robertogreco + tagging   110

What Happened to Tagging? | JSTOR Daily
"When we fret about the perils of an algorithm-driven society, tagging represents the road not taken. It was a technology that supported decentralized content creation and community, rather than the limited number of centralized social networking sites that house the majority of online conversation today. It was an approach in which everyone added a little bit of value—for instance, in the form of tags that provided context and made content findable (and not as a way to self-promote, but just because it was easy and helpful). It was a form of conversation that centered content and ideas, not celebrities and influence: You might connect with someone who regularly used the same tags that you did, but that was because they shared your interests, not because they had X thousand followers.

And yes, it required a little more effort. But when I look around the web today, and at the many problems that have emerged from our submission to the almighty algorithm, I wonder if the effort was a feature, not a bug. By requiring us to invest ourselves in the job of finding content and building community, tag-driven conversations made us digital creators, not just digital consumers. It’s a social web we could have again—and one for which we could be truly thankful."
tagging  folksonomy  2019  alexandrasamuel  web2.0  flickr  del.icio.us  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  tags  rss  web  online  internet  chaos  messiness  bottomup  twitter  facebook  algorithms  effort 
10 days ago by robertogreco
Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online | WIRED
"KUDOS TO THE fans. One of the nominees for the Hugo Awards this year is Archive of Our Own, a fanfiction archive containing nearly 5 million fanworks—about the size of the English Wikipedia, and several years younger. It's not just the fanfic, fanart, fanvids, and other fanworks, impressive as they are, that make Archive of Our Own worthy of one of the biggest honors in science fiction and fantasy. It's also the architecture of the site itself.

At a time when we're trying to figure out how to make the internet livable for humans, without exploiting other humans in the process, AO3 (AO3, to its friends) offers something the rest of tech could learn from.

Here's a problem that AO3 users, like the rest of the internet, encounter every day: How do you find a particular thing you're interested in, while filtering out all the other stuff you don't care about? Most websites end up with tags of some sort. I might look through a medical journal database for articles tagged "cataracts," search a stock photo site for pictures tagged "businesspeople," or click on a social media hashtag to see what people are saying about the latest episode of #GameOfThrones.

Tags are useful but they also have problems. Although "cataracts," "businesspeople," and #GameOfThrones might seem like the most obvious tags to me, someone else might have tagged these same topics "cataract surgery," "businessperson," and #GoT. Another person might have gone with "nuclear sclerosis" (a specific type of cataract), "office life," and #Daenerys. And so on.

There are two main ways of dealing with the problem of tagging proliferation. One is to be completely laissez-faire—let posters tag whatever they want and hope searchers can figure out what words they need to look for. It's easy to set up, but it tends to lead to an explosion of tags, as posters stack on more tags just in case and searchers don't know which one is best. Laissez-faire tags are common on social media; if I post an aesthetic photo of a book I'm reading on Instagram, I have over 20 relevant tags to choose from, such as #book #books #readers #reader #reading #reads #goodreads #read #booksofig #readersofig #booksofinstagram #readersofinstagram #readstagram #bookstagram #bookshelf #bookshelves #bookshelfie #booknerd #bookworm #bookish #bookphotography #bookcommunity #booklover #booksbooksbooks #bookstagrammer #booktography #readers #readabook #readmorebooks #readingtime #alwaysreading #igreads #instareads #amreading. "Am reading" indeed—reading full paragraphs of tags.

The other solution to the proliferation of competing tags is to implement a controlled, top-down, rigid tagging system. Just as the Dewey Decimal System has a single subcategory for Shakespeare so library browsers can be sure to find Hamlet near Romeo and Juliet, rigid tagging systems define a single list of non-overlapping tags and require that everyone use them. They're more popular in professional and technical databases than in public-facing social media, but they're a nice idea in theory—if you only allow the tag "cataract" then no one will have to duplicate effort by also searching under "cataracts" and "cataract surgery."

The problem is rigid tags take effort to learn; it's hard to convince the general public to memorize a gigantic taxonomy. Also, they become outdated. Tagging systems are a way of imposing order on the real world, and the world doesn't just stop moving and changing once you've got your nice categories set up. Take words related to gender and sexuality: The way we talk about these topics has evolved a lot in recent decades, but library and medical databases have been slower to keep up.

The Archive of Our Own has none of these problems. It uses a third tagging system, one that blends the best elements of both styles.

On AO3, users can put in whatever tags they want. (Autocomplete is there to help, but they don't have to use it.) Then behind the scenes, human volunteers look up any new tags that no one else has used before and match them with any applicable existing tags, a process known as tag wrangling. Wrangling means that you don't need to know whether the most popular tag for your new fanfic featuring Sherlock Holmes and John Watson is Johnlock or Sherwatson or John/Sherlock or Sherlock/John or Holmes/Watson or anything else. And you definitely don't need to tag your fic with all of them just in case. Instead, you pick whichever one you like, the tag wranglers do their work behind the scenes, and readers looking for any of these synonyms will still be able to find you.

AO3's trick is that it involves humans by design—around 350 volunteer tag wranglers in 2019, up from 160 people in 2012—who each spend a few hours a week deciding whether new tags should be treated as synonyms or subsets of existing tags, or simply left alone. AO3's Tag Wrangling Chairs estimate that the group is on track to wrangle over 2 million never-before-used tags in 2019, up from around 1.5 million in 2018.

Laissez-faire and rigid tagging systems both fail because they assume too much—that users can create order from a completely open system, or that a predefined taxonomy can encompass every kind of tag a person might ever want. When these assumptions don't pan out, it always seems to be the user's fault. AO3's beliefs about human nature are more pragmatic, like an architect designing pathways where pedestrians have begun wearing down the grass, recognizing how variation and standardization can fit together. The wrangler system is one where ordinary user behavior can be successful, a system which accepts that users periodically need help from someone with a bird's-eye view of the larger picture.

Users appreciate this help. According to Tag Wrangling Chair briar_pipe, "We sometimes get users who come from Instagram or Tumblr or another unmoderated site. We can tell that they're new to AO3 because they tag with every variation of a concept—abbreviations, different word order, all of it. I love how excited people get when they realize they don't have to do that here."

When I tweeted about AO3's tags a while back, I received many comments from people wishing that their professional tagging systems were as good, including users of news sites, library catalogs, commercial sales websites, customer help-desk websites, and PubMed (the most prominent database of medical research). The other websites that compared favorably to AO3 were also on the fannish side of the spectrum and used a similar system of human-facilitated tag wrangling: librarything (a website where you can list all your books) and Danbooru (an anime imageboard). But, we might ask ourselves, why use humans? Couldn't machine learning or AI or another hot tech buzzword wrangle the tags instead?

One reason for the humans is that AO3 began developing its routines in 2007, when the tech wasn't as advanced and they had a lot of willing volunteers. But even now, tag wranglers are skeptical that a machine could take over their tasks. One wrangler, who goes by the handle spacegandalf, pointed me to the example of a character from an audio drama called The Penumbra Podcast who didn't have an official name in text for several episodes after he was introduced. Yet people were writing fanfic—and trying to tag it by character—before they had any name to tag it with.

Because spacegandalf had listened to this podcast—AO3 deliberately recruits and assigns tag wranglers who are members of the fandoms that they wrangle for—they had the necessary context to know that "Big Guy Jacket Man Or Whatever His Name Is" referred to the same person as his slightly more official moniker "the Man In the Brown Jacket" and his later, official name, Jet Sikuliaq (and that none of these names should be confused with a different mysteriously named character from a different audio drama, the Man in the Tan Jacket from Welcome to Night Vale).

With all these tags properly wrangled, I can not only find "Big Guy Jacket Man" and "the Man in the Brown Jacket" and "Jet Sikuliaq" all in the same search results, but I can also drill down and search for crossover fic containing both the Man in the Brown Jacket and the Man in the Tan Jacket—and, one hopes, an entire world of colored-jacketed friends. Sadly, there is none, but at least I know I have a conclusive answer.

Without tag wranglers, I'd be stuck doing an ordinary search for "jacket" or "jacket man"—the first of which gives me hundreds of results about other irrelevant characters who happen to wear a jacket this one time, and the second of which misses some genuinely relevant results about our jacket men of interest.

