robertogreco + schooldesign   533

Gehörlosengerechtes Bauen: Deaf Space Architektur | Sehen statt Hören | BR Fernsehen | Fernsehen | BR.de
"Steel, glass, concrete, open and flooded with light: modern architecture appears generous, clear and bright. This meets the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. But what does deaf building really look like?"
deaf  architecture  schools  schooldesign  accessibility  disabilities  disability  via:cervus  design 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Ein ganzer Ort macht Schule <br />Zwischennutzung in Feldkirchen an der Donau – Blog – schulRAUMkultur
[translation from: www.DeepL.com/Translator

"A whole place goes to school
Interim use in Feldkirchen an der Donau
12.02.2017

Feldkirchen an der Donau is cheering and being cheered. A jewel of contemporary school construction and a committed pedagogical practice put this Upper Austrian community in the limelight. There are many reasons why this was successful. One of them was almost overlooked. The temporary use during the construction site period was an impressive feat of courage and cooperation on the part of civil society, preparing the team of female teachers for their practice in the cluster school unintentionally and, after almost 40 years, turning an advanced school concept from the 1970s into reality. The Feldkirchen hiking school is history again - but it has made history in Feldkirchen ...

The details can be read in the download. The text is the slightly revised version of my technical contribution in the magazine schulheft 163, which was published in autumn 2016. The building of fasch&fuchs.architekten, on everyone's lips, can in my opinion be understood more fundamentally, more profoundly, if the prehistory is also taken into account. This would almost be submerged in history. By a lucky coincidence I was able to salvage and secure it. It shows very well how meaningful spatial school development can be for the success of best architecture.

Meeting room of the parish in use as a school © parish Feldkirchen an der Donau

The use of architecture is a dance with habits. Architects understandably tend not to see the real (not imagined) use anymore. Usage is quickly invisible because "unseen", usage takes place after our creative phase. Therefore, both phases - phase 0, project development, and phase 10, settlement accompaniment - are relevant for school conversions that require laymen to act anew. I will report about it soon - in Leoben I was commissioned for phase 10 at the Bildungszentrum Pestalozzi - an experiment!

The reference to the original contribution in the school book 163: Zinner, Michael (2016): A whole place does school. Text contribution in: Rosenberger, Katharina; Lindner, Doris; Hammerer, Franz (2016, editor): SchulRäume. Insights into the reality of new learning worlds. schulheft 163; 41st year; StudienVerlag Innsbruck. 77–88

A whole place goes to school [.pdf]
http://www.schulraumkultur.at/perch/resources/170206-blog-zinner.michael-2016artikel.schulheft163-ueberarb-ein.ganzer.ort.macht.schule-seite77bis88.pdf "]
education  schools  schooldesign  microschools  community  temporary  sfh  lcproject  openstudioproject  communities  neighborhoods  decentralization  via:cervus  architecture  pedagogy  teaching  learning  howweteach  1970  austria  progressive  tcsnmy 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Innovative Learning Environments & Teacher Change
"The Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change (ILETC) project is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project funded for 4 years from 2016-2019. It brings together the expertise of leading researchers in education and learning environments and partner organisations in education and learning environment design and technology.

The project will be lead by Associate Professor Wesley Imms, who heads a cross disciplinary team of researchers from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at The University of Melbourne. The project is affiliated with the Learning Environments and Applied Research Network (LEaRN)."
via:cervus  australia  learning  schooldesign  melbourne  education  teaching  architecture 
october 2018 by robertogreco
srishti archive | Designing Spaces for Learning - Talk by Geetha Narayanan
"Experience or experimenting, expanding or developing, remembering or copying are all choices designers and educators make as they engage with notions of learning and of change. This paper presents a set of four case studies that articulate the pedagogical visions of a collective who have been investigating the connections between context, culture, consciousness and learning. Set within learning spaces for the urban poor and the elite this paper positions that fostering deep connections between place, space and the child is critical to the development of consciousness and competence. Designing spaces for learning needs, as this paper argues for an appreciation of forms of knowing that juxtaposes primary ways of knowing with the analytic and the designerly. Speaker : Geetha Narayanan (Principal Investigator, Project Vision Design and Research Collective, Centre for Education Research, Training and Development, Srishti School of Art Design & Technology) Seminar Date: March 23rd, 2010 Venue: National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Indian Institute of Science Campus Time: 3.00 p.m. Respondents: Prem Chandavarkar (Architect) & Ampat Varghese(Faculty at Srishti)"

[See also: https://vimeo.com/11049855 ]
geethanarayanan  education  learning  design  architecture  experimentation  pedagogy  2010  context  culture  consciousness  schooldesign 
october 2017 by robertogreco
The Uni Project
"The Uni Project is a nonprofit that brings learning opportunities to public space in New York City. Using custom-designed installations, we pop up in parks, plazas, and other public spaces to offer reading, drawing, and hands-on activities that let New Yorkers embrace the act of learning. We partner with community organizations and city agencies, and we prioritize underserved locations."

[via: https://twitter.com/findtheuni/status/886749020684791808 ]
nyc  sfsh  openstudioproject  lcproject  making  creativity  pop-ups  learning  nonprofit  mobile  portable  classideas  schooldesign  workinpublic  nonprofits 
july 2017 by robertogreco
How Will You Redesign Your School Over The Next Six Months?
"I was talking with architects from the AIA’s Committee for Architecture for Education last week, discussing — along with my superintendent — our school system philosophy of the intersection of space design, technology, and pedagogy. And at the end Karina Ruiz — a West Coast school designer — asked,
“But what if educators don’t have a building project right now?”

And I paused. We had been talking about our journey from opening up a few walls to building truly flexible spaces, from offering kids seating and writing choices to a move toward eliminating single-teacher classrooms, but our presentation was, indeed, geared toward building.

“Everybody always has a building project,” I finally said.

Because every school should be changing all the time. And should be changing with a purpose — moving from adult centered teaching spaces to child centered learning spaces — moving from static environments to flexible environments — moving from controlling design to inspiring design.

Every school needs a building project every year, because you don’t need contractors and bulldozers to change a school environment — you just need commitment.

So if you can’t do the expensive stuff — you can still do the effective stuff. So here are four things you can do to change your school’s space.

One: Give your kids the gift of daylight.

Walk into many classrooms and you’ll see the windowsills piled high with stuff — often adult stuff. You also may see shades or blinds pulled down.

Well, in order to maintain healthy attention kids need three things that are often in short supply in schools — fresh air, large muscle movement, and daylight. One of the easiest to fix, in many schools, is daylight.

Open those blinds and shades. If it’s not a lockdown or the sun blazing in full bore, open them and keep them open. Limit anything on the windows that obstructs the view — kids benefit from being able to see where they are on the earth.

Now clear off those windowsills. That’s not a storage spot — it’s a prime place for children. Make it easy to sit there, make it comfortable.

If you just do this in every classroom you will have rebuilt your school. Attention will go up, discipline problems will go down. Guaranteed.

Two: Get rid of teacher desks.

Or at least dramatically shrink the space teachers claim for themselves.

Listen — when I observe a classroom I really don’t look at the teacher, I watch kids, listen to kids, look for the variety of what kids are doing and how they are doing it — but — an opening ‘fail’ is walking into any classroom and seeing a teacher sitting at their teacher desk. Why would any teacher separate themselves from their students like that?

The teacher’s desk is an ugly remnant of a time when uninvolved teachers led ineffective classes, they really need to vanish. But if they cannot vanish completely, they need to become small spots used for effective one-on-one or one-on-two conversations. Storage can be in one modest-size cabinet against a wall.

If you want to increase learning space, you get rid of space used for — well, something else.

Walking a middle school a year ago with the principal we came across one classroom where the teacher had built — essentially — a tiny house, and a tiny house blocking student access to half of the room’s windows. Looking at the ceiling grid I noted that this teacher had carved out an 8x16–128 square foot living room. There was a presidential-size desk, a pseudo oriental rug, book cases, a coffee maker, and all kinds of personal images: 16% of the classroom space was walled off from kids.


That’s extreme but it’s not that unusual, and it needs to stop. Classrooms belong to children.

So get rid of teacher desks. Or at least shrink them and push them completely away from the windows. In every classroom.

Your school will see it’s learning space increase by 10%.

Three: Keep all of your classroom doors open.

Easy, right? No cost, no moving anything. But transformational.

The most obvious way to build transparency and openness into your educational environment is to open classroom doors and create the notion of ‘the commons.’ Opening doors will make your school noisier and more active. It will convert corridors from waste space to instructional space. It will allow kids who need a different kind of space to have it and yet — remain supervised.

Obviously it will do something else. The talk we gave to the architects was titled “Space that forces change — Change that forces space.” Opening doors will make your teachers change what they do. Noisier environments mean that teacher voice must change. You can’t really yell over it, you have to talk under it, and thus move away from mass instruction.

It does one more key thing — it reveals great teaching and encourages teachers who struggle to collaborate with those great teachers.

So make this an absolute rule: classroom doors stay open.

Four: Let kids sit where they want, if they want.

We have this saying, “a kid can’t walk into any classroom, kindergarten through 12th grade, and choose where, how, or if to sit — we aren’t teaching them to make decisions, which means we aren’t teaching them very much at all.”

This is important. The act of controlling seating, like the act of controlling toilet use, or food and drink, is an act which shatters the possibility of real trust between teachers and children. It’s an act which prevents children from learning how to define their own work environment (If you’d like — it’s an act that leads directly to failure in the first year of college.) It’s also an act which makes the classroom a fight, for you have created rules that work against child learning and a rule that makes no sense to kids.

So stop doing it. Eliminate the rule across the school. Focus on comfort and good choices instead of compliance. Use phrases like, “wouldn’t you be more comfortable standing up? [lying down? by the window? sitting in the hall?]” Or even, “is that space working for you?”

Another guarantee — the entire mood of your school will change.

There. Four ‘quick fixes.’ Quick but not easy. Instead of sledge hammers you’ll need full admin support and peer pressure. You’ll want to document and talk about the changes. You’ll need to see where the design needs tweaking. And most of all, you’ll need patience.

Rebuilding a school creates mess at first. Your kids will need time to learn new patterns — and learn how to make good choices. That’s why these are six month construction projects. Three months to plan and get consensus. Three more to make it work."
irasocol  2017  schools  education  change  adaptability  flexibility  schooldesign  sfsh  furniture  doors  desks  light  seating 
may 2017 by robertogreco
VTN | Vo Trong Nghia Architects - Farming Kindergarten
"The Kindergarten for 500 preschool children, situated next to a big shoe-factory, is a prototype of the sustainable education space in tropical climate. The building is designed for the children of factory workers within low-budget.

The concept of building is “Farming Kindergarten” with continuous green roof, providing food and agriculture experience to Vietnamese children, as well as safe outdoor playground."

[via: http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/126422/farming-kindergarten/

"Vietnam is historically an agricultural country. As it moves to a manufacturing based economy, the country is facing changes as a toll is being taken on the environment. Increased droughts, floods and salinization jeopardize food supplies, while numerous motorbikes cause daily congestion and air pollution in the cities. Rapid urbanization deprives Vietnamese children of green lands and playgrounds, and thus their relationship with nature.

Farming Kindergarten is a challenge to counter these issues. Located next to a big shoe factory and designed for 500 children of the factory's workers, the building is conceived as a continuous green roof, providing a food and agricultural experience to children, as well as an extensive playground to the sky.

The green roof is a triple-ring shape drawn with a single stroke, encircling three courtyards inside as safe playgrounds. Recently, an experimental vegetable garden was realized on its top. Five different vegetables are planted in 200 square-meter garden for agriculture education.

All functions are accommodated under this roof. As the roof lowers to the courtyard it provides access to the upper level and vegetable gardens on top—the place where children learn the importance of agriculture and recover a connection to nature.

Environmental strategies
The building is made of a continuous narrow strip with two side operable windows which maximize cross ventilation and natural lighting. Additionally, architectural and mechanical energy-saving methods are comprehensively applied including, but not limited to: green roof as insulation, green facade as shading and solar water heating. These devices are visibly designed and play an important role in the children’s sustainable education. Factory wastewater is recycled to irrigate greenery and flush toilets.

As a result, the kindergarten operates without air conditioners, despite being located in a harsh tropical climate. According to a post-occupancy record issued 10 months after completion, the building saves 25% of energy and 40% of fresh water compared to baseline building performance.

Cost-efficiency
The building is designed for low-income factory workers' children, therefore construction budget is quite limited. Therefore, the combination of local materials (ex. bricks, tiles) and low-tech construction methods are applied, which also help minimize the environmental impact as well as promote local industry."]

