, Catherine Lacey, A.G. Lombardo, Tamara Shopsin, Robin Sloan, Héctor Tobar, Jeff VanderMeer, and Joshua Wheeler—to compile this guide. It’s honest, self-deprecating, contradictory, and a bit long-winded. We call it “How to make a book.”

— Naomi Huffman"
naomihuffman  nakim  2018  books  classideas  bookmaking  writing  howto  tutorials  publishing 
april 2018 by robertogreco
How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch | Poetry Foundation
"Curious about poetry, but don't know where or how to begin? We've reprinted the first chapter from the book How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch. Its 16 sections provide strategies for reading poems, and each section has plenty of links to examples of poems in our archive to illustrate the points.

Heartland
Poems are like messages in a bottle sent out with little hope of finding a recipient. Those of us who find and read poems become their unknown addresses.

To the Reader Setting Out
The reader of poetry is a kind of pilgrim setting out. To read a poem is to depart from the familiar, to leave all expectations behind.

In the Beginning is the Relation
A lyric poem is a special communiqué between an I and a You. It speaks out of a solitude to a solitude; it begins and ends in silence.

Stored Magic
The lyric poem seeks to mesmerize time. It crosses frontiers and outwits the temporal. It can bridge the gulf between people otherwise unknown to each other.

The Immense Intimacy, the Intimate Immensity
The experience of reading poetry and the kind of knowledge it provides cannot be duplicated elsewhere.

Mere Air, These Words, but Delicious to Hear
From syllable to word to phrase to sentence, the sound of poetry is the source of its primitive pleasures.

In Plain American Which Cats and Dogs Can Read!
A lyric poem walks the line between speaking and singing. Poetry is not speech exactly and yet it is always in relationship to speech, to the spoken word.

Give a Common Word the Spell
The medium of poetry is language, our common property. It belongs to no one and to everyone. The precision of poetry restores language. It also defamiliarizes words by wrenching them from familiar or habitual contexts.

Metaphor: A Poet is a Nightingale
Metaphor drives the engine of poetry. Figurative language—figures of speech and thought—guides the interaction between poet and reader.

Epic, Drama, Lyric: Be Plentiful Like the Universe
Poems may be epic, lyric, dramatic, or a mixture of the three. Most poems find a way to defy these conventional categories.

Harmonious Sisters, Voice, and Vers
The lyric poem began as a work to be performed, to be sung or read aloud. Over time, the lyric transformed into a work for the page, for the reader to imagine in visual terms.

Winged Type
The poem appeals to the eye. It has a shapely dimension and thus relates to the plastic arts, especially painting. The poem is something to look at as well as to recite.

Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking
Rhythm is a form cut into time, as Ezra Pound said in ABC of Reading. It is the combination in English of stressed and unstressed syllables that creates a feeling of fixity and flux, of surprise and inevitability.

The Wave Always Returns
The poem is a muscular and composed thing. It moves like a wave, dissolving the literal. We participate in its flow as it moves from the eye to the ear, to the inner ear, the inner eye.

Help Me, O Heavenly Muse
Where does a poem come from? The sources of inspiration are many, from reason to a touch of madness.

It Is Something of an Accident That You Are the Reader and I the Writer
Reading poetry calls for an active reader. The reader must imaginatively collaborate with a poem to give voice to it."
edwardhirsch  poems  poetry  classideas  tutorials  howto  literature  words  meaning  meaningmaking  language 
april 2018 by robertogreco
BBC Blogs - Academy - How to improve your mojo skills by sacrificing a latte
"A journalist using only the pre-installed apps on their smartphone is like someone driving a Ferrari in first gear. At the risk of stretching the metaphor to breaking point, you can get your phone purring along in fifth with the addition of just a few well-chosen apps. But you’ll have to buy them – yes, by spending actual money.

Before I highlight some of my personal favourites and explain how they could improve your mojo (mobile journalism) output, here’s a quick question: how often do you buy a coffee during the day? Perhaps once on the way to work to get yourself going and again later to counter that mid-afternoon slump? Anecdotally from my face-to-face training for the BBC Academy, many people don't think twice about spending £3 for a triple decaf caramel dry latte (extra nutmeg) once or twice a day.

Yet ask those same people when they last spent a comparable sum on an app to soup up their smartphones and I find that it’s rarely within the last month. More often it is "never".

But if the money on just one coffee a week went instead towards an app, within a few months that smartphone would have acquired new powers (and you might even have lost a few pounds from your waistline).

The apps I’m writing about here are established favourites within the growing global mojo community - that is, producers and reporters who cover news stories and create related content using just their smartphones plus a few gadgets and gizmos like a tripod, a lens, a microphone and a spare battery.

You can also find an entire level of high end apps which stray more into cinematography than video for news and journalism, but I won't be dealing with those here."
smartphones  phones  mobile  journalism  reporting  applications  ios  iphone  video  audio  howto  tutorials  cinematography  editing  onlinetoolkit 
february 2018 by robertogreco
The Challenge of a Straight Line - YouTube
"Explore key methods Concrete Artists in Brazil and Argentina used to create perfectly straight edges in paint. This video is one of three that accompanied the “Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros” (September 16, 2017 – February 11, 2018) at the Getty Museum. For more information visit https://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/cisneros/ "
art  drawing  technique  lines  classideas  arthistory  brasil  brazil  argentina  patriciaphelpsdecisneros  hermelindofiaminghi  raúllozza  juanmelé  rhodrothfuss  willysdecastro  craft  howto  tutorials  research  tape  2017 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Machine Project
"Download
Machine Project Guide to Curating and Planning Events
This tool kit covers the basic ideas, philosophies, and techniques for event-based programming. It's for anyone interested in producing events as a form of cultural programming. It's for anyone who wants to make something exciting happen with other people but isn't sure where to start.

Download
Machine Project Guide to Workshops
This tool kit covers the basic ideas, philosophies, and techniques for workshop-based programming.

Download
Machine Project Guide to Starting Your Own Art Space
This tool kit is for anyone who is considering starting an arts or cultural organization. We will guide you through the ins and outs of conceptualizing, setting up, and running your organization."

[via: "Oh nice—Machine Project has published free downloadable toolkit’s for starting your own art space, curating events, etc. nice way to end their terrific 15-year run:"
https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/956683123730808834 ]
machineproject  via:ablerism  curation  lcproject  openstudioproject  workshops  howto  tutorials  events 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Stephanie Hurlburt on Twitter: "A bunch of people are asking what resources I recommend to start learning graphics programming. So you get a thread on it!"
"A bunch of people are asking what resources I recommend to start learning graphics programming. So you get a thread on it!

