robertogreco + speaking   40

GRADA KILOMBA: DECOLONIZING KNOWLEDGE - Voice Republic
"In this lecture performance Grada Kilomba explores forms of Decolonizing Knowledge using printed work, writing exercises, performative narrative, and visual art, as forms of alternative knowledge production. Kilomba raises questions concerning the concepts of knowledge, race and gender: “What is acknowledged as knowledge? Whose knowledge is this? Who is acknowledged to produce knowledge?” This project exposes not only the violence of classic knowledge production, but also how this violence is performed in academic, cultural and artistic spaces, which determine both who can speak and what we can speak about.To touch this colonial wound, she creates a hybrid space where the boundaries between the academic and the artistic languages confine, transforming the configurations of knowledge and power. Using a collage of her literary and visual work, Grada Kilomba initiates a dialogue of multiple narratives who speak, interrupt, and appropriate the ‘normal’ and continuous coloniality in which we reside. The audience is invited to participate, and to re-imagine the concept of knowledge anew, by opening new spaces for decolonial thinking."

[See also: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grada_Kilomba ]
gradakilomba  performance  decolonization  speaking  listening  2015  knowledge  narrative  art  knowledgeproduction  unschooling  deschooling  colonialism  academia  highered  highereducation  storytelling  bellhooks  participation  participatory  theory  thinking  howwethink  africa  slavery  frantzfanon  audrelorde  knowing  portugal 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Why Nouns Slow Us Down, and Why Linguistics Might Be in a Bubble | The New Yorker
"Writers and language geeks inherit a ranking system of sorts: verbs good, adjectives bad, nouns sadly unavoidable. Verbs are action, verve! “I ate the day / Deliberately, that its tang / Might quicken me into verb, pure verb,” Seamus Heaney writes, in “Oysters.” A sentence can be a sentence without nouns or adjectives, but never without a verb. For the most part.

But nouns deserve more cognitive credit. A study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that nouns actually take longer to spit out than verbs do, presumably because they require more thought to produce. In the study, researchers led by Frank Seifart, a linguist at the University of Amsterdam, and Balthasar Bickel, of the University of Zurich, analyzed hundreds of recordings of spontaneous speech from nine very different languages from around the world: English and Dutch, as well as several others from as far afield as Amazonia, Siberia, the Kalahari, and Tibet. They picked out and compared the spoken renditions of the nouns and verbs, focussing not on how long it took for each word to be spoken but on what was happening in the half-second preceding each word. That tiny window is informative: cognitive scientists have concluded that it takes the brain about that long to formulate its next word, which happens even as a current word or phrase is being spoken.

Which is to say, the future word casts a shadow over the present one. And that shadow is measurable: the researchers found that, in all nine languages, the speech immediately preceding a noun is three-and-a-half-per-cent slower than the speech preceding a verb. And in eight of nine languages, the speaker was about twice as likely to introduce a pause before a noun than before a verb—either a brief silence or a filler, such as “uh” or “um” or their non-English equivalents. That future word, when it’s a noun, is more of a footfall than a shadow, creating a hole in the phrase right before it.

Seifart and Bickel think that this has to do with the different roles that nouns and verbs play in language. Nouns require more planning to say because they more often convey novel information, Seifart told me—that’s one reason why we quickly transition from nouns to pronouns when speaking. Listeners are sensitive to those tiny pauses before a noun, and interpret them as indicating that what follows will be something new or important.

Unlike nouns and pronouns, verbs don’t have “proverbs” to pick up the pace, although we cheat a little with sentences such as, “Susan drank wine and Mary did, too.” Verbs are grammatically more complex than nouns but have less to reveal. When you’re about to say a verb, you’re less likely to be saying something new, so your brain doesn’t have to slow down what it’s already doing to plan for it.

Oddly enough, the one language that doesn’t seem to pre-think its nouns as thoroughly as its verbs is English, Seifart and Bickel found. Although English speakers do slow down their speech immediately before a noun, they use fewer pauses beforehand, not more, when compared to verbs.

“English is peculiar,” Seifart said. English is less useful than we might imagine for understanding what our speech has to say about how we think: “It can never be representative of human language in general,” he said. “To make claims about human language in general, we need to look at much broader array of them.”

