robertogreco + templates   25

Zine machine!
“That magic is what means this web page is also a zine if you print it! Go ahead, try pressing your 🖨️ Print button now. You will need to set the page to landscape and make sure there’s no margins or scaling. We want to print on the edge, baby! You should see a preview laid out like this:”



“Steal this zine!
Please take this template and copy it for your own work.

This is a Glitch app!
Since it’s all hosted on Glitch, this friendly fish will give you the instructions to take a peek at the code and fire up your own version.

Creative Commons Licence
The content and images are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Code highlighting via Prism.js.”
class  ideas  paper  zines  papernet  templates  css  webdesign 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
Mαtt Thomαs on Twitter: "Gonna try to live-tweet @Jessifer’s talk at @uiowa today: “Designing Assignments: Redesigning Assessment.”"
"Gonna try to live-tweet @Jessifer’s talk at @uiowa today: “Designing Assignments: Redesigning Assessment.”

.@Jessifer begins by talking about some personal stufff, as a deliberate tactic to situate himself as a human being amongst other human beings. Something to also do on the first day of class, etc.

.@Jessifer says he doesn’t use the LMS at his school because he doesn’t want students to encounter and interface with it before him, a person.

.@Jessifer points out that today syllabuses are often generated from required, stock, auto-generated templates. This sort of “scaffolding,” however, presumes a lot of things about how learning happens that might not be useful.

For instance, many of us (read: teachers) are designing courses and assignments for students we don’t even know yet. To bring in the work of @saragoldrickrab, we need to design for the students we have, not the students we wish we had.

What happens, for instance, when you learn that 1 in 2 students face food insecurity issues? How might that change how you design courses/assignments?

.@Jessifer moves on to talk about grades. They’re not some universal constant, but rather a technology that we have to learn to use, or perhaps not use.

Grading reduces learning to a transaction instead of a set of human relationships.

College teachers have often internalized ways of grading that they can perhaps free themselves from. @Jessifer says we need to “raise a critical eyebrow” at our own grading practices — e.g., our rubrics. He argues against scale, for a return to subjectivity!

In the gradebook students are reduced to rows, in the rubric reduced to columns.

Especially important things to think about, @Jessifer points out, now that almost all colleges have adopted Learning Management Systems, course “shells,” and standardized syllabuses.

.@Jessifer has recently moved to shorter-worded assignments that ask for non-traditional products. Reconceptualize the internet using analog tools, re-order the words of a poem — then document your process!"
jessestommel  mattthomas  2019  rubrics  grading  teaching  syllabus  assessment  howweteach  howwelearn  colleges  universities  highered  highereducation  humanism  lms  templates  standardization  writing  howwewrite  form  alternative  syllabi 
april 2019 by robertogreco
HTML5 UP! Responsive HTML5 and CSS3 Site Templates
"HTML5 UP
... makes spiffy HTML5
site templates that are:
Fully
Responsive Built on intelligent
HTML5 + CSS3 Super
Customizable100% Free under the
Creative Commons"

[via (used here): http://www.jessamyn.com/ ]
webdev  html5  responsive  webdesign  html  free  templates 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Book design inspired by Edward Tufte - LaTeX Template on Overleaf
"Edward Tufte is a pioneer in the field of data visualization, and his works inspired the creation of two LaTeX classes for books and handouts.

Here we present the excellent sample book produced by the The Tufte-LaTeX Developers pre-loaded into Overleaf (formerly writeLaTeX) for you to use as a starting point for your own work.

Simply click the button above to use Overleaf to create and edit your article - there's nothing to install and no sign up required. When you're finished, use our integrated publish to figshare option to publish your work freely online.

Click here if you'd like to try the corresponding Tufte handout design on Overleaf.

PS: If you're new to LaTeX, our free online LaTeX course covers all the steps you need to get you started."

[via: https://twitter.com/overleaf/status/763811869022756866 via @djacobs]
bookdesign  latex  books  edwardtufte  overleaf  templates 
august 2016 by robertogreco
CURMUDGUCATION: Writing Junk
"First, we need to understand that the state of writing instruction has never been great.

If you are of a Certain Age (say, mine) you may recall a type of writing instruction that we could call the Lego Building Approach. In this method, students are first taught to construct sentences. Then they are taught how to arrange a certain number of sentences into a paragraph. Finally, they are taught to assemble those paragraphs into full essays.

This is junk. It assumes that the basic building block of a piece of writing is a sentence. No-- the basic building block of a piece of writing is an idea. To try to say something without having any idea what you want to say is a fool's errand.

