robertogreco + tednelson   15

Local Area Network
"Inspired by grassroots independent publishing, we will collectively build an online publication within our local area network. We will each contribute a page to this publication, exploring what it might mean to reintroduce a sense of locality to our networks. These contributions might take the form of manifestos, essays, proposals, recipes, or personal corners of the net.

Special thanks to Michèle Champagne, Garry Ing, Greg J. Smith

Visit dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt on Beaker.

Schedule

Thursday, August 23

• 10:30–11:00 — Mindy talks about Artist as Networker
• 11:30–12:00 — Jon talks about p2p and time

Friday, August 24

• 09:30–10:00 — Coffee
• 10:30–10:45 — Exercise 1: Browsing
• 10:45–11:00 — Exercise 2: Profiling
• 11:00–12:30 — Exercise 3: Speed Dialoguing
• 12:30–14:00 — Lunch
• 14:00–14:30 — Exercise 3 Recap: Network Circle
• 14:30–15:30 — Group Discussion
• 15:30–16:00 — Tutorial: Dat and Beaker
• 16:00–17:00 — Reading Discussion

Saturday, August 25

• 09:30–10:00 — Coffee
• 10:00–10:15 — Introduce prompt and examples of grassroots publishing
• 10:15–12:15 — Initial brainstorm
• 12:15–12:30 — Introduce statement: A _____ that _____.
• 12:30–14:30 — Lunch
• 14:30–14:45 — Tutorial: Beaker APIs
• 14:45–17:00 — Begin building personal webpages
• 17:00–18:00 — Table crits

Sunday, August 26

• 09:30–10:00 — Coffee
• 10:00–10:30 — Tutorial: CSS to Print
• 10:30–12:30 — Continue building personal webpages
• 12:30–13:30 — Lunch
• 13:30–15:30 — Continue building personal webpages
• 15:30–16:30 — Begin printing
• 16:30–18:00 — Final Presentations

Overview

Day 1

A series of micro-exercises that create a word bank about each participant. As a group, we will discuss the current state of online communities and speculate on the type of content and interactions we would like to see on new networks.

• Exercise 1: Browsing — A public reading of each participant's past 7 browser searches. Collect 7 keywords.
• Exercise 2: Profiling — List 7 keywords of yourself from the perspective of an algorithm.
• Exercise 3: Speed Dialoguing — A 3-minute conversation in pairs, after which a single keyword must be selected. Continue for 1.5 hours until every possible pair has been created.
• Exercise 3 Recap — One person picks a conversation, reads the respective keyword, and briefly describes how it was selected. The corresponding person selects another conversation, and the process repeats until every person has been selected.

◦ Seita - Rory — bone to bone
◦ Rory - Mike — co-sin
◦ Mike - Stephanie — Russian ketchup
◦ Stephanie - Matt — Craigslist Roommates
◦ Matt - Timur — house plant
◦ Timur - Cyrill — Fleur & Manu
◦ Cyrill - Cezar — Santa Claus
◦ Cezar - Davis — Park Slope
◦ Davis - Taulant — textiles
◦ Taulant - Kenton — the nine
◦ Kenton - Omar — Loblaws
◦ Omar - Derrick — The Wire
◦ Derrick - Sam P — mesh network
◦ Sam - Ysabel — Jane the Virgin
◦ Ysabel - Brian H — train commute
◦ Brian H - Sam G — Annie Albers
◦ Sam G - Josh — fern
◦ Josh - Julia — nomadic / travel
◦ Julia - John C — running
◦ John C - Brian S — bedtime
◦ Brian S - Allison Parrish — adjunct (at NYU)
◦ Allison P - Florence — mukbang
◦ Florence - Mubashir — self taught
◦ Mubashir - Javid — Mexican food
◦ Javid - Seita — Japan

[images]
Some notes from Cyrill, Sam P, Tau

Based on all of the harvested keywords, begin to speculate what the tenants of a new online community might be. What are the values? What are the goals? How do we want to be represented? Do we want it public? Do we want it private? Do we want to create something which reflects the individuals, the community, or both?

• Group Discussion
◦ Internet personas and self-representation
◦ Imperfect algorithms
◦ Passive/Active consumption
• Reading Discussion
*For excerpts and files, please visit dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt/readings/ on Beaker.
◦ Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities
◦ Vannevar Bush, “As We May Think”
◦ A Pattern Language, “Mosaic of Subcultures”
◦ Ted Nelson, Computer Lib/Dream Machine
◦ Maarten Hajer & Arnold Reijndorp, In Search of a New Public Domain
◦ Kev Bewersdorf, “Reversing the Flow of Internet Expansion”
◦ Laurel Schwulst, “My website is a shifting house next to a river of knowledge. What could yours be?”