[see also: https://www.dezeen.com/2014/11/11/farming-kindergarten-vo-trong-nghia-architects-vietnam-vegetable-garden/
http://www.archdaily.com/566580/farming-kindergarten-vo-trong-nghia-architects ]
kindergarten  gardening  farming  education  schools  schooldesign  architecture  vietnam  votrongnghia  agriculture 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Sugar Hill Museum Preschool (David Adjaye) - YouTube
[See also:
http://www.archdaily.com/514785/david-adjaye-s-sugar-hill-development-a-new-typology-for-affordable-housing
http://www.averyreview.com/issues/20/sugar-hill-two-years-later
http://www.designboom.com/architecture/adjaye-associates-sugar-hill-housing-complex-harlem/ ]

"Sugar Hill Museum Preschool is one of the most inspiring projects I've ever seen. Design by the worldwide recognized architect David Adjaye.This educational center, located in between Harlem and Washington Heights is an action from the past, developing right now to expect future results. This project composed by an environment that helps early childhood education to communicate visually within the city, through transparent windows, but at the same time involving the children in an interaction with natural elements. Expression, self-determination, creativity, imagination, economics are some of the splendorous skills offered by Sugar Hill Museum Preschool. Thanks to Broadway Housing Communities for show us the place.

THE SUGAR HILL PROJECT

898 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10032.

The Sugar Hill Project, BHC’s most recent initiative, leverages the success of our integrated model which pairs permanent housing with early education and educational advocacy, and access to the arts. The 191,000sf mixed-use building designed by globally renowned architect David Adjaye was prominently located in Upper Manhattan’s Sugar Hill historic district on 155th Street, the crossroads of the traditionally African-American neighborhood of Harlem and the immigrant, mostly Latino communities of Washington Heights.

BHC received more than 48,000 applications for housing at Sugar Hill.

Conceived as an oasis of stability, learning, and opportunity for children and families in an area where more than 70% of children are born into poverty, the Sugar Hill Project features:

• 124 affordable studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments
• Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling
• 11,000sf Sugar Hill Museum Preschool
• Community art gallery
• Parking garage for residents and community members
• Seasonal green market (June-November)

All 124 apartments have been leased to low-, very low- and extremely low-income families and single adults; 25 of these households came from the NYC homeless shelter system.

A light-filled early childhood center with the capacity to serve up to 200 children from birth to five and their families serves building residents and the wider community.

The innovative Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling is dedicated to the cognitive and creative development of children ages 3-8. An exhibition, education, and storytelling programs celebrate the cultural legacy of one of New York’s most prestigious neighborhoods. Young visitors and their families are invited to engage with art and artists as they explore and share their creative voices.

A replicable model of innovation in affordable housing and community development, BHC’s Sugar Hill Project is poised to generate transformational change for generations to come.

sugarhillmuseum.org "
preschool  davidadjaye  architecture  schooldesign  design  2016  nyc  education 
march 2017 by robertogreco
rosanbosch.com
"“What is the most flexible in a room? You! Design needs to relate to the development of people, to the development of our mind and body. It’s not just an instrument of decoration, but a tool for change. Rosan Bosch at TEDx in Indianapolis 2013.

Rosan Bosch Studio is an interdisciplinary agency working in the cross-field of art, design and architecture. We believe that the physical environment makes a difference to the way we act in the world. Therefore we use interior design as active tool to create change - whether it comes to urban spaces, schools or workplaces.

Our portfolio ranges from small art and development projects to total designs of schools, libraries and private companies. We base each project on the customer's specific challenges and customize the design solution to the people who will use it in everyday life.

With a focus on creativity and innovation we convert ideas into physical product and create spaces and environments that make a difference. See examples of our projects."

[See also:
https://www.instagram.com/rosanboschstudio/

http://www.designboom.com/architecture/jeanne-gang-studio-gang-architects-the-academy-for-global-citizenship-chicago-urban-farm-05-23-2016/
http://studiogang.com/project/academy-for-global-citizenship ]
design  architecture  schooldesign  alexandralange  rosanbosch  interiors  schools  education 
january 2017 by robertogreco
The Wonder Years: Creating a Middle School Launching Pad - Urban Planning and Design - architecture and design
"As a way of summarizing our findings, we created 10 “rules of the road” that we are continually referring to as a check on our design:

1. The range of growth between 6th and 8th grade is vast, but they’re all still just children.
2. Our children are transforming every day, so our school should too.
3. Retaining the benefits of grade-affiliation is crucial in the move toward project—and discipline-based work.
4. Middle school is the “starting point,” when you begin to become who you will be (as an adult).
5. Let’s leverage technology to provide two-way conversation, and have a ‘push-out’ / ‘pull-in’ dynamic.
6. We still need places for quiet and spaces for personal, sometimes sensitive conversations.
7. Aim to create a facility that encourages parents to “let go.”
8. Access to nature is a “need to have,” not a “nice to have.”
9. A happy faculty means happy students.
10. And, make it MAGIC.

Now here’s a deep-dive into what we discovered for each of the stakeholder groups:

6th Grade

Profile

We found that 6th graders need their own lane before they fully merge into the greater middle school community. This is their first taste of independence—their world just expanded! Although they experience massive change in maturity level from September to June, they still need space to play, both outdoors and in. This is a time to celebrate their imaginations because they are not yet self-conscious about risk-taking. Additionally, 6th graders still need help with organization, study skills and daily prep.

Design Strategies

We believe there should be a 6th grade-centric space that can close and open to the larger school. The design of the space will highlight creativity, provide ample areas to pin up/showcase work, minimize distractions, offer direct connection to the outdoors and create a space for play (maybe designed by kids). Overall, the 6th grade space will be a cozy, home-like atmosphere with bright colors.

7th Grade

Profile

Seventh graders are beginning to build awareness of the outside world and a desire to make a difference. Social life takes on a new importance, and they are ready to expand their world. With that said, they are still easily distracted, as well as awkward and insecure; they feel “stuck in the middle.” Seventh graders tend to have a strong connection to teachers, and while they are ready to make more of their own choices, creativity now feels risky. They are just beginning to attack “maker” activities.

Design Strategies

To cater to the needs of a 7th grader, the middle school environment needs hangout spaces, as well as distributed spaces for quiet group work/focus work. It’s critical to have visual and physical access to shared areas with 8th graders to provide exposure to mentorship. In terms of play, 7th graders need a connection to outdoors, age-appropriate play opportunities and access to “maker” space. The classroom should provide choice and flexibility with furniture, such as fidget chairs, that students can move on their own.

8th Grade

Profile

Eighth graders tend to be curious and intellectual, but not yet jaded. They are learning to think critically for the first time and handle ambiguity. They are ready to take on leadership roles and are increasingly interested in the “real world” and their place in it. As pre-teens who feel torn between childhood and adulthood, the social life of an 8th grader has started to expand beyond the school.

Design Strategies

Flexible classrooms will allow 8th grade students to toggle between learning modes, a learning style that hints at upper school culture. This age group needs central flex space for showcasing, broadcasting, making and talking about work, as well as places to sit and reflect.

Faculty

Profile

Middle school faculty are intensely dedicated to their students. Teachers are challenged to find private space to have sensitive conversations with students, parents, and colleagues, and they get stressed when limitations of space get in the way of delivering active education. They are always looking for moments of calm and focus.

Design Strategies

Middle school faculty need one-on-one meeting spaces, private phone space, “behind the scenes” teacher areas, tutoring/teaching bars, teacher-only bathrooms, access to beauty and nature to reduce stress, and places to sit and reflect.

Parents

Profile

Middle school parents are learning to let go. They don’t yet know how to handle their kids’ growing independence, so they need reassurance and communication from the school. They need to feel wowed and inspired by DE facilities, tech presence and student work. Additionally, children are embarrassed by parents’ presence on campus, and helicopter parents can be a distraction to both students and teachers.

Design Strategies

To fulfill the needs of both parents and students, the middle school should have a large lobby space with transparency to student work, but limited access to classrooms. The lobby will serve as an exhibit space for student projects and could feature a tech space as public face of school. The building should look fun, cool and tech-forward with two-way broadcasting.

What’s Next
We are currently in the process of interpreting and integrating these strategies into the design of the new middle school. Under the guidance of Dr. Rodney De Jarnett, Dwight-Englewood’s Head of School, we will be looking to create an environment where, in Dr. De Jarnett’s words, “our children, faculty, and parents will walk in and immediately feel something special.” Stay tuned for a design update in the coming months."
middleschool  sfsh  schools  schooldesign  2016  parenting  independence  quiet  children  education  learning  organization  studyskills  markthaler 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Learning Ecologies: Can the City Be Our Classroom? - Urban Planning and Design - architecture and design
"Over the past few months, Gensler San Francisco’s EDU 2.0 group, a cohort of emerging designers, strategists and leaders in the Education practice area, hosted a series of three roundtable discussions around the experiential learning trend and what it means for educational institutions and cities.

Project-based approaches to teaching have been disrupting the educational landscape for several years and many institutions have fully embraced experience-based curriculum; however, the built-environment has not kept up. This approach requires environments that encourage both self-guided and group learning, provide maker spaces and allow students to personalize their educational experience. Participants in the roundtable discussions included thought leaders and innovators from elementary education, high school, university and cultural institutions, as well as organizations involved in education for all ages. While our conversations varied due to the diverse participants, our question for all of the discussions was the same:

In a world where resources for learners are pervasive and abundant, where institutions may no longer play the role of primary purveyors of information, and abilities may be represented in ways different from the traditional diploma, what role will the institution of education play?

Commentary from some of our roundtable participants included:

• “We’re striving to build a university as it should be, not how it may have accidentally evolved over a hundred years.” –Mike Wang, Minerva Schools

• “I’m going out and using a series of experiences and apprenticeships to create a new form of higher education.” –Dane Johnson, Experience Institute

• “What could it look like if you designed a school rooted in equity and innovation and its goal was to bring disparate groups together?” –David Clifford, Design School X, Stanford d.School

• “At CCA we remake our physical environment…and our curriculum constantly in a way that is incredibly agile and it benefits the students.” –Mara Hancock, CCA

Through these conversations we identified the following trends on the horizon that not only apply to educational projects, but also retail, cultural and civic work:

• Curators of Experience: Learner-Centric Education
The goal of this kind of education is not to impart information nor to create experts, but to allow the students to learn how to identify questions, themes and problems.

• Community
For campus-less institutions and legacy institutions alike, place, identity and community remain important.

• Irresistible Places
Our most impactful memories of school often surround these special, irresistible places; a corner of a library or the place where you ate lunch with your friends. These places encourage and enable memorable learning experiences.

• Technology is a Tool, Not a Solution
Information delivered online in a vacuum, unrelated to real-world experience, is difficult to internalize and doesn’t feel relevant to the student.

• In Defense of the University
When we demand that learning be unencumbered by reaching a specific goal, a learner has the opportunity for free intellectual exploration.

• Tinkering
This educational practice includes the importance of play and prototyping within a context of experiential learning.

• Beyond the Report Card
Badging, sharing a digital portfolio, a deep network of collaborators and one’s ability to tell one’s story are more important to many employers than the conventional GPA.

• Intergenerational Learning
Age and experience level are not always the indicator of the role of educator.

• Scale It Up
Traditional educational systems can learn from innovative charter schools, cultural institutions and private schools to provide the best opportunities for all students.

The full list of trends explained in more details can be found here. [http://www.gensler.com/uploads/document/515/file/Learning-Ecologies_Gensler.pdf ]"
lindseyfeola  schooldesign  sfsh  cityasclassroom  schools  age  experience  education  tinkering  technology  community  learning  howwelearn  mikewang  danejohnson  davidclifford  marahancock  curriculum  lcproject  openstudioproject  apprenticeships  mentoring  cca  experientiallearning  experientialeducationcities  urban  urbanism 
january 2017 by robertogreco
불확실한 학교 Uncertainty School
"Uncertainty School is a school to explore potential that cannot be described in a language of the world of certainty. The school’s curriculum focuses on art, technology, disability, and their correlation with one another, and aims at unlearning of exclusive or discriminatory viewpoints we have unconsciously accepted. Uncertainty School invites artists, activists and students main participants, regardless of disability. The school holds workshops for participants and public seminars open to general audience. The school provides sign language interpretation, translation, stenography, taking participants’ various types of disability into consideration, and offers education in a space easily accessible by the people with varying types of physical disabilities. Uncertainty School encourages participants to develop their independent artistic practice while forming a community of interdependent learning, in pursuit of a genuine value system based on fairness, beyond the concept of pro forma equality.

Uncertainty School workshops organized by Taeyoon Choi will introduce computer programming skills, online publication and exhibition methods, conducive to participants’ creative practice. Uncertainty School seminars will feature local and international artists participating in Mediacity Seoul 2016. The artists will to introduce their work and discuss technology, environment, and the human body in contemporary art.

Participants and collaborating artists will produce artwork or reinterpret existing work and present a group exhibition at Community Gallery of Buk Seoul Museum of Art. The entire process will be documented in video and writing, and posted on the website of Mediacity Seoul 2016."
uncertaintyschool  lcproject  openstudioproject  seoul  korea  southkorea  taeyoonchoi  altgdp  education  school  schooldesign  unschooling  deschooling  art  artschools  equity  fairness  unlearning  artschool 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Wherever you find people - Reviews - Domus
[Book is here:
http://www.park-books.com/index.php?pd=pb&lang=en&page=books&book=760
http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/W/bo25046924.html
https://www.amazon.com/Wherever-You-Find-People-Niemeyer/dp/3038600261
http://www.grahamfoundation.org/grantees/5316-wherever-you-find-people-the-radical-schools-of-oscar-niemeyer-darcy-ribeiro-and-leonel-brizola ]

"In 8 chapters, 20 interviews and many photos, this book edited by Aberrant Architecture analyses the history of a Brazilian icon of public architecture: the CIEPs conceived by the architect Oscar Niemeyer."