Another of the Tag Wrangling Chairs, Qem, also thinks that machine tag wrangling is unlikely, pointing to machine translation as a cautionary tale. “There are terms in fandom which, while commonly understood in context among fans, would not be when you take it out of the fandom context," Qem says. For example, seemingly innocuous words like "slash" and "lemon" do not refer to a punctuation mark or a citrus fruit in fannish contexts, and tag wranglers are already well aware that machine translation can only manage the literal, not the subcultural meanings. Qem's co-chair, briar_pipe, is slightly more sanguine: "I personally think it might be interesting to have AI/human partnerships for this type of data work, but you have to have humans who are aware of AI limitations and willing to call AIs on mistakes, or else that partnership is useless."

AI certainly does have limitations. There always seems to be a new report of products that claim to be AI—Amazon's Mechanical Turk, Facebook's M, Google Duplex, the Expensify receipt scanner—but in fact often involve hordes of poorly paid, undercompensated, invisibilized humans performing "ghost work" that is attributed to AI.

The tag wranglers on AO3 aren't paid at all. The archive's parent organization, the Organization for Transformative Works, is a nonprofit, and everyone involved in the project is a volunteer. But … [more]
tagging  folksonomy  fandom  taxonomy  2019  archives  archiveofourown  gretchenmcculloch  cv  internet  web  online  collaboration  ao3  tagwrangling 
june 2019 by robertogreco
Scratching the Surface — 104. Cab Broskoski and Chris Sherron
"Cab Broskoski and Chris Sherron are two of the founders of Are.na, a knowledge sharing platform that combines the creative back-and-forth of social media with the focus of a productivity tool. Before working on Arena, Cab was a digital artist and Chris a graphic designer and in this episode, they talk about their desire for a new type of bookmarking tool and building a platform for collaborative, interdisciplinary research as well as larger questions around open source tools, research as artistic practice, and subverting the norms of social media."

[direct link to audio:
https://soundcloud.com/scratchingthesurfacefm/104-cab-broskoski-and-chris-sherron ]
jarrettfuller  are.na  cabbroskoski  chrissherron  coreyarcangel  del.icio.us  bookmarkling  pinterest  cv  tagging  flickr  michaelcina  youworkforthem  davidbohm  williamgibson  digital  damonzucconi  stanleykubrick  stephaniesnt  julianbozeman  public  performance  collections  collecting  research  2000s  interview  information  internet  web  sharing  conversation  art  design  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  online  onlinetoolkit  inspiration  moodboards  graphicdesign  graphics  images  web2.0  webdesign  webdev  ui  ux  scratchingthesurface  education  teaching  edtech  technology  multidisciplinary  generalists  creative  creativitysingapore  creativegeneralists  learning  howwelearn  attention  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  algorithms  canon  knowledge  transdisciplinary  tools  archives  slow  slowweb  slowinternet  instagram  facebook 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Designing better file organization around tags, not hierarchies
"Computer users organize their files into folders because that is the primary tool offered by operating systems. But applying this standard hierarchical model to my own files, I began to notice shortcomings of this paradigm over the years. At the same time, I used some other information systems not based on hierarchical path names, and they turned out to solve a number of problems. I propose a new way of organizing files based on tagging, and describe the features and consequences of this method in detail.

Speaking personally, I’m fed up with HFSes, on Windows, Linux, and online storage alike. I struggled with file organization for just over a decade before finally writing this article to describe problems and solutions. Life would be easier if I could tolerate the limitations of hierarchical organization, or at least if the new proposal can fit on top of existing HFSes. But fundamentally, there is a mismatch between the narrowness of hierarchies and the rich structure of human knowledge, and the proposed system will not presuppose the features of HFSes. I wish to solicit public feedback on these ideas, and end up with a design plan that I can implement to solve the problems I already have today.

This article is more of a brainstorm than a prescriptive formula. I begin by illustrating how hierarchies fall short on real-life problems, and how existing alternative systems like Git and Danbooru bypass HFS problems to deliver a better user experience. Then I describe a step-by-step model, starting from basic primitives, of a proposed file organization system that includes a number of desirable features by design. Finally, I present some open questions on aspects of the proposal where I’m unsure of the right answer.

I welcome any feedback about anything written here, especially regarding errors, omissions, and alternatives. For example, I might have missed helpful features of traditional HFSes. I know I haven’t read about or tested every alternative file system out there. I know that my proposed file organization scheme might have issues with conceptual and computational complexity, be too general or not expressive enough, or fail to offer a useful feature. And certainly, I don’t know all the ramifications of the proposed system if it gets implemented, on aspects ranging from security to sharing to networks. But I try my best to present tangible ideas as a start toward designing a better system. And ultimately, I want to implement such a proposed file system so that I can store and find my data sanely.

In the arguments presented below, I care most about the data model and less about implementation details. For example in HFSes, I focus on the fact that the file system consists of a tree of labeled edges with file content at the leaves; I ignore details about inodes, journaling, defragmentation, permissions, etc. For example in my proposal, I care about what data each file should store and what each field means; I assert that querying over all files in the file system is possible but don’t go into detail about how to do it efficiently. Also, the term “file system” can mean many things – it could be just a model of what data is stored (e.g. directories and files), or an abstract API of possible commands (e.g. mkdir(), walk(), open(), etc.), or it could refer to a full-blown implementation like NTFS with all its idiosyncratic features and characteristics. When I critique hierarchical file systems, I am mostly commenting at the data model level – regardless of the implementation flavor (ext4, HFS+, etc.). When I propose a new way of organizing files, I am mainly designing the data model, and leaving the implementation details for later work."
tags  tagging  design  folksonomy  files  filing  computing  organization  via:jslr  hierarchy  hypertext  complexity  multiverse  search 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Eyes Without a Face — Real Life
"The American painter and sculptor Ellsworth Kelly — remembered mainly for his contributions to minimalism, Color Field, and Hard-edge painting — was also a prodigious birdwatcher. “I’ve always been a colorist, I think,” he said in 2013. “I started when I was very young, being a birdwatcher, fascinated by the bird colors.” In the introduction to his monograph, published by Phaidon shortly before his death in 2015, he writes, “I remember vividly the first time I saw a Redstart, a small black bird with a few very bright red marks … I believe my early interest in nature taught me how to ‘see.’”

Vladimir Nabokov, the world’s most famous lepidopterist, classified, described, and named multiple butterfly species, reproducing their anatomy and characteristics in thousands of drawings and letters. “Few things have I known in the way of emotion or appetite, ambition or achievement, that could surpass in richness and strength the excitement of entomological exploration,” he wrote. Tom Bradley suggests that Nabokov suffered from the same “referential mania” as the afflicted son in his story “Signs and Symbols,” imagining that “everything happening around him is a veiled reference to his personality and existence” (as evidenced by Nabokov’s own “entomological erudition” and the influence of a most major input: “After reading Gogol,” he once wrote, “one’s eyes become Gogolized. One is apt to see bits of his world in the most unexpected places”).

For me, a kind of referential mania of things unnamed began with fabric swatches culled from Alibaba and fine suiting websites, with their wonderfully zoomed images that give you a sense of a particular material’s grain or flow. The sumptuous decadence of velvets and velours that suggest the gloved armatures of state power, and their botanical analogue, mosses and plant lichens. Industrial materials too: the seductive artifice of Gore-Tex and other thermo-regulating meshes, weather-palimpsested blue tarpaulins and piney green garden netting (winningly known as “shade cloth”). What began as an urge to collect colors and textures, to collect moods, quickly expanded into the delicious world of carnivorous plants and bugs — mantises exhibit a particularly pleasing biomimicry — and deep-sea aphotic creatures, which rewardingly incorporate a further dimension of movement. Walls suggest piled textiles, and plastics the murky translucence of jellyfish, and in every bag of steaming city garbage I now smell a corpse flower.

“The most pleasurable thing in the world, for me,” wrote Kelly, “is to see something and then translate how I see it.” I feel the same way, dosed with a healthy fear of cliché or redundancy. Why would you describe a new executive order as violent when you could compare it to the callous brutality of the peacock shrimp obliterating a crab, or call a dress “blue” when it could be cobalt, indigo, cerulean? Or ivory, alabaster, mayonnaise?

We might call this impulse building visual acuity, or simply learning how to see, the seeing that John Berger describes as preceding even words, and then again as completely renewed after he underwent the “minor miracle” of cataract surgery: “Your eyes begin to re-remember first times,” he wrote in the illustrated Cataract, “…details — the exact gray of the sky in a certain direction, the way a knuckle creases when a hand is relaxed, the slope of a green field on the far side of a house, such details reassume a forgotten significance.” We might also consider it as training our own visual recognition algorithms and taking note of visual or affective relationships between images: building up our datasets. For myself, I forget people’s faces with ease but never seem to forget an image I have seen on the internet.