Day 2 and 3

Inspired by grassroots independent publishing, we will collectively build an online publication within our local area network. We will each contribute a page to this publication, exploring what it might mean to reintroduce a sense of locality to our networks. These contributions might take the form of manifestos, essays, proposals, recipes, or personal corners of the net.

• Some references
*For all references, please visit dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt/references/ on Beaker.
◦ Whole Earth Catalog
◦ New Woman's Survival Guide
◦ Dome Books 1 & 2
◦ Autoprogettazione
◦ Computer Lib/Dream Machine
◦ Inflato Cookbook
◦ How to Build Your Own Living Structures
• Statement: A _____ that _____.
◦ A proposal for good gossip (Mike)
◦ A text that strengthens from collective readership (Brian H)
◦ An algorithm that gives you 9 friends (Cezar)
◦ A manifesto that overcrowds until reaching illegibility (Seita)
◦ A website that keeps you warm (Davis)
◦ A drawing scripture decoded for its disciples (Derrick)
◦ A local guide to hypnosis (Julia)
◦ A series of short stories with multiple outcomes (Javid)
◦ A manual to close down the street (John C)
◦ An example of a structured format that collects items for sharing (Kenton)
◦ A speculative source of value (Omar)
◦ An interface to fill the peer-to-peer web with procedurally-generated nonsense (Allison)
◦ A flag to rule (Cyrill)
◦ A tutorial for creating a dark aesthetic (Rory)
◦ A narrative that encourages people to unfollow others (Florence)
◦ A text that shows the value of collective, unified thought (Josh)
◦ A space to give more than I receive (Sam G)
◦ A reading experience for slow life (Matthew)
◦ A set of directions that takes you on a blind date (Stephanie)
◦ An acknowledgment of the context in which the internet operates and this space exists (Mubashir)
◦ A service that maps connected peers (Sam P)
◦ A dedicated day for tidying your network presence (Tau)
◦ An interface that promotes continuous real life interactions (Timur)
◦ A page that reconsiders “local area network” through neighbourhood civic infrastructures (Brian S)

Some Projects

[images]

View all projects on Beaker Browser at
dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt .

[images]

Steph, A website for a blind date
dat://d4d4cf7526a7bea710f18eb9797c6cb3e3354d59041d711a2d630222eb144644/

[images]

Brian H, A text that strengthens from collective readership
dat://ffb9a22300a2c76a43c4e5b204b66d6f28edbda0fdad8cabd0d24ddaa79687f9/
Download A-B-Z-Times.ttf

[images]

Mubashir, An acknowledgment of the context in which the internet operates and this space exists
dat://837cf6bca44d16229dd6bc4681f52c82bae4f05f2c672f284efb632cfc83b932/

[images]

Sam P, A service that maps connected peers
dat://e5225908fe650662e6f709c579cb35cefdab2cabcc06d8ebd80c2a3bc351b9be/

[images]

Florence, A narrative that encourages people to unfollow others
dat://8bd0ba7d8dcdbc110fb89cd4528ad191ec4bb3a4e6d8a373fc2173d0b6c2aa98/

Documentation

[images]

Photos by Garry Ing"
mindyseu  jürglehni  jongacnik  p2p  p2pweb  beakerbrowser  dat  christopheralexander  apatternlanguage  janejacobs  vannevarbush  tednelson  maartenhajer  arnoldreijndorp  kevbewersdorf  laurelschwulst  2018  local  grassroots  publishing  p2ppublishing  web  webdev  webdesign  garrying  michèkechampagne  gregsmith  wholeearthcatalog  manifestos  survivalguide 
may 2019 by robertogreco
Are.na / Blog – Towards A Library Without Walls
"Collaboration has also become key to the way we conceive associative indexing on today’s version of the Internet, which could not have been anticipated by Bush at today’s scale. In “As We May Think,” Bush does acknowledge the possibility of sharing links generated by the Memex in the example of a researcher reproducing a trail on the Turkish bow for inclusion in a colleague’s “more general” trail.6 However, the scale of a hypertextual tool such as Are.na, which has over 20,000 users, far exceeds the one-to-one exchange Bush envisioned for his Memex, with significant implications for associative indexing. This phenomenon has its own neologism, “crowdsourcing,” wherein large numbers of users, most typically through the Internet, contribute to an information platform, as seen widely from commercial endeavors such as Google-owned Waze to non-profit projects such as Wikipedia. The relative advantages and disadvantages of crowdsourcing for knowledge production are the subject of much literature but could be briefly alluded to here in terms of diversity of material, collective intelligence, increased scale, and lack of consolidated control. But at its most promising, crowdsourcing creates the potential for rich communities that can form around information sharing, as is well articulated by Paul Duguid and John Seely Brown writing on the social life of information:
“[D]ocuments do not merely carry information, they help make it, structure it, and validate it. More intriguing, perhaps, documents also help structure society, enabling social groups to form, develop, and maintain a sense of shared identity. Viewing documents as mere information carriers overlooks this social role.”7
"