"The CIEPs, Centros Integrados de Educação Pública (Integrated Centres of Public Education), were meant to solve a problem. The 508 school buildings constructed from 1982 onward in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil were meant to be an alternative answer for the future.

A dearth of schools, overcrowded classrooms, meagre funds and a growing abyss between public and private institutions were just a few of the problems facing the State of Rio de Janeiro in the early 1980s. Brazil was at a turning point, heading toward the end of the military dictatorship, a slow transition to democracy, and for the first time in decades, free elections. In Rio, mass migration had swollen the population, but the public schools were utterly unprepared to educate the great quantity of students living in conditions of poverty. Leonel Brizola (1922-2004), the state governor elected in 1983, decided to respond to the demand by creating the CIEPs, an ambitious architectural project devised with his chief adviser the anthropologist Darcy Ribeiro, and one of the most visionary architects at the time, Oscar Niemeyer.

Wherever You Find People – The Radical Schools of Oscar Niemeyer, Darcy Ribeiro and Leonel Brizola tells the story behind the CIEPs by giving an in-depth and detailed account of the historical and sociological motives that led to their construction. The pros and cons of this iconic and socially driven architectural initiative are weighed. Compiled by Aberrant Architecture in London (David Chambers and Kevin Haley), the book is divided into 8 chapters and over 20 conversations/interviews with the designers of the centres. Numerous photographs that have never been published before are featured. Half of the 508 schools were built in the 1980s, and half in the 1990s, during Brizola's second term in office, all in the State of Rio de Janeiro. Another 500 were left unbuilt, but blueprinted by Niemeyer. They are modular constructions built mainly with solid, tough and inexpensive concrete.

The model for the CIEPs was a "concentrated city" with a central building and other smaller satellites around it: a covered sports hall, an octagonal library, a penthouse for students on the roof, a dental office, a medical office and sometimes an outdoor swimming pool. It was a complete package, given to many cities, from Rio to small towns.

A simple idea, almost a utopia, lies at the base of the design. On the one hand we have Brizola’s vice-governor Darcy Ribeiro (1922-1997), who firmly believed in the power of education and in a system that would, in his words, lead the country to salvation. “Our children represent the most valuable part of Brazil, and also our own destiny as a free and democratic nation, committed to building a worthy existence for all its sons and daughters,” he says in an interview. On the other hand we have Oscar Niemeyer (1907-2012), who through architecture helped obtain the political aims of creating a polis. “I’ll begin by saying it is a revolutionary project, from an educational point of view. A school that not only seeks, like the old ones, to instruct its students, but also to provide an effective support to all the children of the neighbourhood,” the Brazilian architect says in an interview held in 1986. He was referring to redemptive and necessary architecture.

Then there is the criticism of the project. It comes from right-wing politicians who judge Brizola's social ideals unsuccessful, and from people criticising its technical imperfection. In fact, the centres have required special rehabilitation in recent years, especially regarding classroom acoustics and climate control. Fortunately, the CIEPs have shown to be durable. Today, they are being painted. They are decorated with colourful writing and drawings and the grass is cut regularly. It is probable that the State of Rio will need more CIEP school buildings. Toward the end of the book, hoping for such development, the Brazilian Claudia Costin, a senior director for education at the World Bank, says, “And this idea, it’s magic. The idea that it’s possible to change the lives of these kids. If we don’t believe in this, then why have public schools?”"
schools  schooldesign  architecture  2016  books  oscarniemeyer  brazil  brasil  leonelbrizola  darcyribeiro  cieps  education  1980s 
december 2016 by robertogreco
How To Transform a Space | Activities For Children | Do It Yourself, Environment, homeschool, Imagination, Play At Home Mom, Uncategorized | Play At Home Mom
"Here are the steps I use when transforming a space – whether it be a classroom or playroom…..

1. Move everything out. Yep, get to work and clear out the entire space. This includes taking everything off the walls. My classroom had SEVEN cork boards (not even at child height – which is an entirely different topic altogether) with SEVEN different colors and SEVEN different borders. Whoa!!

2. Clean. There’s no better palate than a nice, clean space. My classroom walls were covered in posters, letters, numbers, tape, and Velcro. The first thing I did was rip those suckers off the walls. I did that before I even decided to take ‘before’ pictures. My floors were a disaster, covered in tape and sand.
3. Purge. Not going to use it? Chunk it. (I threw away about 4 filing cabinets full of worksheets. Worksheets? In pre-k? Pfft!!)

4. Sit in the space – I know this sounds corny, but sitting in a space to visualize how children play is important.

5. Consider the light. Natural light is a great area for an art space, darker areas are good spaces for relaxing and light panel play.

6. Is there a sink in the room? My classroom does not have a sink. Boooooooo! If you have a sink in your space, it’s also a good area for art….washing paint brushes, cleaning paint containers, etc.

7. Get neutral rugs and leave the walls bare. As Alfie Kohn says,

“You can tell quite a lot about what goes on in a classroom or a school even if you visit after everyone has gone home. Just by looking at the walls – or, more precisely, what’s on the walls — it’s possible to get a feel for the educational priorities, the attitudes about children, even the assumptions about human nature of the people in charge.”

Clean walls and neutral rugs/tables helps keep the focus on the beauty of the materials in the room, rather than the bright colors of carpet, tables, and furniture. Let children create the space with pictures of them playing and their artwork. This is a great way for them to reflect on their play and feel worthy – the space belongs to them.

8. Move things back and set up one space at a time. You might find that once you get the furniture in, it really doesn’t work in that space. We have a resource room in our school, so ALL of the cabinets and filing cabinets from my room went in there, to allow for more space. The same can be done with playroom closets, basements, and attic space.

9. Bring in your own lighting. One thing I love about my son’s Montessori school is all of the natural sky lights and the fact that they use lamps around the room for lighting, as opposed to overhead fluorescent lights – yuk! I keep the lights off in my classroom and rely on light sources such as strands of light, rope lights, lamps, and the overhead projector to light our room. There is something very peaceful about the space, and everyone who enters my room comments about how peaceful it is. Yay! That’s what I was going for.

10. Remember that nothing is permanent. It’s okay to change the room around to meet the needs of your students. I recently made a “cozy corner” where we put our rock pillows. Children can go here to read, listen to stories, of just jump on the pillows. My guess is that my room will change again."
via:jolinaclément  2015  classrooms  alfiekohn  sfsh  schooldesign  classroomideas 
august 2016 by robertogreco
How Can Schools Prioritize For The Best Ways Kids Learn? | MindShift | KQED News
"Educators know the world has changed and are increasingly acknowledging that it’s time to be asking different questions about what it means to improve education. Richardson travels around the world for his work and can point to examples of schools and districts that are asking themselves difficult questions to propel change. The successful ones are letting the answer to the question, “How do kids learn best?” drive everything they do in schools.



Schools need to have a clear vision, rooted in today’s context and a set of practices that reflect those two things. When he consults with schools, Richardson said he most commonly sees a lack of vision based in how students learn. In his many talks he shares a list of things educators know intuitively about how kids learn best alongside a list of things schools do because it’s easier for adults. He says if educators want to shift education to the modern context, they need to prioritize things that help students learn best.

“It’s about doing work that matters,” Richardson said. “It’s about connections. It’s about play. It’s about cultures where kids and teachers are learners.” When schools have a set of beliefs about learning and enact those beliefs through practice, but don’t anchor what they are doing in today’s context, they may be doing something progressive, but also a little irrelevant. Beliefs and contexts without practice leads to ineffective teaching. The sweet spot for a very different type of education system lies in the Venn diagram of all three: beliefs, context and practice.

[diagram]

“Kids deserve consistency that is grounded in a belief system,” Richardson said. He has talked with students who hate that they have to adapt to completely different expectations, structures, and rules in every class. When a school isn’t unified around a vision the experience for students can be very disorienting.

To begin moving towards what Richardson calls a “modern education” system, he says educators need to learn, educate, articulate, and then do it.

LEARN

It’s no longer enough for teachers to get a credential and then sit back and teach the same content year after year. Richardson says to be part of modern learning, teachers need to actively educate themselves about the context students live in and how they can improve as educators.

“There’s never been a more amazing time to be a learner,” Richardson said. “How are we in education not running towards that in our own personal lives and embracing that?”

It’s not just about connecting on Twitter with other educators or asking for professional development about technology. If teachers are waiting for a planned PD about something they are probably already stuck. “You have to have the disposition of an eight-year old to find your own learning,” Richardson said.

EDUCATE

“You probably aren’t going to be able to do this by yourself, so go out and build capacity,” Richardson said. Parents, community members, students and school board members can be allies for making the shift. Richardson points to CCSD59 as an example of a district that reaches out to all parent populations, communicates about vision and practice through a blog and educates with its Facebook page. “They are constantly putting practice in front of people to build their capacity to engage,” Richardson said.

ARTICULATE

Articulating a mission statement about where students should be when they graduate and actualizing it with a vision that lays out how to get there, is a key step in slowly making the shift Richardson describes. It can be difficult to interrogate longstanding policies and choices, but if districts, schools and individual educators can’t reflect on what’s working and what isn’t, articulate a change, and begin doing it, the education system as a whole will become irrelevant.

DO IT

“This is really hard, but I think it’s worth it,” Richardson said. Teachers can start by picking one area of the curriculum and letting students own it. Then advocate for that practice, and connect with other educators who are doing it. There comes a point when talking about the need to change is no longer enough; educators who resonate with Richardson’s message, have to jump in and try it."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxyKNMrhEvY ]
katrinaschartz  willrichardson  sfsh  2016  schools  education  learning  howwelearn  howweteach  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  purpose  pammoran  britishcolumbia  schooldesign  technology 
july 2016 by robertogreco
“It’s a good school, of course, but…” — The Synapse — Medium
"And if your school is “good” because it doesn’t undo the born-in advantages of its students, it is not “good” at all, but simply a fairly efficient day care operation.

Allow me to step back for a moment — I said above that we meant rich white schools 95% of the time, but let’s look at the other 5%. In those cases we mean ‘compliance academies’ — African-American and Latino kids marching in straight lines wearing uniforms and being routinely humiliated for any violation of whiteness expectations. Whether KIPP or Success Academies or the all-minority school in your neighborhood, these are the contemporary equivalent of British colonial schools or American Indian Schools. They are “good” because they are more under control than the terrible public schools most big cities offer their poor, and because whites imagine that Black boys taught to march in step will be less of a threat on the street.

And if that is “good” we are very much the miserable racists we seem to be.

So, if our definition of “good schools” is painfully illusory, what might we measure to find “good”?

A Few Metrics

Is choice expected? More than a few times visitors to our Albemarle County high schools ask, “so kids are allowed to eat anywhere?” To which I tend to always reply, “of course.” When that conversation extends the objections people bring up tend to sound — to me — as if they think their school is filled with especially sloppy animals. Which is weird, except that kids will always drop to the level of your expectations.

I toured a new high school in Washington, DC once where the teachers had pulled all the new comfortable furniture from student spaces and hidden it in faculty offices — ”the kids,” an Assistant Principal assured us, “don’t know how to use this furniture.” “They don’t know how to use chairs and couches?” I asked. He ignored my question.

To me choice equals trust. And I have never seen a school where kids were really learning anything that didn’t involve a hell of a lot of mutual trust between kids and adults.

I ‘measure’ a few things. How many kids are in the hallways during class time? is one. Kids in the hallways means that kids are trusted — are trusted to be on their own, are trusted to go where they need to go — whether that’s the library, our mechatronics labs, or wherever. Are kids in classrooms sitting or standing in lots of different ways? Really, very few kids are comfortable in classroom chairs, and when kids are uncomfortable they’re focused only on discomfort. We made a rule a few years ago that we’d never buy less than three kinds of seating and worksurfaces for any learning space, but even where we’ve managed to refurnish, kids need to learn to create their best environment. If you don’t let kids choose how, where, or if to sit you are failing to help them prepare for life, and it is not “good.”

Choice in technologies? Are kids using phones? Do they get to really control the one-to-one devices you give them? (Download, add software, change the interface) Are kids in a class using different software or web tools/sites to work? “These are personal learning devices,” my boss Vince Scheivert is fond of saying, “if they can’t personalize them, they aren’t that.”

It is essential — in this century — that kids learn to use the tools of their lifespans, and your kids are going to live their lives in the mid to late 21st Century. Whine all you want about the good ol’ days on your own time, but if you are working in education you must be modeling, you must be helping children learn to live well by making good technological choices. They cannot do that, your school is not “good,” if you ban, lock down, and tightly direct technology use.

A library with a lot of noise, collaboration, tools. About seven years ago I heard it said that, “in this century a library had to become the community kitchen, and stop being a supermarket.” Around that time I stumbled into that Fifth Avenue, New York Apple Store at 2.00 am and came to the conclusion that this century’s libraries needed to be community centers for contagious creativity. The point being that the world needed very few libraries with massive collections, after all Google was already scanning the entirety of the University of Michigan, Harvard, and New York Public Library, creating the incredible database of the world’s words. For ten years already schools I worked in had been using Fordham University’s Ancient History Sourcebook to connect kids to history. We needed our libraries to have tools kids wouldn’t find at home or in classrooms. We needed space for kids to gather, to process information together, to make things, to create.

Our libraries have tools, 3D printers, music construction studios, zones for writing, microcomputers, one has a laser cutter. They are the active academic core of our schools, crowded and noisy and full of invention — though yes, we create quieter zones as well, and rooms for teams to work in.

If your library is not a place that works for today, your school has a problem.

The Corridor Climate supports all kids. I often tell the story of working in two neighboring high schools. One was small (about 300 kids), and was always near the top of the state in test results. The other was large (2,700), far more diverse, with many more “challenges.”

The small school was a brutal place, with constant bullying by kids and teachers. The big school felt very safe for most everyone.

The big one created safety many ways, but it began in the corridors which were carpeted for sound control, had very wide stairways and doorways to eliminate passing time crush points, and had teachers standing outside every classroom doorway during passing times, constantly interacting with kids. The small school had none of that. The big school also gave kids 10 minutes between classes, a long enough time that the typical pressure we see disappeared.
Time, sound control, relationships in action. Those are things you can do. Here’s a test, if SpEd kids sometimes need to leave classes early in order to change classes safely, your school is, by definition, unsafe. And kids made unsafe in your corridors will do badly. In life if not academically.

Remember, ending bullying is all about adult behaviors. Kids imitate adults.

Kids are taking risks, teachers are taking risks. Risk is how we grow. Risk is the essential modus operandi of both childhood and adolescence. If I walk a school and I don’t see kids taking risks, in class, in the library, on the playground, in the halls, I know we have a school that is fighting that essential mode. And that can’t be a good school. But kids won’t take risks unless teachers and administrators are daily risk takers. The teacher who repeats last year’s lesson almost exactly is a problem that needs to be addressed. The teacher whose classroom always looks the same is a problem. And the administrators who don’t encourage and demonstrate risk taking are a problem.

When schools squelch risktaking they stop being educational institutions and become, simply, institutions.

Now, go back over the past year. How does your school do when you change your measuring sticks? “Good” cannot be about either socioeconomics or compliance. “Good” has to be about kids growing, about every kid being ok, about every kid learning the tools and environments they will live in.

In the end, you know. A really good school doesn’t end with a “but…” or a “just…” or a wish that kids would all come even if they didn’t have to."
2016  irasocol  choice  schools  sfsh  openstudioproject  lcproject  libraries  technology  edtech  risktaking  teaching  learning  education  schooldesign  safety  bullying  behavior  making  diversity 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Assorted Stuff : Wasted Spaces
"When I go to ISTE, I’m mostly looking for interesting and new-to-me ideas for using technology to enhance learning. For adults as well as kids. While you can do much of that inquiry online, there is something about being immersed live in the community that cannot be duplicated digitally.

At the same time I also make it a point to attend sessions by a small group of the same presenters, even if I pretty much know what they’re going to say. Because I also know they are people who will inspire me and jumpstart my thinking in unique ways. One of those people is Will Richardson.

During his ISTE talk, Will compared the very trendy concept of makers spaces with computer labs, saying that schools need a maker culture, not spaces. It was almost a throwaway line, a relatively small point in his talk but also one that got stuck in my warped little mind.

Wiil’s view of maker spaces as the new computer lab* perfectly encapsulates the uneasy, slightly negative feelings I’ve had towards the maker space concept, as the chatter and activity around it has has grown over the past four or five years.

It’s not that I disapprove of the idea of kids as makers. I love it. That’s exactly what school should be. But that’s not how the concept is applied in most schools.

As happened with computing devices, someone’s idea of a “maker space” is set up in a corner of the library, stored in a vacant room, or assembled in a cart rolled between classrooms. With students performing pre-planned activities for a fixed period of time, before returning to their “real” work.

In most schools I’ve observed, maker space is a pull out program for students that we know will pass the spring tests. A reward for completing that real work. An option for kids before or after school, or during lunch. An elective for students with space in their schedule.

Maker space is usually whatever the local advocate says it is. I’m interested in robots, so we buy robot kits. The dollar store had a sale on Popsicle sticks, so we construct towers. The principal bought a 3D printer, so we better use it. (Until the filament runs out and we can’t afford to buy more.)

I’ve seen all of this in schools and more.

A school with a maker culture, however, is one in which students are encouraged to explore all aspects of “maker” that interest them. Music, writing, science, video, coding, drawing, cooking, and many, many more topics that may not even occur to adults who think of “school” in very traditional ways. Auto shop, wood shop, metal shop were maker spaces when I was a kid, all of which have largely been removed from schools in this area.

Once upon a time, all of this was part of a liberal education. Providing kids the opportunity to explore a wide variety of subjects during their K12 years. Making them aware of their options. Preparing them for life, not just for college. I know, it’s an ideal view of school. One that in the real world America of my youth was never perfectly implemented.

That’s exactly what a school built around a maker culture would be. Rather than being a reconfigured computer lab.

*******

*An anachronism that should disappear but only seems to be reconfigured every few years with new devices."
makerspaces  computerlabs  making  makers  schools  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  timstahmer  culture  makerculture  cooking  science  woodshop  metalshop  autoshop  drawing  coding  music  writing  teaching  howweteach  classrooms  schooldesign  materials  iste  willrichardson  2016  vi:audreywatters 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Start-Up School Designs Outside the Traditional Mold — and Finds Many Benefits - Independent Ideas Blog
"School design should both challenge and reify a school’s culture and mission. Choosing a design can be a task that overwhelms, and as the moments of decision making draw ever closer, it is natural for the school team to simply settle on the most expedient option.

We justify this expedient thinking by citing a number of factors, including community buy-in, the budget, the politics of teacher territory, students and their relationship to the learning environment, and, perhaps most important, time. But if we make design decisions with expediency, we lose a key opportunity and could fundamentally alter or weaken the school’s mission and culture.

At Beacon Academy (Illinois), we instead decided to take an intentional design approach — which we credit with strengthening our mission and culture.

Thinking Beyond the Traditional Model of School

We faced many of the issues above as we planned Beacon Academy, a start-up Montessori-based 9-12 high school that opened in Evanston, Illinois, in fall 2014. Today, we serve 125 day students with a mission grounded in the Montessori principles of experiential learning, entrepreneurial thinking, and in-depth interdisciplinary studies.

We resolved to use these principles to reimagine school design. Perhaps the most important decision we made before we began was to stop thinking like a school. While this may sound counterintuitive, intentionally moving away from the model of “school” forced us to view our students’ learning environment with new eyes.

Gone were the inevitable stories about things that worked (or didn’t work) for us when we were in school or that latest top 10 list of educational trends from a Buzzfeed article. Instead, we immersed ourselves in conversations about the impact that design could have on our students’ learning. Our savvy board of trustees hired a design team whose vision transcended the traditional thinking and norms about the way schools should look and feel. A few of our board members, the director of admissions, and the head of school worked in close partnership with the team.

Focusing on Place-Based Pedagogy

From the beginning, we committed to a pedagogy that emphasized place. This focus provided us with the template to consider the relationship between our school’s design and our mission and values. The design of our physical space derived from this relationship. For our Montessori-based school, this meant all spaces would prioritize beauty, openness, and fluidity.

We considered place in two concrete ways:

1. We would leverage the surrounding community’s assets. For example, we decided local arts organizations would deliver the arts curriculum. We would use the local YMCA for indoor athletic activities and P.E. classes.
2. We set out to create a radically open learning environment with few walls and lots of open spaces, mirroring our interdisciplinary philosophy.

Ensuring That Design Is Practical and Fits the School’s Culture

We needed to accept some limitations in design. As the school representatives, we ensured the design team heard our voices on items we didn’t think would work practically or wouldn’t fit into the culture we sought to build. When the team proposed having no assigned offices in the building for the sake of co-working and collaboration, we pushed back with direct feedback because certain school roles would require private spaces.

Today, our space consists of an open floor plan with no true hallways — largely a result of our design team’s concepts. (Check out a virtual walkthrough of Beacon Academy’s space.)

Implementing a Design Thinking Process

What we found to be most important in the various design phases was our collective willingness to embrace the design thinking process. For the process to yield the greatest results, we needed to have faith in its transformative power. Mind you, this was not blind faith. Indeed, we had conducted research and studied key data about the efficacy of design thinking. But moving from the theoretical to the actual, and knowing that we would be pushing the familiar boundaries, was, at times, a terrifying prospect. Starting a school from scratch puts everyone in an uncomfortable position because everything is untested.

Ultimately, we trusted in a few key ideas as we designed our school. We drew on brain science to introduce a late start time (academic classes never start before 9 a.m.) and long class periods (usually 80 minutes). In addition, we held to the Montessori philosophy and to our belief that adolescence is a time of transformation to realize potential, not a time of turmoil to control.
Sharing Positive Outcomes of Intentional Design and Design Thinking

Since Beacon Academy opened a year and a half ago, the school has been a successful endeavor. We implement design thinking daily to authentically relate to students. They have a primary role in problem solving, whether it’s coming up with better ways to keep the school clean, disseminate important class assignments, or organize spaces for optimal learning.

This fall, we will move into a brand-new space, where we’ve applied the same Montessori principles and design thinking process. We offered a Beacon 2.0 class during our spring interim term to fully engage students in the school design, and we now can use real data to make the next space even more conducive for learning and community building.

We see additional tangible results from our intentional design. Applications to Beacon Academy have increased by 20 percent for each of the last two years. The attrition rate is 2 percent while the annual fund has had 100 percent parent participation in the same time period. Our commitment to mission-centered design has been a major factor in the school’s strong beginning.

Designing in a School Setting: Five Principles to Follow

While learning about one school’s journey is always interesting, it is perhaps more helpful to consider how best to apply a process to your own environment. To close, I recommend following these principles.

1. Invest real time and dollars in the process.

One of the biggest pitfalls in under-budgeting is that you only scratch the surface of what is possible in your school. For example, if you plan an event to engage the community in announcing your ideas, plan for it to be easy to attend and fun to participate in so you can hear from a diversity of voices. Also, be clear about the items you value (e.g., furniture, finishes, technology, natural light, etc.), and spend your money on them. Avoid trying to cover everything in a mediocre way, and focus on what your school values most.

2. Be open to being wrong.

Unless you can see into the future, you are going to make some incorrect assumptions about what your community values, what you think is going to work, and, most important, what students want. These are not failures unless you are unwilling to adjust and evolve with the process. Identify the non-negotiables of mission and culture at the beginning, but let the process take its course.

3. Engage with people outside the world of education.

In the same way that we want our students to think in an interdisciplinary fashion, we must break out of the echo chamber that can exist in the independent school community. Remember, we are independent schools. So think independently. Check out how other industries are designing their workspaces. Seek out entrepreneurs who work with a sense of urgency and outside the confines of the educational calendar and culture. No matter your location, you’ll find lots of smart and interesting people in your community. Engage them.

4. Leverage your best assets: the students.

Talk to your students about what they want, but provide a structure to these conversations. Students are a wellspring of ideas, but they aren’t always realistic (e.g., let’s put in a fire pole or an escalator). When working with students, set clear parameters and have a purpose to the conversation so you can uncover their most effective and creative ideas.

5. Have a sense of humor.

You are not designing a spaceship to escape from a nuclear apocalypse. You are creating a space for learning and community building. Be playful. Sometimes exploring seemingly crazy ideas can lead to really amazing solutions. Remember, you are designing a home away from home for an intergenerational, transient group of individuals. Things are going to evolve as soon as the space is complete.

So have some fun with the process. Ultimately, anything you do in this spirit will have a powerful impact on your school."
place-baced  place  pedagogy  lcproject  openstudioproject  schools  beaconacademy  montessori  jeffbell  schooldesign  designthinking  interdisciplinary  collaboration  howweteach  howwelearn  teaching  learning  sfsh 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Databite No. 76: Neil Selwyn - live stream - YouTube
"Neil Selwyn presents (Dis)Connected Learning: the messy realities of digital schooling: In this Databite, Neil Selwyn will work through some emerging headline findings from a new three year study of digital technology use in Australian high schools. In particular Neil will highlight the ways in which schools’ actual uses of technology often contradict presumptions of ‘connected learning’, ‘digital education’ and the like. Instead Neil will consider ….

• how and why recent innovations such as maker culture, personalised learning and data-driven education are subsumed within more restrictive institutional ‘logics’;

• the tensions of ‘bring your own device’ and other permissive digital learning practices • how alternative and resistant forms of technology use by students tend to mitigate *against* educational engagement and/or learning gains;

• the ways in which digital technologies enhance (rather than disrupt) existing forms of advantage and privilege amongst groups of students;

• how the distributed nature of technology leadership and innovation throughout schools tends to restrict widespread institutional change and reform;

• the ambiguous role that digital technologies play in teachers’ work and the labor of teaching;

• the often surprising ways that technology seems to take hold throughout schools – echoing broader imperatives of accountability, surveillance and control.

The talk will provide plenty of scope to consider how technology use in schools might be ‘otherwise’, and alternate agendas to be pursued by educators, policymakers, technology developers and other stakeholders in the ed-tech space."

[via: "V interesting talk by Neil Selwyn on ed-tech and (dis)connected learning in school"
https://twitter.com/audreywatters/status/718900001271783424 ]

"the grammar of schooling"
neilselwyn  edtech  byod  via:audreywatters  logitics  technology  teaching  learning  howweteacher  power  mobile  phones  ipads  laptops  pedagogy  instruction  resistance  compliance  firewalls  making  makingdo  youth  schools  design  micromanagement  lms  application  sameoldsameold  efficiency  data  privacy  education  howweteach  regimentation  regulation  rules  flexibility  shininess  time  schooliness  assessment  engagement  evidence  resilience  knowledge  schedules  class  leadership  performativity  schooldesign  connectedlearning  surveillance  control  accountability  change  institutions  deschooling  quest2play  relationships  curriculum  monitoring  liberation  dml  liberatorytechnology  society  culture  ethnography  schooling  sorting  discipline  ipad 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Will · We’re Trying To Do “The Wrong Thing Right” in...
[Also here: https://medium.com/@willrich45/we-re-trying-to-do-the-wrong-thing-right-in-schools-210ce8f85d35#.g134rm67t ]

"Whenever I think about the way most schools are structured today, I always come back to the same question: Do we do the things we do because they’re better for kids or because they are easier for us? For instance: separating kids by age in school. Is that something we do because kids learn better that way? Or do we do it because it’s just an easier way organizing our work? I think all of us know the answer to that. And there are quite a few other comparisons like those that are worth thinking about:

• Do kids learn better when we separate out the content into different subjects, or is it just easier for us?
• Do kids learn better when we have every one of them pretty much go through the same curriculum in the same way, or is it just easier for us?
• Do kids learn better when we have them turn off all of their technology in school, or is it just easier for us?
• Do kids learn better when we we assess them all the same way, or is it just easier for us?
• Do kids learn better when we decide what they should learn and how they should learn it, or is it just easier for us?
• Do kids learn better in 50 or 90 minute blocks, or is it just easier for us?

To be sure, these are not new questions, nor are they unique to my thinking. Many of us in the edu online community have been writing about these things for years. As with much of the “we need to change schools” conversation, it’s another part of the repeatedly articulated argument that appeals to common sense but hasn’t much moved the needle when it comes do doing things any differently in schools.

So why bring it up yet again? Well, for me at least, two words: Russell Ackoff.

A couple of weeks ago, thanks to some serendipitous surfing online, I came across this 10-minute snip of an interview with Ackoff, a pioneer in the field of systems thinking who was a professor at the Wharton School prior to his death in 2009. I was staggered a bit after watching it because he was able to articulate something I have been feeling for a while now but had been unable to find the words for:
“Peter Drucker said ‘There’s a difference between doing things right and doing the right thing.’ Doing the right thing is wisdom, and effectiveness. Doing things right is efficiency. The curious thing is the righter you do the wrong thing the wronger you become. If you’re doing the wrong thing and you make a mistake and correct it you become wronger. So it’s better to do the right thing wrong than the wrong thing right. Almost every major social problem that confronts us today is a consequence of trying to do the wrong things righter.”

Here’s the video. [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzS5V5-0VsA ]

I’ve been thinking about Ackoff pretty much consistently since I watched it, and the application of that lens to our current practice in schools is profound. Can there be a more apt example of trying to “do the wrong thing right” than in schools? Look again at that list above. Are we in search of efficiency, or effectiveness?

I think the answer is obvious. If you watch the clip, you’ll hear Ackoff dive into the education issue head on. He says, and I agree, that the system is not about learning (effectiveness). It’s about teaching (efficiency). And believe me, I understand why we have that focus. Given our devotion to an overstuffed curriculum, standardized tests, “college and career readiness” and more, about the only way we can see our students navigating the school experience is to “teach” it, to organize it, pace it, and assess it in some way that allows us to confer the adjective “educated” to each student. This despite the obvious truth that the vast majority of what we “learn” in school is quickly forgotten, and the truest “education” for our life’s work comes on the job, not in school.

Sadly, “doing the right thing” for our kids in schools is difficult. In education, our structures, our histories, our nostalgia for trying to do the “wrong thing right” runs deep. Regardless of how we got here (and the story is complex [http://hackeducation.com/2015/04/25/factory-model ],) we are profoundly wedded to what now constitutes this “education system” that dominates our learning world. The roles and expectations of students and teachers and administrators and parents are so clearly reinforced by our own experience, our cultural representations, and by those who have millions of dollars invested in the status quo that any serious suggestion that we might be doing the “wrong thing” is simply layered over by a new initiative, a new technology, a new curriculum, or a new success story to avoid having to grapple with the more fundamental question.

But that will not work for much longer. The contexts for learning and education have changed. As Ackoff says in his book Turning Learning Right Side Up [http://www.amazon.com/Turning-Learning-Right-Side-Education/dp/0132887630/ ]:
There is no way that the vast majority of teachers, whatever their training, can ever hope to match in their classrooms what students can receive at will from sources of their own choosing (14).

Unfortunately, the vast majority of schools I’ve visited continue to try to do the “wrong thing right.” While few teachers or administrators really believe that learning happens best when kids are grouped by age, or when they are all forced to learn the same things on the same day in the same way, or when we chop up what we’ve chosen for the content into 50-minute periods and different subjects, we do that stuff anyway. And, if you look at the recent Gallup survey of engagement [http://www.gallup.com/services/189926/student-poll-2015-results.aspx ] of almost 1 million students across the US, trying to do the “wrong thing right” is having devastating consequences. Of high school juniors, just 32% say they are “involved and enthusiastic” in school, 17% say they have fun at school, 17% say they “get to do what they do best,” and 16% say they “will invent something that changes the world.”

Read those numbers again, and ask yourself can we possibly be doing the right thing? Can we possibly label our current practices as “effective?”

As with most addictions, the first step to changing this is to admit we have a problem. The signs that we are reaching “peak education” in the traditional system are becoming more and more apparent by the day. (More about that in a later post.) And while I’m not naive enough to suggest that policy makers and vendors and many educators are at all ready to begin the process of moving away from a focus on efficiency toward a focus on effectiveness, that shouldn’t stop individual teachers or school systems from starting down that path.

Doing the right thing in schools starts with one fairly straightforward question: What do you believe about how kids learn most powerfully and deeply in their lives? Once you’ve answered that as an individual and as a school community, the question that follows is does your practice in classrooms with kids honor those beliefs? In other words, if you believe that kids learn best when they have authentic reasons for learning, when their work lives in the world in some real way, when they are pursuing answers to questions that they themselves find interesting, when they’re not constrained by a schedule or a curriculum, when they are having fun, and when they can learn with other students and teachers, then are you giving priority to those conditions in the classroom? Are you acting on your beliefs?

I’m working with districts where this is the root question, and where the answer is the fundamental driver for every decision made within the system. It’s a recognition that the roles and responsibilities of the system have irrevocably changed due to the shifts in the world we’ve seen over the last two decades. And it’s also a recognition that we have to approach our work with children from an entirely different angle than what we are accustomed to. But make no mistake, it’s a long, difficult process of change to endure.

This is not the first time in our history that we’ve faced such a seismic shift in our needs regarding schools and education. As Ackoff writes:
Here, a culture declaring itself to be the protector of individual liberty, and affording seemingly boundless opportunities for the expression of personal freedom, the challenge of creating a large, docile population that would accept the dominance of the factory system in their lives was enormous. In the first decades of the nineteenth century, it became clear that the only way to succeed with industrializing (and hence modernizing) this country was to find a way to break the inherently free human spirit during childhood (Kindle 177.)

As we are confronted with “modernizing” this country once again, it’s a focus on that “inherently free human spirit during childhood” that is once again at the core of our work. But instead of finding ways to break that spirit in children, this time around we must “do the right thing” and allow it to flourish in profound and beautiful ways for learning."
2016  willrichardson  russellackoff  peterdrucker  unschooling  deschooling  learning  education  schools  schooldesign  lcproject  openstudioproject  howwelearn  teaching  efficience  data  childhood  children  school  agesegregation  disciplines  interdisciplinary  efficiency  edtech  politics  policy  schedules  scheduling  assessment  curriculum  sfsh 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Rule of Three and other ideas
"and other handy thoughts: so many folks have asked me for a "quick start" set of rules for the design of 3rd Millennium learning spaces...
... this Rule of Three section and some of the other ideas here (see top of this page), have all been well received in conferences, seminars and most importantly adopted / shared with success by practitioners. These are proven, working ideas, so I thought it was time to park some of them on a web page:

***

rule of three - physical

I guess rule one is really that there is no absolutely right way to make learning better - schools are all different, their communities, contexts vary and as I have often observed on a windy day they become different places again. So you build your local recipe for great learning from the trusted and tested ingredients of others, adding a bit of local flair too. But this rule of three helps:

one: never more than three walls

two: no fewer than three points of focus

three: always able to accommodate at least three teachers, three activities (for the larger spaces three full "classes" too)

make no mistake - this is not a plea for those ghastly open plan spaces of the 1960s with their thermoplastic floors under high alumina concrete beams - with the consequent cacophony that deafened their teachers. Today's third millennium learning spaces are multi-faceted, agile (and thus easily re-configured by users as they use them), but allow all effective teaching and learning approaches, now and in the future, to be incorporated: collaborative work, mentoring, one-on-one, quiet reading, presentation, large group team taught groups... and more.

***

rule of three - pedagogic

one: ask three then me

A simple way to encourage peer support, especially in a larger mixed age, stage not age space, but it even works fine in a small 'traditional" closed single class classroom. Put simply the students should ask 3 of their peers before approaching the teacher for help. I've watched, amused in classes where a student approaches the teacher who simply holds up 3 fingers, with a quizzical expression and the student paused, turned and looked for help for her peers first. Works on so many levels...

two: three heads are better than one

Everyone engaging in team teaching reports that, once you get over the trust-wall of being confident that your colleagues will do their bit (see Superclasses) the experience of working with others, the professional gains, and the reduction in workloads are real and worthwhile. You really do learn rapidly from other teachers, the children's behaviour defaults to the expectations of the teacher in the room with the highest expectations, and so on. Remarkably schools especially report on the rapid progress of newly qualified teachers who move forward so quickly that people forget they are still NQTs. And older teachers at career end become rejuvenated by a heady mix of new ideas and of self esteem as they see that their "teaching craft" skills are valued and valuable.

three: three periods a day or fewer

Particularly in 2ndary schools a fragmented timetable of 5 or 6 lessons a day wastes so much time stopping and starting. Children arrive and spend, say, 3 minutes getting unpacked, briefed and started, then end 2 minutes before the "bell" and have 5 minutes travelling time between classes. On a 5 period day that is (3+2+5) x 5 = 50 minutes "lost" each day, 50 x 5 = 250 lost each week, which is effectively throwing away a day a week. Longer blocks, immersion can be solid blocks of a day of more, some schools even adopt a week, gets students truly engaged - and serves as a clear barrier to Dick Turpin teaching ("Stand and Deliver!") - which simply cannot be sustained for long blocks of time - thank goodness. This doesn't mean that the occasional "rapid fire" day (a bit like pedagogic Speed Dating!) can't be used to add variety. But longer blocks of time work better mainly.

***

rule of three - BYOD / UMOD

some schools adopting Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), or more recently Use My Own Device (UMOD - somehow, bringing them wasn't enough!) initially adopted really comprehensive "acceptable use policies" - bulging folders of policy that were neither understood nor adhered too (see for example the "sacrificial phones" mention under "What young people say" in the 2011 Nominet funded Cloudlearn research project).

Today though (2015) schools around the world, from Scandinavia to Australasia, are simpifying all this by three simple rules.

one: phones out, on the desk, screen up

Not everyone has a "desk" anymore of course, but the point here is that a device hidden under a work surface is more likely to be a problem than one on the worksurface, screen up. This makes it quick and easy to use, where appropriate, and simple to monitor by teachers or peers.

two: if you bring it, be prepared to share sometimes

This is more complex that it looks. Obviously handing your phone or tablet over to just anyone isn't going to happen, but the expectation that friends, or project collaborators, might simply pick up "your" device and chat to Siri, Google for resources, or whatever, means that bullying, inappropriate texts / images, or general misdemeanours are always likely to be discovered. Transparency is your friend here, secrecy masks mischief - and the expectation of occasional sharing is transparency enough. It also helps students develop simply safety / security habits - like logging out of social media to prevent Frapping or similar.

three: if you bring it, the school might notice and respond positively

If you've brought your own device along, the least you might expect is that the school gives you useful things to do, that you could not otherwise do, or couldn't do so well, without that device.

This requires a bit of imagination all round! A simple example would be the many schools that now do outdoor maths project tasks using the devices GPS trace capability (the device is sealed in a box during the excercise) like the children below tasked with drawing a Christmas tree on the park next to their school: estimating skills, geometry, measurement, scale, collaboration.... and really jolly hard to do with a pencil!

[image of a GPS traced tree]

***

knowing the 3rd millennium ABCs

A

ambition: how good might your children be?

agility: how quickly can we reconfigure to catch the wave - at a moment, only over a year, or at best across a generation?

astonishment: we want people to be astonished by what these children, and teachers, might achieve - how do we showcase this? how do we respond to it ourselves?

B

brave: what are others doing, what tested ideas can we borrow, how can we feed our own ideas to others? Brave is not foolhardy or reckless!

breadth: learning reaches out to who? embraces what? what support do you give for your school's grandparents for example?

blockers: you will need help with beating the blockers - if you run at the front, you need resources that win arguments: what is the evidence that...? why doesn't everyone do this...? where can I see it in action...? why should I change, ever...? all this exists of course (see top of page for example), but you need to organise it and be ready with it. A direct example is this workshop manual we developed for the new science spaces at Perth's Wesley College in Australia.

C

collegiality: that sense of belonging, of us-ness, sense of family, sharing, co-exploring, research. Also a sense of us (the team working on this innovation) being learners too - and able to show that we are trying cool stuff too - you won't win hearts and minds by saying but not doing;

communication: how does a learning space / building communicate what happens within? and this is about symmetry: how does the school listen to what happens outside school? how do we share and exchange all this with others?

collaboration: we don't want to be told, but we want to do this with others. How do we share what we learn as we do it? Who do we share with? How do we learn from them?"
tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  edtech  technology  schooldesign  stephenheppell  via:sebastienmarion  pedagogy  howweteach  howwelearn  education  teaching  learning  schools  collaboration  byod  umod  sharing  ambition  agility  astonishment  bravery  breadth  blockers  collegiality  communication  simplicity  mobile  phones  desks  furniture  computers  laptops  etiquette  conviviality  scheduling  teams  interdependence  canon  sfsh 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Quiet Schools Network - Quiet Revolution
"Our mission is to create Quiet Schools, which are characterized by an inclusive culture in which everyone is recognized for their potential to learn and lead in authentic ways.

We partner with schools to train Quiet Ambassadors to serve as experts in introversion/extroversion and work with their colleagues to:

• Enhance engagement, creativity and kindness.
• Foster the ability to communicate with presence and compassion.
• Tap into the power of quiet leadership."



"Quiet Ambassador Program
Our yearlong comprehensive training and support of one or more Quiet Ambassadors from your school includes in-person and online workshops, individual and team coaching sessions, and a treasure trove of online resources for the entire community.

Susan Cain, whose work has been deemed by educators as “salient, timely, and crucial,” will kick off the Quiet Summer Institute with a keynote about the Quiet Revolution in education, which will be followed by two full days of interactive workshops that promise to be engaging and enlightening. After developing a deeper awareness of their own personality styles, participants learn strategies that include, but are not limited to: empowering quiet students, collaborating more effectively with colleagues, maximizing flow in the creative process, and creating more balanced classroom environments.

…and Membership in Quiet Schools Network
When schools partner with Quiet Revolution through the Ambassador Program, they become part of a national independent school community dedicated to collective innovation and the sharing of best practices. Network benefits include a monthly newsletter, a yearly student magazine, regional seminars offered by our Quiet Revolution team, and measurement tools for year-end assessments."
quiet  susancain  heidikasevich  schools  education  kindness  presence  compassion  lcproject  openstudioproject  introverts  schooldesign  leadership  sfsh 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Tiny Schools Project | 4.0 Schools
"Over the last 20 years, the world has changed far faster than our schools have evolved, and this gap gets wider every year. What we need — more than ever — is a systemic approach to creating new schools that prepare students for the future they will inherit while decreasing the risks and costs of testing of new ideas for schooling.

That’s why we’ve created The Tiny Schools Project (TSP), designed to support graduates of our Launch program who are focused on creating new innovative school models. Tiny Schools are prototypes, serving just one class of students so that innovative ideas can be tested in a safe environment. Participants in the TSP receive coaching, start-up funding, and support as they progress towards creating a full school over 2-12 months.

If we’re going to rethink school, we need to rethink how we create schools. Innovative schools coming out of the Tiny Schools Project will be field-tested and ready to scale after they demonstrate clear evidence of success at a small scale. And instead of spending over $500k and two years to find out whether a single school will be successful, we are able to test 4-5 new school models in 3–6 months for the same cost. We think the Tiny Schools Project represents an important step forward in the business of launching schools.

We expect 75% of these pilots to come to life as a larger school within two years, either as a low-cost private school, a new stand-alone charter school, or a new school model within the charter network or network that served as host site for the pilot. All schools in the program should be on track to run without philanthropy after year three.

Over time, we think the schools that come out of the Tiny Schools Project will demonstrate a bold vision of more personalized, more accessible and more sustainable school design."
microschools  tinyschools  education  schools  schooldesign 
december 2015 by robertogreco
SAIC - Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects: Kunlé Adeyemi
"Kunlé Adeyemi is an architect, urbanist, and designer. His recent work includes Makoko Floating School, an innovative, prototype, floating structure located on the lagoon in the heart of Nigeria's largest city, Lagos. This acclaimed project is part of an extensive research project, African Water Cities, being developed by NLÉ, an architecture, design, and urbanism practice founded by Adeyemi in 2010 with a focus on developing cities. NLÉ is currently developing a number of civic, research, and architectural projects in Africa—one of which is Chicoco Radio Media Center, the amphibious building in Delta city of Port Harcourt in Nigeria. Born and raised in Nigeria, Adeyemi studied architecture at the University of Lagos where he began his early practice, before joining the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in 2002. At OMA he led the design, development, and execution of several large prestigious projects in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. These include the Shenzhen Stock Exchange tower in China, Qatar National Library in Doha, and Prada Transformer in Seoul. He served as a member of the International Advisory Council for the World Design Capital 2014 and a juror for the Venice Architecture Biennale 2014. For the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennial, on view October 3, 2015–January 3, 2016, Adeyemi has partnered with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to develop and build a functioning vendor kiosk for exhibition in Millennium Park. After the Biennial exhibition, the kiosk will be moved and installed permanently on the Chicago Lakefront."
architecture  kunléadeyemi  schooldesign  schools  makokofloatingschool  lagos  nigeria  africa  nlé  water  cities  urban  urbanism 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Power Positions | Dirty Furniture
"When it comes to taking a seat at the table, not all sides are created equal. Architecture and design critic Alexandra Lange considers an underexplored mechanism of control.

From 1959 architect Philip Johnson would lunch at a corner table in the Grill Room, part of the Four Seasons restaurant in the Seagram Building he designed. Contemporaries Frank Lloyd Wright and Henry Dreyfuss held court at the Oak Room in New York’s Plaza Hotel. How can Johnson’s decision to make his own Oak Room be interpreted as anything other than a power play? Here everyone had to sit, literally, at his table. Clients, colleagues, supplicants, artists: on his own turf, the architect trumped them all. And the table itself laid bare an unspoken hierarchy, depending on where you sat.

All tables do: choose a seat close to or far away from the seat of power and you reveal your sense of place. Take the seat you’ve been allocated and you find out where others place you. If you don’t like your position you can move, or, if an Arthurian knight, fight. It is more subtle, though, to change the rules of engagement by changing the shape of the board."



"The Boardroom Table"



"The Kitchen Table"



"The Schoolroom Table"



"In some offices, homes and schoolrooms, the table is now in decline. Meetings today might be held in break-out areas defined by soft furniture, stadium-style steps, or even foam mountains. With low-slung sofas and side tables, such landscaped interior spaces may come closer to Saarinen’s floor-level Katsura ideal, albeit without the elaborate manners and tatami mats. In today’s suburban kitchens, meanwhile, meals are as likely eaten at the counter or on the sofa as at a table. Family dinners have become nothing but a fetish for food writers. As schools embrace technology, communal writing surfaces become less necessary – the laptop is table, pen and pad in one. In each of these new scenarios some freedoms are gained, but chances for conversation are lost. The table gives and it takes away: it can harden hierarchies but also create the space for speech.

The idea of an architect as a fixed physical presence in a city seems quaint today; one imagines them instead in transit, on the phone, or on site. I hardly want architects to return to public life patronising from the corner table, but wouldn’t there be some benefit to watching their design work at work, to staking a claim for architecture’s importance to cities through their physical presence? The history of the table proves its versatility as a symbol for how people are connected to one another. Its disappearance suggests a retreat into individual architectures for eating, working, learning that can’t bode well for diplomats, housewives, students or business."
alexandralange  tables  power  hierarchy  education  harknesstables  harkness  harknessmethod  2015  architecture  furniture  relationships  teaching  learning  pedagogy  business  boardrooms  modernmen  kitchens  families  homes  offices  officedesign  schooldesign  kingarthur 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Burntwood school wins 2015 Stirling prize – and offers lessons for all | Art and design | The Guardian
"With light-flooded classrooms and a sharply chamfered concrete facade, this building is a symbol of a bygone age"

[See also: “AHMM: the Stirling prize-winners who design schools for the future – in pictures”
http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/oct/15/ahmm-stirling-prize-winners-schools-for-the-future-in-pictures
architecture  schooldesign  design  schools  ahmm  education 
october 2015 by robertogreco
The 13 most innovative schools in the world - Tech Insider
[grain of salt, and some guffawing for a certain item on this list]

"Makoko Floating School. Lagos, Nigeria. The school that floats.
Ørestad Gymnasium. Copenhagen, Denmark. The school in a cube.
Big Picture Learning. Providence, Rhode Island. The school in the real world.
Egalia Pre-school. Stockholm, Sweden. The school without gender.
AltSchool. San Francisco, California. The school of Silicon Valley.
Sra Pou Vocational School. Sra Pou village, Cambodia. The school for building community.
P-TECH High School. Brooklyn, New York. The school that bridges high school and college.
Steve Jobs School. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The school that thinks different.
Brightworks School. San Francisco, California. The school that teaches dangerously.
Carpe Diem Schools. Aiken, Ohio. The school built like an office.
Innova Schools. Peru. The school built by world-class designers.
Blue School. New York, New York. The school fusing compassion and creativity.
Samaschool. San Francisco, California. The school that says it's not too late."
schools  schooldesign  education  2014  nigeria  lagos  sweden  denmark  gender  learning  howwelearn  lcproject  openstudioproject  bigpictureschools  samaschool  blueschool  altschool  p-techhighschool  cambodia 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Better Space, better education? Japan's alternative kindergarten (Learning World: S5E41, 1/3) - YouTube
"The architecture of this Japanese kindergarten is striking: it has an oval shape which frames a garden, trees are growing through the roof of the building. Slides lead the way into the garden and animals are part of the establishment. There are no internal walls, so the children hear the noises from neighbouring classes, helping them hone their concentration skills. But what is the purpose of this odd architecture?

Its architect, Takaharu Tezuka, has designed it to fulfill the need for doing the same thing over and over again. Through repetition, children investigate the world: the roof serves as a running track, as a place to interact with the trees growing below. It offers a room to the children where they can learn about the risks of growing up...learn more about this special kindergarten!

What role do trees, plants and outdoor spaces play in a child’s cognitive development? https://youtu.be/YTL3IJ4dXQ0
Can exceptional architectural design make a difference to the way we learn? https://youtu.be/unSw_u7KEfQ "
kindergarten  japan  tezukaarchitects  architecture  design  learning  howwelearn  schools  schooldesign  2015  children  fujikindergarten  takaharutezuka 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Our RISD — Playing for Keeps
"Children in eastern China are taking the notion of learning through play to new heights, according to Associate Professor of Industrial Design Cas Holman, who has been collaborating with educator Cheng Xueqin to design tools for kids that complement her vision for learning. Over the past 14 years, Cheng has developed a comprehensive play-driven educational model for China that is being used to incredible effect in 120 public preschools in Anji County.

“Anji Play is about joy and agency and allowing kids to develop as whole people,” says Holman. “The play is completely child-directed; teachers don’t even prompt them about what to build. When playtime is over, the children draw ‘play stories’ to visually communicate what they made and what questions they were trying to answer.”

Holman observed the system in action during a trip to China last month and plans to return in August to work with factory directors on creating a core set of high-quality materials – ladders, barrels, blocks and the like – with consistent specs. She’s also working with Cheng’s team to help adapt the model for use in the US and other western countries.    

The approach to play at these Chinese preschools is one Holman has long advocated for through her own work. As she notes in this newly posted opinion piece for Fast Company, “The ideal toy for a child is not a toy at all but something they’ve appropriated for play.”

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/120218237 ]

[See also: https://www.fastcodesign.com/3048508/the-case-for-letting-kids-design-their-own-play ]
play  children  china  kindergarten  schools  education  casholman  chengxuegin  design  schooldesign  toys  student-directedlearning  reggioemilia  via:ablerism  roleplaying  preschool  anjiplay  anji 
july 2015 by robertogreco
‘A change of heart towards children.’ Historical perspectives from England, Australia and New Zealand on the design of a new primary school for Cambridge, Catherine Burke
"Architects and educators who collaborated in the post war era have talked about the development of a ‘common vocabulary of design’ in relation to the planning of new school buildings supported by a consensus in the dominant ways of envisaging the modern school. From the 1930s, there also developed a common vocabulary of progressive education. Key concepts that were presented and discussed at international conferences (1930s-70s) included the phrases; ‘education for living’; and ‘education through art’. John Dewey’s Art as Experience (1934) was no doubt responsible for much discussion about the place of the arts in education.

‘Education through art’ is an idea most closely identified with Sir Herbert Read however when one considers the evidence from important gatherings of educationalists in the antipodes during this period, one realizes that the phrase may have been used more generally and was certainly used by the Canadian artist and educator (Toronto Art Gallery) Arthur Lismer in 1937 as the title of one of his addresses at the Victoria NEF conference."



"The change of heart towards children that Clegg was striving for also concerned attitudes towards the older child, often as he saw it abandoned by the system owing to their talents being measured merely in academic terms. Clegg was a significant voice in the findings of the Newsom Enquiry which reported in 1963 as ‘Half Our Future’. These were the majority of secondary modern pupils, the rejected and the neglected as ‘they do not readily lend themselves to measurement by the conventional criteria of academic achievement.’ (Newsom Report 1963, p. 1). The report concluded there was a need for ‘ a change of heart, on the part of the community as a whole ‘ towards children. What was needed was a recognition that those parts of education, less easily measurable, were as vital to the individual and society as those that were. This was an education of the spirit: That part of humanity that defies measurement. In particular, Clegg drew attention to the role of the expressive arts and their impact on other basic skills.

‘one can more often than not measure the things of the mind,
the things governed by law and regulations - spelling,
punctuation, calculations, the facts of history and geography,
science, technical proficiency, the accuracy of the perspective,
the effectiveness of the timetable, even the degree of
submission achieved by the cane. But you cannot measure the
love of poetry, the sensitivity to music or art, the zest or
initiative with which the peculiarities of nature are
investigated, the extent to which encouragement and
expectation and just treatment breed trust and compassion and
concern in a child.

When he was asked by an American scholar if he had any statistics to share with them about this revolution in primary education, Clegg reached for his leather briefcase he carried with him and emptied the contents saying these are your statistics ‘extraordinary samples of paintings, drawings, collages, embroideries, stories, poems and essays produced by pupils in his district.’ (Charles Silberman, Revolution, Foreword p.5) and Clegg insisted that the products were the children themselves."



"A new school for Cambridge

Under the UK government's Free Schools policy, every new build must have a sponsor and the new primary school for Cambridge is one of two University Training Schools currently under construction – the other being a secondary school in Birmngham. The University College London sponsored and opened an academy two years ago.

The Cambridge primary school will be a University training and research school (UTS) and is intended to be a beacon for the region as well as representing the best possible practice nationally and internationally. There is a lot of expectation. Today, I want to describe the design of the school and share with you some of the ways that knowledge of the history of education and school design past and present has informed the design process. The school is due to open in September 2015. It will be a three form entry school : 60 Reception, 20 year 1 and 20 year 2 growing to 630 children ( 21 classes) by 2016017. It will include a 78-place nursery by 2016-17. The architects are Marks Barfield (designers of the London Eye). In many ways in terms of design, the building and its relationship with the grounds share many characteristics of children’s; design ideas in The School I’d Like. It is possible to measure these comparable features. However, whether this school is able to come close to the radical agenda agreed across time and space by the generation of ambitious teachers artists architects and administrators associated with the powerful ‘revolutionary’ capacity of education through art, and the aspirations of children and young people in the SIL is another matter. There is hope that inspired leadership informed by an historical sensibility and a high level of energy will indeed create a showcase of what is possible to achieve through ‘learning beyond limits’ a terms associated with the beliefs and practice of advisory head teacher for the project, Dame Alison Peacock. However, we are reminded that the spirit of a creative school cannot reasonably be measured and evaluated in the same terms that are likely to characterize research that will be carried out at the school. Whether the school fits the child in the way that Alec Clegg, a generation of progressive educators and children expressing their hopes for the future intended, will depend on the capacity of teachers to practice their art fully and with a wisdom that is rooted in a respect for the child as an artist and creator of their own worlds.

Final words of Alec Clegg “the entire object of true education is to make people not merely do the right things but enjoy the right things’"
catherineburke  2015  alecclegg  education  schools  schooldesign  architecture  children  learning  england  australia  newzealand  creativity 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Designing for touch, reach and movement in post-war English primary and infant schools | Catherine Burke - Academia.edu
"
Clothes quickly pile up on the desks as children busily undress for the dance lesson. The first to change are soon by the door, ready to make their way to the hall, their bare feet wriggling impatiently in their shoes for the moment when they can kick them off and spring on to the hall floor. On the way along the corridor the bodies bustle and an animated walk threatens to break into running ... Once inside the hall, a line of shoes immediately appears under chairs lined up along the wall and swift bare feet dart and prance in lively stepping and jumping. Some rush across the space exhilarated by the feel of air against their faces, some pluck their feet off the floor in hops and leaps, and others swing wide their arms in unrestrained gesture which sweeps them high onto their toes, or pulls them into an off-balance suspension that dissolves into the slack of a downwards spiral. Soon the teacher calls for the classÕs attention and the lesson begins." (McKittrick, 1972: 11)."

Introduction

In his seminal work, About Looking, John Berger (1980) succeeded in opening up new avenues of critical discussion focused on visual texts and the impact of such on their makers and audiences. Ways of Seeing reminded us that seeing comes before words and that the infant looks and recognizes before it can speak (Berger, 2008 front cover). Seeing comes before speaking, but touching is a necessary part of understanding, while movement affords freedom and enables choice. As Raymond Tallis has eloquently established, the pointing finger is a fundamental sign of the human mind in the exercise of its powers of observation and discernment (Tallis, 2010). Together, the sense of touch, the facility of reach and the act of movement imply living fully. It has been long noted that the first sense experienced by infants in exploring the world is touch (Charlton Deas 1913-26 in Grosvenor & MacNab 2013). The sense of touch has been examined by scholars in relation to a range of perspectives involving teaching and learning including object lessons (Keene 2008) and tactile engagement in the context of visual impairment (Grosvenor & McNab 2013). Outside of schools, the sense of touch has been used as a lens to appreciate and explore the experience of learning in museums (Chatterjee 2008; Classen 2005; Pye 2008). The principal anatomical parts involved in touch - the fingers and the hand - have been subjected to critical and creative scrutiny within cross-disciplinary discussions about what it means to be human (Napier 1993; Tallis 2010). In a previously published article (Burke & Cunningham, 2011), I explored with Peter Cunningham the significance of hands as part of what might be called the choreography of the classroom. In that piece we noted how the relationship between the hand and cognitive function has been well established and recognized by teachers and others (Sennett 2008). We also noted how ‘critique of how children were encased in unsuitable or uncomfortable school furniture… (was) characteristic of progressive educational discourse during the first half of the 20th century’ (Burke and Cunningham, 2011: 538).

Few scholars have so far paid critical attention to the ways that designers of school buildings have incorporated into the design process notions of bodily movement. One exception is found in the work of Roy Kozlovsky who has examined how interpretations of movement in the primary school environment engaged post-war architects in England. Consideration of the significance of rhythmic movement shifted their metaphorical conceptualization of the eye of the pupil from a technical apparatus to an organic association as a living muscle ‘that requires its own cycle of concentration and relaxation’ (Kozlovsky, 2010: 707). In this paper, I will extend a focus on the sense of touch to embrace the attributes of reach and movement exposed by a close reading of Building Bulletins reporting on English primary school building design during the period 1949-72. The rationale for this is found in the discourses fueling the drivers of educational redesign in post-war education when ‘reach’ became associated with an idea of the child enabled to exercise powers of freedom and self-expression. I will demonstrate how the imagined exercise of touch, reach and movement evidences an understanding, shared among architects working for the Ministry of Education in the post-war government, of how the body of the school child mattered in the transformation of education towards the design of the modern school and the nurturing of the modern citizen (Stillman and Castle-Cleary, 1949). Through an analysis of the content of a series of Building Bulletins, published by the Ministry of Education (later Department of Education), I will show how, for architects, the imagined use, place and disposition of body parts in close (often touching) proximity to the material environment of school, informed their thinking and featured in their planning. Building Bulletins reported on the design of school buildings in general and on certain particular aspects, such as colour or furniture."



"Sensory contexts of touch, reach, and movement

So what, in conclusion, can we say about this scrutiny of the discourse around touch, reach and movement in the Building Bulletins published in the period 1949-72? First, the findings clearly demonstrate how close was the vocabulary of touch, motion and emotion shared by progressive educators and architects during these years. Feeling (touching) the material environment through an imaginary identification with a young child, was a strategy of design. The material — designed — environment of education was perceived as a key pedagogical force in an education which emphasized the role of the senses. This is well captured in the following statement by Alec Clegg, CEO for the West Riding of Yorkshire during these years (1945-74).
'Children learn mostly from that which is around them and from the use of the senses. These impressions so gained will depend a great deal on interests that will vary considerably. If children are interested they will listen more carefully, look more closely and touch more sensitively. With interest there is created the element of wonder, the most precious element of life' (Sir Alec Clegg, 1964).

Close observation of children's active engagement with the material environment they encountered through their skin, limbs and whole bodies was characteristic of educational and architectural discourses regarding the most appropriate contexts for teaching and learning at this time. Second, observable by its absence in the Building Bulletin's commentary on touch, reach and movement is the figure of the school-teacher, within a systematic approach to designing from the body of the child outwards. This sits easily with the progressive image of the school as discussed through visual evidence from iconic school environments in this period (Burke and Grosvenor, 2007). Finally, in examining the imagined settings for touch alongside notions of scale and reach in the context of the built environment, we are forced to address questions of comfort and discomfort, agency and non-agency. In this analysis, the sense of touch leaves its anchor of materiality and comes to appear essential to affording a sense of belonging, allied to a notion of rights to participate in an imagined democratic community."
catherineburke  1940s  1950s  1960s  1970s  schools  schooldesign  multisensory  education  children  learning  progressive  howwelearn  howwteach  teaching  pedagogy  environment  touch  reach  movement  motion  emotion  alecclegg  johnberger  furnitue  color  architecture  design  scale  bodies  body  furniture  christianschiller  materials  difference  accessibility 
june 2015 by robertogreco
HIBINOSEKKEI + youji no shiro display gridded façade on hanazono kindergarten
"keeping to the local architectural styles of the miyakojima region- an island 2000km away from tokyo- this is where the hanazono kindergarten and nursery is located. designed by HIBINOSEKKEI and youji no shiro, the building has been characterized by its subtropical, oceanic climate as well as its surrounding context. immersing the children with the outdoors and encouraging creativity are two main elements underlined throughout the nursery. the ground floor, open, breazy and like a studio, is dedicated to art and simultaneously promotes comfortable ventilation. the kindergarten features courtyards and terraces allowing the children to integrating learning, playing and eating outside whenever it is possible."
hibinosekkei  youjinoshiro  architecture  design  schooldesign  education  kindergarten  japan  children  littoralzone  indooroutdoor  schools  liminalspaces  liminality 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Takaharu Tezuka: The best kindergarten you’ve ever seen | Talk Video | TED.com
"At this school in Tokyo, five-year-olds cause traffic jams and windows are for Santa to climb into. Meet: the world's cutest kindergarten, designed by architect Takaharu Tezuka. In this charming talk, he walks us through a design process that really lets kids be kids."
takaharutezuka  tezukaarchitects  architecture  2007  schooldesign  design  kindergarten  japan  tokyo  schools  education  children  fujikindergarten 
april 2015 by robertogreco
School in Malawi
"Built in Malawi – one of the world’s least-developed and most-densely populated countries – by Architecture for a Change, the Legson Kayira Community Center & Primary School explores the possibility of the school as a covered canopy.

It offers a larger covered area that provides shade, open, well-lit and well ventilated spaces. The structure becomes very efficient in terms of material vs. covered square meterage, and becomes itself a visual icon."
schools  schooldesign  design  architecture  africa  malawi  johnsaaiman  architectureforchange  containers  2014 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Lived-in Room: Classroom Space as Teacher [eScholarship]
"This paper is a portrait of a public elementary school classroom in light of the relationships, history, and ideas that have formed its physical space. In describing Judy Richard’s classroom, the author shows how a creative teacher’s commitment to seeing her classroom as a living space inevitably brings her to overstep the narrow limits of the traditional mandates of classroom management. The author presents this portrait as an example of the ideological and creative stance teachers can assume in relation to their classrooms. Addressing challenges that are specific to urban public schools, the author also suggests that public schools must abandon their oversimplified conception of learning spaces and develop support systems that help teachers incorporate the socio-emotional, developmental, and cultural needs of their students into their classroom settings."
houmanharouni  education  teaching  space  place  classrooms  socialemotionallearning  classroommanagement  2013  howweteach  school  learning  howwelearn  schooldesign  socialemotional  classroom 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Kéré Architecture :: School Extension / Gando / Burkina Faso
"Two years after the completion of the Primary School, there was demand from more than 260 children from Gando and the surrounding region to attend the school. It quickly became apparent that an extension was badly needed to service the educational needs of these students. With overwhelming support from surrounding villages, this School Extension was built using local labor and materials.

