robertogreco + specialeducation   4

Jonathan Mooney: "The Gift: LD/ADHD Reframed" - YouTube
"The University of Oregon Accessible Education Center and AccessABILITY Student Union present renowned speaker, neuro-diversity activist and author Jonathan Mooney.

Mooney vividly, humorously and passionately brings to life the world of neuro-diversity: the research behind it, the people who live in it and the lessons it has for all of us who care about the future of education. Jonathan explains the latest theories and provides concrete examples of how to prepare students and implement frameworks that best support their academic and professional pursuits. He blends research and human interest stories with concrete tips that parents, students, teachers and administrators can follow to transform learning environments and create a world that truly celebrates cognitive diversity."
neurodiversity  2012  jonathanmooney  adhd  cognition  cognitivediversity  sfsh  accessibility  learning  education  differences  howwelearn  disability  difference  specialeducation  highered  highereducation  dyslexia  droputs  literacy  intelligence  motivation  behavior  compliance  stillness  norms  shame  brain  success  reading  multiliteracies  genius  smartness  eq  emotions  relationships  tracking  maryannewolf  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  punishment  rewards  psychology  work  labor  kids  children  schools  agency  brokenness  fixingpeople  unschooling  deschooling  strengths  strengths-basedoutlook  assets  deficits  identity  learningdisabilities  schooling  generalists  specialists  howardgardner  howweteach  teams  technology  support  networks  inclusivity  diversity  accommodations  normal  average  standardization  standards  dsm  disabilities  bodies  body 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Walker Cares
[via: https://instagram.com/p/3R84rxq2MP/ ]

"Walker provides intensive services for children and youth facing complex emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges. Walker's multidisciplinary programs extend specialized therapeutic environments beyond our classrooms into family homes, public schools and community settings.

Walker provides intensive services for children and youth facing complex emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges. Walker's multidisciplinary programs extend specialized therapeutic environments beyond our classrooms into family homes, public schools and community settings."

[from http://walkercares.org/academic-programs/walker-school/about.asp

"The Walker School is a Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education‑approved private special education school comprising a coeducational K-8 academic program for children ages 5 through 13 with complex presentations that are often manifested by behavioral, social, and emotional challenges. The Walker School is an extended-year program with the capacity to serve 80 students. To meet the unique learning needs of each student, the Walker School offers an academic program that fully incorporates the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, developmentally appropriate practices, and intensive therapeutic services. Our school and classroom environments are designed to help students, whose educational needs have not been met in previous programs and settings, build interpersonal and social skills that enable them to successfully access a general education curriculum. For example, we offer many in-class supports that promote self-regulation and concentration, including but not limited to:

• Instructional design with a focus on pacing (e.g., extending/adjusting time, allowing sensory breaks, frequent variation in activities)

• Supplementary aids (e.g., adaptive seat cushions, sensory toys and materials, graphic organizers)

• Assistive technology (e.g., computers, iPads, specialized software, audiobooks)

Our classroom educational teams provide significant individualized support to students. Our classroom educational teams include a licensed teacher, an assistant teacher, and a milieu staff. Our classroom ratio is higher than the industry norm, and we have a number of supervisory staff and support staff available to assist student as needed. Additionally, each student and his/her family/legal guardian work with a multidisciplinary team that includes the aforementioned teaching and milieu staff, as well as a clinician, psychopharmacologist, and other specialists as needed (e.g., speech and language pathologist, occupational therapist and technology specialists). Working together, the team is able to ensure that the student and his/her family/legal guardian have input into the development and ongoing review of the student’s individualized education plan and clinical and behavioral support plans. Educational Coordinators are available to assist the team with developing and implementing instructional modifications and specialized approaches to teaching and learning that may benefit a particular student and/or the student community as a whole.

Behavioral, social, and emotional skills are addressed throughout the school day - in class, during structured recess and lunch groups, and in classroom-based social skills therapy groups. Each child is assigned a clinician who assesses the child and his/her family’s strengths and needs and is responsible for coordinating the program’s services with community-based services. For students in need of additional support for self-help and daily living skills, these issues may also be addressed in the classroom.

In all of our work with students, we draw heavily on the use of evidence-based practices and trauma-informed care, and we have systems in place to assess progress toward academic and behavioral, social, and emotional goals." ]
schools  needham  massachusetts  walkerschool  via:ablerism  occupationaltherapy  specialeducation 
july 2015 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The Wilful Ignorance of Richard Allington
"Now, since "Doctor" Allington has called me a "cheater" and "illiterate" - let me list my credentials - and I will argue that these are contemporary - post-Gutenberg - credentials. Sure "Doctor," I struggle mightily with decoding alphabetical text, and sure, unless I am drawing my letters, copying them in fact, my writing is just about useless, and - well, to go further, I've never learned to "keyboard" with more than one finger. So yes, "Doctor," by your standards I can neither read nor write. And to get around that I do indeed "cheat." I use digital text-to-speech tools, from WYNN to WordTalk to Balabolka to Click-Speak and I use audiobooks all the time, whether from Project Gutenberg or LibriVox or Audible. Yes, I "cheat" by writing with Windows Speech Recognition and Android Speech Recognition and the SpeakIt Chrome extension.

And "Doctor," I not only use them, I encourage students all over the United States, all around the world in fact, to cheat with these tools as well. I've even helped develop a free suite of tools for American students to support that "cheating."