I really enjoy giving beginner-level workshops. Here are two that focus on graphics:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1yJSQy4QtcQxcMjr9Wj6kjMd2R1BLNA1mUebDtnaXDL8/edit
https://www.slideshare.net/StephanieHurlburt/graphics-programming-workshop

If you're a graphics coder reading this wondering how you can host a workshop too, I've written about that:
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/11/1/guide-to-running-technology-workshops

I also wrote my own little writeup on graphics, notes from when Rich & I were helping Sophia learn graphics.
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/10/28/casual-introduction-to-low-level-graphics-programming

One more graphics workshop-- this one includes a raytracing and particle demo for you to play with.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1d0StEQMEdz4JUEHXfTPbwKIGYex2p5Mko1Rj66e5M80/edit

I love @baldurk 's blog series, "Graphics in Plain Language" https://renderdoc.org/blog/Graphics-in-Plain-Language/

For those ready to wade into advanced waters, "A trip through the graphics pipeline" by @rygorous is great
https://fgiesen.wordpress.com/2011/07/09/a-trip-through-the-graphics-pipeline-2011-index/

This online book is just an amazing introduction to shaders, by @patriciogv and @_jenlowe_ https://thebookofshaders.com/

Prepare yourself for a monster list of graphics resources on this site! My favorite is the SIGGRAPH papers. http://kesen.realtimerendering.com/

I'm a big fan of Cinder and OpenFramworks, both C++/graphics. They are what I started from.
https://libcinder.org/docs/guides/opengl/index.html
http://openframeworks.cc/learning/

BGFX is also great!
https://github.com/bkaradzic/bgfx

For a more beginner friendly library, Processing is simply lovely. https://processing.org/tutorials/

Shaders! GLSLSandbox is more beginner-friendly, Shadertoy if you want to see some crazy shit
http://glslsandbox.com/
https://www.shadertoy.com/

Can't go without mentioning @CasualEffects 's Graphics Codex-- excellent and comprehensive graphics resource. http://graphicscodex.com/

I stand by this advice on how to approach learning graphics programming.
[image with screenshot of chat]

Since we're now on the topic of getting jobs, do mock interviews and get mentors and talk to people. https://twitter.com/sehurlburt/status/872919452718727168 ["Attn coders who struggle w these, or jr coders:

It is your homework to set up a mock interview w one of these folks"]

My mentor list is FULL of graphics programmers. They all love helping you. I do need to update it with more.
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/11/14/list-of-engineers-willing-to-mentor-you

People ask me about learning math and I point them to @EricLengyel 's book
https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Game-Engine-Development-Mathematics/dp/0985811749/

GPU Performance for Game Artists by @keithoconor
http://fragmentbuffer.com/gpu-performance-for-game-artists/

There are more resources I didn't mention. Check out the last two slides of this https://www.slideshare.net/StephanieHurlburt/graphics-programming-workshop , and http://www.realtimerendering.com

This is a good little collection of resources on advanced GPU optimization and documentation.
https://github.com/g-truc/sdk/tree/master/documentation/hardware/amd/Southern%20Islands

Destiny's Multithreaded Rendering Architecture by @mirror2mask
http://www.gdcvault.com/play/1021926/Destiny-s-Multithreaded-Rendering

An important point: The vast majority of graphics coders I know don't know math very well. Don't be scared away if you aren't a math person.

I say this as someone who adores math, was expecting to use it all the time, & only ever needed basic linear algebra for my graphics work.

Someone made a Slack chat for graphics programming learning/development! Both experienced folks + newbies welcome. https://twitter.com/iFeliLM/status/884801828696805377 ["Great idea. We have a Slack group here:

Invite link here: https://join.slack.com/gfxprogramming/shared_invite/MjExMTIxOTc4NjkwLTE0OTk3ODgxNDYtYTRkNzQ2OGIxOQ "]"
graphics  programming  howto  tutorials  stephaniehurlburt  via:datatelling  math  mathematics  coding 
july 2017 by robertogreco
10 ways to have a better conversation
"Celeste Headlee is an expert in talking to people. As part of her job as a public radio host and interviewer, she talks to hundreds of people each year, teasing from her guests what makes them interesting. At a TEDx conference two years ago, Headlee shared 10 tips for having a better conversations that work for anyone:

1. Don’t multitask.
2. Don’t pontificate.
3. Use open-ended questions.
4. Go with the flow.
5. If you don’t know, say that you don’t know.
6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs.
7. Try not to repeat yourself.
8. Stay out of the weeds.
9. Listen.
10. Be brief.

Watch the video for the explanations of each point. I’m pretty good on 1, 5, & 7 while I struggle with 3, 4, and sometimes 6. 9 is a constant struggle and depends on how much I’ve talked with other people recently."
conversation  classideas  listening  howto  tutorials  celesteheadlee  multitasking  pontification  questionasking  questioning  flow  notknowing  uncertainty  experience  repetition  brevity 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Cheap Bots, Done Quick!
"This site will help you make a Twitterbot! They're easy to make and free to run.

To use it, create a Twitter account for your bot to run under and then sign in below. The bots are written in Tracery, a tool for writing generative grammars developed by Kate Compton. This site is run by George Buckenham - he can be contacted at vtwentyone@gmail.com. "
twitter  bots  twitterbots  howto  tutorials  georgebuckenham 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Surveillance Self-Defense | Tips, Tools and How-tos for Safer Online Communications
"Modern technology has given those in power new abilities to eavesdrop and collect data on innocent people. Surveillance Self-Defense is EFF's guide to defending yourself and your friends from surveillance by using secure technology and developing careful practices.

Select an article from our index to learn about a tool or issue, or check out one of our playlists to take a guided tour through a new set of skills."

[See also:

"Worried about the NSA under Trump? Here's how to protect yourself: We don’t yet know Trump’s surveillance plans, but follow these guidelines if you think it’s better to be safe than sorry"
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/nov/10/nsa-trump-protect-yourself

"Surveillance Self-Defense Against the Trump Administration"
https://theintercept.com/2016/11/12/surveillance-self-defense-against-the-trump-administration/

"A 70-Day Web Security Action Plan for Artists and Activists Under Siege"
https://medium.com/@TeacherC/90dayactionplan-ff86b1de6acb

"Surveillance and inaction"
https://phiffer.org/writing/surveillance-and-inaction/

CryptoParty
https://www.cryptoparty.in/

"Digital Security and Source Protection for Journalists – A Handbook"
http://susanemcgregor.com/digital-security/

"Don’t panic! Download “A First Look at Digital Security”"
https://www.accessnow.org/a-first-look-at-digital-security/

"Protecting Your Digital Life in 7 Easy Steps"
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/17/technology/personaltech/encryption-privacy.html

"The Source Guide to Defending Accounts Against Common Attacks"
https://source.opennews.org/en-US/guides/defending-accounts/ ]
eff  privacy  security  surveillance  howto  tutorials  technology  2016  nsa  onlinetoolkit  digital  internet  web  online 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Getting started with Raspberry Pi — PaulStamatiou.com
"What you can do with a tiny $35 computer and how I built a digital photo frame

In early 2012 an intriguing single-board computer with a weird name hit the market. For the low price of $35, you could get a fully functioning computer that could run a real operating system.

It was called the Raspberry Pi and it was the brainchild of a UK charity called the Raspberry Pi Foundation. They saw the need for an affordable computer after seeing a consistent drop in students applying to study computer science.

Well it turns out this tiny and cheap fully-functional computer had a much larger audience than anticipated. Multiple models have been created since, including the $5 Pi Zero, and over 9 million Raspberry Pis have been sold.