"Considering the ways in which Are.na operates within a community of artists and culturally-engaged individuals, contrasting Are.na with Bush’s Memex highlights the importance of conceiving how knowledge forms, knowledge tools, and knowledge communities all interplay with one another. By acknowledging other forms of knowledge beyond the scientific and better understanding the role sociality plays in our contemporary experience of information, we can better define what constitutes information and how best to describe, classify, organize, and make it accessible as librarians. Rather than prioritizing static information, fixed organization, and solitary experiences as the conventional library environment is known to do, those of us who work in LIS can adopt the more boundless strategies that we encounter in hypertextual tools such as Are.na for the benefit of the communities that we serve, essentially working towards becoming a library without the brick walls that Lampland and Star refer to in regards to infrastructure that fails to serve user needs. Parallel to thinking about what Are.na might mean for librarianship, we can look to extant projects such as the Prelinger Library and the Sitterwerk’s Kunstbibliothek, whose methods for organizing their material also exist as an alternative to more traditionally-organized libraries.

So to expand on Sam’s question and its inverse: What could a reference interview that uses Are.na look like? What would happen if books in an OPAC were nodes that could be linked by users? And what if the discovery tools we design actually encouraged research that is social, elusive, and nonlinear?"
are.na  libraries  internet  web  online  2017  karlywildenhaus  mlis  archives  archiving  marthalampland  susanleighstar  hypercad  hypertext  vannevarbush  paulotlet  tednelson  stéphanemallarmé  knowledge  information  clissification  taxonomy  accessibility  librarians  social  memex  paulduguid  johnseelybrown  crowdsourcing  aswemaythink  connections  collaboration 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Networked Learning as Experiential Learning | EDUCAUSE
"No one believes that knowing the alphabet and sounding out words mean that a person possesses the deep literacy needed for college-level learning. Yet our ideas about digital literacy are steadily becoming more impoverished, to the point that many of my current students, immersed in a "walled garden" world of apps and social media, know almost nothing about the web or the Internet. For the first time since the emergence of the web, this past year I discovered that the majority of my sophomore-level students did not understand the concept of a URL and thus struggled with the effective use and formation of hyperlinks in the networked writing class that VCU's University College affectionately calls "Thought Vectors in Concept Space"—a phrase attributed by Kay to Engelbart and one that describes the fundamentally experiential aspect of networked learning.5 My students appeared not to be able to parse the domains in which they published their work, which meant that they could not consistently imagine how to locate or link to each other's work by simply examining the structure of the URLs involved. If one cannot understand the organizing principles of a built environment, one cannot contribute to the building. And if one cannot contribute to the building, certain vital modes of knowing will be forever out of reach.

Yet educators seeking to provide what Carl Rogers called the "freedom to learn" continue to work on those digital high-impact practices.6 It is a paradoxical task, to be sure, but it is one worth attempting—particularly now, when "for the first time in the still-short span of human history, the experience of creating media for a potentially large public is available to a multitude."7 Students' experience of what Henry Jenkins has articulated as the networked mediation of "participatory culture" must extend their experience to school as well.8 School as a site of the high-impact practice of learner-built, instructor-facilitated, digitally networked learning can transform the experience of education even as it preserves, and scales, our commitment to the education of the whole person.

The web was designed for just this kind of collaboration. One does not need permission to make a hyperlink. Yet one does need "the confident insight, the authority of media-making" to create meaning out of those links. Such confidence and authority should be among the highest learning outcomes available to our students within what Mimi Ito and others have described as "connected learning."9 Learner-initiated connections that identify both the nodes and the lines between them, instead of merely connecting the dots that teachers have already established (valuable as that might be), co-create what Lawrence Stenhouse argues is "the nature of knowledge . . . as distinct from information"—"a structure to sustain creative thought and provide frameworks for judgment." Such structures can encourage an enormously beneficial flowering of human diversity, one that lies beyond the reach of prefabricated outcomes: "Education as induction into knowledge is successful to the extent that it makes the behavioural outcomes of the students unpredictable."10

Offering students the possibility of experiential learning in personal, interactive, networked computing—in all its gloriously messy varieties—provides the richest opportunity yet for integrative thinking within and beyond "schooling." If higher education can embrace the complexity of networked learning and can value the condition of emergence that networked learning empowers, there may still be time to encourage networked learning as a structure and a disposition, a design and a habit of being."
networkedlearning  2016  gardnercampbell  jeromebruner  georgekuh  experientialleaerning  experience  learning  howwelearn  education  carlrogers  hypertext  web  online  internet  literacy  alankay  dougengelbart  adelegoldberg  tednelson  vannevarbush  jcrlicklider  georgedyson  alanturing  johnvonneumann  self-actualization  unschooling  deschooling  progressive  networks  social 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Links 2013 ["Bret Victor: It’s the end of 2013, and here’s what Bret fell in love with this year"]
"What is the difference between scientific and non-scientific thinking? Thinking within a consistent theory versus thinking haphazardly?