Not that the Lego Building Approach should feel bad for being junk. The instructional writing landscape is littered with junk, clogged with junk, sometimes obscured by the broad shadow of towering junk. And on almost-weekly basis, folks try to sort out what the junk is and how best to clear it away.

Here's John Warner at Inside Higher Ed trying to answer the question, "Why can't my new employees write?" Warner reports that he hears that question often from employers. With a little probing he determines that what they mean by "can't write," is "They primarily observe a fundamental lack of clarity and perceive a gap between the purpose of the writing and the result of what’s been written, a lack of awareness of audience and occasion."

In other words, they don't seem to get the idea that they are supposed to be communicating real ideas and information in a real way to real people. It's not a question of rigor or expectations, Warner notes. It's that they were trained to do something else entirely.

I believe that in many cases, these young professionals have never encountered a genuine and meaningful rhetorical situation in an academic or professional context. They are highly skilled at a particular kind of academic writing performance that they have been doing from a very early age, but they are largely unpracticed at that what their employers expect them to do, clearly communicate ideas to specific audiences.

My students’ chief struggle tends to be rooted in years of schooling where what they have to say doesn’t really matter, and the primary focus is on “how” you say things.

This is the flip side of our current bad ideas about reading-- the notion that reading is a set of skills that exist independent of any actual content. Current writing standards and therefor instruction assume the same thing-- that a piece of writing involves deploying a set of skills, and the actual content and subject matter are not really important. This is not so much a pedagogical idea as a corporate one, somehow filtered down form the world where it's believed that a great corporate manager will be great whether the company makes lubricating oil, soup, soap, or fluffy children's toys.

Michelle Kenney at Rethinking Schools talks about how this skills-based writing turns to junk in "The Politics of the Paragraph." Innumerable schools have found ways (or borrowed or bought ways) to reduce writing to a simple set of steps, providing a checklist for students to follow when writing (and for teachers to use when scoring). Kenney writes about the inevitable outcome of this approach, even when using a procedure developed in house:

I also noted a decline in the overall quality of thought in these paragraphs. Students had more confidence in their writing, but they were also less invested in their ideas. Writing paragraphs and essays was now a set of hoops to jump through, a dry task only slightly more complex than a worksheet.

Mediocre writing starts with the wrong questions, and a focus on a set, proscribed structure and process encourages students to ask the wrong questions. Hammer them with writing templates, and students start to see an essay as a slightly more involved fill in the blank exercise. "I have to have five paragraphs-- what can I use to fill up the five paragraph-sized blanks?" "I need three sentences to make a paragraph-- what can I use to fill in the the three sentence-shaped empty spaces." This gets you junk.

The appeal of the template is easy to see-- teaching writing is hard and grading writing is even harder. Every prompt has an infinite number of correct answers instead of just one, and every piece of writing has to be considered on its own terms. The very best writing includes a unique and personal voice, and teaching a students to sound like him- or herself is tricky. Much easier to teach them all to sound like the same person.

The important questions for writing are what do I want to say, who do I want to say it to, and what's the best way I can think of to say it. But the results of those are really hard to scale up, if not impossible. So it comes as no surprise that the Age of Common Core College and Career Ready Standards has provided us just with more junk writing instruction."



"I know there are teachers who think they are swell. I've met some. Here's why some teachers like these writing standards:

1) They are teaching their own set of standards and pretending that their own standards have something to do with the Core standards.

2) They don't like to teach writing, and what they want someone to do is just reduce it to some simple rules so that they can just go through the motions and be able to say they're teaching writing without having to suffer through the hard work.

3) They don't know how to teach writing.

I'm sorry, but if you tell me that you think the standards are great for writing instruction, I will judge you. I'm not proud of it, but there it is (especially in Pennsylvania, where we have found ways to make the writing standards even worse). Will argues that teachers need more support, that there are "veteran teachers who had no practice in teaching the kind of writing, particularly argumentative writing, that the standards call for," and that's probably true, but I'm okay with that, because the standards call for junk. Teachers do need "support" in the teaching of writing (I do love how "needs support" is now our code word for "needs to be whacked upside the head and straightened the hell out"), but the standards are not the place to find it, and they're not the foundation on which to base it. I promise that I'll present my Writing Instruction Professional Development in a Can but this is already a long post, so we'll save that for another day.

But I will give you Step One, because summer is the perfect time to work on it.