At some level, this training is no different from Facebook’s algorithm learning based on the images we upload. Unlike Google, which relies on humans solving CAPTCHAs to help train its AI, Facebook’s automatic generation of alt tags pays dividends in speed as well as privacy. Still, the accessibility context in which the tags are deployed limits what the machines currently tell us about what they see: Facebook’s researchers are trying to “understand and mitigate the cost of algorithmic failures,” according to the aforementioned white paper, as when, for example, humans were misidentified as gorillas and blind users were led to then comment inappropriately. “To address these issues,” the paper states, “we designed our system to show only object tags with very high confidence.” “People smiling” is less ambiguous and more anodyne than happy people, or people crying.

So there is a gap between what the algorithm sees (analyzes) and says (populates an image’s alt text with). Even though it might only be authorized to tell us that a picture is taken outside, then, it’s fair to assume that computer vision is training itself to distinguish gesture, or the various colors and textures of the slope of a green field. A tag of “sky” today might be “cloudy with a threat of rain” by next year. But machine vision has the potential to do more than merely to confirm what humans see. It is learning to see something different that doesn’t reproduce human biases and uncover emotional timbres that are machinic. On Facebook’s platforms (including Instagram, Messenger, and WhatsApp) alone, over two billion images are shared every day: the monolith’s referential mania looks more like fact than delusion."
2017  rahelaima  algorithms  facebook  ai  artificialintelligence  machinelearning  tagging  machinevision  at  ellsworthkelly  color  tombrdley  google  captchas  matthewplummerfernandez  julesolitski  neuralnetworks  eliezeryudkowsky  seeing 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Wikity, One Year Later | Hapgood
"I have to admit, I thought early on that there would be larger appetite for Wikity. There may still be. But it has proved harder than thought.

Part of the reason, I think, is that the social bookmarking world that I expected Wikity to expand on is smaller than I thought, and has at least one good solid provider that people can count on (Pinboard, written and maintained by the excellent Maciej Cegłowski). More importantly, people have largely built a set of habits today that revolve around Twitter and Facebook and Slack. The habits of personal bookmarking have been eroded by these platforms which give people instant social gratification. In today’s world, bookmarking, organizing, and summarizing information feels a bit like broccoli compared to re-tweeting something with a “WTF?” tag and watching the likes roll in.

I had a bunch of people try Wikity, and even paid many people to test it. The conclusion was usually that it was easy to use, valuable, cool — and completely non-addictive. One hour into Wikity people were in love with the tool. But the next day they felt no compulsion to go back.

We could structure Wikity around social rewards in the future, and that might happen. But ultimately, for me, that struggle to understand why Wikity was not addictive in the ways that Twitter and Facebook were ended up being the most important part of the project.

I began, very early on, compiling notes in Wikity on issues surrounding the culture of Twitter, Facebook, social media, trolling, and the like. Blurbs about whether empathy was the problem or solution. Notes on issues like Abortion Geofencing, Alarm Fatigue, and the remarkable consistency of ad revenue to GDP over the last century. Was this the battle we needed to have first? Helping people understand the profound negative impact our current closed social media tools are having on our politics and culture?

I exported just my notes and clippings on these issues the other day, from Wikity, as a pdf. It was over 500 pages long. I was in deep.

As the United States primary ramped up, I became more alarmed at the way that platforms like Facebook and Twitter were polarizing opinions, encouraging shallow thought, and promoting the creation and dissemination of conspiracy theories and fake news. I began to understand that the goals of Wikity — and of any social software meant to promote deeper thought — began with increasing awareness of the ways in which our current closed, commercial environments our distorting our reality.

Recently, I have begun working with others on tools and projects that will help hold commercial social media accountable for their effect on civic discourse, and demonstrate and mitigate some of their more pernicious effects. Tools and curriculum that will help people to understand and advocate for the changes we need in these areas: algorithmic transparency, the right to modify our social media environments, the ability to see what the feed is hiding from us, places to collectively fact-check and review the sources of information we are fed.

Wikity will continue to be developed, but the journey that began with a tool ended at a social issue, and I think it’s that social issue — getting people to realize how these commercial systems have impacted political discourse and how open tools might solve the problem — that most demands addressing right now. I don’t think I’ve been this passionate about something in a very long time.

I’ve had some success in getting coverage of this issue in the past few weeks, from Vox, to TechCrunch, to a brief interview on the U.S.’s Today Show this morning.

I think we need broader collaborations, and I think open tools and software will be key to this effort. This is a developing story.

So it’s an interesting end to this project — starting with a tool, and getting sucked into a movement. Wikity is complete and useful, but the main story (for me) has turned out to lead beyond that, and I’m hurtling towards the next chapter.

Was this a successful grant? I don’t know what other people might think, but I think so. Freed from the constrictions of bullet pointed reports and waterfall charts, I just followed it where it led. It led somewhere important, where I’m making a positive difference. Is there more to success than that?

Thanks again to the Shuttleworth Foundation which kicked me off on this ride. I’ll let you all know where it takes me in the future.

(And to my Wikity fans and users — don’t worry: Wikity is not going away. As long as I can’t live without it, it’s going to continue to be developed, just a bit more slowly)."
mikecaulfield  wikity  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  software  pinboard  wikis  2016  socialmedia  titter  facebook  slack  socialgratification  tagging  compulsion 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Taxonomy and Recirculation — Responsive Web Design
"We identified five distinct ways that posts could be sorted, each with its own purpose and rules:

categories and tags have no overlap. A term can exist in one list or the other, but not both. Categories are the primary grouping of the post, and the terms are quite broad: “Food”, “Race”, “Art”. If taxonomy is branding, then these top-level categories convey the major themes that make up The Toast. The category is relatively prominent in the homepage and article page metadata.

tags are much more topical. Topical tags are displayed on the front-end, but their real purpose is to drive the “recirc” modules that help users explore the site. (More on that in a second.) Keeping these tags functional means that we can automagically show more posts about “Buddhism” or “Shakespeare” as long as everything is tagged consistently.

fake tags are actually fake. The funny tags (like truckin’ and the continuation thereof) are a vital and hilarious part of The Toast experience, but the little information architect in our hearts wept whenever a user clicked through to the archive page for one of the 6,152 tags that only had a single post in them. On the new site, those “tags” are still presented on the front-end, but on the back-end they’re just a plain text field. (The fake tags link out to a Google Search, which we think is hilarious. We’re fun at parties.) We kept the funny and the functional, but gave them each their own field so they could be used differently. Deep breaths, taxonomists. It’s all going to be OK.

series have their own taxonomy list. The series are a major draw, and a huge source of multiple page views – it’s hard to read something like Mallory’s Two Monks Inventing Bestiaries and not immediately want more in the same vein. The next thing a user wants to see is probably not another article related to “animals”, but more inventions from the monks: perhaps maps, or dinner parties. By separating the series into their own taxonomy–rather than grouping them under Tags or Categories—we were able to build recirc modules that give preference to series-siblings over topic-siblings.

authors are managed only as people, not tags. Wordpress has a built-in way to create authors, with a byline and a gravatar. But the old taxonomy included many author names as tags, too—this was unnecessary, and we are all about avoiding unnecessary work. In the new system it’ll be easy to see more articles by a given author, so you can catch up on the back catalog written by your favorites.

Migration: Like cleaning out your closet, but with more robots
Migrating from the old taxonomy to our new and shiny five-part taxonomy required some human effort—with a lot of help from automated scripts. It wasn’t feasible to manually re-tag every single post and launch a new site during this century. But the new taxonomy wouldn’t work unless the existing posts were converted to the new system.

We started by exporting the full list of all tags on the site to a spreadsheet. We sorted and grouped by the number of posts in each entry, so tags with more than five posts could be handled first, leaving tags with only one post for later. We tasked Nicole and Mallory with recategorizing the list, which was the best client trolling we’ve ever done. They sorted each entry into:

• topic for tags that were topical and should stay as true tags.
• series for tags that should be converted to the new Series taxonomy.
• author for tags that are people. Tags are people!
• joke for the funny tags that should be converted to entries in each post’s plain text field.
• delete for tags that were no longer relevant or had no entries in them.

This sorting of tags into their new buckets could only be done by real people who were familiar with all the content in question, then the work after that could be automated. We also hope that this process will prophylactically prevent their tags from getting out of control in the future."
via:tealtan  tags  tagging  taxonomy  2015  cms  thetoast  webdev  webdesign  archives 
october 2015 by robertogreco
pinboard private tags //5880.me (–⅃-)
"Holy smokes!