In recent years, scientists have grown concerned that much of the literature on human psychology and behavior is derived from studies carried out in Western, educated, industrialized, rich, democratic countries. These results aren’t necessarily indicative of how humans as a whole actually function. Linguistics may face a similar challenge—the science is in a bubble, talking to itself. “This is what makes people like me realize the unique value of small, often endangered languages and documenting them for as long as they can still be observed,” Seifart said. “In a few generations, they will not be spoken anymore.” In the years to come, as society grows more complex, the number of nouns available to us may grow exponentially. The diversity of its speakers, not so much."
language  languages  weird  nouns  verbs  communication  linguistics  2018  alanburdick  action  frankseifart  balthasarbickel  future  present  speed  speaking  english 
may 2018 by robertogreco
actually (27 Oct., 2003, at Interconnected)
"Dunbar contends that humans evolved vocal grooming (language) as a more efficient form of bonding. Assuming that our closest ancester, the chimpanzee, has hit the time budget limiting factor, and that our extra efficiency has all come about with the transition to vocal grooming, this means language is 2.8 times more efficient for bonding than the mechanism nonhuman primates use. That is, "a speaker should be able to interact with 2.8 times as many other individuals as a groomer can. Since the number of grooming partners is necessarily limited to one, this means that the limit on the number of listeners should be about 2.8. In other words, human conversation group sizes should be limited to about 3.8 in size (one speaker plus 2.8 listeners)." (Which makes sense if you think about the different qualities of a conversation with three versus four participants. A study is quoted to back this up.)"
mattwebb  2003  dunbar  dunbarnumber  grooming  primates  humans  groups  groupsize  conversation  speaking  interaction 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Once you start to speak, people will yell at you.... - Noteworthy and Not
"Once you start to speak, people will yell at you. They will interrupt you, put you down and suggest it’s personal. And the world won’t end.

And the speaking will get easier and easier. And you will find you have fallen in love with your own vision, which you may never have realized you had. And you will lose some friends and lovers, and realize you don’t miss them. And new ones will find you and cherish you. And you will still flirt and paint your nails, dress up and party, because, as I think Emma Goldman said, “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.” And at last you’ll know with surpassing certainty that only one thing is more frightening than speaking your truth. And that is not speaking."
audrelorde  voice  speaking  emmagoldman  revolution  vision 
april 2015 by robertogreco
pechaflickr
"pechaflickr = the sound of random flickring

Can you improv a coherent presentation from images you have never seen?

Enter a tag, and see how well you can communicate sense of 20 random flickr photos, each one on screen for 20 seconds. Advanced options offer different settings.

Curious? I used pechaflickr to talk about pechaflickr. [http://cogdogblog.com/stuff/techtalks13/ ] If you are making use of this, please share with me!"
speaking  improv  improvisation  pechakucha  flickr  random  via:lukeneff  pechaflickr  extemporaneous  presentations  classideas 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Rigor Redefined
"Today’s students need to master seven survival skills to thrive in the new world of work. And these skills are the same ones that will enable students to become productive citizens who contribute to solving some of the most pressing issues we face in the 21st century.

1. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving…

2. Collaboration and Leadership…

3. Agility and Adaptability…

4. Initiative and Entrepreneurialism…

5. Effective Oral and Written Communication…

6. Accessing and Analyzing Information…

7. Curiosity and Imagination…



Across the United States, I see schools that are succeeding at making adequate yearly progress but failing our students. Increasingly, there is only one curriculum: test prep. Of the hundreds of classes that I’ve observed in recent years, fewer than 1 in 20 were engaged in instruction designed to teach students to think instead of merely drilling for the test.

To teach and test the skills that our students need, we must first redefine excellent instruction. It is not a checklist of teacher behaviors and a model lesson that covers content standards. It is working with colleagues to ensure that all students master the skills they need to succeed as lifelong learners, workers, and citizens. I have yet to talk to a recent graduate, college teacher, community leader, or business leader who said that not knowing enough academic content was a problem. In my interviews, everyone stressed the importance of critical thinking, communication skills, and collaboration.