Write. Write for a blog. Write letters to the editor of your newspaper. Write long thoughtful letters to friends. You can no more teach writing without actually doing writing than you can teach reading if you've never cracked open a book. So go do that. And don't consult any standards or templates when you do. Just ask yourself-- what do I want to say? That's the only thing you need to get started."
writing  education  teaching  teachingwriting  schools  2016  howweteach  howwewrite  commoncore  templates  fiveparagraphessays  sfsh  pedagogy  curriculum  practice 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Templates are easy to change. Content usually isn't. | CSS-Tricks
"If it's a chunk of HTML that goes in a database, it's content

It's not impossible to change content, but it's likely much harder and more dangerous.

Websites can last a long time. Content tends to grow and grow. For instance on CSS-Tricks there are 2,260 Posts and 1,369 Pages. Over the years I've sprinkled in classes here and there to do certain stylistic things and over time I always regret it.


Why the regret over classes in content?

Maybe you'll find you named the class wrong and start hating it.
Maybe you'll change the class to something you like better.
Maybe you'll stop using that class.
Maybe you'll forget that class even existed, and not address it in a redesign.
Maybe you'll use that old name again, only it does something new now and messes up old content.

Those are just a few possibilities.

But the pain comes when you decide you'd like to "fix" old content. What do you do? Find all old content that uses those classes and clean them out? Try to run a database query to strip classes? Tedious or dangerous work.

Content in Markdown Helps

Markdown is comfortable to write in, once you get the hang of it. But its best feature is that it doesn't put, or even allow you to put, classes on any of the HTML it generates. Unless you write HTML directly in the Markdown, which always feels a little dirty (as it should)."
webdev  webdesign  css  content  design  templates  via:nicolefenton  2016  html  chriscoyier 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Men (Still) Explain Technology to Me: Gender and Education Technology | boundary 2
"There’s that very famous New Yorker cartoon: “On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” The cartoon was first published in 1993, and it demonstrates this sense that we have long had that the Internet offers privacy and anonymity, that we can experiment with identities online in ways that are severed from our bodies, from our material selves and that, potentially at least, the internet can allow online participation for those denied it offline.

Perhaps, yes.

But sometimes when folks on the internet discover “you’re a dog,” they do everything in their power to put you back in your place, to remind you of your body. To punish you for being there. To hurt you. To threaten you. To destroy you. Online and offline.

Neither the internet nor computer technology writ large are places where we can escape the materiality of our physical worlds—bodies, institutions, systems—as much as that New Yorker cartoon joked that we might. In fact, I want to argue quite the opposite: that computer and Internet technologies actually re-inscribe our material bodies, the power and the ideology of gender and race and sexual identity and national identity. They purport to be ideology-free and identity-less, but they are not. If identity is unmarked it’s because there’s a presumption of maleness, whiteness, and perhaps even a certain California-ness. As my friend Tressie McMillan Cottom writes, in ed-tech we’re all supposed to be “roaming autodidacts”: happy with school, happy with learning, happy and capable and motivated and well-networked, with functioning computers and WiFi that works.

By and large, all of this reflects who is driving the conversation about, if not the development of these technology. Who is seen as building technologies. Who some think should build them; who some think have always built them.

And that right there is already a process of erasure, a different sort of mansplaining one might say."



"Ironically—bitterly ironically, I’d say, many pieces of software today increasingly promise “personalization,” but in reality, they present us with a very restricted, restrictive set of choices of who we “can be” and how we can interact, both with our own data and content and with other people. Gender, for example, is often a drop down menu where one can choose either “male” or “female.” Software might ask for a first and last name, something that is complicated if you have multiple family names (as some Spanish-speaking people do) or your family name is your first name (as names in China are ordered). Your name is presented how the software engineers and designers deemed fit: sometimes first name, sometimes title and last name, typically with a profile picture. Changing your username—after marriage or divorce, for example—is often incredibly challenging, if not impossible.

You get to interact with others, similarly, based on the processes that the engineers have determined and designed. On Twitter, you cannot direct message people, for example, that do not follow you. All interactions must be 140 characters or less.

This restriction of the presentation and performance of one’s identity online is what “cyborg anthropologist” Amber Case calls the “templated self.” She defines this as “a self or identity that is produced through various participation architectures, the act of producing a virtual or digital representation of self by filling out a user interface with personal information.”