This is a long post so I more than likely made some errors along the way. Feel free to let me know on Twitter, thanks!"
raspberrypi  classideas  hacking  howto  paulstamatiou  tutorials  2016 
september 2016 by robertogreco
bubble103 on Scratch
[Specifically these projects:

"The Colour Divide - Trailer"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/70058680/

"Two | The Colour Divide"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/97663280/

"[Now out] A Colour Divide Q & A!"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/111996769/

"Vectoring Like A Pro #1"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/75539018/

"Vectoring Like A Pro #2"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/102075619/

"Ya Gotta ♥ Variables"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/80209136/ ]

[See also:

https://twitter.com/bubble103_

"Hi, I'm @bubble103's evil clone.
jk... this is my test account...

Follow my main account, @bubble103!
*currently not taking any voice acting requests*"
https://scratch.mit.edu/users/bubbie103/ ]

[via: Thursday Keynote
http://webcast.mit.edu/sum2016/scratch/1631/index-d1.html ]
scratch  vectors  tutorials  coding  drawing  illustration  howto  tarynbasel 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Creating Groups – Hypothesis
"If you want to annotate privately with a group of hypothes.is users, then our groups feature is what you”ll want to use. Once you create a group, you can invite others to join it by sharing a special link. That link will also serve as the group home page with a list of members and texts annotated by the group. You can also link to a stream of annotations created by group members from the group home page.

NOTE: after linking to documents to be annotated form the group home page, users must 1) activate hypothes.is and 2) toggle the scope selector in the hypothes.is sidebar to the appropriate group from “public.”"
hypothes.is  annotation  groups  onlinetoolkit  howto  tutorials  via:tealtan 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Annotating PDFs Without URLs – Hypothesis
"For sometime now, you’ve been able to annotate PDFs using Hypothes.is, both on the web and locally, with hosted PDFs syncing with local instances and various local instances syncing with each other. Jon Udell wrote about this magical feature here over a year go.

[video]

For those that tried it out, however, there was one annoying snag, especially if you were trying to lead a large group (of students, say) through the process: users had to create an annotation on a local PDF before they would be able to view any pre-existing annotations created elsewhere–in other local instances or where originally hosted. (The same would happen for identical PDFs hosted at two distinct URLs.)

So it was possible to be sent a PDF that had supposedly been annotated, open it, activate Hypothes.is and not see any annotations. Even if you knew about the need to create an annotation to view annotations, you were entering that conversation blindly or else creating a dummy annotation to be deleted later. This added step admittedly took away some of the “mind-blowingness” of annotating PDFs across multiple locations using Hypothes.is.

Now that step is no longer necessary.

What’s changed?

We used to use the URL as the primary identifier of PDFs. That’s what the Hypothes.is client would search for in the database to anchor annotations on a page. Now we use the digital fingerprint that is baked into PDFs from their generation as part of the spec for the format. We did use this fingerprint previously as a secondary identifier to map local PDFs to hosted ones or PDFs hosted at different URLs to each other, which is what caused the lag between new annotation creation and appearance of pre-existing annotations. This shift from URL to PDF fingerprint will truly enhance the portability of annotations on the format across the web.

For example, if the same scholarly journal article is housed at two different repositories, annotations created at either location will show up at the other (assuming both PDFs have the same fingerprint, an assumption that is not always the case). Public annotations created on a local version of the same PDF will also be immediately viewable. If I annotate an essay at a permanent URL on JSTOR, then download the article and share it via email, or host it on my own WordPress site, my annotations will anchor through all incarnations of that PDF."
via:tealtan  hypothes.is  pdfs  annotation  howto  tutorials  pdf 
july 2016 by robertogreco
adaptive1 | Learning Library
"The Adaptive Design Association abides by the “open source” philosophy of design and fabrication. This does not mean that we simply offer our techniques and processes free of charge, but that we share them with a community who can build and expand upon what we teach. We hope that you -- whether you be a student, teacher, parent, designer, or therapist -- will in turn share your own concepts and designs with us, so that we may grow together.

Our community blog and forum is a platform for individuals to share adaptive design techniques, problems, and solutions with each other from all over the world -- and we encourage you to follow and join the conversation here.

The Adaptive Design Association also embraces a non-proprietary stance with our designs. Our work is not about the item -- but about the child -- and about children in every school or home whose environments might not be built for them.

When we focus on ownership, we delay in building -- and ultimately hinder a child from reaching their full potential. So please Take, Build, Improve, and Expand upon the things you see here -- but understand not only what you are doing -- but for whom -- and do so safely and collaboratively with others."
diy  howto  cardboard  via:ablerism  tutorials  opensource  classideas  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  adaptivedesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
One voice, many hands — Several People Are Typing — The Official Slack Blog
"First, you need to know what voice you’re using. There’s a difference between creating a voice from scratch and building on one that already exists — and we’ll get to the difference between a constructed or a nourished brand voice in a later piece — but once you know your voice, you have to break it down again in order to work out how to scale it.

Starting with the what

When we first started approaching this problem at Slack, we tried to do it from a logistical, logical, mechanical point of view. We started making lists of words and phrases that sound like things we’d say.

Or, more often, lists of things we’d never say. It’s always easier to identify what you don’t want your voice to sound like than what you do. “We should never sound like this,” you say, reading a densely packed jargon-filled piece of marketing copy from a long-defunct service. “We mustn’t ever use this word. Or this phrase. Or… here: I’ll just make a list.”

Thing is, while it’s easy to identify the negative traits, it creates a gaping void for anyone who isn’t inside the mind of the holder of that voice. Anyone who comes to write for you steps off the huge cliff of “not like this” into an empty space. What DO you sound like, then?

A great first step, as used in many style guides (and guides to styling style guides) is the “this but not that” list.

From our style guide, for example:
We are:
Confident (never cocky)
Witty (but not silly)
Informal (but never too informal)
Intelligent (and always treat our users as intelligent, too)
Friendly (but not ingratiating)
Helpful (never overbearing)
Clear, concise and human.

We are characterful
But we never let character overwhelm content. What we have to say is infinitely more important than being admired for the way in which we say it. If people can’t see the substance for the style, we’ve gone wrong.

But having that basic sense of the personality of the company, or the brand, doesn’t mean that people can necessarily step into and out of it when they need to write something.

If people are still relying on checking the lists of things they sound like against things they shouldn’t, they tend to get bound up and overthink. The words are all there, but the feeling behind them is lacking. They’re trying to sound a certain way, but it doesn’t feel clear how or why they’re wanting to sound that way.

Never mind the what — start with the why

Our training in writing at Slack has shifted over time, then, from using the solid ‘examples and end results’ to encouraging people to tap into the feelings behind them.

We’re working on getting people to think of writing — of using the “Slack voice” — as merely using their own voice, but using shared characteristics or values to approach whatever it is they’re about to write. And how do you get into that brain? We use a few of our company values to help focus on how it is we sound. Simple: just ask a few questions, and consider a few things.

Empathy

Whatever someone is about to write, we encourage people to think about the person they’re writing it for. To give them a face, and a name. If it helps to think of someone you know, do that. If it helps to think of an appropriate emoji face that sums it up, why not? Ask yourself:

• What is the reader feeling? Where have we found them?
• Are they angry? Confused? Curious? Excited?
• How often might they see this bit of writing? How would it read after the 20th time?
• How do I want them to feel at the end? How can I help get them there?

Courtesy

Being courteous is about being respectful, but not over-polite. Adding 12 extra pleases and thanks, or a paragraph telling people what you’re about to say in the next paragraph is less courteous than simply telling people what they need to know and then getting out of their way.