We need to use academic content to teach the seven survival skills every day, at every grade level, and in every class. And we need to insist on a combination of locally developed assessments and new nationally normed, online tests—such as the College and Work Readiness Assessment (www.cae.org)—that measure students’ analytic-reasoning, critical-thinking, problem-solving, and writing skills.

It’s time to hold ourselves and all of our students to a new and higher standard of rigor, defined according to 21st-century criteria. It’s time for our profession to advocate for accountability systems that will enable us to teach and test the skills that matter most. Our students’ futures are at stake."
tonywagner  rigor  education  testprep  testing  standardizedtesting  schools  teaching  learning  criticalthinking  problemsolving  collaboration  leadership  agility  adaptability  initiative  entrepreneurialism  communication  writing  speaking  information  curiosity  imagination 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero × Blog × Suggestions for Speakers
• Import ideas. Search for examples that are outside the purview of everyone in the audience. Novelty wins, so start somewhere unexpected and figure out a way to navigate toward your topic. For example, last week I gave a talk at Build about screens, but started with the composition of aspirin pills. In your search, look for common verbs with different nouns. In the case of technology and aspirin, both are getting smaller, yet have limits to their minimum size because of what we can grasp. Of course, novel examples require hunting. Good thing that process is fun.

• Write, then jump to Keynote as quickly as possible. Keep in mind lectures are visual, too. My process is usually writing, then into keynote, back into writing, and then another pass at Keynote. Also, consider using blank slides for your most critical points. The absense of visuals will force your audience to look at you, giving the point extra importance.

•A nice typeface on a dark background is good enough. Spend your time on the ideas and practicing the talk.



• Go in loops. It’s nice to come back to a thread that you dropped. Use recurring themes in your examples. Develop a thought to a question, say “I’m going to leave that question hanging for a bit,” then start somewhere else, and eventually link the new place to the the hanging question’s answer. I’m sure you can think of a bunch of other ways to do this. Leaving loops open creates anticipation. Resolving them creates closure. Both are necessary for a good talk.

• Have padding. Listening is hard work, especially if you’re at a conference and listening for 5 or 6 hours in a row. Help your audience along by keeping in a little bit of fluffiness, and changing beats every 10 minutes or so. For instance, last talk, I wanted to show that screens had no problem showing a lot of different kinds of imagery. Rather than saying that one simple sentence, I stretched it out for a couple minutes by showing a bunch of different images of horses. Now, this is definitely ridiculous, but it had a purpose—the example lets your brain rest for a minute and allows the previous points to sink in. It’s negative space. I like to think of this fluffiness as if they were establishing shots or B-reel in television. Every once in a while, your brain needs a break."
frankchimero  presentations  advice  speaking  keynote  publicspeaking  2013  design 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Greatness of College Lectures (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"you need to learn ways of thinking. These are what lectures, at their best, can provide. They show you how the speakers think about problems, how they feel about them, and, in doing so, provide a more fleshed-out notion than writing ever could."
lectures  presentations  thinking  edwardtufte  scottmccloud  aaronswartz  2006  larrylessig  education  learning  writing  speaking  via:Preoccupations  openminded  mindchanges  mindchanging 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Kicker Studio: Six Questions from Kicker: Robert Brunner
"What are 5 things all designers should know?

1. Perseverance. It’s hard to make great stuff. Never say die (for as long as you can).

2. Responsibility. You are driving things that will affect a lot of people, from your development partners and your clients, to the people who use the things you create. Don’t let it scare you or cause you to freeze up, but always be cognizant of the impact of your decisions.

3. How to communicate. Most designers do not know how to do this. Learn to write and speak well about your work. It will serve you for a long time and can be the difference maker.

4. Empathy. Learn how to put yourself in other’s shoes and see the situation and opportunities you’d miss from your eyes. It will make you very valuable

5. How to enjoy the journey. You have one of the best jobs in the world. It’s a long, wild ride, so have fun with it and don’t dwell too much on what went wrong. Keep your feet moving."
robertbrunner  design  designers  perseverance  responsibility  communication  writing  speaking  empathy  understanding  process  glvo  howwework  2011  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Ambition in speaking & writing: TEDx by 8 year olds | NoTosh
"We challenged the school by asking what would happen in terms of ambition, outlook and understanding the power of speech if Thorney Close students created the UK’s first live and online event, created by children for children, as part of the world’s most famous and popular lecture series."