I'm crucially interested in the problem of representing theory such that intuitions are fruitful and theoretically sound, and representations suggest analogies that stay true to the theory. That's not diSessa's problem, but I feel that his viewpoint has some powerful clues."



"Hofstadter says that all thinking runs on analogy-making. Sounds good to me! If he's even partially correct, then it seems to me that a medium for powerful thinking needs to be a medium for seeing powerful analogies. And a medium for powerful communication needs to be designed around inducing the dance he's talking about up there."



Kieran Egan: "Thinking about education during this century has almost entirely involved just three ideas—socialization, Plato's academic idea, and Rousseau's developmental idea. We may see why education is so difficult and contentious if we examine these three ideas and the ways they interact in educational thinking today. The combination of these ideas governs what we do in schools, and what we do to children in the name of education.

Our problems, I will further argue, are due to these three ideas each being fatally flawed and being also incompatible with one other."

Bret Victor: "If you're going to design a system for education, it might help to understand the purpose of education in the first place. Egan points out how modern education is implicitly driven by a cargo-culty mish-mash of three lofty but mutually-incompatible goals. Good luck with that!"



"The cultural importance of the printing press doesn't have much to do with the technology -- the ink and metal type -- but rather how print acted as a medium to amplify human thought in particular ways.

Print was directly responsible for the emergence of a literate and educated society, which (for example) made possible the idea of societal self-governance. The US Constitution could only exist in a literate print culture, where (for example) the Federalist papers and Anti-Federalist papers could be debated in the newspapers.

As you read and watch Alan Kay, try not to think about computational technology, but about a society that is fluent in thinking and debating in the dimensions opened up by the computational medium.
Don't think about “coding” (that's ink and metal type, already obsolete), and don't think about “software developers” (medieval scribes only make sense in an illiterate society).

Think about modeling phenomena, modeling situations, simulating models, gaining a common-sense intuition for nonlinear dynamic processes. Then think about a society in which every educated person does these things, in the computational medium, as easily and naturally as we today read and write complex logical arguments in the written medium.

Reading used to be reserved for the clergy, to hand down unquestionable Revealed Truths to the masses. Today, it's just what everyone does. Think about a society in which science is not reserved for the clergy, to hand down unquestionable Revealed Truths to the masses, but is just what everyone does."



[Reading tips from Bret Victor:]

"Reading Tip #1

It’s tempting to judge what you read: "I agree with these statements, and I disagree with those."

However, a great thinker who has spent decades on an unusual line of thought cannot induce their context into your head in a few pages. It’s almost certainly the case that you don’t fully understand their statements.

Instead, you can say: "I have now learned that there exists a worldview in which all of these statements are consistent."

And if it feels worthwhile, you can make a genuine effort to understand that entire worldview. You don't have to adopt it. Just make it available to yourself, so you can make connections to it when it's needed.

Reading Tip #2

Carver Mead describes a physical theory in which atoms exchange energy by resonating with each other. Before the energy transaction can happen, the two atoms must be phase-matched, oscillating in almost perfect synchrony with each other.

I sometimes think about resonant transactions as a metaphor for getting something out of a piece of writing. Before the material can resonate, before energy can be exchanged between the author and reader, the reader must already have available a mode of vibration at the author's frequency. (This doesn't mean that the reader is already thinking the author's thought; it means the reader is capable of thinking it.)

People often describe written communication in terms of transmission (the author explained the concept well, or poorly) and/or absorption (the reader does or doesn't have the background or skill to understand the concept). But I think of it more like a transaction -- the author and the reader must be matched with each other. The author and reader must share a close-enough worldview, viewpoint, vocabulary, set of mental models, sense of aesthetics, and set of goals. For any particular concept in the material, if not enough of these are sufficiently matched, no resonance will occur and no energy will be exchanged.

Perhaps, as a reader, one way to get more out of more material is to collect and cultivate a diverse set of resonators, to increase the probability of a phase-match.

Reading Tip #3

Misunderstandings can arise when an author is thinking in a broader context than the reader. A reader might be thinking tactically: :How can I do a better job today?" while the author is thinking strategically: "How can we make a better tomorrow?"

The misunderstanding becomes especially acute when real progress requires abandoning today's world and starting over.