I ... just learned about private tags on Pinboard.

If you start a tag with a dot, only you will see it

As someone who works on client projects, I am so thrilled to learn there's a way to tag what I learn on a project with that project name without making the link itself private. Stoked."
pinboard  tags  tagging  privacy  maxfenton  2015 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Tags | Collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
"We have 2,227 tags and this is page 1 of 62. The tags are sorted in ascending order by tag name."
tags  tagging  cooper-hewitt  collections  taxonomy 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Augmented Ecology
"Augmented Ecology is a research platform that tracks developments in an emerging branch of the anthropocene; the intertwining of data and media systems with ecosystems.

[image: “Heat-map for yearly migratory pattern of the Black-throated Gray Warbler on eBird”]

Mapping, visualization and tracking technologies contribute to a more detailed picture of the living and geological landscapes. They help to model, to explore, to research, to protect, to admire, exploit or conserve the natural world by extending our view. By satellite, drone, radio-tag, browser and smartphone, hidden paterns and behaviour are discovered, networks of meaning are formed and participatory science undertaken. These tools are extending our human senses, making visible the daily life of a whale not unlike the way early telescopes made the features of Saturn visible.

[image “Mapping efforts by Google Trek”]

Through epizoic media, drone ecology and satellite sensors living systems seem to be emerging as a subset of the internet of things (IoT). Perhaps this subset could be called an Internet of Organisms (IoO), at any rate it makes for a splendid looking acronym…

The augmentation of natural systems raises some new questions: What changes does the increasing level of media resolution bring to our relationship with the great out-doors and wildlife? What kinds of opportunities do they offer for interaction, research, citizen science or tourism? What is their impact on the political value of the wilderness, both as a global commons and as a refuge away from human society, government and corporate power?

[image “Bengal Tiger Panna 211, the subject of an attempted GPS-Collar hack by cyberpoachers 2014”]

The aim of this research is to highlight how technologies such as remote sensing, tagging, mapping, uav-s, develop a next chapter in our ongoing history of exploration, domestication, exploitation of, and fascination for the dynamic systems we are part of.

[image “SAISBECO facial recognition software for the study of wild apes 2011”]

The wired wilderness is becoming populated by data-harvesting animals, camera-traps, conservation drones, Google Trek adventurers, cyberpoachers and many other forms of machine wilderness. Perhaps Augmented Ecology can be a fieldguide to browse this weird neck of the woods? Surely these developments are worth our deliberate attention - Theun Karelse

This research was triggered by the development of an opensource smartphone application called Boskoi for exploring and mapping the edible landscape undertaken at FoAM. As one of the first participatory apps focussed on nature, it flashed out many issues. The issues surrounding Redlist species were particularly thought provoking and resulted in a session in FoAM’s program at Pixelache festival in 2011 asking: ‘Is there still a privatelife for plants?’ (an adaptation of the title of the BBC natural history series)"
tumblrs  augmentedecology  ecology  multispecies  conservation  technology  anthropocene  mapping  maps  visualization  landscapes  nature  wildlife  droneecology  drones  sensors  ioo  internetoforganisms  sensing  tagging  wilderness 
march 2015 by robertogreco
We're sharing more photos but getting less in return
"Theoretically, we could have an up-to-the-minute photo database of any popular location. We'd just need Instagram to include more metadata by default and allow users to sort by location (or let a third-party app do the same).

If we were properly organizing the photos we're already putting online, I could see how a festival was going, and Google Maps could show me all the photos taken from the Eiffel Tower in the last five minutes. I could even see if a popular bar is crowded without any official system. We'd be able to see the world right now, as clearly as we see its past on Google Street View, as quickly as news spreads on Twitter.

We have the data and the technological infrastructure, but we're stuck because no developer can access all the data.

If anyone was going to deliver these capabilities, it would be Flickr. In 2006, it was the canonical destination for photos. If you wanted to see photos of a certain place or subject, that’s where you went. But Facebook replaced Flickr as a social network, killing it on the desktop, and Instagram released a simpler mobile app, killing it there too. That would have been fine if Facebook and Instagram kept their photos data-rich and fully exportable. But both services give fewer tagging, grouping, and other sorting options, and they built their photos into incompatible databases. Facebook won't organize photos any way but by human subject or uploader. Instagram has just a few view options and focuses solely on the friend-feed.

We're photographing everything now, building this amazing body of work, but we're getting less and less out of it.

We do get some benefits from not having one monopoly in charge of photo sharing: Instagram did mobile better than Flickr, Facebook can link a photo of someone to their whole social profile, and Foursquare efficiently arranges photos by location. These advantages, however, have replaced Creative Commons licensing, advanced search, and any other tool that relies on treating the world's photo pool as a mass data set rather than a series of individualized feeds.

Twitter, Tumblr, and Imgur siphon off bits of the photo market without giving them back into the mass set. Meanwhile, any photo service that dies off (RIP Picasa, Zooomr, Photobucket) becomes a graveyard for photos that will probably never get moved to a new service.

Why are we giving up this magical ability to basically explore our world in real-time? The bandwidth is lower than streaming video; the new-data-point frequency is lower than Twitter; the location sorting is less complicated than Google Maps or Foursquare. But no one service has an incentive to build this tool, or to open up its database for a third party. Instead they only innovate ways to steal market share from each other. Flickr recently downgraded its mobile app, removing discovery options and cropping photos into squares. The new app is an obvious Instagram imitation, but it won't help Flickr recapture the market. If any photo service beats Instagram, it won't be by making data more open.

Our collective photo pool suffers from a tragedy of the commons, where each service snaps up our photos with as few features as it can, or by removing features. (Snapchat, for example, actively prevents photos from joining the pool by replacing the subscription model with a one-to-one model, efficiently delivering photos straight from my camera to your feed.) We are giving our photos to these inferior services, they are making billions of dollars from them, and what we're getting back is pathetic.

The best agnostic tool we have is the archaic Google Image Search, which doesn't effectively sort results, doesn't distinguish between image sources, and doesn't even touch location search. The lack of agnostic metadata is keeping us in the past. As Anil Dash pointed out in 2012, the photo pool (like blogs and status updates) is becoming fragmented and de-standardized. Everything we're putting online is chopped up by services that don't play well together, and that's bad for the user.

Dash wrote, "We'll fix these things; I don't worry about that." I do. I don't think technology has to work out right. We can build expressways where we should have built bullet trains. We can let an ISP monopoly keep us at laughable broadband speeds. We can all dump our memories into the wrong sites and watch them disappear in 10 years. We can share postage-stamp-sized photos on machines capable of streaming 1080p video.

Even if we do fix this, it will not be retroactive. There are stories about whole TV series lost to time because the network stupidly trashed the original reels. Now that we take more photos than we know what to deal with, we won't lose our originals—we'll just lose the organization. When Facebook and Instagram are inevitably replaced, we'll be left without the context, without the comments, without anything but a privately stored pile of raw images named DCIM_2518.JPG.

Just a heap of bullshit, really."
nickdouglas  flickr  metadata  photography  2014  instagram  tags  tagging  search  storage  facebook  tumblr  imgur  twitter  picasa  zooomr  photobucket  archives  archiving  creativecommons  realtime  foursquare  googlemaps  snapchat  anildash  googleimagesearch  technology  regression  socialmedia  fragmentation  interoperability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Identify Yourself
"At its core function, the Internet is a tool for the communication of information, whether factual or fictional. It has allowed us access to knowledge we would have otherwise never known, at a rate that we could have never achieved with printed materials. Each tool that we have developed to spread information has exponentially increased the speed at which it travels, leading to bursts of creativity and collaboration that have accelerated human development and accomplishment. The wired Internet at broadband speeds allows us to consume content so fast that any delay causes us to balk and whine. Wireless Internet made this information network portable and extended our range of knowledge beyond the boundaries of offices and libraries and into the world. Mobile devices have completely transformed our consumption of information, putting tiny computers in our pockets and letting us petition the wishing well of the infoverse.

Many people say this access has made us impatient, and I agree. But I also believe it reveals an innate hunger. We are now so dependent on access to knowledge at these rapid speeds that any lull in our consumption feels like a wasted moment. The currency of the information appears at all levels of society. From seeing new television shows to enjoying free, immediate access to new scientific publications that could impact your life’s work, this rapid transmission model has meaning and changes lives. We have access to information when we are waiting for an oil change and in line for coffee. While we can choose to consume web junk, as many often will, there is also a wealth of human understanding and opinions, academic texts, online courses, and library archives that can be accessed day and night, often for free."