"So on May 27th in a lecture hall in Sunderland sixty 7, 8 and 9 year olds explored topics such as the secret language of animals, why slugs have slime and what family means – and made history in the process by participating in the first ever TEDx event for under 10′s."
notosh  ewanmcintosh  edchatie  tedx  children  classideas  ambition  outlook  understanding  speaking  publicspeaking  presentations  events  online  onlineevents  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Making It All Worthwhile
"I've facilitated enough PD to not feel new at it. I've taken enough coursework in PD at Stanford to feel like I get some of the theory behind teaching adults about teaching children. Whenever I'm planning a session or a talk, though, I don't lean on the theory or my experience half as hard as I do on the fear that I'll be working with a teacher who's exactly like me, and he'll hate me. Which is to say, rather, that I'll hate me.

My urinal buddy helped me understand that whenever I blog or facilitate PD or give a talk or drive in traffic or cook a meal or talk to my friends, subconsciously, I'm always wondering, "Would I hate me?" It's a coin flip, really, whether that's evidence of personal integrity or flagrant self-absorption."
danmeyer  teaching  speaking  pd  professionaldevelopment  integrity  self-absorption  empathy  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
FT.com / FT Magazine - Don’t touch me, I’m British
"But though Americans won’t touch strangers, they will talk to them. They will chat to people at neighbouring tables in restaurants, or in line at the supermarket. That conversation doesn’t turn the speakers into friends – a mistake Europeans sometimes make. Generalising grossly: to Americans, conversation doesn’t imply intimacy.

Applying Carroll’s theories to Britons, you understand why foreigners think we are repressed. Americans won’t touch strangers, the French won’t talk to them, but Brits will neither touch nor talk to them. Passport to the Pub, a semi-official guide for foreign tourists to the UK, warns: “Don’t ever introduce yourself. The ‘Hi, I’m Chuck from Alabama’ approach does not go down well in British pubs.”

Nor are Britons permitted to make eye contact…

Latins are luckier. They can touch and talk to strangers even when sober…"
culture  rules  sex  cultureshock  france  germany  finland  uk  english  england  touching  conversation  americans  us  relationships  speaking  talking  kissing  interpersonal  norms  culturalnorms  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Behind the TEDTalk 2010 on Vimeo
"Behind the TEDTalk is the touching story of two extraordinary people [Raghava KK and Ken Robinson] who shared the stage at the 2010 TED Conference."
presenting  presentations  ted  howto  howwework  performance  kenrobinson  2010  raghavakk  speaking  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
miscellany · Next time, ask: What’s the worst that will happen?...
"Next time, ask: What’s the worst that will happen? Then push yourself a little further than you dare. Once you start to speak, people will yell at you. They will interrupt you, put you down and suggest it’s personal. And the world won’t end. And the speaking will get easier and easier. And you will find you have fallen in love with your own vision, which you may never have realized you had. And you will lose some friends and lovers, and realize you don’t miss them. And new ones will find you and cherish you. And you will still flirt and paint your nails, dress up and party, because, as I think Emma Goldman said, “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.” And at last you’ll know with surpassing certainty that only one thing is more frightening than speaking your truth. And that is not speaking."
naomiwolf  vision  cv  persistence  speaking  truth  revolution  emmagoldman  anarchism  anarchy  meaning  life  values  yearoff  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  iconoclasm  radicals  radicalism  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Embarrassingly pimping (Phil Gyford’s website)
"I give very few talks about anything. I am terrible at knowing what I know. I assume that most people in the audience of any conference I attend will know more than me about anything I could talk about. For similar reasons, I’m no good at thinking of things I could write about for magazines. You all know what I know.

It turns out that I need to run a website on a very specialised topic for eight years before I’m in a position to feel confident talking about it. This may be a little extreme."