• How does this help the person I’m talking to?
• What’s the very essence of what they need to take from this? How quickly can they get to it?
• Do I need to speak at all? Is this something a person will work out by themselves?

Think about what you need to say in advance. Work through all the questions people may have, and answer them. Then delete anything that is extraneous or confusing information.

Craftsmanship

The stuff you put out into the world speaks volumes to people about every other part of whatever you make. You’re representing all your colleagues, your team, all the people that don’t get seen, whatever you type. So being precise about the quality of the work will speak volumes about all the work that people can’t see.

• Can this be tighter? Can I lose the first paragraph?
• Who can give me a second opinion, or a second pair of eyes?
• When I read it out loud, does it make me stumble? Can I rewrite it so that it doesn’t?

Playfulness

At Slack, playfulness is not about the number of emoji you can use, or whimsy or … whatever. It’s about being in a playful stance: being in the spirit of the game, having an open mind, looking at the world sideways or surpassing expectations.

• What does this usually sound like?
• What different angle can I look at this from? How can I approach this differently?
• What word or phrase can I throw in there that will make someone smile?
• What do I need to do to meet expectations? What can I do to surpass them?
• How can I use this opportunity to make someone’s day a little more pleasant?

We tend think of our voice, in addition to being an external representation of the people behind it, as part of the product. And because of that, we aren’t necessarily making rules about what to say or what not to say. We’re trying to find the right traits to tap into, trying to open up the space so people can sound like themselves — because, if they work here, sounding like themselves is sounding like Slack — but come at it from a position of shared characteristics. It’s less about mechanics — more about a sensibility. Of course, even if you’re working from inside out like this, you still need rules (and more of that anon). But working this way means we can be a little more flexible, a little more able to stretch and grow, and be, in general, a little more liberal with our words.

Because we’re hippies.

Not really. It’s because, so far, it actually seems to be (mainly) working."
sfsh  content  contentstrategy  voice  slack  writing  howto  tutorials  organizations  webdev  communication  webdesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Explore your world through field mapping with OpenStreetMap | Mapbox
"Now that you have started mapping the world on OpenStreetMap from the comfort of your chair, let’s see how to add addresses, street names, and amenities using first-hand observations with field mapping. Field mapping is a survey technique to capture the details of one’s physical surroundings. Let’s use a simple paper map to survey the location of a waste basket in a neighborhood.

Mapping tools

To get started, gather the following items:

• A printed map from field papers, or a notepad
• Pencil or pen
• Camera (optional)
• Fellow explorers (optional)

Begin your journey

Make sure you are in an area that is safe for field mapping. A residential neighborhood, shopping street or a park are all great places to start. Doing this as a group activity with friends makes it even more interesting to compare notes after you are done.

The general idea with field mapping is to collect the details of what you observe around you while navigating a space. Details could include anything that catches your attention: shops and street signs, public amenities like benches and ATMs, street information like cycle lanes and pedestrian crossings or important facilities like hospitals and police stations.

Here are some tips:

• When mapping in groups, make sure to divide the area to cover maximum ground.
• It helps to think about what you are interested in mapping to allow you to be more focused on the field.
• If you are taking photos or recording an audio narration, make sure to note the locations on a paper map or using a GPS.
• Above all else, enjoy your walk!

Mapping on paper

Pen and paper are the most convenient way to capture observations from the field. It is simple, low cost and helps build a stronger sense of space and distance. The important aspect of paper mapping is to maintain a consistent scale. To help maintain scale, you can print an existing map and use it as a reference to add missing details on top. A tool called field papers allows you to conveniently make a printable atlas for this purpose.

While field mapping:

• Always begin by marking your starting point on paper. This could be anything from a house address, a known landmark or a shop.
• To orient yourself, make sure to keep an eye out for navigational aids like street signs, building names and addresses.
• Use symbols to represent common features like a medical store or a post box that do not have a name. Specifically, note features that you wish to map.
• If you are using field papers, you can upload your scan and use it as a background in iD or JOSM to map the missing details on OpenStreetMap.

Once you have become comfortable with basic field mapping using a pen and paper, you can explore other tools for collecting data and mapping on OpenStreetMap.

Other tools for field mapping

Collecting data for field mapping can also be done by taking photographs and recording GPS traces. For example, you could:

• Capture crowdsourced street view imagery with your phone using Mapillary.
• Accurately record GPS locations and trails using apps like OSMTracker for Android or Pushpin for iOS.

For more mapping techniques take a look at the OpenStreetMap Wiki."
aarthychandrasekhar  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  fieldmapping  maps  mapping  exploration  2016  fieldpapers  howto  tutorials 
february 2016 by robertogreco
PatrickJMT
"I have been teaching mathematics for over 8 years at the college/university level and tutoring for over 15 years. Currently I teach part time at Austin Community College, but have also taught at Vanderbilt University (a top 20 ranked university) and at the University of Louisville.

Often times, people are nervous about getting help in math: don’t be! I tell my students all the time that math is challenging for all of us at one point or another. My intent is to provide clear and thorough explanations, and to present them in an environment in which the student is comfortable. mannequinAlthough I do not promise to make someone into an A+ student overnight, with regular help just about every student I have encountered makes significant improvements over time. Think about learning math in the same way you would learn to play piano or learn another language: it takes time, patience, and LOTS of practice."
math  tutorials  mathematics 
february 2016 by robertogreco
How to Read for Grad School | Miriam E. Sweeney
"In graduate school the work load increases and students will find that they are expected to master two to three times the material that they were used to as an undergraduate. This can be intimidating to the point of overwhelming a student into paralysis. Following these tips should help you master your readings instead of allowing the readings to master you!

1. Read Strategically, Not Linearly. Reading for graduate school is different than reading a book for pleasure. When we read for pleasure we often start at the beginning of the book, reading carefully in a linear fashion. If you do this with your academic material, it will take twice as long and it is likely you won’t retain the right kind of information from the reading. Instead of reading linearly, read strategically. As an academic reader your job is to mine the text you are reading for information. Instead of cruising along the narrative, you need to dive in, find the information you need, and move along to the next stack of readings for class.

If you are reading a book this means you should look over the table of contents, then read the entire introduction carefully. In academic books, the introduction is where the author states all of their main points, the framework they will use, and an outline of what information will be covered in each chapter. Next, look over the last chapter. This is the conclusion, which will restate the main arguments of the author and will often contextualize these arguments in a broader context, suggest next steps, or speculate solutions or alternatives. From here you can go to the parts of the book you want deeper knowledge about. Individual chapters will be laid out similarly to the book structure with an introduction, and middle and the conclusion. Skimming the beginning and end of the chapter will give you the main points, then you can gather evidence by browsing the middle parts of the chapter. Remember, you are not really expected to read every single word of the book; your mandate is to understand the author’s main ideas, arguments, and be able to articulate why this discussion matters.

If you are reading a journal article, start by checking the name of the journal that published the article. This will key you in to the scope and boundaries that the article is working within. Next, carefully read the title and the abstract of the piece. A good abstract should clearly explain the main argument of the article, the kind of evidence the author uses, and a succinct conclusion, or what the author found out. Armed with this information, look over the introduction to see how the author is framing their work, paying attention to the citations they use. This tells you who the author is trying to be in dialogue with. Next, flip to the discussion section. Sometimes this is separate than the conclusion, sometimes not, depending on the disciplinary standards of the author and journal. Read the discussion and conclusion carefully. These sections will explain the author’s main arguments and the “why you should care” piece. Now you can go back through the article armed with the knowledge of where the author is leading you and browse over methods and results sections. Pay attention particularly to images and data visualizations. Note how these things relate to or support the discussion and conclusion sections you read.