While many seem to experience their Internet lives as a separate space of reality, I have always felt that the two were inextricable. I don’t go on the Internet; I am in the Internet and I am always online. I have extended myself into the machines I carry with me at all times. This space is continually shifting and I veer to adjust, applying myself to new media, continually gathering and recording data about myself, my relationships, my thoughts. I am a immaterial database of memory and hypertext, with invisible links in and out between the Internet and myself.

THE TEXT OBJECT
I would sit for as long as I could and devour information. It was not uncommon for me to devour a book in a single day, limiting all bodily movement except for page-turning, absolutely rapt by whatever I was reading. I was honored to be literate and sure that my dedication to knowledge would lead to great things. I was addicted to the consumption and processing of that information. It frustrated me that I could not read faster and process more. The form of the book provided me structured, linear access to information, with the reward for my attention being a complete and coherent story or idea.

Access to computers and the Internet completely changed the way that I consumed information and organized ideas in my head. I saw information stacked on top of itself in simultaneity, no longer confined to spatiotemporal dimensions of the book. This information was editable, and I could copy, paste, and cut text and images from one place to the next, squirreling away bits that felt important to me. I suddenly understood how much of myself I was finding through digital information."



"There is a system, and there are people within this system. I am only one of them, but I value deeply the opportunities this space grants me, and the wealth contained within it. We must fight to keep the Internet safe and open. Though it has already lost the magical freedom and democracy that existed in the days of the early web, we must continue to put our best minds to work using this extensive network of machines to aid us. Technology gives us so much, and we put so much of ourselves back into it, but we must always remember that we made the web and it will always be tied to us as humans, with our vast range of beauty and ugliness.

I only know my stories, my perspective, but it feels important to take note during this new technical Renaissance, to try and capture the spirit of this shift. I am vastly inspired by the capabilities of my tiny iPhone, my laptop, and all the software contained therein. This feeling is empowerment. The empowerment to learn, to create, and to communicate is something I’ve always felt is at the core of art-making, to be able to translate a complex idea or feeling into some contained or open form. Even the most simple or ethereal works have some form; the body, the image, the object. The file, the machine, the URL, these are all just new vessels for this spirit to be contained.

The files are beautiful, but I move to nominate the Internet as “sublime,” because when I stare into the glass precipice of my screen, I am in awe of the vastness contained within it, the micro and macro, simultaneously hard and technical and soft and human. Most importantly, it feels alive—with constant newness and deepening history, with endless activity and variety. May we keep this spirit intact and continue to explore new vessels into which we can pour ourselves, and reform our identities, shifting into a new world of Internet natives."

[Available as book: http://www.lulu.com/shop/krystal-south/identify-yourself/paperback/product-21189499.html ]
[About page: http://idyrself.com/about.html ]
internet  online  krystalsouth  howweread  howwewrite  atemporality  simultaneity  text  books  internetasliterature  reading  writing  computing  impatience  information  learning  unbook  copypasteculture  mutability  change  sharing  editing  levmanovich  computers  software  technology  sorting  files  taxonomy  instagram  flickr  tagging  folksonomy  facebook  presence  identity  web2.0  language  communication  internetasfavoritebook 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Little Mystical - Notes on “The Structure of Collaborative Tagging System”
"I stumbled across a 2005 research paper on Delicious tagging, which studied tag usage across users and time. Here are some highlights:"

[Allen's commentary between highlighted screenshots:]

"This is perhaps the single greatest challenge with archival (personal or institutional) and systems for returning – your sensibilities in how to divide and categorize things change and throws off all your previous taxonomic efforts. These two articles on channel drift and decay theory may be worth revisiting."

"I wrote an overview of my Pinboard tagging structure [http://tanmade.com/writing/2012/05/05/tagging-structures.html ] back in 2012, which hasn’t changed very much – and is remarkably similar to this."
allentan  2013  pinboard  tagging  folgsonomy  tags  taxonomy  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  retrieval  social  socialbookmarks 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Tagging Structures – Allen Tan is…writing
"Tags have cascading levels of specificity: publishing > journalism > reading > narrative, for example, letting me jump in at whatever scale that I can remember. A useful rule-of-thumb is to name these tags what I’m likely to search for later, which sometimes feels like future sight."



"As fallback, I have 10 tags at the top level: technology, education, life, publishing, political, society, design, history, art, and food. Some of these things overlap, and that’s ok: they reflect the way I mentally sort what I find and read. Everything should be tagged at least one of these lead tags, and they are the starting points when I remember almost nothing about what I’m looking for.

This gives me a naming framework at the moment of tagging, too: I start with the lead tag and then describe the bookmark with broad categories, gradually getting more specific (the same way one would carve at sculpture), and then I skim through the article and my highlights again to add any individual triggers: names and highly specific concepts tend to be dropped in here. Specific uses (say, shopping) or projects also come at the end.



"This is a continuously evolving system: my bookmarks from even half a year ago looks different from my bookmarks now. This sometimes gives me trouble when I get confused by things tagged out of order, or by outdated naming conventions (I try to tag all people names as firstname-lastname now). So, careful and diligent pruning is necessary to keep this system coherent."

[See also: http://tealtan.tumblr.com/post/54105931916/notes-on-the-structure-of-collaborative-tagging that references http://www.citeulike.org/user/zelig/article/305755 + http://arxiv.org/pdf/cs.DL/0508082.pdf ]
allentan  2012  tagging  folksonomy  pinboard  del.icio.us  granularity  tags  bookmarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialbookmarks  taxonomy 
june 2013 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
i miss delicious.com
" Delicious is the Rome, Jerusalem, and Paris of my existence as an academic these days. It's where I make my friends, how I get the news, and where I go to trade. All this from a little server that does nothing but share bookmarks in public.
...For two years I've been using Delicious as an information organizer. It's produced an impressive encyclopedia of the most interesting information, images, articles, citations, books, and subjects on the internet to which I might want to refer. Consider my dissertation tag, under which are a wide variety of online images and Google books that I'll be using for my research. Not only can I come back to them, but I can also find related subjects—dissertation material related to walking—and navigate seamlessly from one to another. As an improvement on the index card system—or on my own terrifying piles of articles, even now ornamenting my bookshelf, or even on the folders within folders within folders of word documents—this represents a definite improvement."

"There is nothing like Delicious out there in terms of an community for finding grass-roots curators and beholding their careful, discerning brilliance over time.  Not twitter, where we all snark meaninglessly; not tumblr, which buries precious information beneath a flood; not Zotero, where it's nearly impossible to browse strangers or follow them from afar.  

In the end, I don't care that the people were more reliable than Yahoo, or that corporate America destroyed my intellectual commons.  I miss you, Delicious.  Give me my library back."

[More: https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308703279855058944 and https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308679134744293376 and others]
joguldi  research  del.icio.us  socialbookmarking  community  twitter  zotero  intellectualcommons  2013  libraries  yahoo  data  privacy  connectivism  collectivism  folksonomy  tags  tagging  learning 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Folksonomy :: vanderwal.net
"I am a fan of the word folk when talking about regular people. Eric put my mind in the framework with one of my favorite terms. I was also thinking that if you took "tax" (the work portion) of taxonomy and replaced it with something anybody could do you would get a folksonomy. I knew the etymology of this word was pulling is two parts from different core sources (Germanic and Greek), but that seemed fitting looking at the early Flickr and del.icio.us."

"The value in this external tagging is derived from people using their own vocabulary and adding explicit meaning, which may come from inferred understanding of the information/object. People are not so much categorizing, as providing a means to connect items (placing hooks) to provide their meaning in their own understanding."
folksonomy  via:litherland  tagging  vocabulary  definition  taxonomy  thomasvanderwal  2007  flickr  del.icio.us 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Social information processing - Wikipedia
"Social information processing is "an activity through which collective human actions organize knowledge."[1] It is the creation and processing of information by a group of people. As an academic field Social Information Processing studies the information processing power of networked social systems.