We are ants crawling on a tree branch. Most ants are happy to be on the branch, and happy to be moving forward.

[image]

But there are a few special ants that, somehow, are able to see a bigger picture. And they can see that this branch is a dead end.

[image]

They can see that if we really want to move forward, we'll have to backtrack a long ways down.

They usually have a hard time explaining this to the ants that can only see the branch they're on. For them, the path ahead appears to go on forever.

[image]"
bretvictor  brunolatour  andreadisessa  douglashofstadter  place  cognition  science  sherryturkle  kieranegan  terrycavanagh  stewartbrand  longnow  julianjaynes  davidhestenes  carvermead  paulsaffo  tednelson  dougengelbert  alankay  reading  toread  2013  gutenberg  printing  print  modeling  simulation  dynamicprocesses  society  progress  thinking  intuition  analogies  education  systemsthinking  howweread  learning  ideas  concepts  context  readiness  simulations 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Tinderbox Stretchtext Writing System
"Have you ever found yourself in a conversation which followed too many rabbit trails? Have you ever read an article which did the same? What if you could have digressions and concise style in the same document?

Do you:

• need to write documents which appeal to laypeople and experts?
• struggle with an inability to show the context of a quote without losing your readers?
• wish you could create links which include explanations and multiple possible destinations?
• need to publish information to the web, but find yourself dissatisfied with the terse, flat writing it encourages?

These are just a few reasons the Tinderbox Stretchtext Writing System can help you write a better document.

More uses:
• Follow digressions without derailing the flow and purpose of your text.
• Make links which don't require readers to visit a different page.
• Show full citations in the body of the document without disrupting readers, while still grouping sources at the end.
• Include extra tables and figures.
• Comment on your sources without breaking the flow of your argument.
• Discuss the reasons you didn't cite certain sources for various sections.
• Create paper editions of your enhanced electronic document.

According to Theodor H. Nelson, who first wrote about Stretchtext in 1967, such systems help readers because "The reader remains oriented. If he loses track of where he is, he "shrinks" the text to a higher, shorter level; if he wants to study a topic in more detail, he magnifies it (Nelson, April, 1967). Additionally, such systems also help the writer remain oriented, since it removes your obstacles for good writing."
hypertext  tools  writing  expansion  html  webdev  tednelson  via:litherland  tinderbox  stretchtext  webdesign 
december 2013 by robertogreco
What Screens Want by Frank Chimero
"We need to work as a community to develop a language of transformation so we can talk to one another. And we probably need to steal these words from places like animation, theater, puppetry, dance, and choreography.

Words matter. They are abstractions, too—an interface to thought and understanding by communication. The words we use mold our perception of our work and the world around us. They become a frame, just like the interfaces we design."



"When I realized that, a little light went off in my head: a map’s biases do service to one need, but distort everything else. Meaning, they misinform and confuse those with different needs.

That’s how I feel about the web these days. We have a map, but it’s not for me. So I am distanced. It feels like things are distorted. I am consistently confused.

See, we have our own abstractions on the web, and they are bigger than the user interfaces of the websites and apps we build. They are the abstractions we use to define the web. The commercial web. The things that have sprung up in the last decade, but gained considerable speed in the past five years.

It’s the business structures and funding models we use to create digital businesses. It’s the pressure to scale, simply because it’s easy to copy bits. It’s the relationships between the people who make the stuff, and the people who use that stuff, and the consistent abandonment of users by entrepreneurs.

It’s the churning and the burning, flipping companies, nickel and diming users with in-app purchases, data lock-in, and designing with dark patterns so that users accidentally do actions against their own self-interest.

Listen: I’m at the end of a 4-month sabbatical, and I worry about this stuff, because the further I get from everything, the more it begins to look toxic. These pernicious elements are the primary map we have of the web right now.

We used to have a map of a frontier that could be anything. The web isn’t young anymore, though. It’s settled. It’s been prospected and picked through. Increasingly, it feels like we decided to pave the wilderness, turn it into a suburb, and build a mall. And I hate this map of the web, because it only describes a fraction of what it is and what’s possible. We’ve taken an opportunity for connection and distorted it to commodify attention. That’s one of the sleaziest things you can do.

So what is the answer? I found this quote by Ted Nelson, the man who invented hypertext. He’s one of the original rebel technologists, so he has a lot of things to say about our current situation. Nelson:
The world is not yet finished, but everyone is behaving as if everything was known. This is not true. In fact, the computer world as we know it is based upon one tradition that has been waddling along for the last fifty years, growing in size and ungainliness, and is essentially defining the way we do everything. My view is that today’s computer world is based on techie misunderstandings of human thought and human life. And the imposition of inappropriate structures throughout the computer is the imposition of inappropriate structures on the things we want to do in the human world.