Reading strategically instead of linearly will make you a more efficient and effective academic reader. Getting familiar with how different formats of writing are structured will give you the confidence and control to find the information you need in them more efficiently.

2. Take Notes! As you are reading strategically, you absolutely must take notes simultaneously. Otherwise it is guaranteed you will not remember the kinds of details you need to recall in class, in your paper, in your own research down the road. Develop a system of your own whether it is sticking a post-it note in the book and jotting something down, or opening up RefWorks or Zotero, or Word and throwing some notes down as you read. Whatever you do, remember that future you will have NO IDEA what present you is thinking, no matter how brilliant a thought it is. Be specific, include detailed citations and pages numbers for direct quotes so you don’t have to chase them later.

If you are reading as preparation for a class, make sure you are also jotting down 3-5 questions, observations, or provocations that you can use in class for participation. In grad school, everyone is expected to participate on a high level, so have something to say ahead of time to avoid the high-blood pressure that comes from your professor’s cold, hard stare.

3. Be purposeful. Being purposeful in your readings means that as you are moving strategically through the text you are also being deliberate about what you want to glean from the reading, what are meant to glean, and how this fits with the other readings and conversations you have had in class, along with your own life experiences. Ask yourself, “What is the author trying to say? What is motivating her exploration of this topic? What does this research contribute? What academic conversations is the author trying to align with? What are the main arguments of this piece? How does this relate to my other assigned readings?” Going in with these questions in mind will focus you as you read and aid you in pulling out the most relevant information.

4. A Critical Perspective. Lastly, applying a critical perspective in your reading is helpful for situating a reading in broader contexts. Contrary to how it sounds, being critical does not simply mean being negative or criticizing wantonly. Critical perspectives are those that trace and name flows of power: Who has power and who does not? Who benefits from particular social arrangements, and whom do they marginalize? Critical perspectives also question assumptions and values that are implicit in arguments: What values are underlying this work? What experiences and perspectives do these values privilege? How might centering different values or experiences re-frame the argument or conversation? Asking questions like this will help you have deeper conversations about your readings, and really, isn’t that the whole point of graduate school?

Time to make your reading work for you- good luck!"
reading  pedagogy  teaching  2012  miriamsweeney  howto  tutorials  studying  notetaking  criticalthinking  gradschool  howtoread  academia  academics 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Gazler/githug · GitHub
"Githug is designed to give you a practical way of learning git. It has a series of levels, each requiring you to use git commands to arrive at a correct answer."
git  tutorials  github  howto  githug 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Retronator Pixel Art Academy by Matej 'Retro' Jan — Kickstarter
"An adventure game that teaches you art, played directly in your browser. All experience levels are welcome."
pixelart  games  gaming  howto  tutorials  edg 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Amelia Greenhall: Start your own b(r)and: Everything I know about starting collaborative, feminist publications
[via: "Is there something like a website framework for starting an organization? Like boilerplate/best practices on decision-making, structure,"
https://twitter.com/CaseyG/status/598262858661699584

"This guide by @ameliagreenhall feels like the closest thing to what I'm imagining…but not as generic as a "framework" http://ameliagreenhall.com/posts/start-your-own-b-r-and-everything-i-know-about-starting-collaborative-feminist-publications "
https://twitter.com/CaseyG/status/598263698147377152

"I have a hard time believing there isn't already a whole universe out there of "forkable" sets of principles, how-tos, bylaws, workflows?"
https://twitter.com/CaseyG/status/598264178994974720 ]
via:caseygollan  advice  branding  publishing  startups  publications  howto  organization  bestpractices  frameworks  principles  workflows  organizations  2015  tutorials 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Butterick’s Practical Typography
"1. The ty­po­graphic qual­ity of your doc­u­ment is de­ter­mined largely by how the body text looks. Why? Be­cause there’s more body text than any­thing else. So start every project by mak­ing the body text look good, then worry about the rest.

In turn, the ap­pear­ance of the body text is de­ter­mined pri­mar­ily by these four ty­po­graphic choices:

2. point size is the size of the let­ters. In print, the most com­fort­able range for body text is 10–12 point. On the web, the range is 15–25 pix­els. Not every font ap­pears equally large at a given point size, so be pre­pared to ad­just as necessary.

3. line spac­ing is the ver­ti­cal dis­tance be­tween lines. It should be 120–145% of the point size. In word proces­sors, use the “Ex­act” line-spac­ing op­tion to achieve this. The de­fault sin­gle-line op­tion is too tight; the 1½-line op­tion is too loose. In CSS, use line-height.

4. line length is the hor­i­zon­tal width of the text block. Line length should be an av­er­age of 45–90 char­ac­ters per line (use your word-count func­tion) or 2–3 low­er­case al­pha­bets, like so:

abcde­fghijklmnopqrstu­vwxyz­abcde­fghijklmnopqrstu­vwxyz­abcd

In a printed doc­u­ment, this usu­ally means page mar­gins larger than the tra­di­tional one inch. On a web page, it usu­ally means not al­low­ing the text to flow to the edges of the browser window.

5. And fi­nally, font choice. The fastest, eas­i­est, and most vis­i­ble im­prove­ment you can make to your ty­pog­ra­phy is to ig­nore the fonts that came free with your com­puter (known as sys­tem fonts) and buy a pro­fes­sional font (like my fonts eq­uity and con­course, or oth­ers found in font rec­om­men­da­tions). A pro­fes­sional font gives you the ben­e­fit of a pro­fes­sional de­signer’s skills with­out hav­ing to hire one.

If that’s im­pos­si­ble, you can still make good ty­pog­ra­phy with sys­tem fonts. But choose wisely. And never choose times new ro­man or Ar­ial, as those fonts are fa­vored only by the ap­a­thetic and sloppy. Not by ty­pog­ra­phers. Not by you."

[Summary of key rules: http://practicaltypography.com/summary-of-key-rules.html
Foreword (by Erik Spiekermann): http://practicaltypography.com/foreword.html ]
typography  design  graphicdesign  howto  tutorials  fonts  matthewbut­t­er­ick 
march 2015 by robertogreco
How to share what you're Reading on Twitter — Casey's Notes and Links
"How does it work? You hit a button to share the page you’re looking at to your Reading feed. You can also see what your friends are Reading too, in realtime. (There’s more, but that’s basically what matters.)

I find Reading really different from other places where people share links on the internet, not because it has the sickest new technology, but because it has a really clear shared culture amongst its users. The rule is:
Share what you’re reading. Not what you like. Not what you find interesting. Just what you’re reading.


Basically:

• Don’t wait until after you’ve read it.
• Don’t think too much about it.
• Don’t worry about whether the content is good or bad or boring or interesting, everyone else will figure that out for themselves.