Typically computer tools are used such as:

* Authoring tools: e.g., blogs
* Collaboration tools: e.g., wikis, in particular, e.g., Wikipedia
* Translating tools: Duolingo, reCAPTCHA
* Tagging systems (social bookmarking): e.g., del.icio.us, Flickr, CiteULike
* Social networking: e.g., Facebook, MySpace, Essembly
* Collaborative filtering: e.g., Digg, the Amazon Product Recommendation System, Yahoo answers, Urtak"

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Social_information_processing ]
filtering  collaboration  wikipedia  wikis  blogs  informationprocessing  networks  networkeddata  socialnetworking  information  socialmedia  socialinformationprocessing  flickr  pinboard  del.icio.us  taxonomy  tagging  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Tagging is broken - Kippt Blog
[This makes no sense to me. The argument sounds like: tagging is broken because tags don't have a purpose, but if you use hashtags instead they all of a sudden have a purpose.]
via:caseygollan  tags  tagging  del.icio.us  pinboard  hashtags  kippt  2012  socialboomarks  socialboomarking  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Flickr: Discussing Tagography ~ case studies in FlickrCentral
"Tagography is a bit of a riff on tags, for which an ad-hoc standard can be found here. Please feel free to post your comments and your own examples of tag use in this thread."
folksonomy  tips  tagography  photography  tags  tagging  flickr  2004 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Flickr: Discussing Tagging it up ~ some suggestions for tagging your images. in FlickrCentral
"You can find some specifics examples of how people are using tags in the tagography thread.

a bunch of flickr users have made some suggestions for tags in this thread, and i've tried to compile a thorough a list as possible here, from those suggestions ~ feel free to pick and choose from this list as you see fit: …"
names  naming  subjects  genre  medium  folksonomy  tagography  2004  tags  tips  tagging  flickr 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Shirky: Ontology is Overrated -- Categories, Links, and Tags
"This piece is based on two talks I gave in the spring of 2005 -- one at the O'Reilly ETech conference in March, entitled "Ontology Is Overrated", and one at the IMCExpo in April entitled "Folksonomies & Tags: The rise of user-developed classification." The written version is a heavily edited concatenation of those two talks.

PART I: Classification and Its Discontents

Q: What is Ontology? A: It Depends on What the Meaning of "Is" Is.

Cleaving Nature at the Joints

Of Cards and Catalogs

The Parable of the Ontologist, or, "There Is No Shelf"

File Systems and Hierarchy

When Does Ontological Classification Work Well?

Domain to be Organized

Participants

Mind Reading

Fortune Telling

Part II: The Only Group That Can Categorize Everything Is Everybody

"My God. It's full of links!"

Great Minds Don't Think Alike

Tag Distributions on del.icio.us

Organization Goes Organic"
2005  flickr  del.icio.us  web  metadata  classification  categorization  taxonomy  via:caseygollan  tagging  tags  folksonomy  clayshirky  ontology  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
Flickr Co-Founder Caterina Fake on the Value of Viral Loops [Exclusive Q&A;] | Fast Company
"There's both a good and bad side to virality. Products with viral hooks that are so strong they coerce people to sign up--in order to achieve a huge initial viral rush--are obviously bad. Not only do they alienate users, they don't lead to a sustainable business. On the good side, you have organic growth, which comes as a natural byproduct of something that spreads simply because people like it--eBay, Hot or Not, and Flickr. I can't think of an antonym for it."

"The decision to make all the photos public versus private was motivated by the fact that conversations are where metadata happens."
2009  via:tealtan  metadata  folksonomy  tagging  joshuaschachter  del.icio.us  growth  gameneverending  gne  socialmedia  design  viral  flickr  technology  caterinafake  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
The Fans Are All Right (Pinboard Blog)
"I learned a lot about fandom couple of years ago in conversations with my friend Britta, who was working at the time as community manager for Delicious. She taught me that fans were among the heaviest users of the bookmarking site, and had constructed an edifice of incredibly elaborate tagging conventions, plugins, and scripts to organize their output along a bewildering number of dimensions. If you wanted to read a 3000 word fic where Picard forces Gandalf into sexual bondage, and it seems unconsensual but secretly both want it, and it's R-explicit but not NC-17 explicit, all you had to do was search along the appropriate combination of tags (and if you couldn't find it, someone would probably write it for you). By 2008 a whole suite of theoretical ideas about folksonomy, crowdsourcing, faceted infomation retrieval, collaborative editing and emergent ontology had been implemented by a bunch of friendly people so that they could read about Kirk drilling Spock."
pinboard  2011  fanfiction  taxonomy  folksonomy  brittagustafson  del.icio.us  avos  bookmarking  bookmarks  tags  tagging  collaboration  collaborative  crowdsourcing  fans  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
collision detection: "The tag is the soul of the Internet"
"Okay, enough of these stoner epiphanies! The point is that Instagram’s tags, primed by de Kerckhove’s provocation, made me think anew about the cognitive power of tags — their sense-making ability. But I also realized I haven’t seen designers do anything particularly interesting with tags in a while. I haven’t seen anything that helps me spy patterns in data/documents/pictures in similarly weird and fresh ways. Maybe tagging, as a discipline, hasn’t been pushed in very interesting ways. Or maybe I haven’t been looking in the right place?

(Irony of ironies, I realize I’ve never bothered to tag my blog posts.)"
clivethompson  tags  tagging  folksonomy  perspective  instagram  flickr  blogs  blogging  sensemaking  2011  photography  discovery  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Pinboard - antisocial bookmarking
"This is a rough outline of what we have planned for the site. Things in gray haven't been implemented yet; things in black are live on the site."<br />
<br />
Final item: "Get acquired by Yahoo and slowly grow useless"
pinboard  bookmarking  bookmarks  tagging  roadmap  todo  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Smart Automatic Bookmarks - favbot
"Imagine never having to meticulously bookmark and label your favorite websites. Favbot saves and organizes your browsing history. It figures out the best labels to use for each web page. It understands what websites are important to you. It predicts what other websites you will be interested in. It puts you fully in control. It provides analytics to improve your productivity. Powerful machine-learning algorithms at work. Start using it now."
bookmarking  firefox  onlinetoolkit  favbot  del.icio.us  bookmarks  search  memory  tags  tagging  browsinghistory  automation  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Delicious's Data Policy is Like Setting a Museum on Fire
"Yahoo! is going to shutter its social bookmarking service Delicious, the web learned today, and with it will sink an incredibly valuable source of collectively curated knowledge. You can easily export your own bookmarks (no verdict yet where we should all meet up to import them to) but what if you want to export other peoples'? That's at least half the value of the service, socially curated discovery."
del.icio.us  yahoo  data  history  curation  curating  tags  tagging  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  2010  archives  loc  web2.0  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
R.I.P. Delicious: You Were So Beautiful to Me
"It was beautiful. And now it's gone.<br />
<br />
The Library of Congress should have bought it, similar to the way it has now archived every Tweet ever tweeted.<br />
<br />
So much value. So unappreciated. So tragically lost. Where will we all gather next, where our bookmarks can be centralized for maximum network effect? Perhaps this story demonstrates that's not the right question to ask."
del.icio.us  social  yahoo  2010  readwriteweb  tags  tagging  value  cv  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
A New System For Synthesizing : Transdisciplinary Design Transblog | Parsons The New School for Design
"In lectures, I jotted the speaker’s critical ideas prefaced with their initials and noted my ideas, prefaced with “me:”. I saved the full articles in Evernote, instead of saving just links to them in Delicious. With these, I tagged only the keywords that have the meaning of the article that are not actually in the article. For example, tagging a criticism of Freakonomics with “failure, lesson, complexity, outsider, transdisciplinary, ripple, effects”.

The serendipitous moment came when it was time to write my first paper: I realized I already had much of the ‘raw footage’, and instead of generating, I need to synthesize as Tim Brown explains in Change By Design. Searching ‘complexity’ and ‘systems’ in Evernote gave me specific ideas I had previously noted from 4 lectures, 3 articles and a systems diagram I’d created. It was the answer to the question: What use is an excellent note I’ve taken when it’s forgotten and scribbled somewhere in one of my notebooks?"
evernote  del.icio.us  gmail  notetaking  tagging  bookmarking  synthesis  transdisciplinary  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Ability Maps, #deaf Mayors and $1000 Strollers - Anil Dash
"In short, users label themselves with self-descriptive tags. Then they check in to venues as normal. The site that's tracking them aggregates their visited venues by tags, and allows maps (or simple search queries) by tags to show patterns or popular venues. Voila: An imperfect, but perfectly usable, map of the places that welcome people of all abilities. And nobody is individually trackable to the places that they hang out."
accessibility  anildash  unintendedconsequences  technology  mobile  maps  collaboration  community  userexperience  geolocation  design  geo  ada  tagging  selftagging  usability  disabilities  disability  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
How Barcodes and Smartphones Will Rearchitect Information - The Conversation - Harvard Business Review
"These are just three possible implications. One can imagine many, many more. The reason it's so powerful is that any time we create a new tagging architecture that is decentralized and out "at the ends" of the network, we have the ability to unleash the power of self-organization. Given how localized and voluminous information is, any solution for integrating marketplace and marketspace information must be decentralized and self-organizing.
mobile  phones  smartphones  tagging  bargodes  rfid  gps  dna  qrcodes  iphone  ubicomp  spimes 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A stranger comes to town « Snarkmarket
"Step 1: Rob Greco reads Jason Kottke’s blog.