We can produce a vision of the web that isn’t based on:

consolidation
privatization
power
hierarchies
surveillance

We can make a new map. Or maybe reclaim a map we misplaced a long time ago. One built on:

extensibility
openness
communication
community
wildness

We can use the efficiency and power of interfaces to help people do what they already wish more quickly or enjoyably, and we can build up business structures so that it’s okay for people to put down technology and get on with their life once their job is done. We can rearrange how we think about the tools we build, so that someone putting down your tool doesn’t disprove its utility, but validates its usefulness.



Let me leave you with this: the point of my writing was to ask what screens want. I think that’s a great question, but it is a secondary concern. What screens want needs to match up with what we want.

People believe there’s an essence to the computer, that there’s something true and real and a correct way to do things. But—there is no right way. We get to choose how to aim the technology we build. At least for now, because increasingly, technology feels like something that happens to you instead of something you use. We need to figure out how to stop that, for all of our sakes, before we’re locked in, on rails, and headed toward who knows what.

One of the reasons that I’m so fascinated by screens is because their story is our story. First there was darkness, and then there was light. And then we figured out how to make that light dance. Both stories are about transformations, about change. Screens have flux, and so do we."
frankchimero  2013  screens  flux  build2013  plasticity  jamesburke  plastic  skeoumorphs  containers  materials  change  transitions  perception  flatdesign  windowsphonemetro  ios7  software  replacement  shape  affordances  grain  design  paper  print  eadwardmuybridge  movement  motion  animation  customization  responsivewebdesign  responsiveness  variability  mutability  mutations  ux  interactiondesign  interfaces  language  ethanmarcotte  maps  mapping  representation  cartography  embodiedmeaning  respresentation  tednelson  computersareforpeople  softwareisforpeople  unfinished  responsivedesign 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Unbuilding — Lined & Unlined
[now here: https://linedandunlined.com/archive/unbuilding ]

Here's another something that's too large to unpack in a quote or two or three or more, so just one, then read and view (many images) the rest.

"Unlike the thesis, Antithesis was an optional class. Instead of a constant, year-long process, it was interstitial, happening during a “down time” in the year. We didn’t really have class meetings — instead, I spent my time hanging out in the studio. Everyone loosened up. After thinking intensively about the thesis for 12 weeks, it was time to stop thinking about it — at least, consciously. The goal was not to keep pushing forward on the thesis but to get new projects started in parallel."

[video: https://vimeo.com/63008758 ]
completeness  sourcecode  viewsource  critique  susansontag  webdesign  aestheticpractice  criticalautonomy  canon  andrewblauvelt  billmoggridge  khoivinh  community  communities  livingdocuments  constitution  usconstitution  metaphors  metaphor  borges  telescopictext  joedavis  language  culturalsourcecode  cooper-hewitt  sebchan  github  johngnorman  recycling  interboropartners  kiva  pennandteller  jakedow-smith  pointerpointer  davidmacaulay  stevejobs  tednelson  humanconsciousness  consciousness  literacy  walterong  pipa  sopa  wikipedia  robertrauschenberg  willemdekooning  humor  garfieldminusgarfield  garfield  danwalsh  ruderripps  okfocus  bolognadeclaration  pedagogy  mariamontessori  freeuniversityofbozen-bolzano  openstudioproject  lcproject  tcsnmy  howweteach  cv  anti-hierarchy  hierarchy  autonomy  anti-autonomy  anti-isolation  anti-specialization  avant-garde  vanabbemuseum  charlesesche  understanding  knowing  socialsignaling  anyahindmarch  thinking  making  inquiry  random  informality  informal  interstitial  antithesis  action  non-action  anikaschwarzlose  jona 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Casey A. Gollan: Notes + Links: Weeks 12, 13, and almost 14
"Nelson and Bush seem to get pretty hung up on technical (or even mechanical) hurdles rather than conceptual ones. There’s a lot of fussing about, in Bush’s case, how to shuffle microfilm around quickly, or in Nelson’s case, complicated server configurations. It reminds me of how characters in sci-fi movies park their hovercars to go use a payphone. These inventors are willing to imagine radically different worlds but can’t let go of the most banal limitations. And the things they lamented not having are no longer pipe dreams! Reading their texts in 2012, there appears to be no reason why a Memex or Xanadu can’t exist, other than that they just don’t. It seems like Nelson specficially, who I guess is still working, is too smart for his own good. Too wrapped up in the details of his obsessions. “It seemed so simple and clear to me then. It still does,” he writes, “But…I mistook a clear view for a short distance.” If perfectionism can be said to plague Nelson’s projects, it must also be acknowledged that it’s his philosophy of choice. I was shocked to read his justification for why Xanadu must be built from scratch, completely and perfectly: “Existing systems do not combine well; hooking them together creates something like the New York subway system.” … Perhaps the problems that bogged Nelson down indefinitely only reveal themselves in time, but I wonder if somebody with more distance or a less stubborn idea of the right way to build things could actually build the thing — even if it isn’t perfect. I also never realized that Bush thought a lot more about interfaces than Nelson, who basically rejected them entirely (at least as far as I’ve read): "How you will look at this world when it is spreadeagled on your screen is your own business: you control it by your choice of screen hardware, by your choice of viewing program, by what you do as you watch, but the structure of the world—the system of interconnections of its stored materials—is the same from screen to screen, no matter how a given screen may show it." … Nelson’s decoupling of backend and frontend is pretty profound. It underscores the base-ness of his ideas: he’s talking about different structures for writing and thinking, not just presenting plain old content in a style that evokes structure. There is not necessarily a visual difference between these two things but conceptually it is huge. Even if the real problems lie in data structures, I can’t help but gravitate towards the descriptive aspects and imagine tools I’d want to use. I love Nelson’s vision of computers as “a waterworks for the mind”: "Your computer screen will be the spigot—or shower nozzle—that dispenses what you need when you turn the handle. But that system must be based on the fluidity of thought—not just its crystallized and static form, which, like water’s, is hard and cold and goes nowhere.""
tednelson  vannevarbush  computers  computing  design  2012  caseygollan  literarymachines  aswemaythink 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Every user a developer, part II, or: Momcomp « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird
"The things which I’ve painted as trivial here are admittedly anything but. But they are, I sincerely believe, how we’re going to handle — have to handle — the human interface to this so-called Internet of Things we keep talking about. Each of the networked resources in the world, whether location or service or object or human being, is going to have to be characterized in a consistent, natural, interoperable way, and we’re going to have to offer folks equally high-level environments for process composition using these resources. We’re going to have to devise architectures and frameworks that let ordinary people everywhere interact with all the networked power that is everywhere around them, and do so in a way that doesn’t add to their existing burden of hassle and care.