[via: http://magicalnihilism.com/2011/02/21/phil-gyford-on-knowing-what-youre-talking-about/ ]
philgyford  speaking  conferences  knowing  experts  confidence  cv  writing  knowledge  sharing  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
So Long 2010, and Thanks for All the Pageviews — Satellite — Craig Mod
"Make no mistake, there is nothing easy about writing. It requires a tremendous amount of time &, often, blind belief in the output. The larger essays can take upwards of 50-100 hours to complete — write, edit, design, rewrite, whiskey, redesign, self-doubt, layout, cry, publish, promote, correct embarrassing invariable spelling mistakes.

But the act of writing each of these essays has led to a deeper insight into the subject…this is something many creatives simply choose not to engage. & it's a shame. Reflection through writing can illuminate the next step in a creative process which all too often feels like flailing aimlessly in the dark.

…I'd go so far as to say an unarticulated experience or creative process is one left unresolved. By writing about your experience you close the loop…When you publish, both the output of the experience (book, software, photographs, etc) & now the ability to replicate that experience is in the hands of your audience. That's a powerful thing…"
craigmod  writing  internet  web  photography  kickstarter  speaking  freelancing  creativity  2010  relection  reflection  execution  articulation  doing  making  make  glvo  balance  understanding  learning  tcsnmy  publishing  blogs  blogging  ipad  experience  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Liz Danzico - Adding By Leaving Out: The Power of the Pause on Vimeo
"We tend to think of the pause as awkward. In speech, pauses connote uncomfortable silence, an issue at hand, and as communicators, we smooth over silence with fillers. We’re trained to deliver smooth speech, censoring “um” and “ah” out. As designers, as much as we value whitespace, we tend to fill it. This distaste for the pause — and the inverse seeking an always-on state — is a daily battle we face. We’re impatient with the pause, and as a result, we’re missing out on a great deal. What would happen if we become more comfortable with the pause? As it turns out, we can add by leaving out. From Edison to Underhill to web-based software, learn where the pause has power."