Case provides some examples of templated selves:
Facebook and Twitter are examples of the templated self. The shape of a space affects how one can move, what one does and how one interacts with someone else. It also defines how influential and what constraints there are to that identity. A more flexible, but still templated space is WordPress. A hand-built site is much less templated, as one is free to fully create their digital self in any way possible. Those in Second Life play with and modify templated selves into increasingly unique online identities. MySpace pages are templates, but the lack of constraints can lead to spaces that are considered irritating to others.


As we—all of us, but particularly teachers and students—move to spend more and more time and effort performing our identities online, being forced to use preordained templates constrains us, rather than—as we have often been told about the Internet—lets us be anyone or say anything online. On the Internet no one knows you’re a dog unless the signup process demanded you give proof of your breed. This seems particularly important to keep in mind when we think about students’ identity development. How are their identities being templated?

While Case’s examples point to mostly “social” technologies, education technologies are also “participation architectures.” Similarly they produce and restrict a digital representation of the learner’s self.

Who is building the template? Who is engineering the template? Who is there to demand the template be cracked open? What will the template look like if we’ve chased women and people of color out of programming?"



"One interesting example of this dual approach that combines both social and technical—outside the realm of ed-tech, I recognize—are the tools that Twitter users have built in order to address harassment on the platform. Having grown weary of Twitter’s refusal to address the ways in which it is utilized to harass people (remember, its engineering team is 90% male), a group of feminist developers wrote The Block Bot, an application that lets you block, en masse, a large list of Twitter accounts who are known for being serial harassers. That list of blocked accounts is updated and maintained collaboratively. Similarly, Block Together lets users subscribe to others’ block lists. Good Game Autoblocker, a tool that blocks the “ringleaders” of GamerGate.

That gets, just a bit, at what I think we can do in order to make education technology habitable, sustainable, and healthy. We have to rethink the technology. And not simply as some nostalgia for a “Web we lost,” for example, but as a move forward to a Web we’ve yet to ever see. It isn’t simply, as Isaacson would posit it, rediscovering innovators that have been erased, it’s about rethinking how these erasures happen all throughout technology’s history and continue today—not just in storytelling, but in code.

Educators should want ed-tech that is inclusive and equitable. Perhaps education needs reminding of this: we don’t have to adopt tools that serve business goals or administrative purposes, particularly when they are to the detriment of scholarship and/or student agency—technologies that surveil and control and restrict, for example, under the guise of “safety”—that gets trotted out from time to time—but that have never ever been about students’ needs at all. We don’t have to accept that technology needs to extract value from us. We don’t have to accept that technology puts us at risk. We don’t have to accept that the architecture, the infrastructure of these tools make it easy for harassment to occur without any consequences. We can build different and better technologies. And we can build them with and for communities, communities of scholars and communities of learners. We don’t have to be paternalistic as we do so. We don’t have to “protect students from the Internet,” and rehash all the arguments about stranger danger and predators and pedophiles. But we should recognize that if we want education to be online, if we want education to be immersed in technologies, information, and networks, that we can’t really throw students out there alone. We need to be braver and more compassionate and we need to build that into ed-tech. Like Blockbot or Block Together, this should be a collaborative effort, one that blends our cultural values with technology we build.

Because here’s the thing. The answer to all of this—to harassment online, to the male domination of the technology industry, the Silicon Valley domination of ed-tech—is not silence. And the answer is not to let our concerns be explained away. That is after all, as Rebecca Solnit reminds us, one of the goals of mansplaining: to get us to cower, to hesitate, to doubt ourselves and our stories and our needs, to step back, to shut up. Now more than ever, I think we need to be louder and clearer about what we want education technology to do—for us and with us, not simply to us."
education  gender  technology  edtech  2015  audreywatters  history  agency  ambercase  gamergate  society  power  hierarchy  harassment  siliconvalley  privilege  safety  collaboration  identity  tressiemcmillancottom  erasure  inclusion  inclusivity  templates  inlcusivity 
april 2015 by robertogreco
mrmrs / designer + developer in sf
"Trying to make the web as fast as possible, highly readable, 100% responsive, and easy to navigate.

I like building tools that help make designing in the browser a little easier.

Advocate for users and open-source."
adammorse  via:maxfenton  webdev  opensource  css  readability  responsivewebdesign  templates  responsivedesign  webdesign 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Free eBook
"A step-by-step guide to creating an ebook in ePub and mobi formats, complete with ebook template, and a useful style guide for authors."
ebooks  howto  publishing  templates  tutorials  epub  mobi  via:caseygollan  epubs 
april 2014 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
HTML5 Reset :: A simple set of templates for any project
"Like a lot of developers, we start every HTML project with the same set of HTML and CSS files. We've been using these files for a long time and have progressively added bits and pieces to them as our own personal best practices have evolved.