But beyond that, I'll match my scholarship with "Doctor" Allington's anytime, including my "deeply read" knowledge of the history of American education, and my "actual" - Grounded Theory Research - with real children in real schools in real - non-laboratory, non-abusive-control-group - situations.

And beyond that, I tend to think I'm as "well read" as any non-literature major around. So if the "Doctor" wants to debate James Joyce or Seamus Heaney or current Booker Prize shortlist fiction, or argue over why American schools often teach literature and the real part of reading, the understanding - so badly, I think I'll be able to hold my own."
irasocol  2013  richardallington  literacy  multiliteracies  credentialism  assistivetechnology  learning  education  accommodations  testing  speechrecognition  gutenbergparenthesis  audiobooks  cheating  specialeducation  commoncore  universaldesign 
december 2013 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Thinking TEST and Toolbelt Theory again, the Tech Choice Paradigm for Every Child
[Related: http://www.iwasthinking.ca/2013/10/10/understanding-ira-socols-test-approach/ ]

"None of this is unimportant. These are the kinds of tool choices which will help define success for students in their lives in their century. It is especially critical for every student on every margin, the ones - like me - who need to make the right technological choices to be effective at, say, reading or writing. Or at communicating, or at maths. These aren't "assistive technologies" anymore than elevators, cars, and eyeglasses are - they are the tools we need to learn to choose, use, and leverage to be our best.

Let's go through this. It isn't enough, in this century, to say, "I will read (or watch) the news." We need to decide what kinds of news to read, watch, and interact with, when to do that so we maximize our learning and attention, on what device to do that, using what apps or software to prioritize it. If I use Flipboard do I know how t set that up? What are the limitations of New York Times apps? How do I interact with the Guardian? Is it worth having news alerts emailed to me? texted to me? About what? If reading isn't easy, or I'm in my car a lot, which apps best convert text to speech?

It isn't enough to say, "I'll write that down." On what? How? Where? Do I know how to set up Windows Speech Recognition? How to use Speech to Text in Android? in Dragon Lite in iOS? in Chrome? Do I know how to configure a keyboard on a tablet or mobile device? Can I adapt a keyboard if I have to use a computer in another country?

Obviously, we just don't "send letters," I need to know how to text my boss even if I'm driving. I need to know how to send a professional text, a professional email, a professional dm. I need to know how to read critical work emails and texts even if I'm driving or rushing through an airport. And, most critically, I will need to choose and set up devices throughout my life.

These are essential skills. And these are essential skills that certain children - the privileged - get at home from the start, but they are essential skills which most American schools have chosen to deny to kids whose parents cannot supply them with these options - thus widely increasing the devastating opportunity gap.

The critical point today is, you can't do any of this if you do not begin by changing how you acquire the technology in your school, and then change how you teach with that technology. You have to begin by buying technology based your students' needs to respond individually to the first three steps in TEST, so that they have the options, and eventually the knowledge, to function in a multi-device, multi-operating system world."



"Cochrane explicitly locates this within the postcolonial realm of the Disability Studies/Disability Rights movement - a large force in Europe - and little known in American, especially American K-12, education. The Disability Studies movement views disability as between somewhat and entirely a social construct... my preference is to use the term Transactional (see also this) - the opposite of the medical model... and tends to want to allow humans to make identity choices instead of being described by diagnosis - as even the most well-meaning American educators tend to do. (Americans like to use the same terminology for "disability" as for all pathologies, so they say, "a student with a reading disability" as they'd say, "a student with cancer." The other option is for the student to choose - or not choose - to use an identity label as we would with other forms of identity, "an African-American student," "a dyslexic student," "a gay student.")

This matters not just for students we label as having "disabilities," it matters for all not statistically average. Students cannot reach their potentials when we spend more effort limiting them and describing their problems than we spend enabling them and equipping them with the tools they need."
toolbelttheory  irasocol  education  teaching  learning  byod  technology  assistivetechnology  onesizefitsall  2013  test  choice  diversity  disability  disabilitystudies  colonialism  reading  writing  communication  specialeducation  postcolonialism  disabilities 
october 2013 by robertogreco

related tags

accessibility  accommodations  adhd  agency  assets  assistivetechnology  audiobooks  average  behavior  bodies  body  brain  brokenness  byod  cheating  children  choice  cognition  cognitivediversity  colonialism  commoncore  communication  compliance  credentialism  deficits  deschooling  difference  differences  disabilities  disability  disabilitystudies  diversity  droputs  dsm  dyslexia  education  emotions  eq  extrinsicmotivation  fixingpeople  generalists  genius  gutenbergparenthesis  highered  highereducation  howardgardner  howwelearn  howweteach  identity  inclusivity  intelligence  intrinsicmotivation  irasocol  jonathanmooney  kids  labor  learning  learningdisabilities  literacy  maryannewolf  massachusetts  motivation  multiliteracies  needham  networks  neurodiversity  normal  norms  occupationaltherapy  onesizefitsall  postcolonialism  psychology  punishment  reading  relationships  rewards  richardallington  schooling  schools  sfsh  shame  smartness  specialeducation  specialists  speechrecognition  standardization  standards  stillness  strengths  strengths-basedoutlook  success  support  teaching  teams  technology  test  testing  toolbelttheory  tracking  universaldesign  unschooling  via:ablerism  walkerschool  work  writing 

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