That’s it. And as it turns out:

• Not giving a shit about how what you share affects your personal #brand is preposterous in this day and age.
• A community of readers not overthinking what they share is an amazing place to hang around. Imagine being inside everybody’s brains at once: noisy, random, scintillating.
• Friends paying slight attention to each other’s noise creates [BONG RIP] a kind of collective consciousness. “Ah, I saw you’ve been reading a lot about avocados AND healthcare AND feminism AND…” That’s weird! But what’s even weirder is that the things my friends are reading today — the best and worst of their internets — becomes part of their constellations of thought. Maybe next year they’ll give a talk about healthcare and feminism, or six months from now they’ll quit their job to move across the country and grow avocados, or next week they will publish an article connecting these three disparate topics. Reading trails are bursting with inklings of future thoughts, projects, and schemes, captured before they materialize. Of course, not everything happens because of links, but a lot seems to. Like, Max and Nicole meeting on Reading and…getting married:
“I met @maxfenton through @kissane and @reading and @Readmill. And he asked me to marry him. And I said yes. Thank you, internet. <3” — Nicole Fenton (@nicoleslaw) February 23, 2013


THIS IS ALL TO SAY, the very best way I’ve found to interact with Reading is to launch a Twitterbot that tweets your links, and following your friends’ Readingtwitterbots, too.

It’s a little complicated, so I wrote down how to do it. Feel free to ask me if you get stuck."
caseygollan  twitter  reading.am  howto  tutorials  internet  web  online  sharing  howweread  friends 
february 2015 by robertogreco
How To Talk To Girls On Twitter Without Coming Off Like A Creepy Rando
"Don't make our own jokes back at us, or explain them to us. This one should hopefully be easy. When you are about to add on to a woman's joke, just take a second and really think (at about the speed indicated by the ellipses, to give you plenty of time to really mull it over): "Is it possible ... that ... what I am about to say ... is exactly the joke ... SHE was making?" Look deep into your heart. If it is possible, err on the side of not making the joke. I promise that everyone will be okay without it. (Check out the replies to this joke for a very meta example of this phenomenon.)

Don't be a pedant. Before you hit her with the #actually (highly useful terminology care of Desus), consider again: Is it possible she was making a joke? Joke-making by women has been legal for years, and many of us have gotten very good at it. Okay, so you've considered it, and it definitely wasn't a joke, it was just a factual error. Was it a truly harmful error? Then definitely, go ahead and correct it! But did she just imply that Tarantino directed True Romance, when really he just wrote the screenplay? Oh, buddy. I know it feels pretty awesome to correct people, and scratches what feels like a very urgent itch, but the same is true for jerking off, and we just don't do that in public. Chances are someone has already told her, and if they haven't, that's still okay. Really!

Don't be a mentions pest. Almost any woman with a fair number of followers will know what I'm talking about here: someone who you don't follow but who @'s you all the time with innocuous but inane comments or questions, nothing so out of line that you'd feel justified telling them to fuck off, but constantly making little demands on your attention. It's surprisingly exhausting! Social cues exist on Twitter, too, mostly in the form of faving or replying. If you're making a lot of little jokes in her mentions and she's not even pity-faving them, I'm so sorry, but you're probably being a mentions pest. Maybe chill a little.

Don't derail and make it about you. Yes, we know, not ALL men. You, personally, would never. Is that really, truly what's important here, though?

Don't imitate bad dudes in our mentions. This one is really specific, but it's also shockingly common. Like, when we're like, "Ugh, another strange dude frickin' told me to smile today," some dude will @ us all jokingly like, "Durrr but you're so much prettier when you smile!!!" First of all, if we don't know you, why would we instinctively get that you're joking when it matches actual things that actual dudes say to us? Even if we do get that you're joking—even if you're a friend—I hope you can imagine that it doesn't seem to us to be the funniest, most original joke we've ever heard. Instead, it comes off as a self-serving gesture to cast yourself as "one of the good ones" who "gets it." But adding on to the endless chorus of dudes who say wack shit to us, even in jest, is just not the move.

Faving is almost always cool. Ditto thank-yous, expressions of sympathy, non-gross compliments, answers to actual questions, and pictures of cute animals. (One exception to "faving is cool": If you see girls talking amongst themselves about sex or their bodies or something, don't fav that. We know you can see it, the same way we know you can overhear us in public, but it's like if we were having the conversation at a coffee shop and you winked at us. Eww.)

It's probably cool if you want to defend us from trolls, but keep us out of it. If someone is harassing us and you want to tell them about themselves, thank you, that's super sweet. But take our handle out of your reply to them so we don't have to keep seeing it in our mentions. And try to be thoughtful about not drawing our attention to trolls unnecessarily, or drawing their fire to us.

If someone tells you that you're being weird or annoying or creepy, say sorry and cut it out. It doesn't matter if she's being way harsh about it, or that you're a super-awesome dude and didn't mean it that way—literally the only cool move when someone enforces their boundaries is to respect them, apologize, and back off. Even if you weren't being a creep before, a really easy way to make yourself one is to stick around after someone's made it clear that they want you to leave them alone, even if it was for what you think is a bullshit reason.

If you don't know each other, maybe just don't @ her. This one is going to make dudes mad, I think, but like ... what if you just didn't? Would you die? Maybe think about why you feel entitled to have a stranger listen to your thoughts at all? This isn't a perfect analogy, but a good rule of thumb is to treat the mentions of someone who doesn't follow you back (i.e. someone who hasn't explicitly consented to listen to you) like you're asking her to take out her earbuds on the bus. (Here's a bonus article-within-an-article, by the way, entitled "How To Talk To Women On Public Transportation": Oh gosh please just don't.) Is what you have to say funny or interesting enough that you'd feel good about saying it to her while she looks at you blankly, earbuds dangling? Listen, I'm just urging you to consider the alternative path of not @'ing her whenever you're about to @ her. You may find that it suits you, and sorry, but there's a good chance it'd suit us, too."
gender  socialmnetworks  sociamedia  twitter  etiquette  culture  2015  lilybenson  howto  tutorials  favoriting 
february 2015 by robertogreco
HOWTO: use GitHub Pages to host a bootstrap-themed website | Open Educational Thinkering
"Last week I mentioned in a blog post and my weekly newsletter the pre-launch website of my new (part-time) consultancy Dynamic Skillset. I had an enquiry as to how the site put together, so I put together this screencast:

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YCPWpVjwh8 ]

The great thing about being shown how to do something via video is that, if you get stuck, you can pause, rewind and watch parts again. In this one, I go through the process of downloading a responsive website theme and hosting it for free using GitHub Pages.

Remember, the way to increase your digital and web literacies is to tinker about and try new things. You can’t break anything here and all you have to lose is your GitHub virginity."
github  webdev  hosting  webdesign  howto  tutorials  2015 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Ferguson & The Design Dimension: Exploring Makeshift Tear-Gas Masks on BBC Radio 4 | Victoria and Albert Museum
"In a recent interview for BBC Radio 4’s programme, The Design Dimension, co-curator Catherine Flood discussed an exciting development from Disobedient Objects. Since our exhibition has been open, the team has received anecdotal evidence of social and political movements deploying our How-To Guides around the world.

Amongst our How-To Guide users are people protesting in Ferguson, a struggle sparked by the fatal shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.