[Something very brief that I wrote about pause a few months before: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/626105538/hustle-works-best-when-paired-with-pause-time ]
lizdanzico  pause  slow  slowness  design  webdesign  words  comments  collections  whitespace  impatience  patience  behavior  smoothness  wabi-sabi  fluency  speech  speaking  communication  understanding  thomasedison  toshare  classdieas  jonathansafranfoer  awkwardness  webdev  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Publish. Now. — Satellite — Craig Mod
"This is — now that I think about it — how talks should go. Built on the fly. A sort of performance art erected on genuine experience and knowledge. Improvisation. Or, perhaps not. But, undeniably, because of the rapidly changing nature of publishing, it's almost impossible to repeat the same talk about books with a straight face. I've spoken at several conferences in the last few months and the data in the presentations — by necessity — was updated at the very last minute. Things are moving fast. And it's fun."
craigmod  presentations  speaking  planning  conferences  meaning  change  improvisation  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: what I meant to say at lift - part two - big red buttons and sliding into glass
"Touch & screens...if it's all we do...we're going to be missing most of our bodies & senses. Presentations/PowerPoint are an example. Conference organisers & software/hardware makers seem determined to promote fantasy that slides control themselves...computer off stage, hidden, controller as small as possible...seem to be working towards an ideal state where slides are advanced by an inflection in speaker's mind. ...reinforces & is reinforced by, a particular school of talks which imagines them as exchange of minds facilitated by language, occasionally supported by imagery...such a waste, like taking talking head off telly & going to see it live... We should be thinking of all the things we can to make ourselves more watchable...one...is to engage physically w/ our materials - our presentation, our slides. We should be performing PowerPoint not just showing it. You ought to be able to buy a PowerPoint Hero controller that gets you engaged the way Guitar Hero controller does."
performance  powerpoint  slides  senses  acting  engagement  speaking  talks  keynote  lift  russelldavies  howto  physicality  guitarhero  controllers  spectacle  tcsnmy  classideas  natal  presentations 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Do blog - Ten Do’s and Don’ts for speakers
"1. Do tell your story. It will inspire others more than you will ever know. 2. Do inspire yourself too. Don’t do the talk you always do. Leave your comfort zone. 3. Do tell us of your struggles as well as your successes. Failure is often a better teacher than success. 4. Don’t read it. You know your story off by heart, so let it come from the heart. You will touch more people that way. 5. Do tell us your dreams, your passions, what you stand for, your crazy new idea or your brave new thinking. We need to know what drives you. 6. Do entertain. We cover some serious subjects but that doesn’t mean we have to be serious. Entertainment is good. People learn a lot while laughing. 7. Do disagree. Debate is important. You don’t have to agree with other speakers. 8. Don’t steal other speakers time. It’s a 25 minute talk. 9. Do give the best talk that you have ever done. 10. Do stay around. The food, the beer, the music and the fire-side conversation all go to make The Do lectures so special."
do  speaking  presentations  storytelling  disagreement  debate  failure  success  advice 
february 2010 by robertogreco
35 Greatest Speeches in History | The Art of Manliness
"There was not currently a resource on the web to my liking that offered the man who wished to study the greatest orations of all time-from ancient to modern-not only a list of the speeches but a link to the text and a paragraph outlining the context in which the speech was given. So we decided to create one ourselves. The Art of Manliness thus proudly presents the “35 Greatest Speeches in World History,” the finest library of speeches available on the web.
via:cburell  education  politics  history  management  reference  leadership  literature  philosophy  ethics  speech  speeches  lectures  oratory  selfimprovement  speaking  rhetoric  tcsnmy 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Building a brand « Re-educate
"When I talk to parents about school, they all agree that there are problems. That’s not the hard part. The hard part is convincing them to do something about it. Because really, most people just want to fit in.
lcproject  change  parenting  tcsnmy  schools  schooling  entrepreneurship  speaking  marketing  administration  leadership  gamechanging  comfort  fittingin  branding 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Mind Your Language
"The difficulty applies the other way round too. English-speakers are keen to say please politely in other languages, even if those languages do not express politeness by constantly saying please. So English tourists say ‘por favor’ to waiters and barmen in a way that sounds too insistent to a Spaniard. It is as if someone were to say: ‘A glass of wine, if you please, my good man.’ If you want the butter passed in Spanish, you say, ‘Pass the butter.’ To add por favor can smack of impatience."
language  english  spanish  español  linguistics  translation  culture  travel  speaking  convention 
march 2009 by robertogreco
More time = shorter letter | Dangerous Intersection
“I have only made this letter longer because I have not had the time to make it shorter.” Blaise Pascal, (1623-1662) Lettres provinciales. “If you want me to give you a two-hour presentation, I am ready today. If you want only a five-minute speech, it will take me two weeks to prepare.” Mark Twain
time  brevity  simplicity  speaking  quotations  writing  communication  creativity 
december 2008 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » My Shortest-Ever Post On Presentation
"1. Unless your presentation is billed as "beginner-level" don't include information I can easily Google. What I mean is, while I know nothing about Photo Story, it was painful spending seat-time on a tutorial for adding narration to Photo Story, which is Google's top result for the same query. I can get that anytime1. 2. Instead, cover the stuff I can't Google, that stuff that makes your presence worth my district's money and my time. Here's an easy outline: a) why Photo Story; what problem were you trying to solve? should I care about that problem? b) what complications did you encounter while implementing Photo Story? how did you overcome them? c) what did you learn?"