Momcomp, in other words. It’s an idea whose time I believe has come."
programming  future  internetofthings  development  design  adaptive  ux  ui  tools  momcomp  usability  android  everyware  adamgreenfield  participation  google  appinventor  interaction  invention  literacy  computing  content  mobile  making  technology  alankay  hypercard  jefraskin  bencerveny  junrekimoto  tednelson  dougengelbart  spimes  iot 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Every user a developer: A brief history, with hopeful branches « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird
"the corpus of people able to develop functionality, to “program” for a given system, has been dwindling as a percentage of interactive technology’s total userbase…Alan Kay’s definition of full technical literacy, remember, was the ability to both read & write in a given medium — to create, as well as consume. And by these lights, we’ve been moving further & further away from literacy & the empowerment it so reliably entrains for a very long time now. … we need to articulate a way of thinking about interactive functionality & its development that is appropriate to an era in which virtually everyone on the planet spends some portion of their day using networked devices; to a context in which such devices & interfaces are utterly pervasive in the world, & the average person is confronted with a multiplicity of same in the course of a day; and to the cloud architecture that undergirds that context. Given these constraints, neither applications nor “apps” are quite going to cut it"
android  everyware  adamgreenfield  participation  google  appinventor  interaction  invention  literacy  computing  content  design  development  programming  mobile  making  technology  alankay  hypercard  jefraskin  bencerveny  junrekimoto  tednelson  dougengelbart 
july 2010 by robertogreco