Step 3: I find myself strolling the streets of San Diego with a gang of smart 7th graders.

For the zeit­geisty con­nec­tive tis­sue that is step 2, check out Rob’s reflec­tion here. It includes some very nice words about Snark­mar­ket! (And some nice words about me, too—so of course I was hes­i­tant to link to it too eagerly here—but hon­estly the whole thing is such a cool panoramic tale of a new kind of learn­ing, and Rob’s artic­u­la­tion of it is so good, that I am will­ing to bite the bul­let and incur some neg­a­tive self-aggrandizement points for the sake of sharing.)

P.S. I feel like I have not rec­om­mended a Deli­cious account in years, but Rob’s links are basi­cally what keep me com­ing back to my net­work page. They are thought­ful, thor­oughly anno­tated (his notes are almost lit­tle blog entries), and fright­en­ingly well-tagged."
robinsloan  tcsnmy  tcsnmy7  ego  cv  kottke  taxonomy  zeitgeist  tagging  tags  sandiego  del.icio.us 
april 2010 by robertogreco
My back pages: Whatever happened to serendipity? « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"That is, the records weren’t RFID-tagged, GPS-traced, search-engine-indexed, metadata-enhanced & rated by 100s of prior users. You couldn’t simply be struck by a taste for thrash as you were walking down the street, key in a request and have the answer served to you in milliseconds, complete with map. These tenuous trails to knowledge were something one acquired by happenstance, nurtured through their contingency, cursed in their failure & cherished when they finally came good.
2003  blogging  cities  communications  everyware  serendipity  moblogging  culture  design  future  place  meaning  adamgreenfield  technology  tagging  interaction  information  mobile  ubicomp  socialsoftware 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Museum 2.0: What Could Kill an Elegant, High-Value Participatory Project?
"Haarlem Oost is a branch library in the Netherlands that wanted to encourage visitors to add tags (descriptive keywords) to the books they read. These tags would be added to the books in the catalog to build a kind of recommendation system. To do this, the library didn't create a complicated computer system or send people online. Instead, they installed more book drops and return shelves, labeled with different descriptors like "boring," "great for kids," "funny," etc. This brilliant design allowed patrons to create new knowledge about the books in the library while only slightly adjusting their book-returning behavior."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/4687 ]
books  libraries  library2.0  sorting  tagging  taxonomy  ratings  physicaltagging  classification  keywords 
january 2010 by robertogreco
noticings
"Noticings is a game of noticing things in cities. Snap a photo of something interesting you happen upon, upload it to Flickr, tag it with 'noticings' and geotag it with where it was taken.