Now that modern browsers are starting to support some of the really useful parts of HTML5 and CSS3, it's time for our best practices to catch up, and we thought we'd put our files out there for everyone to use. By no means do we see this as the One True Way to start every project, but we think it's a good starting place that anyone can make their own."
framework  webdev  webdesign  templates  css3  css  html5  html  via:spencerbeacock  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
Walk [Your City]™
"What? An online pedestrian empowerment tool for any citizen to become an engaged stakeholder in their community. The W[YC] platform will allow anyone to auto-magically create their own guerrilla wayfinding sign to export, print and install.

Why? Walk Raleigh, our initial guerrilla (unsanctioned & self initiated) wayfinding project, has resonated with so many people, both home and away (even the BBC came to town!), we had to make it accessible for more people to use. Walk Raleigh has even been adopted as a pilot educational program in Raleigh, N.C. Wait, whats guerrilla or tactical urbanism anyways?

How? By using existing digital resources and the newly released “google maps” walk tool, we will develop a simple point and click sign-making experience for even the most novice of computer-user. Anyone will be able to auto-magically download their own sign."
srg  edg  activism  classideas  templates  communities  community  exploration  guerillawayfinding  wayfinding  northcarolina  raleigh  urbanism  urban  cities  walking  projectideas 
november 2012 by robertogreco
/mentoring
"What is it, exactly?

Anyone can be a part of /mentoring. All it takes is a few lines of text on the internet, expressing your openness to mentoring and offering a specific invitation to get in touch. You might create a dedicated page at 'yourdomain.com/mentoring', write an individual blog post, or even just mention it in a sidebar. Beginning, not formatting, is what matters."

[See also: http://revolution.is/diana-kimball/ AND https://github.com/dianakimball/mentoring AND http://www.twitter.com/mentoring ]
github  gamechanging  distributed  distributedmentoring  templates  learning  education  learningwebs  learningnetworks  networkedlearning  deschooling  unschooling  dianakimball  mentoring 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Keynotopia - Keynote themes for interactive prototyping of iPad, iphone and web apps [more at: http://www.adaptivepath.com/blog/2010/07/15/your-rapid-prototyping-tool-for-ipad-keynote/]
"Put together user interfaces in minutes<br />
Add interactivity and animations without writing code<br />
Export and test your prototypes on the iPhone and the iPad<br />
Capture your audience with click-thru product presentations<br />
Annotate and share your interactive prototypes instead of long requirement documents"
keynote  layout  templates  wireframes  ipad  iphone  prototyping  ux  webdesign  development  design  interface  webdev  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Indexhibit
"A web application used to build and maintain an archetypal, invisible website format that combines text, image, movie and sound."
opensource  webdev  portfolio  glvo  webdesign  design  art  freeware  templates  website  gallery  php 
june 2009 by robertogreco
CD & DVD Templates [Thanks, Jesse]
"COPYCATS is proud to offer our easy to use templates as a tool for graphic designers. These custom cd packaging templates will help you find the perfect look and feel for your product. Choose a platform above to download templates for your specialty cd packaging today!"
dvd  templates  cds  printing 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Tumblr Themes
"This is a repository of custom themes available for your Tumblr-powered tumblelog. I hope you find something you like."
tumblr  themes  css  html  blogging  webdesign  templates  microblogging  via:javierarbona  webdev 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Matthew Buchanan • Theming Tumblr
"Over the past couple of weeks I created a custom theme for Tumblr, which you can see here if you’re reading this post via the Tumblr Dashboard or RSS.
tumblr  css  via:javierarbona  webdesign  tutorials  howto  templates  webdev 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Welcome :: Indexhibit
"Indexhibit is a web application used to build and maintain an archetypal, invisible website format that combines text, image, movie and sound."
art  artists  webdesign  web  layout  css  design  webapps  webdev  website  templates  portfolio  opensource  free  gallery  photography  portfolios  onlinetoolkit  freeware  artist  programming  internet  software  html  code  indexhibit 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Chart Chooser
"Use the filters to find the right chart type for your needs. Then download as Excel or PowerPoint templates and insert your data."
charts  data  diagrams  infographics  graphs  generator  excel  downloads  free  productivity  presentations  powerpoint  visualization  statistics  tables  howto  math  online  utilities  templates 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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