presentations  danmeyer  conferences  professionaldevelopment  teaching  learning  speaking  education 
october 2008 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » ILC 2008 [or why I have long sinced stopped going to education conferences unless forced to do so]
"As a guy who teaches compulsory Algebra to kids who have hated Algebra, I don't see how fourteen presenters managed to blow a scenario where an audience volunteered to attend their sessions. Where the audience is interested in the session (provided the presenter didn't falsely bill it). Where the audience is pulling for the presenter. Where the audience is eager to be dazzled, fed, or inspired. ILC was like walking into eighteen car dealerships, pockets bulging with cash, declaring to every salesperson, "I'm here to buy," and discovering that fourteen of them couldn't close the sale." Follow-up post here: http://blog.mrmeyer.com/?p=1712
presentations  professionaldevelopment  learning  speaking  education  teaching  danmeyer  conferences 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: Nine steps to Powerpoint magic
"Perhaps you've experienced it. You do a presentation and it works. It works! That's the reason we keep coming back for more, that's why so many of us spend more time building and giving presentations than almost anything else we do. Here are some steps to achieve this level of PPT nirvana (Your mileage may vary. These are steps, not rules): 1. Don't use Powerpoint at all. 2. Use your own font. 3. Tell the truth. 4. Pay by the word. 5. Get a remote. 6. Use a microphone. 7. Check to make sure you brought you big idea with you. 8. Too breathtaking to take notes. 9. Short! "
powerpoint  presentations  sethgodin  howto  communication  speaking  advice  tips  keynote  tutorial 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Orange Cone: UX Week Ubicomp UX Presentation, Sketching in NYT
"It was a pleasure to be invited and to present to a group of old and new friends. I felt so comfortable that I decided to abandon my usual presentation format and present without any slides. I brought a suitcase of stuff and a stapled pile of notes, and pulled things out of the suitcase to illustrate my point. Kind of like a prop comedy version of a presentation, except not as funny. Or not as intentionally funny, anyway. However, as usual, I had written the presentation (108K PDF) in PowerPoint, so you can still read what I said, even though the slides are blank and you don't get to see me pulling a Motorola Dynatac phone out of a fake Prada purse. AP says they'll have video of it up soon."
presentations  speaking  ubicomp  mikekuniavsky 
august 2008 by robertogreco
What Barack Obama Needs to Prove in His Democratic National Convention Speech -- New York Magazine
"A century ago, Lim writes, presidential speeches were pitched at a college reading level; today, they’re down to eighth grade, and if the trend continues, next century’s State of the Union addresses will be conducted at the level of “a comic strip
politics  barackobama  speech  language  2008  elections  rhetoric  speaking 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Presentation Zen: Sir Ken Robinson on public speaking
"Remember you are speaking to individuals not abstract group; Be as relaxed as possible; Be conversational & make connection with room; **Know your material; **Prepare, but don't rehearse; **Leave room for improvisation"
speaking  speech  presentations  kenrobinson  howto  tips 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Patrick Winston - How to Speak | overstated
"Professor Patrick Winston gives a wonderfully reflexive and recursive talk about giving talks titled How to Speak. This lecture provides some useful speaking heuristics, especially if you’re in the business of helping people learn."
communication  education  howto  learning  presentation  presentations  public  publicspeaking  speaking  tips  MIT  teaching  tutorial  lectures  pedagogy 
february 2008 by robertogreco
TravelinEdMan: New York Times article on online language learning and 10 such sites
"the field of online language learning is exploding! Listed below are 10 online language learning sites (the first two, Livemocha and Chinesepod are reviewed in the NY Times article)"
language  learning  online  podcast  podcasting  web  foreignlanguage  spanish  chinese  onlinetoolkit  internet  communication  languages  español  mango  ipod  audio  video  via:stephendownes  speaking  listening  voice  voip 
february 2008 by robertogreco
S5: A Simple Standards-Based Slide Show System
"S5 is a slide show format based entirely on XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. With one file, you can run a complete slide show and have a printer-friendly version as well. The markup used for the slides is very simple, highly semantic, and completely accessibl
presentations  free  opensource  pdf  powerpoint  alternative  code  communication  speaking  tutorials  howto  slideshow  css  xhtml 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Smile -- And The World Can Hear You, Even If You Hide
"Smiling affects how we speak, to the point that listeners can identify the type of smile based on sound alone, according to a study by scientists at the University of Portsmouth."
happiness  psychology  voice  perception  senses  hearing  communication  speaking  smiling 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Gestures Convey Message: Learning in Progress - washingtonpost.com
"Teachers who use gestures as they explain a concept are more successful at getting their ideas across...students who spontaneously gesture as they work through new ideas tend to remember them longer than those who do not move their hands."
cognition  language  education  learning  neuroscience  psychology  speaking  literacy  gestures  teaching 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Elephants on Bicycles » Blog Archive » Public Speaking Courses Are A Good Thing...
"In an attempt to keep focused on the meeting today a co-worker and I decided to keep track of the number of times the speaker used the pause word “Um” during their presentation."
statistics  speaking  public  presentations  communication  publicspeaking  language 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Creativity Central - Journal - Talkers V. Listeners
"Listening is a lost art. People aren't really listening, they waiting for their turn to talk. Or they're formulating their talking points while someone else is talking."
listening  speaking  communication  people  society 
march 2007 by robertogreco

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