related tags

1960s  1970s  abandonment  absence  academia  accessibility  accretion  accumulation  action  adamgreenfield  adaptive  adelegoldberg  adobe  aestheticpractice  affordances  alankay  alanturing  algebra  amaya  amazon  analogies  anarchism  anarchy  andreadisessa  andrewblauvelt  android  anger  anikaschwarzlose  animation  annoyance  anthropology  anti-autonomy  anti-hierarchy  anti-isolation  anti-specialization  antithesis  anyahindmarch  apatternlanguage  appinventor  appropriation  arbitrary  archives  archiving  are.na  aristotle  arnoldreijndorp  arpa  art  arthistory  association  aswemaythink  autoethnography  autonomy  avant-garde  beakerbrowser  bencerveny  billmoggridge  blogging  bolognadeclaration  borges  bretvictor  brunolatour  build2013  canon  carlrogers  cartography  carvermead  caseygollan  caseyreas  chance  change  charlesesche  christaflores  christopheralexander  clarity  clissification  coding  cognition  collaboration  collectivism  colonization  comedy  communities  community  completeness  complexity  compliance  composition  computers  computersareforpeople  computing  concepts  connections  connectivism  consciousness  constitution  containers  content  context  cooper-hewitt  cooperation  criticalautonomy  critique  crowdsourcing  culturalsourcecode  culture  curation  curiosity  curriculum  customization  cv  danwalsh  dat  davidhestenes  davidmacaulay  depth  deschooling  design  despair  development  disruption  dkr  documents  dougengelbart  dougengelbert  douglashofstadter  dreammachines  dynamicprocesses  eadwardmuybridge  edtech  education  elation  email  embodiedmeaning  emptiness  engagement  ethanmarcotte  eulogy  everyware  expansion  experience  experientialleaerning  failure  film  filmmaking  fixes  flatdesign  flux  fonts  frankchimero  franklloydwright  freedom  freeuniversityofbozen-bolzano  frustration  future  gandhi  gapfilling  gardnercampbell  garfield  garfieldminusgarfield  garrying  generalists  generalization  georgedyson  georgekuh  github  google  grain  grassroots  gregorybateson  gregsmith  growth  gutenberg  headstart  hierarchies  hierarchy  highered  highereducation  hillbrookschool  history  howwelearn  howweread  howweteach  howwework  html  html5  humanconsciousness  humanity  humanpotential  humor  hypercad  hypercard  hyperlinks  hypertext  idealism  ideas  incompleteness  informal  informality  information  inquiry  integrity  interaction  interactiondesign  interboropartners  interdependence  interest  interested  interestedness  interfaces  internet  internetofthings  interstitial  intertwingularity  intuition  invention  ios  ios7  iot  jakedow-smith  jamesburke  janejacobs  jcrlicklider  jeffwall  jefraskin  jeromebruner  jfk  joedavis  johngnorman  johnmilton  johnseelybrown  johnvonneumann  jonaslund  jongacnik  jonudell  julianjaynes  juliarubin  junrekimoto  jürglehni  karlywildenhaus  kevbewersdorf  khoivinh  kieranegan  kiva  knowing  knowledge  lacma  language  languageacquisition  laurelschwulst  lcproject  learning  leonardodavinci  librarians  libraries  literacy  literarymachines  livingdocuments  local  longnow  lynnehersmanleeson  maartenhajer  making  manifestos  mapping  maps  marcelduchamp  mariamontessori  marshallmcluhan  marthalampland  martinlutherkingjr  materials  math  mathematics  media  memex  messiness  metacognition  metaphor  metaphors  michèkechampagne  mimicry  mindyseu  missedopportunities  mit  mlis  mlk  mobile  modeling  moma  momcomp  motion  movement  multicontextuality  mutability  mutations  mutualaid  naivite  narration  negation  networkedlearning  networks  non-action  okfocus  online  openstudioproject  organizationalpolitics  p2p  p2ppublishing  p2pweb  paper  paradiselost  participation  paulduguid  paulford  paulotlet  paulsaffo  paulsilviapsychology  pedagogy  pennandteller  perception  photoshop  pipa  place  plastic  plasticity  plato  plotters  pointerpointer  policy  politics  poverty  practice  preschool  print  printing  process  programming  progress  progressive  projectxanadu  psd  publishing  random  raspberrypi  readiness  reading  recursion  recycling  reggioemilia  removal  repetition  replacement  representation  responsivedesign  responsiveness  responsivewebdesign  respresentation  rethinking  reversal  rhizomaticlearning  richness  robertrauschenberg  robgiampietro  ruderripps  rules  sadness  scaffolding  schools  science  screens  sebchan  secondaryorality  self-actualization  self-discovery  self-publishing  self-surprise  selfpublishing  shape  shareddiscovery  sharing  sherryturkle  simulation  simulations  skeoumorphs  skeumorphs  skeuomorph  skills  social  socialreciprocity  socialsignaling  society  software  softwareisforpeople  sopa  sourcecode  specialization  speculation  spimes  spiraling  spirallearning  sri  stevejobs  stewartbrand  stimulation  stipulation  stretchtext  strewartbrand  structure  stéphanemallarmé  survivalguide  susanleighstar  susansontag  systemsthinking  tagging  talent  taxonomy  tcsnmy  teaching  technology  tednelson  telescopictext  temptation  tension  terrycavanagh  text  thinking  timberners-lee  time  tinderbox  tools  toread  training  transitions  twitter  ui  unbuilding  understanding  unfinished  unraveling  unschooling  usability  usconstitution  ux  vanabbemuseum  vannevarbush  variability  via:litherland  viewsource  vision  vocabulary  walterong  waltkelly  web  webdesign  webdev  webpublishing  wholeearthcatalog  wikipedia  wikis  willemdekooning  wilsonminer  windowsphonemetro  writing  www  xanadu  xeroxparc  youtube 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: