robertogreco + snarkmarket   107

Can the online community be saved? Is it even worth saving? - The Globe and Mail
"It seems quaint now to speak of online communities in romantic terms. I’ll do it anyway. For the past few decades, we’ve been in love with them.

What made them so appealing was the way that made the world suddenly seemed to open up. Bulletin boards, and then forums, then blogs allowed everyone from knitting enthusiasts to politics nerds to find and talk to others who shared their interests or views. We liked that, and made hanging out there a mainstay of life. But as can happen with love, things can sour bit by bit, almost imperceptibly, until one day you awake and find yourself in toxic relationships.

It wasn’t always this way. Years ago, in the mid-2000s, I sat in a Toronto basement apartment, adding my thoughts to posts on a site called Snarkmarket, which delved into the artsy and philosophical sides of technology and media. To my mind, these wide, wild, intimate discussions seemed to capture everything wonderful about the new modern age: I found like-minded individuals and, eventually, a community.

And then, I was on a plane, flying over the deeply blue waters of the Gulf of Mexico in November, 2013. Somehow, a blog comment section had led me from Toronto to Florida. A group flew in from all over the continent to St. Petersburg, and brought our online discussions to life around tables replete with boozy pitchers shared on patios in the thick Florida air. Putting faces to usernames made fleeting connections feel more solid, and years later, a small number of us are still in touch: so much for the alienating nature of technology.

It does, however, already feel like a different era, and that such recent history can seem so far away brings with it a strange sense of vertigo. Logging on each morning now, I sometimes forget why I ever had so much faith in all this novelty, and wonder if it can be saved at all.

The first fault line was when the centre of gravity of our online socializing shifted to giant platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and more. With that shift to mainstream sites composed of tens or hundreds of millions of users colliding together in a riot of opinion and expression, online communities started to seem unwelcoming, even dangerous places."



"It is tempting to say, then, that the solution is simple: barriers. A functioning community should draw a line around the kind of people it wants, and keep others out. But that’s also demoralizing in its own way. It suggests those lofty ideals that we could find community with people of all sorts across the globe are well and truly dead, forever.

Anil Dash doesn’t believe they are – at least not fully. A mainstay in the American tech scene after founding the blogging platform Typepad in the early 2000s, he has been vocal in his disappointment that platforms such as Twitter have been slow in responding to abuse. “The damage can be done now is so much more severe because everyone is on these networks and they have so much more reach,” he says on the phone from New York. “The stakes are now much higher.”"



"At a scale of tens of thousands or even millions of people, it’s not just notions of community that are lost, but norms, too, where what would be obvious offline – don’t yell at someone to make a point, don’t dominate a conversation just because you can, and so on – are ignored because of the free-for-all vibe of much social media.

Britney Summit-Gil, a writer, academic and researcher of online communities at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, suggests that while sites such as Facebook and Reddit can be full of hate and harassment, there are increasingly effective tools to build smaller, more private spaces, both on those platforms, and on other sites such as messaging app Slack, or even group text chats.

Summit-Gil also argues that in adopting the idea of community, these huge platforms are responsible for endorsing the principle of guidelines more generally: rules for how and by what standards online communities should operate, that allow these spaces to work at all.

Our online relationships aren’t dead, but our sense of community has become more private: hidden in plain sight, in private Facebook or Slack groups, text chats with friends, we connect in closed spaces that retain the idea of a group of people, bound by shared values, using tech to connect where they otherwise might not be able to. Online communities were supplanted by social media, and for a time we pretended they were the same thing, when in fact they are not.

Social media is the street; the community is the house you step into to meet your friends, and like any house, there are rules: things you wouldn’t do, people you wouldn’t invite it in and a limit on just how many people can fit. We forgot those simple ideas, and now it’s time to remember.

My own online community that took me to Florida was, sadly, subject to the gravity of the social giants. It dissipated, pulled away by the weight of Twitter and Facebook, but also the necessities of work and money and family. Nonetheless, we still connect sometimes, now in new online places, quiet, enclosed groups that the public world can’t see. New communities have sprouted up, too – and I still dive in. I’m not sure I would do so as easily, though, had it not been for what now threatens to be lost: that chance to get on a plane, look down from above and see, from up high, what we share with those scattered around the globe.

That sense of radical possibility is, I think, worth fighting to save."
navneetalang  socialmedia  online  internet  web  anildash  britneysummit-gil  2017  consolidation  tumblr  instagram  twitter  facebook  social  lindywest  snarkmarket  community  gamergate  reddit  scale  typepad  abuse 
may 2017 by robertogreco
The 60-second interview: Tim Carmody, independent technology journalist | Capital New York
"CAPITAL: You were a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania before becoming a journalist. Why did you decide to leave academia?

CARMODY: “Decide” might be the wrong word. I was on the academic job market for two years, 2008 and 2009, which were really just a slaughterhouse. Getting a tenure-track job or a good postdoc in the humanities is kind of like getting drafted into the N.B.A. in any year, but schools were cancelling searches and trimming their adjunct budgets right and left, and more and more jobless PhDs were piling up. I was in the top two or three for a couple of really good jobs, which was harder in some ways because it felt really close. Some people keep playing the lottery for years and years, but I just didn’t have the heart to keep doing it.

But I was really lucky; I’d been writing online for popular and crossover publications while I was still in grad school, a couple of essays in The Atlantic. I wrote a future-of-media blog with Matt Thompson and Robin Sloan called Snarkmarket that was really smart and fun and popular with the right people. Jason Kottke liked my writing and asked me to guest-edit his blog. Then Wired took a chance and hired me—I really couldn’t have asked for a better first job in journalism. After that, all the momentum for me was in journalism, so I’ve been doing that ever since.

Still, I’d totally be Professor Carmody in UC-Santa Barbara’s English department if things had gone my way, and I don’t know, maybe that would have been a happy ending too.

CAPITAL: Does your academic background still inform your reporting, or have you found that the skills valued by academia and those valued by journalism are total opposites?

CARMODY: I think the tools of journalism and scholarship complement each other. I had to learn how to be a reporter: do phone interviews, develop sources, write up different genres of articles. In some ways, I appreciated the tools of reporting more, because when you’re writing about Citizen Kane, you can’t get Orson Welles or Gregg Toland on the phone. If you’re writing about Netflix, you might be able to get Reed Hastings or Ted Sarandos on the phone. That’s pretty amazing.

In other cases, I think my training gave me some significant advantages. I’m really good at research, at context. I’m good at breaking down a document, whether it’s a press release or a letter to shareholders or an interview, and digging out what’s important. I’m good at linking things that are happening right now to big changes that happen over decades. I’m really comfortable with the publishing and media industries; I speak their language.

Also, besides research, I was a teacher for ten years. I love working with younger writers, whether it’s as an editor or just helping them think about what they do, because that was my job. And a lot of the students I taught in college have gone on to have really great careers in the industries I write about, which is really satisfying too."



"CAPITAL: You've extensively studied the history, theory, and future of writing. So what’s the future of writing?

CARMODY: I’m bullish on writing. Movies, radio, television, and now digital media—everything was supposed to push us away from text, to video or “back” to speech. First, there’s no going back. We’re always stumbling forward. Second, writing is invincible. Thirty years ago, we thought we’d all be talking to our computers; instead, we’re all typing on our phones. Can you believe we get to play and work on machines that give you new things to read all day? If you’d told me this when I was six years old, I’d have fainted from happiness.

We live in such a hyperliterate world, soaked and saturated in writing: on our machines, on the streets, on our television screens. It’s just that writing doesn’t live in the boxes that it used to. The genie is out of the bottle. But that just means that the magic could be anywhere."
timcarmody  interviews  academia  journalism  highered  highereducation  writing  text  media  snarkmarket  context  research  television  radio  film  literacy  multiliteracies  hyperliteracy  2015  howweread  howwewrite  cellphones  mobile  phones  voicerecognition  readingmachines 
january 2015 by robertogreco
A leaky rocketship / Snarkmarket
"Joining this blog was one of the most important things that ever happened to me, and that’s another way in which I can judge somewhat objectively how important it is been. In November 2008, I was on the academic job market, getting ready to interview for a few tenure-track jobs and postdoctoral fellowships, and it was weird — it was a time when people, smart people, influential people still said “you shouldn’t have a blog, you shouldn’t be on twitter, if you do these things, you should do them under pseudonyms, and if anyone asks you about it, you shouldn’t tell them, because if you blog, and it’s known that you write a blog, online, people are going to wonder whether or not you’re really serious about your work, and you just don’t want to give them any extra ammunition to wonder anything about you.”

I didn’t care. I had been waiting for one or two years, ever since Robin had suggested that maybe Snarkmarket would add a few writers and maybe I might be one of them, I think when we were on our way to the bathroom at the Museum of Modern Art on a random visit, and I was just super hungry to be handed the key to this place where I’ve been reading and writing comments since before I knew what a blog really was.

Is that still a thing, people getting excited about being able to be part of a blog? I didn’t think so, but then I became part of Paul Ford’s tilde.club and saw people falling over themselves to get an invite to SSH into a UNIX server, just to be a part of something, just to have a chance to put up some silly, low bandwidth, conceptually clever websites and chat with strangers using the UNIX terminal. It’s not like being one of the cool kids who’s in on a private beta for the latest and greatest smartphone app, where your enjoyment is really about being separate from the people who aren’t included, and the expected attitude is a kind of jaded, privileged disinterest: it’s more like getting a chance to play with the neighbor kid’s Lego set, and he has all the Legos.

Robin and Matt had crazy good Legos. I didn’t get that academic job, but I was able to take their Legos and build my way into a job writing for Wired, of all places, 30 years old and I’d never been a journalist except by osmosis and imposture here at Snarkmarket, and now I get paid every month to write for Wired, how does that happen except that this place was an extra scaffolding for all of us, for me in grad school, for Matt at newspapers across the country, for Robin at Gore TV/Current TV/Twitter, to build careers that weren’t possible for people who didn’t have that beautiful Lego scaffolding to support them (I’m wearing a sling on my arm right now with straps that wrap around my body to hold my arm in place, and a screw and washer to hold my shoulder bone together, my upper arm bone really, plus my rotator cuff, plus hold massive tendons, plus I’m thinking about those times that I would walk from my apartment in Columbus Circle down Broadway to Four Times Square in Manhattan to go to work at wired, wired isn’t there anymore, Condé Nast just moved in to one World Trade Center today, all the way downtown, but the scaffolding in Manhattan that is just constant, that is the only thing that allows the city to remake itself day after day month after month year after year, so this scaffolding metaphor is really doing something for me, plus Legos, well, Legos that just came from before, so what can I tell you, roll with it).

I don’t work at Wired, Robin doesn’t work at Twitter, Matt is at NPR, and we are where we are because of the things that we did but also because of this place. Ars Technica ran a story about it being 10 years since EPIC 2014 – I could paste the link [http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/epic-2014-recalling-a-decade-old-imagining-of-the-tech-driven-media-future/ ] and maybe that would be the bloggy thing to do, but you’re big boys and girls, you can Google it after you finish reading this — and there’s great interviews in there with Robin and Matt about how they made the video, and some specific names of wars and companies aside, were basically right about how technology companies were going to take the distribution and interpretation of the news away from both traditional journalism companies and the emerging open standards of the World Wide Web. I mean, isn’t that a hell of a thing, to see the future and put it in a flash movie? Anything was possible in 2004, especially if that anything Looked like a future that was vaguely uncomfortable but not so bad, really.

I turned 35 today, and I don’t really have a lot of deep thoughts about my own life or career or where I am in it. I’ve had those on other birthdays, and I’ve had them on many days in the not too distant past. Today, though, I’ve mostly felt warm and embraced by the people all around me, in my home, across the country, on the telephone, connected to me by the mails, whose books I read (and whose books publishers send to my house, my friends are writing books and their publishers send them free to my house, that’s almost as amazing as a machine that I can control that lets me read new things all day), and who were connected to me by the Internet: on twitter or Facebook, on Slack or email, by text message or text messaging’s many, many hypostases, all around me, as real to me as anyone I’ve ever imagined or read or touched, all of them, all of them warm and kind and gracious and curious about me and how I’m doing, what I’m up to, what I’m thinking, what I want to do this week or next month or when I get a chance to read that thing they sent me. it is as real to me as that invented community at the end of epic 2015 [http://epic.makingithappen.co.uk or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQDBhg60UNI ], that brilliant coda that people almost always forget, and I don’t know why because it’s actually a better prediction of our future-come-present than anything in the first video, but maybe it’s not about the New York Times, it’s just about a beautiful day outside, a traffic accident, an open door, Matt’s beautiful voice when he narrates that photograph, beckoning you to come outside to look, LOOK.

The Snarkmatrix Is infinite, the stark matrix is everywhere, the start matrix can touchdown at any point in these electronic channels and reconstitute itself, extending perpetually outward into the entire world of media and ideas and editors who are trying to understand what will happen next, and teenage kids who are trying to figure out how what they’re doing maps in any way at all to this strange, established world of culture, to writers who are anxious for any sense of community, any place to decompress between the often hostile worlds of social media and professional correspondence. People want a place, a third place, and blogs are a great form of that place, even when they’re not blogs. (I’m subblogging now. This is what it’s come to. But I think most of you feel me.)"
2014  snarkmarket  epic2014  epic2015  timcarmody  robinsloan  mattthomas  blog  blogging  writing  scaffolding  lego  snarkmatrix  looking  seeing  observing  sharing  conversation  howwelearn  howwethink  howwewrite  history  future  making  culturecreation  media  journalism  slack  email  im  twitter  facebook  socialmedia 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: A Concise History of the Future
"Tim: I used to have a rule, that I would never just link to stuff. I always had to comment just as much.
That’s why in my first year, I had about fifteen posts.
Robin: a blog is like an article of clothing. a weird one, like a futuristic pointy hat or silver pants.
you don’t know how to wear it at first…
but then you break it in — you get comfortable with it
Tim: but suddenly you go to a party where everyone’s rocking it
and you say… oh, that’s how you do it
Matt: when we started, I just thought it would be a good way to keep in touch w/ Robin. which it has been. but it ended up much awesomer, which was a plus.
Robin: well i credit snarkmarket to essentially changing my trajectory in journalism entirely.
because, almost overnight,
it was so much more FUN than writing normal articles,
and getting feedback in the normal way.
which is to say, not at all.
your party metaphor applies here, tim.
Tim: Snarkmarket easily made me much more interested in, um, now than I ever would have been.
Reminds me of the Nietzsche quote — the trouble with scholars is that by thinking backward, eventually you believe backward too.
Robin: mmm i like that!
Tim: SM has helped me orient my thinking forward.
Robin: a blog — and all the things that surround & support it, like a well-stocked rss reader, and commenters — are an anchor to the present
sometimes to a fault
but even so
Tim: The real trouble is thinking that backwards is the last forwards
like, the real break is the printing press
or the french revolution
or the advent of the computer
some epoch-making change that fixes everything forever
so you don’t see how things are changing now
Matt: it took me a moment to process “backwards is the last forwards.”
Tim: thinking backwards to find beginnings
rather than closures or ruptures
Matt: I eventually got it. I like it.
Tim: which in a way is a blinder to optimism
Matt: I’m going to toss that at a curmudgeonly academic one of these days.
Robin: honestly we’ve waited too long to refresh/reboot/rethink snarkmarket —
partly as a result of, you know, having jobs and lives and things —
but at its ideal it is changing a lot more frequently, a lot more fluidly.
so we should think of this evolution not as an epoch-maker
but the first beat in a new, faster tempo
Matt: amen.
Tim: right, throwing the finish line ahead so you can run past it
Matt: the other day, I was thinking about how I’ve never kept a diary. and there was a moment of regret - all those thoughts and memories that have just been scattered to the ages.
but then I remembered Snarkmarket. which is the oddest type of diary. ‘cause it’s not about me, but it’s about how I view the world.
Robin: yes! actually matt, you just linked to an old 2006 post of mine today —
and i clicked over and went: “wait… who wrote this?”
it struck me in the best possible way
Tim: a diary of public preoccupations
So, like, what are the big moments in SM history?
It seems like Robin targeting Al Gore TV is a big one
EPIC is undoubtedly a big one
which, in a way, is more consequential.
Matt: I remember four years ago, a while after Dean’s Presidential candidacy went up in flames, when I posted about a story I intended to report in ten years. (when his records from office in VT would be made public.)
Robin: love that. i feel that we must endeavor to make snarkmarket a reliable repository for ten-year ideas.
Matt: Snarkmarket seemed the most enduring document in which to declare that intent. there was no better way to send a message to myself in 10 years.
Robin: we’re halfway there already which isn’t bad.



Matt: blogging = destiny.
Robin: welcome to the snarkmatrix officially, tim
Tim: thanks kids.
Matt: yes, we are very glad to have you.
Tim: good to be aboard this leaky rocketship into the future."
snarkmarket  2008  timcarmody  mattthompson  robinsloan  blog  blogging  optimism  writing  howwewrite  howwethink  forwardthinking  backwardthinking  evolution  progress  inventingthefuture  genesis  future 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Calculating the Weight of the Object / Snarkmarket
"I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the relationship between objects and activities. It’s something obviously affected by digitally-enabled multi-functionality. The digital object doesn’t so much have “a function” as a series of functions under an umbrella of one or two metafunctions – to wit, “this device is what I use to keep up to date” or “my tablet is what I use to read everything from the news to novels.” The association between object and function that was often one-to-one has become multiplied, perhaps receding into infinity (what, really, is the limit of what you can do with your iPhone?)

But more than that, though I know it sounds like mere tautology, the function of physical devices is related to their physicality. How they operate and what they do in 3D space is dependent on the manner in which they occupy that space. Maybe it’s my digitally-addled brain that needs reminding of that, but it somehow feels like a point worth repeating. And the Curta, in a world in which even the scientific calculator feels arcane, just seems so fascinatingly, resoundingly, undeniably physical. And perhaps it’s because of that physicality, but something about it thus seems so purposeful.

It is easy to get caught up in romanticizing the object we can touch, just as we here on Snarkmarket can occasionally get a bit too attached to pixels you can interact with and manipulate. But I’ve been wondering lately if, beyond the chatter about the attention economy or a supposed “inherent” nature to print or screens, there isn’t something pleasurable in the object that performs but one function. Physical or digital, it doesn’t matter. All I mean to ask is if there isn’t something to be enjoyed in a conscious minimalism of function rather than form – that one might find relief in the simplicity of a one-to-one relationship between an activity and a thing."

[Video referenced within: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDn_DDsBWws ]
snarkmarket  2014  objects  physicality  weight  navneetalang  williamgibson  patternrecognition  curta  calculators  digital  physical  digitalobjects  metafunctions  functions  space  purpose  pixels  dimensionality  3d 
january 2014 by robertogreco
What a dodo might teach us about books / Snarkmarket
"We seem to be living in a perpetual age of the death throes of The Book. 1 There are too many pieces to count that insist that the book is dead or (despite all odds) is thriving, that paper books are different/better/worse than electronic books, that game apps will save books, blah blah blah. We seem to rehash the same surface-level observations over and over again. As my friend Alan Jacobs wondered, “Why do people still write as though they’re the first ones to think about the difference between e-books and codices?” I’ll spare you my thoughts on the subject, since I’ll only gripe about how people misunderstand the complexities of books, whether on a print or a digital platform, and who wants to read more griping?

If you want to think about these questions through experiencing them, let’s look instead at some books that live on the boundary between print and electronic. The obvious starting place is Amaranth Borsuk and Brad Bouse’s Between Page and Screen (Siglio Press, 2012): it exists in a codex form that can be held in your hand but to read it, you’ll need a computer. The pages of the book are black-and-white geometric shapes that are referred to as markers or hieroglyphs or sigils. The shapes aren’t legible as words to the human eye; hold them up to your webcam, however, and the book’s website will show back to you the poem floating above the page."



"There are other books that take the graphic approach to the question of where the boundary is between print and electronic. Silvio Lorusso and Sebastian Schmieg’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens: Photographed E Ink, Collected Online, Printed On Demand (2012) consists of 56 images of broken Kindle screens found on Flickr and then reproduced in a print-on-demand paperback. The images can be gorgeous, and I love both the way it turns broken objects into art and the layers of mediation, moving from e-ink to pixel to paper, that goes into producing it. And my scholar’s heart loves that at the back of the book are credits for each image.



There’s also the more straightforward projects of printing out the web. Rob Matthews, in 2012, printed out 0.01% of Wikipedia as a 5000-page, 1’7” tall book (XKCD, by the way, has worked out how many printers it would take to print out the entire English-language Wikipedia). There’s the ongoing Printing out the Internet (“A crowdsourced project to literally print out the entire internet.”), which doesn’t seem as clever to me as it does to its creators, although it’s apparently somehow intended to memorialize Aaron Swartz. If that’s not enough, the Library of the Printed Web displays the terrifying number of projects devoted to variations of this enterprise. It makes me weary just thinking about it. I do love The Art of Google Books, however, and if its creator, Krissy Wilson, does end up making a book from the Tumblr (as she suggests she’s interested in doing), I’d buy it in a heartbeat.

My favorite book for thinking about technologies and obsolescence is A Dodo at Oxford: The Unreliable Account of a Student and His Pet Dodo (Oxgarth Press, 2010). This book, edited by Philip Atkins and Michael Johnson, purports to be a facsimile edition of a 1695 printed diary of an student at Oxford who owned a dodo. Atkins and Johnson tell the story of finding the book in an Oxfam, searching for more information about it, and finally editing it for us today. The bulk of the volume is their facsimile replication of the diary with their annotations in the margin explaining various historical facts and oddities; there are also a series of appendices explaining early modern printing, including the use of the long-s, ligatures, and signature marks.



Perhaps the main thing to remember as the fruitless debate circles and circles is that any opposition between print and digital is, today, ridiculous. You might think you’re reading a paper book, but it was, I promise you, produced through digital means. The person who wrote it is overwhelmingly likely to have used a computer to do so, it was edited and typeset using software, its distribution is enabled and tracked with databases, and it is reviewed and discussed in both electronic and physical spaces that are enabled by technology. 3

It’s not a black-and-white world out there. Our methods of producing and consuming books will continue to be as multiply shaded as our reactions to them has always been. So here’s to reading instead of fretting!"
snarkmarket  books  ebooks  sarahwerner  howweread  2014  software  digiital  digitaldualism  alanjacobs  print  papernet  reading 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Starting areas / Snarkmarket
"This short post is about starting areas in MMOs. When you create a new character in, say, World of Warcraft, where do you begin? How much of the world is available to you, and how soon?

Here’s the author Keen’s ideal starting situation — one that apparently goes against the grain of modern MMO design:
Players start hours apart, and in areas of the world so different from each other that the social mechanisms are different. I remember seeing people say, “We do things differently in this part of the world.” Someone hunting in Crushbone might be used to players behaving differently than those in Blackburrow. Even the experiences are totally unique; players on one side of the world might have a dungeon crawl deep into the depths of a vast cavern network, and players on the other side fight camps of orcs in a forest. The unique experience matters because people can swap stories.


Because people can swap stories! That’s so great, and so important. I don’t know exactly how this applies to domains beyond MMOs, but I’m quite sure that it does."
mmos  sotrytelling  gaming  games  videogames  play  conversation  experience  robinsloan  snarkmarket  2013 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Twitter / robinsloan: @audreywatters @tcarmody @mthomps ...
"@audreywatters @tcarmody @mthomps Ha! Nothing we do at @snarkmarket is massive or even particularly scalable—that's part of its charm ;-)"

…in response to https://twitter.com/audreywatters/status/265508419048439808

"@tcarmody @Snarkmarket @mthomps @robinsloan thank you for not calling this MOOC. Otherwise, you'd be dead to me, Carmody"

…in response to https://twitter.com/tcarmody/status/265507504723738624

"The best blogs become great classrooms. On @Snarkmarket’s Tenth Anniversary Seminar w/@mthomps, @robinsloan, me, & you: http://snarkmarket.com/2012/8022 "
snarkmarket  seminars  charm  scaling  scale  robinsloan  timcarmody  audreywatters  moocs  2012  mooc  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
A whole magazine of this, please « Snarkmarket
"Seriously, imagine this magazine. (And when I say “magazine” I obviously mean “website.”) It would be so different from anything that’s out there today. It wouldn’t be people trying to convince you of things. (This is the usual mode of, say, The New York Review of Books—although props to them for publishing Nagel on Plantinga.) Nor would it be people ironically infiltrating different belief systems. (This is the mode of a lot of narrative journalism today, and it’s super entertaining! You know: “I spent six weeks hanging out with these crazy people and here’s what I saw.”) It would be… brains at work. Call it The Grappler. An engine of empathy. I don’t know. It would probably have a readership of 300 people but maybe that’s okay."

[Alexis Madrigal comment: "All hail that which does not scale! All hail that which does not scale!"]
saulwurman  intimacy  small  scale  externalization  debate  belief  thomasnagel  longnow  alanjacobs  ianbogost  www.www  wwwconference  intellectualexcercises  understanding  writing  ideas  magazines  comments  snarkmarket  2012  thegrappler  perspective  empathy  robinsloan 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Games in the street « Snarkmarket
"We didn’t play stickball out in the second-ring suburbs of Detroit, but we did play with sticks. We ran in the street until dark and we built forts in the mud down by the creek. Most importantly, we made up new games on the spot.

That’s just about my favorite thing about kids: their willingness to transform anything, instantly, at any time, into a game. And I do mean a game: a system with rules. It can be as simple as I slap your knee, you slap mine but it’s a game.

I was lucky to fall in with a neotenous crew in college, and we spent long afternoons inventing games at Michigan State, too: coming up with new configurations of ground and body and frisbee out on the big quad around the clock tower.

Anyway, Spike Lee shouldn’t lament cocolevio (?!) because it’s in the nature of kids’ culture to change, eventually beyond recognition, but I’m with him when it comes to games in the street. I’m sure there are still some kids playing this way in Cobble Hill, but definitely not as many as before. I mean, there’s just no way, right? There are so many other games already invented for them now—all these other games waiting indoors on bright screens big and small.

Stickball never looked like much fun to me, but you can carry a stick into a sword battle, too. Those were more our style. And at a certain time of day, with the sun low in the sky, a neat lawn could truly become a battlefield. You got tired after just a few tussles, really desperately tired, and maybe your knuckles got a little bloody too, but you had to keep going, had to keep fighting—at least until your mom called you home for dinner.

Snarkmatrix, you know me: I am not a Luddite (no way) and not a techno-triumphalist, either. So I hope you’ll take it not as a nostalgic yawlp but rather a considered statement about the nature of the mind and the body when I say: Raw unselfconscious imagination is the best graphics engine that has ever existed, and the street will forever be the arena in which all the best games are played."
snarkmarket  play  games  neoteny  comments  edg  srg  minecraft  sticks  children  creativity  spikelee  imagination  cocolevio  stickball  rules  robinsloan  2012  brooklyn  interviews  timcarmody 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Imagination to imagination « Snarkmarket
Ellen Ullman quote:

"I think that literature—essays, stories, poems—is the one form where we can meet, imagination to imagination, without hosts of people in between, no directors and actors and set designers and so on. The medium itself is fairly transparent. You don’t need equipment or electrical outlets. You can go off alone to read, and, if the work is good, you are then intensely close to other human beings."

Tim's comment:

"I’ve been thinking about this a bit lately — how literature overcomes (or tries to overcome) the deficiencies of language — all those failures of imaginations to connect — WITH language. Like, only the spear that made this wound can heal it. Cf also Mallarmé, “to purify the language of the tribe.”"
imagination  connection  mallarmé  language  books  reading  ellenullman  communication  poetry  2012  timcarmody  writing  literature  snarkmarket  robinsloan  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
What (Some) People Like On Twitter « Snarkmarket
"The other day on Twitter, I had a particularly silly/dorky Steve Jobs tweet become crazy popular, like a thousand retweets popular. So — being again, particularly silly and dorky myself — decided to pull some of my most popular tweets into a Storify to try to discern a pattern (if any)."

[Don't miss this comment: http://snarkmarket.com/2011/7301/comment-page-1#comment-38907 ]
in-jokes  laughing  jokes  2011  patterns  howwewrite  snarkmarket  timcarmody  writing  twitter  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Danny O’Brien’s Oblomovka » Blog Archive » organically-grown audiences
"In the end, the conversation moved away from “building traffic” and we ended up talking about how slowly you can grow a blog: avoiding ending up with a mass-produced audience, and instead taking the time to organically grow a smaller, perhaps more costly, but ultimately more satisfying bunch of readers."
slow  introverts  blogs  blogging  media  attention  shyness  audience  2008  dannyo'brien  growth  slowblogging  scale  scaling  conversation  snarkmarket  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Snark and bile and something worse « Snarkmarket
[Why Robin is such a class act…]

"When people complain about the relentless snark and bile of the internet, I never get it. Maybe I’ve just feathered too comfortable a nest for myself in Reader, on Twitter, and here on the Sesame Street of Snarkmarket. Whatever the case, the complaint just never rings true. It never corresponds to my actual experience of the internet.

Tonight, it does…

[Jim Romenesko issue of attribution on his Poynter Institute blog]

But even so, I’d like to think I’m arguing something general and reasonable here. Simply put, it’s this:

YES to public reasoning rooted in real values.
NO to cruelty. NEVER to cruelty."
cruelty  robinsloan  2011  levelheadedness  conversation  snarkmarket  poynterinstitute  jimromenesko  choiresicha  juliemoos  disagreement  behavior  reasoning  publicreasoning  attribution  thoughtfulness  journalism  discourse  argument  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
The Storm Collection | RJI
"Matt Thompson and Robin Sloan, co-creators of the hugely popular web video "Epic 2014," released their newest video today, "SND Storm", at the annual convention of the Society of News Design in St. Louis."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/storm/ ]
robinsloan  mattthompson  snarkmarket  news  journalism  2011  storms  socialmedia  communication  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
Bless the toolmakers « Snarkmarket
So much here in Robin's post and the comments that I'm not going to quote anything. Lots to think about.
tools  apple  pixar  arts  art  robinsloan  snarkmarket  creativity  creation  media  freemandyson  roolmaking  liberalarts  lasting  building  software  design  writing  timcarmody  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Harry Potter and the Comment of Wonders « Snarkmarket
"This comment from Robinson Meyer…kinda blows my mind…chatting about fandoms and Harry Potter, and Robinson says:

"But the best part of Harry Potter, for me, came in the reading of the first few chapters of each new book. It was like meeting old friends. I’d discover every time that Harry and I had both grown up a little, had emotionally become more sophisticated, and that we also had that same old warm rapport and that same old love for each other…"

“[R]eading the first few chapters of Books 5, 6, and 7 are among my happiest memories.” That kinda blows my mind.

It also makes me realize that I had no comparable experience as a young reader. There was no fantasy epic being released/revealed as I grew up…

Seriously, I can’t even fully articulate why—but I am sorta obsessed with the last few lines of Robinson’s comment. It’s almost a recipe. Engineer that, somehow, and you win."

[Some great comments here too. Also, check out the Google+ plus that served as the source for the conversation: https://plus.google.com/u/0/108770025895417156764/posts/HZEV4owg9qz ]
harrypotter  snarkmarket  robinsloan  sahelidatta  timcarmody  franchises  books  children  formulas  literature  serials  expectation  anticipation  childrenliterature  2011  robinsonmeyer  fandom  compulsoryfandom  sharedexperience  culture  classideas  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
More lingo « Snarkmarket
"In the context of formless/definite/interactive, this also deserves a mention: Brian Eno says the right word for “interactive” is… “unfinished.” Artful blockquoting, as usual, by Rob Greco."
snarkmarket  robinsloan  ego  brianeno  unfinished  interactive  cv  2011  remkoolhaas  brucemau  culture  work  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Penumbra has a posse > Robin Sloan
"…another char­ac­ter in this story…Sean McDonald.

…an edi­tor at Far­rar, Straus & Giroux. He’s worked with writ­ers as diverse as Junot Díaz (n.b.), John Hodg­man, and the RZA…also a Snark­mar­ket reader (!) & he’s been an impor­tant vec­tor of enthu­si­asm & encour­age­ment…because his mes­sages have always been two-​​fold. First: this is so cool. Then: it can be even better.

& that gets exactly to the heart of why I’m work­ing with Sarah & Sean to pub­lish Penum­bra. You know me: I am a cham­pion of new modes & meth­ods. I love Kick­starter projects & remix con­tests…not going to stop doing any of that stuff.

…when…shop­ping the Penum­bra man­u­script around…I told [publishers] all the same thing: I’m look­ing for a posse…a smart, cre­ative crew who will help me make this book bet­ter than I could make it on my own.

…isn’t just text on a scree…It’s the design, the phys­i­cal arti­fact…press…events we’ll dream up…real books in real book­stores…"
robinsloan  mrpenumbra  publishing  2011  farrarstraus&giroux  seanmcdonald  sarahburnes  posses  books  events  kickstarter  kindle  gernertcompany  remixing  teamwork  snarkmarket  creativity  collaboration  tcsnmy  classideas  remixculture 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The correct use of a semicolon is a big red flag for me’ « Snarkmarket [Comments: http://twitter.com/rogre/status/84717881635512320 AND http://twitter.com/rogre/status/84718450773213184 ]
“I’m just doing this for the grade.”<br />
<br />
"The problem is now that the grade doesn’t even get you the job."<br />
<br />
"You understand where this is going: it’s not even about plagiarism and term papers… it’s about the framework and future of college itself.<br />
<br />
But, P.S., thinking about plagiarizing a term paper—even now, so many years removed from college—makes me physically ill. Seriously: a sick little stir in my stomach. But it has more to do with self-conception than core values. The idea of putting my name above somebody else’s words is just… like… inconceivable. The whole point of having a brain (and maybe, having a life) is that my name goes above my words and my words aren’t like anyone else’s words. This was true even back in college, when I thought I was going to be a scientist or an economist, not a journalist or a writer. So for a person like me (and I suspect there are many of you among the Snarkmatrix) plagiarism is way more than just cheating. It’s self-abnegation."
plagiarism  cheating  education  highereducation  highered  grades  grading  purpose  competition  colleges  universities  teaching  robinsloan  snarkmarket  economics  voice  anonymity  copying  ownership  self-abnegation  values  schooliness  learning  whatswrongwiththispicture  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Children of Troy « Snarkmarket
"This little correspondence cracked like lightning in my head. I mean, it’s no big deal; it’s a small thing, it’s a letter, they were both in Michigan, it makes perfect sense. And yet, and yet: Clifton Wharton, president of Michigan State University, and Marguerite Hart, librarian of Troy—a tangible thread connected them. And as soon as you realize that, you can’t help but imagine the other threads, the other connections, that all together make a net, woven before you were born, before you were even dreamed of—a net to catch you, support you, lift you up. Libraries and universities, books and free spaces—all for us, all of us, the children of Troy everywhere.

What fortune. Born at the right time."

[…]

"And it’s not the librarian laughing and crying at the same time here; it’s me. Every time I’ve read these letters, it’s me."
snarkmarket  robinsloan  libraries  troy  cityoftroy  books  memories  memory  childhood  reading  librarians  connections  knowledge  freespaces  letters  universities  michigan  michiganstate  ebwhite  isaacasimov  cliftonwharton  margueritehart  johnburns  1971  2011  publiclibraries  education  learning  experience  comments  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
If I could keep just three - Noteworthy and Not
"I’ve been almost completely off line for the last three weeks. It’s a long story but I am now drinking coffee and connected at my local Kroger. Ah, the 21st century.<br />
<br />
I am sitting overloaded with interestingness in my reader feeds. I recalled a past comment from Matt Thompson about the pain of clicking mark as read when you firmly  realize you will never catch up on your reading. Just let it go!<br />
<br />
I have pondered over this coffee on the fantasty of keeping just three feeds for my connection source. They would be:<br />
<br />
Tim O’Reilly’s Twitter feed, 50 Watts, Snarkmarket, and the third would be Roberto Greco at Delicious<br />
<br />
The focus of these thought artists is enriching and enlightening and they would provide long reaching tentacles to the rest of the universe."
ego  bettyannsloan  del.icio.us  infooverload  mattthompson  snarkmarket  timoreilly  markalleread  rss  2011  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Kindle abroad « Snarkmarket
"Honestly, even if you are not ever going to read an e-book, but want a device to help you stay connected and organized while traveling—especially if you’re going a bit off the beaten track—the investment in a Kindle (barely more than a hundred bucks at this point) can’t be beat."
travel  ipad  kindle  robinsloan  snarkmarket  ebooks  connectivity  instapaper  2011  future  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Descartes didn’t say that « Snarkmarket
"I like that description, too! Kotkin liked it so much, he put it in his book. I like it so much, I wanted to find out where it came from.

And it turns out Descartes didn’t say that. And the phrase doesn’t mean what Kotkin thinks it does. But there’s a reason both the philosopher and the new meaning got mixed into it.

Get the genealogical-detective lowdown in a Storify by my Twitter-co-archeologist Wilko von Hardenberg after the jump. (I really like his idea that this would make for a great game/exercise in the classroom.)

Also, if you missed it, see why Martin Luther King and Mark Twain didn’t say what you might think they did either. Similar psychology at work here, too. And it shows that it isn’t just the cut-and-pasters on the interwebs who make these mistakes."

[See also: http://storify.com/wilkohardenberg/the-inventory-of-the-possible-attribution AND http://wilkohardenberg.posterous.com/of-scavenger-hunts-great-cities-and-descartes ]
psychology  cities  twitter  quotes  descartes  joelkotkin  timcarmody  snarkmarket  attribution  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Thrall « Snarkmarket
"The last one is my favorite (so far)—not because it describes my own experience (it doesn’t) or because I agree with it (I don’t quite), but because it’s a great example of someone thinking out loud—working something out in words. And also because it seems to evoke this great line of Lincoln’s, from his Second Inaugural:

"As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country."

Yeah, I think that’s actually what I like about Bridle’s post: it seems to be about thrall and how to get out of it. It’s a concept I am always sometimes obsessed with and always sensitive to; there’s a lot of thrall out there and you have to be careful or it seeps into your clothes, your skin.

I think you can actually finish Lincoln’s line with a lot of different words—industry, company, family—and it stays true."
snarkmarket  robinsloan  thrall  abrahamlincoln  change  lying  deception  self-deception  yearoff  stasis  deschooling  unschooling  servitude  bondage  power  control  freedom  independence  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
A noteworthy feed « Snarkmarket
"I would like to take a moment to recommend an eclectic tumblr called Noteworthy and Not. I would then like to take another moment to note that its author is my mom.

Over the last few years, my parents have both jumped into the bright bubbling conversation of the internet with both feet—reading lots and lots of stuff, across a whole spectrum of subjects, and increasingly sharing a bit of what they find. My dad is more of a Google Reader sharer, so I won’t out him here. But my mom has been posting to a tumblr for a while now, and you know, wow—it’s really good!

This fun, meditative little video was a recent find. I like the short, stirring comment on this post. This is a trip. Here’s homage to A Journey Round My Skull… and of course, Fuckyeahfrankchimero.

Highly recommended." [As is the comments thread on this post too.]
bettyannsloan  robinsloan  handmeups  handmedowns  generations  snarkmarket  commenting  timcarmody  tumblr  mattthompson  frankchimero  steppingout  snarkmarketcommentertoblogger  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Coming out « Snarkmarket
"For those reasons, I’ve still been reluctant to say too much, especially on the open web. There are plenty of privacy issues that go way beyond myself…

But since so much of my life now, so many of my friendships, happen online, and since I’m determined to not let fear or anxiety about what I do or don’t say control how I feel about the world, this seems like as good a time as any to tell a whole lot more people all at once.

As Jeff Mangum put it in Neutral Milk Hotel’s song “Ghost,” I’m resolved to “never be afraid / to watch the morning paper blow / into a hole / where no one can escape.” Or as xkcd put it in the comic “dreams” (This is actually the very last part of my talk), Fuck. That. Shit.

It’s an experience — one that’s always ongoing — that broke my heart and changed my life, irrevocably, for the better. Orders of magnitude better. It taught me who I was and is teaching me who I am. I can’t explain it any better than that."
timcarmody  snarkmarket  adoption  parenting  humanities  digitalhumanities  digital  privacy  online  yearoff  experience  life  beauty  growth  fear  anxiety  courage  lifechanging  identity  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Last Hours of @MayorEmanuel « Snarkmarket
"…here is the stunning conclusion to the story of @MayorEmanuel. He won the election and as predicted by Mayor Daley, vanished into a time vortex in order to save the multiverse.

I’ve also been boning up on my @MayorEmanuel backstory, & man, it is totally batshit in the best possible way. There are layers and layers to this thing that I couldn’t even guess at, and a few I’m probably still missing. In short, the anonymous author(s) of the thread have been building towards this science-fiction/comic-book resolution of the story for a while now, first planting the seeds months ago, then grinding them up like fine celery salt.

You can read a quick-&-dirty PDF of all of @MayorEmanuel’s tweets …assembled by @najuu…I’m not Storifying the whole thing, because 1) Twitter’s archives have a hard time going back that far in the Storify interface & 2) even if they did, I’m not stupid. But I would like to do my small part to gather the limbs of Osiris just here at the end."
timcarmody  rahmemanuel  mayoremanuel  chicago  writing  fiction  multiverse  snarkmarket  humor  realitystretching  politics  storytelling  thenewstorytelling  storify  2011  elections  @mayoremanuel  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Two Mayors « Snarkmarket
"Since Emanuel announced he was running for office, he’s been joined by a delightfully funny and foul-mouthed shadow on Twitter calling himself @MayorEmanuel…combines a kind of exaggeration of the known qualities of the real Rahm Emanuel…with a fully-realized, totally internal world of characters and events that has little to do with the real world and everything to do with the comic parallel universe @MayorEmanuel inhabits.

…The idea is that if we strip back the secrecy and public image to something so impolitic, so unlikely, we might arrive at something approximating the truth…

Yesterday, however, @MayorEmanuel outdid himself. He wrote an extended, meandering narrative of the day before the primary that took the whole parallel Rahm Emanuel thing to a different emotional, comic, cultural place entirely. It even features a great cameo by friend of the Snark Alexis Madrigal. The story is twisting, densely referential, far-ranging — and surprisingly, rather beautiful."
chicago  twitter  rahmemanuel  mayoremanuel  timcarmody  storify  alternateuniverse  humor  snarkmarket  writing  fiction  realitystretching  elections  politics  @mayoremanuel  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
What is social information? « Snarkmarket
"Wallace has already signaled that this is going to be a paragraph about repetition to exhaustion or even injury before he even does it. You could say he needs to keep clarifying & repeating these things because his sentences are so convoluted that otherwise you couldn’t follow them, but 1) his syntax is pretty clear 2) it’s not like he’s a freak about specifying everything… But it’s also just Wallace — who understands all of this, by the way, better than we do: communication, information, redundancy, efficiency, purity, the dangers of too much information, and especially the fear of being alone and the need to find connection with other human beings — creating a structure that allows him to ping his reader, saying “I am here”… and waiting for his reader to respond in kind, “I’m alive right now; I’m a person; look at me.” 
timcarmody  snarkmarket  davidfosterwallace  infinitejest  language  solitude  loneliness  human  need  information  redundancy  efficiency  purity  clarity  communication  infooverload  connectedness  connection  freemandyson  malcolmgladwell  devinfriedman  ycombinator  dailybooth  expression  jamesgleick  congo  kele  languages  words  pinging  drums  2011  northafrica  revolution  revolutions  media  raymondcarver  history  cannon  signaling  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Harry Potter and the Farmer’s Market « Snarkmarket
"So what if you set up a stand next to the radish-monger & sold books at the farmer’s market? …an inventory specifically concocted to tickle the brains & tug the heart-strings of farmer’s market true believers?

Then, what about selling books at fancy food stores, wineries, & (yes) mysterious cheese shops? Don’t people have enough cook books already? Couldn’t those stores stock a little rack of cheap Food Cart Boys thrillers & sell them as impulse buys?

Maybe there’s another format that would work even better. Maybe it’s actually a rack of audio books, & you can play one in the kitchen while you make something great out of that dino kale & mysterious cheese.

I think the market is ripe. Everybody’s wondering: okay, first vampires, then zombies…what’s next?…I think it’s food: tales of weird sci-fi food, tales of illicit criminal food, tales of food & love.

I want the next wave to be food, because I think those could be amazing stories, & because I think they’re worth telling."
robinsloan  comments  snarkmarket  food  books  publishing  booksellers  farmersmarkets  cooking  literature  fiction  2011  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
All hail the humble component « Snarkmarket
Frank Chimero: "I like the term steadfast for these components [durable], and calling the more ephemeral technologies “hot-swap” because you swap them out without shutting down the system."
steadfast  hot-swap  robinsloan  frankchimero  shopping  plannedobsolescence  longevity  plannedlongevity  durability  ephemeralization  electronics  clothing  media  snarkmarket  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Film History 101 (via Netflix Watch Instantly) « Snarkmarket
"Robin is absolutely right: I like lists, I remember everything I’ve ever seen or read, and I’ve been making course syllabi for over a decade, so I’m often finding myself saying “If you really want to understand [topic], these are the [number of objects] you need to check out.” Half the fun is the constraint of it, especially since we all now know (or should know) that constraints = creativity."

[See also Matt Penniman's "Sci-fi Film History 101" list: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6492 ]
film  netflix  history  cinema  movies  timcarmody  snarkmarket  teaching  curation  curating  constraints  lists  creativity  forbeginners  thecanon  pairing  sharing  expertise  experience  education  learning  online  2010  frankchimero  surveycourses  surveys  web  internet  perspective  organization  succinct  focus  design  the101  robinsloan  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  reference  pacing  goldcoins  surveycasts  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Two observations on Lanier on Wikileaks « Snarkmarket
"We’ve canonized these guys, to the point where 1) we think they did everything themselves, 2) they never used different strategies, 3) they never made mistakes, & 4) disagreeing w/ them then or now violates a deep moral law.

More importantly, in comparison, every other kind of activism is destined to fall short. Lanier’s essay, like Malcolm Gladwell’s earlier essay on digital activism, violates the Gandhi principle… The point is, both Ad Hitlerem and the Gandhi Principle opt for terminal purity over differential diagnosis. If you’re not bringing it MLK-style, you’re not really doing anything.

The irony is, Lanier’s essay is actually pretty strong at avoiding the terminal purity problem in other places — i.e., if you agree with someone’s politics, you should agree with (or ignore) their tactics, or vice versa. At its best, it brings the nuance, rather than washing it out."
timcarmody  snarkmarket  wikileaks  jaronlanier  julianassange  2010  falsedichotomies  purity  allornothing  canonization  malcolmx  activism  gandhi  nelsonmandela  jesus  imperfection  grey  tactics  politics  mlk  martinlutherkingjr  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Comic Chat « Snarkmarket
"did not know that a thing called Microsoft Comic Chat ever existed, but now I want it to exist again. Ideally as a web app. Ideally with the option to save comic-chats and post them on your blog.<br />
<br />
Check out the expression selector in the lower right corner! Seriously—I love this."
microsoftcomicchat  comics  comicchat  microsoft  snarkmarket  chat  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Was Marc Ambinder actually a blogger? « Snarkmarket
"But there’s an equally excellent genre of journalism that foregrounds the author’s curiosities, concerns and assumptions — James Fallows’ immortal foretelling of the Iraq War, Atul Gawande’s investigation of expenditures in health care. This is ego-driven reporting, in the best possible way. For every Problem from Hell, there’s another Omnivore’s Dilemma. Far from demolishing counterarguments, Ambinder’s mention of “ego-free journalism” instantly summons to mind its opposite."

"I think this is what Ambinder’s experience reflects — his choices and his idiosyncrasies. He chose to blog about national politics — an extraordinarily crowded (and particularly solipsistic) field. To distinguish himself from the crowd, he chose to craft a persona known for its canny insider’s pose and behind-the-scenes insights. I think it was a terrific choice; I’ve enjoyed his Atlantic writing a lot. But there’s little essential about the format that compelled him to this choice."

[One of three Snarkmarket posts on Marc Ambinder's "I Am a Blogger No Longer", links to them all here: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6396 ]
snarkmarket  mattthompson  blogging  journalism  objectivity  writing  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Blogger, Reporter, Author « Snarkmarket [One of three Snarkmarket posts on Marc Ambinder's "I Am a Blogger No Longer", links to them all here: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6396]
"So far, we have lived in a world where most the bloggers who have been successful have done so by being authors — by being taken seriously as distinct voices and personalities with particular obsessions and expertise about the world. And that colors — I won’t say distorts, but I almost mean that — our perception of what blogging is.<br />
<br />
There are plenty of professional bloggers who don’t have that. (I read tech blogs every day, and couldn’t name you a single person who writes for Engadget right now.) They might conform to a different stereotype about bloggers. But that’s okay. I really did write snarky things about obscure gadgets in my basement while wearing pajama pants this morning. But I don’t act, write, think, or dress like that every day."
blogging  journalism  timcarmody  snarkmarket  blogs  marcambinder  authors  athorship  writing  writers  identity  voice  publishing  newspapers  magazines  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Escape from Thunderdome « Snarkmarket [One of three Snarkmarket posts on Marc Ambinder's "I Am a Blogger No Longer". Links within and a great comment thread too.]
"Ambinder totally made the right choice…because…blogging in a Thunderdome of criticism is a really bad idea…it erodes the soul, &…it’s probably not something that a person should do.

There’s a line of thinking that says the whole point of blogging is to…engage with The People Out There. (Especially Perhaps If They Are Vehement Critics.) I think that line of thinking is wrong…a blog at its best is a dinner party, & if you're the guy who shouts me down whenever I rise to speak, who questions my very motives for throwing this party in the first place: you are not invited.

Now, happily, it’s a special kind of dinner party. Anyone can listen in, & the front door is ajar…there’s probably always an extra place set, Elijah-style. But even so: it’s a space that belongs to its authors, & they set its rules. Maybe that’s easier said than done when you’re blogging about the Tea Party…but I don’t know. There’s a red delete button next to every comment…and it’s pretty easy to click."
robinsloan  blogging  marcambinder  snarkmarket  manners  netiquette  conversation  politics  discussion  argument  etiquette  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
A family resemblance of obsessions « Snarkmarket
"Blogs — the best blogs — are public diaries of preoccupations. The reason why they are preoccupations is that you need someone who is continually pushing on the language to regenerate itself. The reason why they are public is so that those generations and regenerations and degenerations can find their kin, across space, across fame, across the likelihood of a connection, and even across time itself, to be rejoined and reclustered together.

Because that is how language and language-users are reborn; that is how the system, both artificial and natural, loops backward upon and maintains itself; because that is how a public and republic are made, how a man can be a media cyborg, and also become a city. That’s how this place where we gather becomes home."
timcarmody  language  blogs  blogging  definitions  cyborgs  regenerations  degenerations  connections  neologisms  words  time  etymology  ego  cv  obsessions  obsession  snarkmarket  robinsloan  timmaly  family-resemblance  ludwigwittgenstein  meaning  conversation  gamechanging  perspective  learning  understanding  misunderstanding  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Kanye West, media cyborg « Snarkmarket
"At some point in your life, you meet a critical mass of smart, fun, interesting people, and a depressing realization hits: There are too many. You’ll never meet all the people that you ought to meet. You’ll never have all the conversations that you ought to have. There’s simply not enough time."

"Media lets you clone pieces of yourself and send them out into the world to have conversations on your behalf. Even while you’re sleeping, your media —your books, your blog posts, your tweets—is on the march. It’s out there trying to making connections. Mostly it’s failing, but that’s okay: these days, copies are cheap. We’re all Jamie Madrox now."

[Pair of tweets from me in response: (1) .@robinsloan's "clone[d] pieces of yourself" + classroom of middle schoolers = @fchimero's "past me just punked present me" = my every day AND (2) Context for previous tweet: "clone[d] pieces of yourself" http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6262 & "past me just punked present me" http://bit.ly/9afv3q ]

[URLs for my tweets quoted above: http://twitter.com/rogre/status/24637354857 AND http://twitter.com/rogre/status/24637637721 ]
snarkmarket  robinsloan  kanyewest  cyborgs  media  timeshifting  atemporality  mediaextensions  tools  mediaprostheses  conversation  mediaextandability  mediacyborgs  timmaly  cv  teaching  scale  frustration  slow  toolittletime  time  frankchimero  tcsnmy  celebrity  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
A Herald From the Past « Snarkmarket
"Bayard Rustin’s first rule of man­age­ment was to make lists of every con­ceiv­able task. If some­body thinks that some­thing can pos­si­bly go wrong, come up with a spe­cific solu­tion, and put it on the list. Orga­niz­ing any­thing — a mas­sive march, a union picket, a train­ing pro­gram, a news­pa­per — suc­ceeds or fails because of details.

All day long, Rustin and his team crossed off com­pleted tasks and added new tasks to the three– and four-page lists"
bayardrustin  lists  problemsolving  organization  timcarmody  snarkmarket  doing  action  actionminded  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Ruleless Road « Snarkmarket
"In the long list of books I’ll never write, there’s one that’s about a the­ory of risk. The the­ory is that there’s a thresh­old of risk aver­sion beyond which our attempts to extin­guish risk actu­ally exac­er­bate it. It would be filled with the case stud­ies you might expect — things like the overuse of antibi­otics and how a finan­cial insur­ance prod­uct short-circuited the econ­omy. But the open­ing anec­dote would be about roads. And I’d basi­cally copy and paste it from from this Decem­ber ’04 Wired story: …"
comments  mattthompson  snarkmarket  risk  behavior  roads  driving  antibiotics  insurance  finance  riskaversion  helicopterparents  handmoderman  complexity  simplicity  helicopterparenting  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Unemployment Media « Snarkmarket
"It’s the dark side of Clay Shirky’s cog­ni­tive sur­plus, where tech­nol­ogy and edu­ca­tion haven’t just cre­ated a new pool of leisure time, but a pool of high-skill knowl­edge work­ers dev­as­tated by struc­tural unem­ploy­ment, with noth­ing to do but cre­ate and imag­ine and argue, strug­gling to hold on to the lives they imag­ined for them­selves, or used to lead."
cognitivesurplus  clayshirky  snarkmarket  timcarmody  writing  unemployment  greatrecession  productivity  freelancing  content  blogs  blogging  education  2010  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
The generative web event « Snarkmarket [Important post stitching together two other important posts on the future of media]
"One new kind of media that’s start­ing to func­tion as a work is a blog. Not, in most cases, a blog post—but a blog. If NYTimes decides, “hey, we’re going to start & host a blog all about par­ent­ing” that blog becomes a Work. It pro­duces ongo­ing cul­tural focus, & not just because it’s in NYT. Some posts get more atten­tion than oth­ers, espe­cially if they cross over into long-form venue, but writ­ing that blog, stick­ing with it, being its author, cre­ates focus, read­er­ship & long accu­mu­la­tion of con­tent. & I’m sure Lisa Belkin (already wrote a book about par­ent­ing) will get another book out of it.

But the other new, emer­gent work, which might be more rad­i­cal, is the gen­er­a­tive web event. 48HrMag, One Week | One Tool, Robin’s novel­las & maybe even New Lib­eral Arts (espe­cially if we put together another edi­tion) are all ances­tral species of this new thing—chil­dren of TED, Phoot Camp, Long Now, Iron Chef, & par­ents of whatever’s going to come next."
events  ted  gamechanging  tcsnmy  lcproject  future  generative  generativeevents  newliberalarts  longnow  48hrmag  longshot  robinsloan  timcarmody  snarkmarket  collaboration  collaborative  classideas  media  blogs  blogging  longform  phootcamp  ironchef  oneweekonetool  writing  2010  education  weliveinamazingtimes  generativewebevents  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Jonah Lehrer and The Fourth Culture « Snarkmarket
Lehrer: "[4th cul­ture] seeks to dis­cover rela­tion­ships btwn human­i­ties & sci­ences…will ignore arbi­trary intel­lec­tual bound­aries, seek­ing instead to blur lines that sep­a­rate…freely trans­plant knowl­edge btwn sci­ences & human­i­ties, & focus on con­nect­ing reduc­tion­ist fact to our actual expe­ri­ence…take prag­matic view of truth &…judge truth not by its ori­gins but by its use­ful­ness…While sci­ence will always be our pri­mary method of inves­ti­gat­ing the uni­verse, it is naïve to think that sci­ence alone can solve every­thing itself, or that every­thing can even be solved…When we ven­ture beyond edge of our knowl­edge, all we have is art…No knowl­edge has a monop­oly on knowledge."
knowledge  timcarmody  snarkmarket  media  interdisciplinary  humanities  science  art  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  jonahleherer  stevenpinker  proustwasaneuroscientist  books  jeffreyjcohen  truth  learning  relativism  absolutism  brain  language  languages  culture  history  society  messiness  fourthculture  jonahlehrer 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The value of older people « Snarkmarket
"When I see my grand­mother, I don’t ask her about the names of plants or when the best time is to plant cer­tain flow­ers, even though I know that she (and not I) know this stuff cold. I don’t even (at least always) ask her to sew my split pants seat or loose jacket but­ton, even though she’s the one in the fam­ily who’s got the sewing machine and knows how to use it.
experience  wisdom  childhood  grandparents  snarkmarket  relationships  understanding  timcarmody  age  aging 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Reading and the Panda’s Thumb « Snarkmarket [Don't miss the comments thread.]
"“Writ­ing evolved to fit the cor­tex.” On the one hand, it makes per­fect sense that a human inven­tion would be lim­ited by human biol­ogy — that the visual forms of writ­ing would be lim­ited by our abil­i­ties to rec­og­nize pat­terns in the same way that the sounds of let­ters are lim­ited by the shape and struc­ture of the human mouth.
snarkmarket  timcarmody  neuroscience  brain  reading  stanislasdehaene  research  evolution  human  stephenjaygould  claudelevi-strauss  jonahlehrer 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Braiiins « Snarkmarket
I've been digging into the Snarkives of posts tagged with 'braiiins' (as highlighted by @tcarmody the other day) and will probably be bookmarking some of them here (if I haven't already). Reading about neuroscience is some of the best professional development a teacher can ask for. One part that I find most fascinating is how quickly our understanding of the brain changes. And I think this gets back to the importance of uncertainty and why we should place it at the center of school programs. Science provides us with the lesson that we can update our understanding without losing face: throw out the disproved model and embrace the new, but not too tightly, rather uncertainly. That's progressive—valuing what you now know, but always moving on to something more accurate when it appears.
brains  snarkmarket  uncertainty  neuroscience  science  progressive  professionaldevelopment  learning  change  certainty  brain 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: The Attention Deficit: The Need for Timeless Journalism
"Journalism can now exist outside of time. The only reason we’re constrained to promoting news on a minutely, hourly, daily or weekly basis is because we’ve inherited that notion from media that really do operate in fixed time cycles. But we now have the potential to signal importance on whatever scale you might imagine — the most important stories of the year, of the decade, of the moment. What are the most important issues facing this community at this time? What would our sites look like if we asked ourselves that question? What would our journalism look like?"

[Robin's comment reminds me of http://wrongtomorrow.com/ and http://www.kottke.org/tag/post%20updates ]
2007  futureofjournalism  onlinejournalism  innovation  journalism  news  media  time  snarkmarket  mattthompson  robinsloan  timcarmody  follow-up  crisis  continuity  timeshifting  timestretching 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Following up on the need for follow-up » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Which ends up translating, less elegantly but more specifically, to the tyranny of the news peg. In our current approach to news, ideas and connections and continuities — context, more generally — often become subsidiary to “now” itself. Newness trumps all, to occasionally devastating effect. There’s an economic reason for that, sure (the core of it being that audiences like nowness just as much as journalists). But we also now have tools that invite an intriguing possibility: new taxonomies of time. We have Twitter’s real-time news flow. We have Wikipedia’s wide-angle perspective. We have, above all, the web itself, a platform that’s proven extraordinarily good at balancing urgency with memory. We’d do well to make more of it — if for no other reason than the fact that, as Thompson puts it, “a journalism unfettered by time would align much more closely with timeless reality.”"

[referes to: http://snarkmarket.com/blog/snarkives/journalism/the_attention_deficit_the_need_for_timeless_journalism/ ]
news  mattthompson  snarkmarket  magangarber  timcarmody  robinsloan  journalism  media  cycles  2010  context  crisis  reporting  time  research  follow-up  continuity  timeshifting  timestretching  futureofjournalism 
august 2010 by robertogreco
World of Jesus « Snarkmarket
"Let me tell you some­thing: I think that if a game com­pany were to make it, and do it well, “World of Jesus” would be a smash hit. If you wanted to get your War­craft on, you could play as a cen­tu­rion and slash-and-hack Per­sian armies and cru­cify dis­si­dents. Or you could be a Jew­ish rebel fight­ing to over­throw the Romans. Maybe you’re a female dis­ci­ple, fight­ing to retain women’s lead­er­ship roles after Christ’s death. Or you’re a reg­u­lar per­son: a tax col­lec­tor, a fish­er­man, a falafel mer­chant. An online RPG that doesn’t nec­es­sar­ily have to be about how many peo­ple you can kill."
history  mmog  snarkmarket  robinsloan  worldofjesus  games  gaming  timcarmody  annabelscheme  religion  ancientcivilization  jerusalem 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Only crash « Snarkmarket [Might be a handy metaphor for the learning by failing approach to learning, testing the limits of our abilities, crashing, then restarting.]
"Some­times you run across an idea so counter-intuitive and brain-bending that you imme­di­ately want to splice it into every domain you can think of. Sort of like try­ing a novel chem­i­cal com­pound against a bunch of can­cers: does it work here? How about here? Or here?

That’s how I feel about crash-only soft­ware...The only way to stop it is by crash­ing it. The nor­mal shut­down process is the crash...

Maybe there are bio­log­i­cal sys­tems that already fol­low this prac­tice, at least loosely. I’m think­ing of seeds that are acti­vated by the heat of a for­est fire. It’s like: “Oh no! Worst-case sce­nario! Fiery apoc­a­lypse! … Exactly what we were designed for.” And I’m think­ing of bears hibernating—a sort of con­trolled sys­tem crash every winter.

What else could we apply crash-only think­ing to? "
design  ideas  operatingsystem  crash  crashes  crashing  snarkmarket  robinsloan  failure  reset  unstablesystems  instabiity  operatingsystems  metaphors  metaphorsforlearning  learningbyfailing  instability  crashonly 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Chimeric Thinking in the Trough of Disillusionment « Snarkmarket
"We obvi­ously love hybrids and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary think­ing here at Snark­mar­ket. But you know, I think we might love chimeras even more.
snarkmarket  robinsloan  chimeras  chimericthinking  recombinant  interdisciplinary  mashups  hybrids  hacking  patterns  patternrecognition  hacks  theadjacentpossible  recombinantgizmos  classideas  mattjones  mattwebb  berg  berglondon 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Universal acid « Snarkmarket
"The philoso­pher Dan Den­nett, in his ter­rific book Darwin’s Dan­ger­ous Idea, coined a phrase that’s echoed in my head ever since I first read it years ago. The phrase is uni­ver­sal acid, and Den­nett used it to char­ac­ter­ize nat­ural selection—an idea so potent that it eats right through other estab­lished ideas and (maybe more impor­tantly) institutions—things like reli­gion. It also resists con­tain­ment; try to say “well yes, but, that’s just over there” and nat­ural selec­tion burns right through your “yes, but.”"
robinsloan  snarkmarket  danieldennett  evolution  religion  capitalism  globish  english  computing  cloudcomputing  cloud  comments  naturalselection  universalacid  understanding  creativity  whoah  gamechanging  conciousness 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Japan still matters « Snarkmarket
Comment from ec: "The funny thing is that a trip to Tokyo will make you a Japanophile, but not in the way that you imag­ine. Instead of going tech / futur­is­tic design crazy, you will lose your­self in a book­store look­ing at graphic design mags that have that global min­i­mal­is­tic look. You will feast not only on ramen, but you’ll love French pas­tries, as inter­preted by the Japan­ese, and clothing-wise, you might be drawn to the abun­dance of care­fully curated clas­sics from dif­fer­ent sub-cultures (a store devoted to the 1960s Eng­lish Road biker look? A line of Colum­bia out­door wear only sold in Japan, with a slim­mer cut, and richer fab­ric?) Every­thing famil­iar, through a bizarro lens, but a good bizarro. This is the stuff that’s imported to Amer­ica in only small batches."
japan  tokyo  snarkmarket  robinsloan  srg  glvo  edg 
june 2010 by robertogreco
An exercise in empathy « Snarkmarket
"thing I have done since 7/8th grade, at least, & still do all the time today.

It goes like this:

Sitting in any space with other people—a classroom, a city bus, even a big wide-open park—I’ll sometimes let my mind wander and imagine the space from someone else’s vantage point. It’s as simple as that. No deep emotional imagination involved; it’s really just visual.

But the important thing is that I am included in the transformed scene. Doodling on a legal pad, hunched into a laptop, reading a book, whatever. The core of the exercise, I think, is that you see yourself as just another person in the space—an opaque bag of bones—instead of as, you know, the movie camera. The privileged POV.

Does that make any sense? It’s stuck with me as a habit, I suppose, because it’s so simple. This isn’t level 12 meditation. It’s just a little flip, a little dose of visual imagination. But I always find it entirely transporting. And it tends to put me in my place.

Anybody else ever do this?"
empathy  meditation  transformation  robinsloan  totry  ego  pointofview  pov  perspective  thoughtexcercises  tcsnmy  imagination  snarkmarket 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Coldbrain. (Stock, flow, generalists and specialists)
"Generalists...produce content that covers range of topics...necessarily scattershot, & people will dip in & out when content matches their own interests. But if you find a generalist whose interests match your own, it’s all gold. That’s rare.

I see good & bad examples of both approaches every day, & I bet you do too.
There’s a 3rd way, & I rather like it. It’s about producing flow relating to a range of your interests, & saving your stock for things you passionately care about...about being consistently interesting, but caring enough about your audience to spend time digging deeper into topics to create last content. It’s about treating your readers as a diverse bunch of broadly educated people, interested in reading intelligent content & commentary.

Gruber, Kottke, Merlin & so many other people that I love all do this. It’s incredibly obvious in hindsight, but until today, I hadn’t quite appreciated the subtle reasons why I like them so much. Something for us to aspire to."
matthewculnane  snarkmarket  stockandflow  robinsloan  generalists  passion  cv  writing  interesting  interestingness  curation  interested  kottke  daringfireball  merlinmann  specialists  specialization  interestedness 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Explosions in the sky « Snarkmarket
"Robin: Isn’t the span­gling of stars in the sky just basi­cally ran­dom noise onto which we’ve pro­jected pat­terns and then sto­ries? And if that’s been successful—and it toootally has—doesn’t it imply that you could do the same with just about any kind of ran­dom noise? What sort of weird wacky stuff could you spread across your desk to tell sto­ries with? Tim: After the Coper­ni­can rev­o­lu­tion, a con­stel­la­tion isn’t even a con­stel­la­tion. Instead, it’s a two-dimensional flat­ten­ing of a three-dimensional real­ity. Actu­ally, we should prob­a­bly say a FOUR-dimensional real­ity. The light from stars at vary­ing dis­tances, leav­ing their sources at var­i­ous times in the dis­tant past, gets mis­taken, from our earth­bound point-of-view, as a simul­ta­ne­ous two-dimensional pattern. John Mayer (via Robin): I’m try­ing to fold over time, to see it as a random-access hard disk where I can move to any point in time and change the way I see today."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/5883 ]
time  space  thingtothinkabout  constellationalthinking  snarkmarket  robinsloan  timcarmody  johnmayer  astronomy  light  perspective  history  physics  life  whoah  constellations  sky 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The Places I Have Come to Fear the Most « Snarkmarket
"I have a reflex­ive dis­like of sub­urbs. I grew up in Orlando, in one of its sub­urbs stacked on sub­urbs, all in dis­tant orbit around a tiny cen­ter of faux-urbanity we called down­town. (Which in turn hov­ered in dis­tant orbit around a giant cen­ter of faux-reality we called Dis­ney World.)

Orlando feels hor­ri­bly life­less to me. I often say that in Orlando, you have to drive 20 min­utes to get to the con­ve­nience store. I can’t think of a sin­gle good Mom-&-Pop shop around where I grew up. When I go back to visit, there are no places where my friends and I can sit idly and chat until the wee hours. For a while, we seri­ously took to fre­quent­ing the lob­bies of the nicer hotels...How could any­one choose a sub­urb over a city? I ask myself. Cities engen­der cre­ativ­ity and comity & effi­ciency. The Renais­sance could never have taken place in a sub­ur­ban­ized Europe.

But I occa­sion­ally get jolted out of my city-worship when I encounter a bit of real­ity like..."
mattthompson  snarkmarket  cities  suburbs  2005  orlando  boston  washingtondc  schools  parenting  urban  sustainability  nyc  suburbia  vibrancy  efficiency  invention  renaissance  creativity  dc 
may 2010 by robertogreco
From space to time « Snarkmarket
"Bri­dle says read­ers don’t value what pub­lish­ers do because all of the time involved in edit­ing, for­mat­ting, mar­ket­ing, etc., is invis­i­ble to reader when they encounter final prod­uct. Maybe. But mak­ing that time/labor vis­i­ble CAN’T just mean brusquely insist­ing that pub­lish­ers really are impor­tant & that they really do do valu­able work. It needs to mean some­thing like find­ing new ways for read­ers to engage with that work, & mak­ing that time mean­ing­ful as THEIR time.

In short, it means that writ­ers & pro­duc­ers of read­ing mate­r­ial prob­a­bly ought to con­sider tak­ing them­selves a lit­tle less seri­ously & read­ers & read­ing a lit­tle more seri­ously. Let’s actu­ally BUILD that body of knowl­edge about read­ers and their prac­tices — let’s even start by look­ing at TIME as a key deter­mi­nant, espe­cially as we move from print to dig­i­tal read­ing — & try to offer a bet­ter, more tai­lored yet more vari­able range of expe­ri­ences accordingly."
reading  writing  snarkmarket  comments  thebookworks  books  publishing  annotation  quotations  interactivity  experience  time  space  data  amazon  penguin  jamesbridle  robinsloan  respect  ebooks  kindle  ipad  bookfuturism  attention  timcarmody  edting  formatting  value  understanding  commonplacebooks  transparency  visibility  patterns  patternrecognition  friends  lisastefanacci  bookselling  npr  practice 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The new utility belt « Snarkmarket
"While we’re out scour­ing San Diego that after­noon, our allies leap into action. Fin­ished images are appear­ing in real-time. Every few min­utes I’ll check the Drop­box app on my iPhone, see some­thing new, announce it to the group, and every­one will gather around the tiny screen and ooh and ahh...This is the new utility belt: Twitter...Google Docs...Dropbox...So if these are the tools, what are the skills? Jane McGo­ni­gal has already fig­ured this out. She calls them the ten col­lab­o­ra­tion super­pow­ers. And in par­tic­u­lar, I think the first three are key:

* Mob­ba­bil­ity: the abil­ity to do real-time work in very large groups; a tal­ent for coor­di­nat­ing with many peo­ple simultaneously.
* Coop­er­a­tion radar: the abil­ity to sense, almost intu­itively, who would make the best col­lab­o­ra­tors on a par­tic­u­lar task.
* Ping quo­tient: mea­sures your respon­sive­ness to other people’s requests for engagement."
snarkmarket  dropbox  googledocs  twitter  socialnetworking  crowdsourcing  collaboration  robinsloan  storytelling  socialnetworks  technology  tools  onlinetoolkit  writing  thenewutilitybelt  tcsnmy  cv  shelldrake  tcsnmy7  sandiego  journalism  normalheights  alexismadrigal 
april 2010 by robertogreco
What’s the basic unit of reading? « Snarkmarket
Great piece by Tim Carmody that starts with "We’ve got a bunch of con­ven­tions about the ways we read and write which don’t have as much to do with how we read and write as we thought they did." I'm tweaking it to "We’ve got a bunch of con­ven­tions about the ways we learn which don’t have as much to do with how we learn as we thought they did."
unschooling  change  technology  reading  writing  schools  education  publishing  books  newspapers  ipad  deschooling  unlearning  snarkmarket  timcarmody  context  expectations 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The very foundations « Snarkmarket
"I think these three domains are all espe­cially impor­tant and inter­est­ing because they’re all meta–domains. That is to say, they deter­mine the play­ing field for other domains, so changes here cause chain-reactions. There’s lever­age. Change any of these domains in a deep way and you change the econ­omy. You change tech­nol­ogy. You change fam­ily struc­tures and land-use patterns. But it’s true for energy most of all. Hop­ing for a mir­a­cle is not a real strat­egy, I know; but don’t for­get that the early days of steam power, oil and elec­tric­ity all had a bit of the mirac­u­lous to them. Some new energy-harvesting process, or some rad­i­cally more pow­er­ful kind of bat­tery: either could trans­form society—absolutely up-end it. And changes in energy end up chang­ing every­thing else—law and edu­ca­tion included. How excit­ing is that?"
energy  law  education  local  tcsnmy  comments  robinsloan  ted  snarkmarket  gamechanging  lcproject  future  problemsolving  meta  unschooling  deschooling  learning  distributed  simplicity  complexity 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Gaiman, Morrison, and the strange substratum « Snarkmarket
"But this is the impor­tant part: I think if you look on any writer’s shelf in TV or Hol­ly­wood, you’ll find Mor­ri­son. That’s def­i­nitely true of writ­ers of shows like Bat­tlestar Galac­tica and LOST. Yes—in fact, LOST is basi­cally a TV series writ­ten by Grant Mor­ri­son. It’s his techno-occultism, his rain­bow sophis­ti­ca­tion. Comic-book adven­ture meets quan­tum foam meets Rider-Waite. I really believe the writ­ing staff at LOST would cop to it."
snarkmarket  robinsloan  grantmorrison  neilgaiman  lost  writing  comics  toread  battlestargalactica  adventure 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The future of designed content « Snarkmarket
"Okay—the point of this artic­u­la­tion is not to con­vince Gawker Media to hire a bunch of design­ers. Rather, it’s get you to imag­ine what blogs like those would look like if they both­ered with bespoke design every day. I think it’s a super-interesting vision.
design  internet  culture  magazines  webdev  gawker  publishing  content  webdesign  interactiondesign  journalism  future  web  contentstrategy  snarkmarket  robinsloan  io9  lifehacker  pictory  rss  bespoke  googlereader  collective  prediction 
january 2010 by robertogreco
A new class of content for a new class of device « Snarkmarket
"the web kinda hates bounded, holis­tic work...likes bits & pieces, cross-references & rec­om­men­da­tions, frag­ments & tabs...loves the fact that you’re read­ing this post in Google Reader...iPad looks to me like a focus machine...such an oppor­tu­nity for sto­ry­telling, & for inno­va­tion around sto­ry­telling...oppor­tu­nity to make the Myst of 2010...con­nect the dots. For all its power & flex­i­bil­ity, the web is really bad at pre­sent­ing bounded, holis­tic work in a focused, immer­sive way. This is why web shows never worked. The web is bad at con­tain­ers...bad at frames... the young Hayao Miyaza­kis & Mark Z. Danielewskis & Edward Goreys of this world ought to be learn­ing Objective-C—or at least mak­ing some new friends. Because this new device gives us the power and flex­i­bil­ity to real­ize a whole new class of crazy vision—and it puts that vision in a frame. ... In five years, the coolest stuff on the iPad should be… jeez, you know, I think it should be art."
design  culture  storytelling  snarkmarket  blogging  journalism  robinsloan  immersion  epub  content  ipad  marketing  attention  future  books  change  multimedia  apple  media  innovation  2010  focus  singletasking  multitasking  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs  monotasking 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Telling stories with interfaces « Snarkmarket
"This genre makes absolutely no sense on TV. I love things that make absolutely no sense on TV.

So I actu­ally think Google has vaulted to the front of the field with these videos. For one thing, their use of sound is sub­tle and bril­liant; it lights up your brain. They also just really deliver on the fun­da­men­tals: they are 100% faith­ful to the inter­face (no excep­tions!) but they present it in a super-dynamic way. And finally, they’ve invented a brand-new nar­ra­tive tech­nique: auto­com­plete sus­pense. (Seri­ously: it’s their secret weapon. G-E-N-I-U-S.)

But where does it go from here? Is this really just a micro-genre best suited to ads for inter­net com­pa­nies? Or does the fact that we spend so much time on this stage our­selves mean that it really can be the venue for more (and more kinds of) storytelling?"
stories  storytelling  google  advertising  ads  video  michaelwesch  themonitor  robinsloan  snarkmarket 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Doorknobs and directors « Snarkmarket
"This is not to say that super-specialization is not a super-smart strat­egy! Being extremely good—the best in the world—at a par­tic­u­lar thing is actu­ally one of the best strate­gies for sur­vival and sat­is­fac­tion. But I just don’t think it nec­es­sar­ily leads any­where other than… super-specialization. It seems to me, look­ing around, that the peo­ple in charge of cities, pub­lic spaces, orga­ni­za­tions, and Spider-Man 4 are the peo­ple who have gone straight at those more macro lev­els like an arrow."
specialization  generalists  cv  robinsloan  snarkmarket  macro  micro  dou­glashof­s­tadter  jeffveen  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  detail  bigpicture  specialists 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Wandering above a sea of media « Snarkmarket
"This is prob­a­bly not going to push my stock/flow ratio in the right direc­tion, but I’m start­ing a tum­blr. It’s so odd! I am com­pletely mys­ti­fied by the plat­form and its dynam­ics. I have no idea how to do any­thing. (And I sorta like the feeling?)
tumblr  comments  robinsloan  snarkmarket  flow  stockandflow  wonderdeficit  deficitofwonder  wonder 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Towards A Theory of Secondary Literacy « Snarkmarket
"This is where most of the futur­ists got it wrong — the impact of radio, tele­vi­sion, and the tele­phone weren’t going to be solely or even pri­mar­ily on more and more speech, but, for tech­ni­cal or cul­tural or who-knows-exactly-what rea­sons, on writ­ing! We didn’t give up writ­ing — we put it in our pock­ets, took it out­side, blended it with sound, pic­tures, and video, and sent it over radio waves so we could “talk” to our friends in real-time. And we used those same radio waves to down­load books and news­pa­pers and every­thing else to our screens so we would have some­thing to talk about."
timcarmody  literacy  reading  writing  secondaryliteracy  snarkmarket  books  radio  multimedia  marshallmcluhan  walterong  jacquesderrida  secondaryorality 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Telling stories about stories « Snarkmarket
"Increas­ingly, I’m con­vinced that no media is suc­cess­ful or even com­plete until it’s been trans­formed or extended. I know this is not super-controversial—it’s sort of the Cre­ative Com­mons party line—but it turns out things don’t trans­form them­selves! A lot of media gets CC-licensed and then just sits there.
robinsloan  annabelscheme  platforms  creativecommons  remixing  fanfiction  storytelling  media  henryjenkins  cocreation  participatoryculture  participatory  snarkmarket  newmedia  starwars  harrypotter  narrative  engagement  remixculture 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Undercapitalized « Snarkmarket
"But if you use Haque’s new-economy and Scheiber’s old-economy cri­tiques of cur­rent prac­tices, you get some­thing very pow­er­ful. The pre-managerial, heroic-age-of-capitalism indus­tri­al­ists of the 19th and early 20th cen­turies didn’t always build things that were good, from our per­spec­tive — but they BUILT things, cre­at­ing real cap­i­tal and value along the way, coalsmoke aside. It’s this fifty-year-blip of late uncre­ative cap­i­tal­ism, milk­ing old prop­erty for its dregs, reshuf­fling money to cre­ate some­thing from noth­ing, that has cul­tur­ally really screwed us up."
us  economics  gamechanging  leadership  management  organizations  administration  timcarmody  snarkmarket  umairhaque  manufacturing  middlemanagement  comments  healthcare  2009  finance  compensation  noamscheiber  malcolmgladwell  billsimmons 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Embracing eclecticism « Snarkmarket
"How will my book­store evolve over the next sev­eral decades? How can I retain the essence of what I do — and how the store serves the com­mu­nity? It’s sound­ing like the cur­rent model will be obso­lete pretty soon, at least in terms of finan­cial via­bil­ity. I can’t tell at this point how the Amer­i­can Book­sellers Asso­ci­a­tion is going to help us tran­si­tion to the near future, but I doubt there will be any rev­o­lu­tion­ary changes — they are advo­cates for too many indies to try any­thing too rad­i­cal too quickly. As for me, I’m plan­ning to stick around and fol­low your con­ver­sa­tions, per­haps try out an idea or two, and attempt to fash­ion a model that will fly in the real world. Maybe I’ll start a blog on the store web­site: Book­fu­tur­ism: A Case Study."
thebookworks  bookfuturism  snarkmarket  timcarmody  comments  friends  booksellers  bookstores  future  lisastefanacci 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The invention of content delivery, pt 1 « Snarkmarket
"In short, “the web” is not a medium — at least not in the same sense that pho­tog­ra­phy is. It is a con­tent deliv­ery sys­tem, that not only rep­re­sents and repro­duces con­tent but also stores and deliv­ers it. For most peo­ple, this change in con­tent deliv­ery has offered remark­able change, but has not posed a cri­sis of the same sort felt by painters and sculp­tors and play­wrights in the wake of pho­tog­ra­phy. It’s not writ­ers who face a cri­sis, but publishers. So, then: web:publishing* :: photography:visual culture**
writing  trends  publishing  analogy  timcarmody  snarkmarket  content  contentdelivery  web  painting  photography 
november 2009 by robertogreco
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