You can learn more about our guides and their deployment in Ferguson by clicking on the clip below, and the full radio programme can also be heard via this link. Additionally, an article featuring co-curator Gavin Grindon and the global deployment of DIY Tear Gas Masks can be accessed via this link."
teargas  gasmasks  duy  ferguson  disobedientobjects  2014  howto  tutorials 
december 2014 by robertogreco
LearnOSM
"OpenStreetMap is a free street level map of the world, created by an ever growing community of mappers.

Anyone can edit OpenStreetMap. Here you can learn how LearnOSM provides easy to understand, step-by-step guides for you to get started with contributing to OpenStreetMap and using OpenStreetMap and using OpenStreetMap data. If you are interested in running an OpenStreetMap workshop, check out the LearnOSM trainer resources."

[via: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvH02nwB_X4

See also: http://mapgive.state.gov/learn-to-map/
https://gist.github.com/meetar/b9929dfec129d1d7f5f2 ]
openstreetmap  osm  mapping  maps  howto  tutorials 
august 2014 by robertogreco
OpenFarm: Learn to Grow Anything by Rory Landon Aronson — Kickstarter
"The Problem

When searching for plant growing advice, it is common to run into the following situations:

• Advice is overly generic
• Advice is not structured, written, nor formatted well
• Advice is very specific, but not relevant to you or your garden
• There is no way to discuss or contribute new advice

The OpenFarm Solution

OpenFarm is a free and open database for farming and gardening knowledge. Similar to Wikipedia, the data is free for everyone to access and anyone can contribute content. Because people grow plants differently based on environmental conditions and growing practices, OpenFarm provides a framework for everyone to share their story, and for learners to find the best, most relevant content.

OpenFarm Growing Guides are structured stories for growing a specific plant with particular practices and environmental conditions. Below, is a mockup example of Nancy's Guide for growing Heirloom Tomatoes with organic practices, in a greenhouse. Below the image are descriptions for each of the sections of the guide."
wiki  gardening  farming  howto  tutorials  agriculture 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Interface Writing: Code for Humans | Nicole Fenton
"What actions can people take? What are you asking them to do?
What are you allowing them to do? What are the rules and dead-ends?
What sort of language do you use to guide people?"

Whatever you’re building, you need to think about the content in the database and the instructions around it. I call those things interface writing. Some people call them microcopy since they’re usually short."



"With clear instructions and a warm tone, you can help them find what they need quickly, without having to ask someone for help."



"When you’re writing for the web, you’re having the same sort of conversation with your readers. You’re telling them to do something or asking them a question. Above all, you want it to make sense and feel natural to them.

Our strings have to be useful—not funny—so we need to do the extra work of figuring out what our readers need. That makes it easier to show people around, ask for more of their time, or get them to take a particular action."



"From a high level, these are my goals when I’m writing strings:

• Be clear.
• Be kind.
• Be careful.
• Be honest.

Focus on the reader’s needs. Think about the implications of what you’re asking for. Be honest about what you’re doing with the data. That’s extremely important."



"Talk to them, not at them. Use positive language and avoid yammering on about your company or your interface. The system isn’t the point."



"Don’t assume you’re the core audience. Most of the time, we’re not designing for ourselves. Think about the universe of people out there. Word choice is extremely important when you’re trying to grow.

Avoid jargon and catchphrases. Cut the bullshit. You don’t have to be hip or clever, but you do have to be nice.

Don’t assume dichotomies or binaries will do the trick. Not everything will fit into a boolean. Real life is complicated. As an example, some people are neither male nor female. They’re still people and they deserve our consideration.

Don’t interrupt. Keep things focused and make sure this is the best time to deliver this message."

[video here: https://vimeo.com/103526258 ]
interface  writing  nicolefenton  2014  tone  instruction  conversation  listening  howweteach  teaching  howto  tutorials  microcopy  interfacewriting  writingfortheweb 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Free eBook
"A step-by-step guide to creating an ebook in ePub and mobi formats, complete with ebook template, and a useful style guide for authors."
ebooks  howto  publishing  templates  tutorials  epub  mobi  via:caseygollan  epubs 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Photoshop Animation Techniques (Redux, Creative Cloud) on Vimeo
"This tutorial is an update from my first tutorial. This time around I use Photoshop CC and delve into a few more techniques that I've learned while working in production.

Adobe Photoshop is a tool that a great number of creative minds are familiar and comfortable with. While it isnt software package that has been built with animation specifically in mind there it has huge potential as an animation tool. The ability to control an aesthetic within the software gives a very hands on feel to the process and endless possibilities for your end result. I hope that this tutorial will help bridge the gap between designer and animator, beginner and professional."
animation  design  photoshop  tutorials  howto  via:tealtan  alexgrigg  edg 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Make your own cellphone from scratch.
"The DIY Cellphone is a working (albeit basic) cellphone that you can make yourself. It can make and receive phone calls and text messages, store names and phone numbers, display the time, and serve as an alarm clock. It connects to GSM networks (like AT&T and T-Mobile in the U.S.) using a regular (full-size) SIM card. It builds on the hardware and software in the Arduino GSM Shield but extends it with a full interface, including display, buttons, speaker, microphone, etc. The phone is made up of a custom electronic printed circuit board (PCB), about 60 electronic components, and a laser-cut enclosure. Its hardware and software are open-source and available on GitHub (hardware, software).

Part of my motivation for making the phone -- and helping others to do the same -- is the fact that while cellphones are ubiquitous in our society, most of us have little idea what they're made of or how they work. In fact, you can make a cellphone in much the same way you'd make anything else: find the right parts, figure out how to connect them together, and try to do it in a way that's attractive and robust. Because of the ubiquity of cellphones, there are companies making the components they're made of; with some digging, I was able to find versions of these parts that are possible to buy in small quantities and that are possible to assemble by hand. This wasn't necessarily easy, but it's a very different problem than trying to learn the physics needed to understand how a cellphone tower works. 

I've been using various versions of this phone as my primary device for almost a year and have taught workshops in which others have made the phone for themselves. It doesn't require any specific knowledge of electronics, but it does involve configuring software, soldering a lot of small components, and laser-cutting, all of which can be difficult if you haven't done them before. I'd only recommend this project if you already have some experience with Arduino and soldering, or can find someone to help you out. You'll also need to get access to a laser-cutter, or find an alternative way to make the enclosure for the phone."

[See also this and related photos from Che-Wei Wang: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cwwang/11038248644/ ]
mobile  phones  howto  diy  tutorials  projectideas  openstudioproject  che-weiwang 
november 2013 by robertogreco
In-depth tutorials and articles on web design | Webdesigntuts+
"Webdesigntuts+ is a blog made to house and showcase some of the best web design tutorials and articles around. We publish tutorials that not only produce great results and interfaces, but explain the techniques behind them in a friendly, approachable manner.
Web design is a booming industry with a lot of competition. We hope that reading Webdesigntuts+ will help our readers learn a few tricks, techniques and tips that they might not have seen before and help them maximize their creative potential!"
typography  ux  javascript  css  html  howto  webdev  edg  srg  via:steelemaley  classideas  web  design  tutorials  webdesign  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Start Developing iOS Apps Today: Introduction
"Creating iOS apps is fun and rewarding, and if you're a new developer you might be wondering where to begin. This road map provides the perfect starting point for iOS app development. On your Mac computer, you can create iOS apps that run on iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. Follow this road map to learn where to get the tools you need, understand the major concepts and best practices, and see where to find more information.

As you proceed through the road map, you will use Xcode and the iOS SDK, Apple’s tools for app development. You will learn the basics of programming with Objective-C, the language that powers all iOS apps and frameworks, and will explore the Cocoa Touch frameworks. You will create a simple iOS app and learn how to test it on a device. Finally, you will learn how to submit an app to the App Store."
coding  programming  srg  edg  howto  ipad  iphone  iphonedev  mobile  tutorials  apple  development  ios_appdev 
march 2012 by robertogreco
The Git Parable
"The following parable will take you on a journey through the creation of a Git-like system from the ground up. Understanding the concepts presented here will be the most valuable thing you can do to prepare yourself to harness the full power of Git. The concepts themselves are quite simple, but allow for an amazing wealth of functionality to spring into existence. Read this parable all the way through and you should have very little trouble mastering the various Git commands and wielding the awesome power that Git makes available to you."
tutorials  howto  tips  versioncontrol  tutorial  programming  git  via:tealtan 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Git Reference
"This is the Git reference site. This is meant to be a quick reference for learning and remembering the most important and commonly used Git commands. The commands are organized into sections of the type of operation you may be trying to do, and will present the common options and commands needed to accomplish these common tasks.

Each section will link to the next section, so it can be used as a tutorial. Every page will also link to more in-depth Git documentation such as the offical manual pages and relevant sections in the Pro Git book, so you can learn more about any of the commands. First, we'll start with thinking about source code management like Git does."
via:tealtan  tutorials  howto  cheatsheet  versioncontrol  development  programming  tutorial  documentation  reference  git 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Don’t Fear the Internet
"Are you a print designer, photographer, fine-artist, or general creative person? Do you have a shitty website that you slapped together yourself in Dreamweaver in that ONE web design class that you took in college? Do you not have a site at all because you’ve been waiting two years for your cousin to put it together for you? Well, we’re here to help. We know that you have little to no desire to do web design professionally, but that doesn’t mean that you want an ugly cookie-cutter site or to settle for one that hasn't been updated since Hackers was in theaters. Through short tutorial videos, you’ll learn how to take a basic wordpress blog and manipulate the css, html (and even some php!) to match your aesthetic. You’ll feel empowered rather than crippled by the internet and worst case scenario you’ll at least end up having a better idea of how professional web designers turn your design dreams into a reality on screen."
howto  tutorials  web  tutorial  design  reference  webdesign  css  html  srg  edg  via:tealtan  webdev  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Why Tweet? (And How To Do It) | A.T. | Cleveland
"Effective tweeting requires effective writing. The short form—each tweet is 140 characters or less—requires discipline. Tweets reward clarity, wit and concision. You could train yourself to be a better writer by using twitter effectively. It hones your focus on the sentence level, and the sentence is the most important unit of composition.

Once, I asked a group of students to take an essay they had written for class and tweet it, sentence by sentence. By forcing them to fit each sentence into that white box, I was asking them to analyze every word they used and to consider how they constructed the clauses in the sentence. They were furious with me: they hated the exercise. But they all agreed they thought about their sentences more than they had when they first wrote the paper…

I have broken down effective tweets into four categories: headline, questions, self-contained quips and comments…"
tutorials  howto  questions  comments  quips  headlines  2011  communication  howwewrite  practice  efficiency  brevity  sentences  classideas  writing  twitter  annetrubek  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Learn Web Design, Web Development, and iOS Development - Treehouse
"What do you want to learn today?

Web Design: CSS, CSS3, Aesthetic Foundations, HTML, HTML5 and Responsive Web Design.

Web Development: HTML5, JavaScript and Introduction to Programming.

iOS: Build iPhone and iPad apps with Objective-C, Xcode and more."
webdev  howto  tutorials  coding  programming  ipad  iphone  ios  xcode  objective-c  responsivewebdesign  css3  css  srg  edg  javascript  html5  html  design  webdesign  webdevelopment  responsivedesign  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Obsessions: No-Code Sites — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers
"So in this case, to make the website run, an image is dropped onto a specific folder which Hazel watches to get filenames ready for the web. The app then copies it to the Dropbox folder, which then shoots it off to the Dropbox servers, which then syncs with a webserver folder. Everything’s then presented by Stacey, which you’ll remember is devised to operate without much coding."
howto  via:maxfenton  nocodesites  no-codesites  dropbox  portfolios  code  stacey  tutorials  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Learn to code | Codecademy
"Codecademy is the easiest way to learn how to code. It's interactive, fun, and you can do it with your friends."
education  programming  tutorials  coding  edg  srg  learning  codecademy  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Resume Is Dead, The Bio Is King :: Tips :: The 99 Percent
"If you’re a designer, entrepreneur, or creative – you probably haven’t been asked for your resume in a long time. Instead, people Google you – and quickly assess your talents based on your website, portfolio, and social media profiles. Do they resonate with what you’re sharing? Do they identify with your story? Are you even giving them a story to wrap their head around?"<br />
<br />
"the resume is on the out, and the bio is on the rise. People work with people they can relate to and identify with. Trust comes from personal disclosure. And that kind of sharing is hard to convey in a resume. Your bio needs to tell the bigger story. Especially, when you’re in business for yourself, or in the business of relationships. It’s your bio that’s read first."
design  writing  business  work  resumes  cv  biography  bios  howto  tutorials  jobsearch  jobs  creativity  entrepreneurship  via:carlasilver  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The art of seeing (Part II) The Practice
"When I observe a school I start by watching how I, and how kids, approach it. I watch how the corridors operate, both when filled with movement and (if) when empty. Empty corridors during a school day speak loudly to me. So do classrooms with one kind of seating, one kind of lighting, or one "teaching wall." I watch the feet of kids in a class. I watch them fidget… [many more examples]…

This multiply-focused kind of observation helps me to begin to deep map a school…

the linearity and single-focus of traditional education has, perhaps, robbed you of, or severely limited, your human observation skills. Tens of thousands of hours of single subject lessons, of staring at teachers, of conference sessions divided into "tracks," have stunted the human abilities you had before you entered school. So, if you feel out of practice, here are a few ideas: Eavesdrop…Look for something you haven't looked for before in a place you've been a million times…Stare…Talk to strangers"
irasocol  noticing  observation  learning  schools  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  students  perspective  eavesdropping  staring  strangers  conversation  understanding  2011  howto  tutorials  adhdvision  adhdwalk  deepmapping  sensemaking  publicschools  sla  chrislehmann  pammoran  children  people  howwework  howwelearn  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
How To Run A News Site And Newspaper Using WordPress And Google Docs - 10,000 Words
"A former colleague of mine, William Davis, understands what a “web first” workflow is, and has made it happen through software at his newspaper in Maine. The Bangor Daily News announced this week that it completed its full transition to open source blogging software, WordPress. And get this: The workflow integrates seamlessly with InDesign, meaning the paper now has one content management system for both its web and print operations. And if you’re auspicious enough, you can do it too — he’s open-sourced all the code!"

[See also: http://publisherblog.automattic.com/2011/06/20/bangor-daily-news-a-complete-publishing-system-on-wordpress/ ]
wordpress  googledocs  workflow  cloud  journalism  editing  classideas  publishing  news  newspapers  howto  opensource  open  maine  blogging  indesign  print  digital  2011  tutorials  williamdavis  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
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