The game happens in day long turns, and you have until 3pm GMT to upload your noticings from the previous day."
tomarmitage  noticing  flickr  games  observation  tcsnmy  cities  play  tagging  api  via:preoccupations  glvo  classideas 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Pinboard - antisocial bookmarking
"The site is now open for beta testing (which means bookmarks are backed up and features are less likely to break). Give it a try if you find delicious too slow for your needs." ... "Social bookmarking for introverts
maciejceglowski  tagging  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  maciejcegłowski 
july 2009 by robertogreco
people clouds (tecznotes)
"I've only been conscientiously tagging my links for a few months, but already I'm starting to get a clear picture of the kinds of material I get from my friends. I love the idea that a nice stick-and-rock diagram can be made to sum up the specific expertise of people I know, and the topics I look for from each of them. ... Do you tag your links like this? Does it help you develop a sense for those in your circle who are go-to people for certain topics? Does it help you get through your daily reading to know what certain people are best at? Don't you wish that Delicious would let you check your own name for the hive-mind consensus about what you're good for? "
michalmigurski  tagging  tags  del.icio.us  diagrams  clustering  hivemind 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Reinvented Software - Together for Mac OS X - Keep Your Stuff Together, Find It Again Instantly
"Together lets you keep everything in one place. Text, documents, images, movies, sounds, web pages and bookmarks can all be dragged to Together for safe keeping, tagged, previewed, collected together in different ways and found again instantly."
software  mac  osx  organization  tagging  productivity  library  database  applications  together  notes  via:preoccupations  libraries 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Ethan Hein’s metablog » Social bookmarking is delicious
"The most practically useful thing on the whole entire social web is Delicious. Its original point was to store your web browser bookmarks online. That’s reason enough to use it. But the real value of Delicious is how it connects the thoughts in your head to the thoughts in the heads of innumerable internet strangers. Even more useful is the way it stores, reorganizes and reflects your own thoughts back to you. Delicious feels less like a web site I look at and more like a new module of my brain. It’s also like a slow-paced but highly absorbing text-based computer game, a loosely organized internet scavenger hunt." ... "Flickr is the second most useful site on the social web. It shares many of Delicious’ best qualities, like tagging and the rich inspiration of other users. Here are my Flickr items tagged with Delicious. After looking at my Turing tag on Delicious, my next move would be to take a look at my Turing tag on Flickr."
del.icio.us  flickr  folksonomy  tagging  tags  socialbookmarking  blogging  memes  learning  recursion  via:preoccupations 
november 2008 by robertogreco
YouTube - Information R/evolution
"This video explores the changes in the way we find, store, create, critique, and share information. This video was created as a conversation starter, and works especially well when brainstorming with people about the near future and the skills needed in order to harness, evaluate, and create information effectively."
michaelwesch  information  visualization  folksonomy  tagging  libraries  future  internet  taxonomy  collaboration  education  technology  reference  search  culture  organization  digital  web  media  classification 
august 2008 by robertogreco
LibraryThing | Catalog your books online
"Enter what you're reading or your whole library—it's an easy, library-quality catalog. LibraryThing also connects you with people who read the same things."
books  onlinetoolkit  learning  discussion  cataloging  librarything  socialsoftware  collaboration  socialnetworking  libraries  catalog  folksonomy  organization  tagging  tags  database  reading  community  social  online  literature  web 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Best Stuff
"an open, organic, polymorphous site which, depending on the user, could take on diverse forms and meanings. The site simply asks you to input your "best stuff" in the world: whether it be a song that inspires you, your favourite little Indian restaurant
community  social  sharing  books  music  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  ranking  ratings  recommendations  networking  network  collaboration  tagging  things 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Peripheral vision and ambient knowledge :: Blog :: Headshift
"We need to let people organise their inputs by exposing all relevant information in granular feed form and then provide smart aggregation and tagging tools to create a personal eco-system of content, cues and links."
via:preoccupations  filtering  infooverload  flow  feeds  rss  tagging  tags  content  information  management  knowledge  ambient 
july 2008 by robertogreco
TOPP [Tagging of Pacific Predators] - "Follow the adventures of leatherback turtles, white sharks, elephant seals, salmon sharks, albatross, and 18 other species on TOPP"
"began in 2000 as one of 17 projects of the Census of Marine Life, an ambitious 10-year, 80-nation endeavor to assess and explain the diversity and abundance of life in the oceans, and where that life has lived, is living, and will live."
via:tomc  sharks  animals  biology  birds  classideas  data  environment  fish  geography  maps  mapping  reference  research  science  interactivity  locative  location-based  tagging  oceans  wildlife  nature  turtles  realtime  tracking  pacific  marine 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds
"toy for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts, and color schemes. The images you create
visualization  tagclouds  tags  tagging  visual  del.icio.us  text  language  mapping  maps  words 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - Tools for Vizuality
"As they do we will march from literacy to vizuality. In order to complete that great transition, we'll need a whole suite of tools, like these first primitive ones above, which permit us to manipulate, manage, store, cite and create moving images as easi
annotation  film  hypertext  media  movies  tagging  technology  video  visual  kevinkelly  literacy  visualliteracy 
june 2008 by robertogreco
iterasi [via: http://www.fabricoffolly.com/2008/05/virtual-moonbeams-impossible-task-of.html]
all of that dynamic personalization makes it extremely difficult to save pages for future use...to help, we've created a simple browser-based tool for saving any Web page—dynamically generated or otherwise—with the click of a button.
bookmarking  archiving  web  online  internet  tools  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  tagging 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Archives & Museum Informatics: Museums and the Web 2008: Paper: Oates, G., The Commons on Flickr: A Primer
"ideal is that other institutions join, and special interest groups from the millions of people using Flickr will seek out and help describe content that they are interested in, and have knowledge about. This will make both the institutional catalogue (or
commons  flickr  georgeoates  photography  participatory  tagging  commenting  crowdsourcing  museums  history 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Howard Rheingold's Vlog: Introduction to Social Bookmarking
"The third in a series of videos documenting my use of social media in my personal and professional life. This installment introduces social bookmarking. My del.icio.us account is hrheingold."
socialbookmarking  tagging  howardrheingold  education  del.icio.us  bookmarking  bookmarks  socialmedia  socialsoftware 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Bush-U-Like « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"doctrine of computational ubiquity some forty years downstream...and frank description of the memex as outboard memory augmentation...Vannevar Bush as belonging properly to the history of ubicomp."
ubicomp  memex  vannevarbush  hypertext  del.icio.us  ubiquitous  memory  information  infooverload  specialization  search  taxonomy  tagging  tags  internet  web  specialists 
february 2008 by robertogreco
How YOU Can Make the Web More Structured - ReadWriteWeb
"Putting meta information into page headers is easy and should be a must-do thing for everyone. Beyond that, providing information such as author, date, and location makes data that much more valuable."
advice  blogging  code  content  metadata  microformats  semanticweb  internet  markup  standards  folksonomy  findability  semantic  webdesign  webdev  users  usability  tagging  tags  howto  format  meta 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Tag Cloud (Ftrain.com): 2080 State of the Union Address: Key Terms and Phrases Faitfully Prepared for the Review of the Benefactors
"algae die-off, Asteroid mitigation, Freedom management module, Global endocrine bloom, Iraq 2.0 , Lunar earmarking, Rejuvenation centers, Space elevator reconstruction, SuperULTRA-MEGAFreedom, Suboptimal colonial integration, Snacks relief..."
humor  politics  tagging  words  paulford  future  futurology 
january 2008 by robertogreco
geobloggers » The overdue Places post II - Prototyping Iconicness
"something that we decided was fairly important early on, the photos couldn’t just be the most ‘interesting’ photos, as defined by our interestingness score. When we did that, we didn’t get stuff that we though was iconic enough."
algorithms  api  design  development  flickr  geocoding  geotagging  maps  prototyping  places  interestingness  tagging  tags 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Pasta: text pasting service for del.icio.us
"Paste text below and hit preview until you are happy. Submit auto-generates a web page and posts it to del.icio.us"
del.icio.us  text  tools  tagging  tags  bookmarklets  bookmarking  applications  socialsoftware  onlinetoolkit  maciejceglowski  maciejcegłowski 
january 2008 by robertogreco
About the “Learn More” series « LibraryStream
"a series of self-paced discovery entries for library staff interested in venturing out on the social web. Each post is meant as a short introduction to a different social website, tool, or concept. It might not be ground-breaking information to veteran r
socialnetworking  socialsoftware  libraries  howto  tutorials  training  web2.0  networkedlearning  applications  del.icio.us  e-learning  online  flickr  twitter  youtube  tags  tagging  wikis  blogs  blogging  technology  learning  information  library  secondlife 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect: When Pointers Fade & Die I
"developer's assumption that sufficient numbers of people would be willing to use this service to access user-generated opinions about that space, whilst knowing little or nothing about the individual who generated the link. Risk versus reward."
yellowarrow  annotation  space  location  location-based  tagging  trust  risk  user  usergenerated  geotagging  janchipchase 
january 2008 by robertogreco
delicious blog » using delicious on your iphone
"In the meantime, given this is the week of Macworld we thought you’d be interested in this Quick Tip on how to use Delicious on your iPhone."
del.icio.us  iphone  tagging  howto 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Many hands make light work « Flickr Blog
"What if you could contribute your own description of a certain photo in, say, the Library of Congress’ vast photographic archive, knowing that it might make the photo you’ve touched a little easier to find for the next person?
flickr  library  libraries  folksonomy  copyright  museums  participatory  crowdsourcing  publicdomain  photography  tagging  commons  archive  tags  loc  community  history 
january 2008 by robertogreco
ShiftSpace | An Open Source layer above any webpage
"Having wandered for years in an owner-centric Cyberspace, where do we turn for online public spaces? ShiftSpace (.org) seeks to provide a new town-square built above the existing privatized hyper-mall of information that is the World Wide Web. We are bui
opensource  firefox  shiftspace  web  community  social  internet  gui  collaborative  semanticweb  sharing  gamechanging  activism  socialsoftware  tagging  trails  communication  interaction  interactive  metaweb  collaboration  experience  cooperation  annotation  website  comments  extensions  browser  archive  danphiffer  browsers 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Dave Snowden on Everything is Fragmented | stuart henshall
"His point of view is information models don’t apply to humans. We are pattern recognition devices. We recognize and act based on partial data sets. We know that this is often true."
davesnowden  management  knowledge  patternrecognition  patterns  human  intelligence  complexity  social  systems  tagging  links  folksonomy  via:preoccupations 
november 2007 by robertogreco
The End of Cyberspace: A thought about the future of memory
"computer memory's impact on human memory isn't merely one of "offloading" or externalizing or digital amnesia: it's a story of a shifting of mnemonic resources, and a reconfiguration of the contents of our memories, not a simple shrinking of our memories
memory  mobile  tagging  storage  flickr  notetaking  writing  experience  navigation  gamechanging  cognition  brain  human 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Learning 2.0 - The Things
"Welcome to the original Learning 2.0 Program. This site was created to support PLCMC's Learning 2.0 Program; a discovery learning program designed to encourage staff to explore new technologies and reward them for doing 23 Things."
activities  business  flickr  collaboration  howto  gamechanging  community  learning  lessons  librarians  libraries  management  workshops  web2.0  web  technology  tools  resources  training  reference  networkedlearning  online  pedagogy  professionaldevelopment  courses  progress  tagging  tags  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  wikis  work  education  elearning  folksonomy  free  media  blogs  autodidacts  lcproject  homeschool  unschooling  schools  podcasts  webdesign  myspace  recording  programming  rss  del.icio.us  onlinetoolkit  internet  content  user  webdev 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Jiglu: Tags that think
"Jiglu is a super-smart engine that pieces your site together, intelligently tagging and linking your web content"
tagging  tags  blogging  blogs  bookmarks  collaboration  datamining  sharing  web2.0  semantics  automation  generator  widgets  webdesign  services  networking  webdev 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Scripted Re-Mark: Batch Editing Your Bookmarks - Freshblog
"The service is dubbed Scripted Re-Mark, since you use a script to "re-mark" your bookmarks. It grew out of my earlier experiments with automatic tagging and frustrations with migrating a blog."
del.icio.us  bookmarks  editing  hacks  javascript  rules  share  tagging  tags 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Blogger Migration for Delicious and FreshTags - Freshblog
"Hitch #1. Delicious does not support batch delete. Hitch #2. Delicious will block you if you generate requests too quickly. Hitch #3. Delicious imports are compulsorily marked "not shared"."
del.icio.us  hacks  javascript  bookmarks  bookmarklets  automation  tagging 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Scripted Re-Mark - Batch Editor for Bookmarks
"This service helps you manage your bookmarks stored on popular social bookmarking site del.icio.us. If you've ever wanted to make edits to all your bookmarks in one hit ("batch mode"), then this is for you. It makes it easy to re-tag bookmarks en masse,
bookmarking  bookmarks  del.icio.us  productivity  folksonomy  hacks  sharing  webapps  tools  tagging  tags  javascript 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Socialight / Home
"Discover great places on your mobile as you walk around!...Share and recommend places and experiences with friends... or the whole planet!...Tag the world with virtual Sticky Notes!"
gps  annotation  locative  location-based  location  urban  ubiquitous  ubicomp  everyware  information  mapping  maps  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  sms  mobile  phones  tagging  geography  geotagging  folksonomy  iphone 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Semapedia.org: index
"Our goal is to connect the virtual and physical world by bringing the right information from the internet to the relevant place in physical space."
aggregator  location-based  ambient  annotation  taxonomy  folksonomy  semantic  semantics  semanticweb  mobile  phones  locative  location  maps  mapping  local  learning  information  geotagging  interactive  hyperlinks  qrcodes  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  semacode  tagging  geocoding  geography  everyware  ubicomp  ubiquitous 
october 2007 by robertogreco
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