As the Primary School was built in close conjunction with Gando community members, the building became an important identifying landmark in the region. Since the material quality and architectural expression of the building became such a strong symbol for the Gando community itself, the new extension was designed with the same principles and methods. Similarly to the Primary School, the School Extension was also built with hand-made compressed stabilized earth blocks. The ventilation strategy of pulling the hot tin roof away from the inner perforated ceiling was also used. Unlike the Primary School, however, the ceiling of the Extension was designed as a singular vault. Rather than leaving reveals between the ceiling surface and beam elements, the monumental vault was constructed with gaps within the weave of the brick pattern of the ceiling. This ‘breathing’ surface draws cool air from the windows into the interior space and allows hot air to escape through the ventilations, all while remaining shaded and protected from damaging rains by the overhanging roof.

The School Extension was completed in 2008 and now supports an additional 120 students. The Gando School Library is currently under construction and is sited directly adjacent to the School Extension. The Library is scheduled to be ready for occupancy at the end of 2014."

[See also: http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/smallscalebigchange/projects/primary_school
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Di%C3%A9b%C3%A9do_Francis_K%C3%A9r%C3%A9
http://theculturetrip.com/africa/burkina-faso/articles/di-b-do-francis-k-r-sustainable-architecture-in-burkina-faso/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOdIdyPV8Dw
https://vimeo.com/106480504
http://www.ted.com/talks/diebedo_francis_kere_how_to_build_with_clay_and_community
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD23gIlr52Y&list=PL1KB54LKXdiRbJN92mqttllm9k4s9OqIW ]
architecture  schools  africa  burkinafaso  2008  kéréarchitecture  design  schooldesign  diébédofranciskéré 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Designing around sound? — Medium
"Hi Boris—a great experiment. I’m looking at non-text inputs for students and the noise factor comes to mind every time.

So in the future will we pick our coffee shop/office based on acoustics as much as the espresso? Will shopkeeps design around sound—I don’t think anyone pays much attention to that right now. I noticed Propaganda Coffee is a very bright room and the noise volume quickly becomes distracting.

And just in case you can’t get out to a coffee shop: https://coffitivity.com/ "
sound  learning  soundscapes  education  schools  schooldesign  acoustics  coffeshops  bradovenell-carter  2015 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Seven Pathways
"Our pathways are two things: Commitments for our professional learning - how will we learn to be contemporary educators - and promises to our students - what kind of educational environment are we building.

The Seven Pathways

Choice and Comfort

It is our responsibility to provide every learner with real learning space choices based on task-based and physical comfort-based needs, which not only allow their cognitive energy to be focused on learning but helps students to develop the contemporary skills needed to alter and use spaces to initiate and accomplish collaborative and individual work. This includes the availability of multiple communication tools and contemporary technologies as well as assisting students in understanding and creating a variety of learning products which demonstrate student choices in curriculum, task, technologies, and media.

Instructional Tolerance

We will all support student learning environments where active, engaged learners routinely choose from a variety of learning spaces, collaborative and individual activities, and technology tools, including their own personal devices. Our environments will create student opportunities to learn best practices essential to entering contemporary learning and work environments and which enable students to sustain an open mindset and skillset in the use of evolving technology tools. These environments, pre-K through 12, will allow negotiated environmental rules which include and improve student individual and community decision-making.

Universal Design for Learning/Individualization of Learning

No child within the Albemarle County Public Schools should need a label or prescription in order to access the tools of learning or environments they need. Within the constraints of other laws (in particular, copyright) we will offer alternative representations of information, multiple tools, and a variety of instructional strategies to provide access for all learners to acquire lifelong learning competencies and the knowledge and skills specified in curricular standards. We will create classroom cultures that fully embrace differentiation of instruction, student work, and assessment based upon individual learners’ needs and capabilities. We will apply contemporary learning science to create accessible entry points for all students in our learning environments; and which support students in learning how to make technology choices to overcome disabilities and inabilities, and to leverage preferences and capabilities.

Maker-Infused Curriculum

Across our School Division we are committed to student construction of knowledge and skills through the processes of imagining, creating, designing, building, engineering, evaluating and communicating learning. We believe that it is essential that our students learn how to be "Makers" in all phases of their lives, rather than just consumers. We are committed to "Making" as "how we learn," and not as an "extra," and we understand that both "Learning to Make" and "Making to Learn" are essential in every day classroom practice.

Project/Problem/Passion-Based Learning

All Albemarle County Public School students will have consistent learning opportunities across the curriculum to construct knowledge and understanding through responses to authentic problems; to create projects that demonstrate higher order thinking and knowledge acquisition, and to pursue personal interests by making real choices in project forms and media, even when those choices might lie beyond pre-determined expectations. Students will always be encouraged in the use of differentiated pathways as ways to both learn and demonstrate lifelong learning competencies.

Interactive Technologies

In every classroom, every day, we strive to create open learning environments in which students make individual choices as they use technologies to develop classroom work and assignments, and to provide opportunities for our students to actively make tech-based product investigation and choice as part of their study of curriculum. Our students will, regularly during instructional time, use those contemporary technologies (both school provided and individually owned) interact with external experts and students in other communities in order to build learner competencies in the use of the technologies of this century for information access and communication.

Connectivity

We will continuously develop and use activities that engage students in learning networks, including asynchronous and synchronous communication with external experts, access to digital content including primary sources, and interaction with other learners locally and globally who represent a variety of demographically diverse communities. We will, every day, promote and value collaborative projects and knowledge development representative of principles of global and digital literacy and effective, and which demonstrate appropriate global, national, community, and digital citizenship."
albermarleschooldistrict  irasocol  pammoran  technology  connectivity  projectbasedlearning  passionbasedlearning  making  mekers  curriculum  pathways  interaction  universldesign  learning  individualization  howweteach  howwelearn  teaching  education  schools  tolerance  instruction  choice  comfort  toolbelttheory  schooldesign  communication  pbl 
march 2015 by robertogreco
- Design school X is the genome. It has the...
"“Design school X is the genome.

It has the design to train any kind of educator, an enzyme, to fill a particular need, to be well matched to any particular learner.

When you plug in X for a specific city, a specific set of contexts, that is the equivalent to picking a cell type. The genome swings into action, by activating certain genes, choosing which catalysts to bring into the mix, hiring and training certain educators, and suppressing other genes that are not needed. The right mix of catalysts will make for a healthy, loving cell.

To keep it healthy and loving, the genome is flexible, and can choose which genes to activate or suppress as time passes, even though the genome itself doesn’t change.

The genome can be used to create a distributed system as well, of small storefronts throughout a city, activating genes that encode for catalysts that facilitate communication across the living system. These genes might encode for signaling molecules or hormones, that pass between storefronts, and keep the whole system healthy, as well as antibodies that can be on the lookout for what might be disrupting the health of the whole community.”

— Dr. Anton Krukowski, Scientist, teacher, musian, DSX Catalyst"
designschoolx  schools  schooldesign  2015  davidclifford  antonkrukowski  adaptability  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  teaching  learning  local  networkedlearning  networks  modeling  prototyping  systemsthinking  systems  community  communities  flexibility  enzymes 
january 2015 by robertogreco
School libraries shelve tradition to create new learning spaces | Teacher Network | The Guardian
"You might think technology would spell the end of books and libraries. But many schools have embraced the digital revolution and built innovative spaces that foster a love of literature"

[See also: “Inspirational school libraries from around the world – gallery
From a story garden in Cornwall to hexagonal towers in Los Angeles, we look at inventive spaces designed to get children excited about books
• School libraries shelve tradition to create new learning spaces”
http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/gallery/2015/jan/08/school-libraries-world-books-gallery ]
libraries  schools  schooldesign  architecture  interiors  2015  education 
january 2015 by robertogreco
A New Classroom That Produces More Energy Than It Consumes | WIRED
[See also: http://andersonanderson.com/2013/02/01/energy-positive-portable-classroom/ ]

"Creating an energy positive building is a give and take of inputs and outputs. The key to sustainability isn’t just producing more energy—the smartest (and cheapest) way to go about it is to reduce the amount of energy used in the first place. “The assumption is to achieve a net zero building, you have to get as many solar panels on there as you can,” says Anderson. But right now, energy conservation is cheaper than production.

The classroom does use roof solar panels to generate energy, though the roof’s saw-tooth shape helps to that end. The slating, jagged design is often referred to as a factory roof, deriving from its use in the design of factories more than a century ago. With north-facing windows, this roof shape is particularly efficient at capturing daylight, and paired with lower-lying windows too, it provides ventilation for hot air to escape. Not to mention a good way to shed rain water. Before electricity was widespread, these roofs were the main way massive factories could get both light and ventilation. It fell out of favor, replaced by flat roofs, once electricity became cheaper, but Anderson says it’s still a remarkably effective design. “It’s a reminder some of those things were there for very good reasons,” he says.

Every window in the classroom opens and closes, which means the amount of airflow is endlessly adjustable. It’s also more expensive. Anderson says sustainability often comes with a hefty initial price tag that pays for itself in the following years and decades. “We’ve typically been shortsighted,” he says. At this point, the classroom is really just a laboratory of sorts. It’s undergoing a two year testing period where every aspect of the structure will be monitored, tracked and quantified to see how well the it compares to its projected computer modeling.

If it works according to plan, the energy-producing building isn’t just good news for the school itself. It’s easy to imagine if you get enough of these networked classrooms built, you could offset less efficient structures on the school campus, perhaps with enough spillover energy to account for transportation and entire surrounding neighborhoods. That’s in the future, of course. And it will be a major challenge for locations less idyllic than Hawaii. But it’s an exciting vision nonetheless, and one Anderson thinks we should be actively working toward. “In some ways, the emphasis the world has on net zero is unfortunate,” he says. “It’s not enough for net zero to be the goal—we have to look at the bigger picture.”"
schooldesign  education  schools  design  energy  architecture  2014  andersonanderson  sustainability  environment  light  hawaii 
december 2014 by robertogreco
THE FLOYD LEG
"The Floyd Leg was born from the idea of creating frameworks for people to make their own furniture. We're constantly thinking about the evolving idea of home, the spaces we inhabit and how this relates to the objects in our lives. Our furniture is simple to ship and uncomplicated for people to transport and adapt. The Floyd Leg is about people, who bring soul to our products—each with a unique point of view, style, and preference.

The Floyd Leg has shipped to over 30 countries, and in 2015 we will be launching a wider line of furniture and home goods."
furniture  tables  schooldesign  mobility 
september 2014 by robertogreco
feldman + quinones construct bamboo childhood center in colombia
"as part of the national integral youth attention strategy ‘de cero a siempre‘, daniel feldman and ivan quinones have created an early childhood center called ‘el guadual’ to transform the city center of villa rica, colombia. the building’s inauguration marked the end of a three-year long participatory design and development effort that has strived to generate pride and ownership since the beginning of the process. charades with local kids, teenagers, employees, and community leaders were the starting point of the project in terms of spaces, materials, dimensions, and relations with the city. construction lasted nine months and the total cost was $1.6 million. the funds to build the school came from international cooperations, private donations, and public resources. more than 60 local builders were employed and certified alongside 30 local women who were trained in early youth education to become the daily workforce of the facility."

[See also: http://architizer.com/blog/brilliant-bamboo-this-colombian-childrens-center-proves-how-participatory-design-can-produce-inspired-architecture/ ]

[video: https://vimeo.com/92429538 ]
colombia  schools  schooldesign  architecture  participatory  participatorydesign  design  villarica  bamboo  children  danielfeldman  ivanquiñones 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Mini-Schools: A Prescription for the Reading Problem by Paul Goodman | The New York Review of Books
"For ages six to eleven, I propose a system of tiny schools, radically decentralized. As one who for twenty years has urged democratic decentralization in many fields, including the schools, I am of course interested in the Bundy recommendation to cut up the New York system into sixty fairly autonomous districts. This would restore some relevance of the culture (and the staff) of the school to the culture of the community. But however valuable politically, it is an administrative arrangement; it does not get down to the actual pedagogical operation. And it certainly is not child-centered; both poor and middle-class communities have their own ways of not paying attention to children, according to their own prejudices and distant expectations. By “tiny school,” therefore, I here mean twenty-eight children…with four teachers (one grown-up to seven children), and each tiny school to be largely administered by its own staff and parents, with considerable say also for the children, as in Summer-hill. The four teachers are:

A teacher regularly licensed and salaried. Since the present average class size is twenty-eight, these are available.

A graduate from the senior class of a New York college, perhaps just embarking on graduate study. Salary $2000. There is no lack of candidates to do something interesting and useful in a free setting.

A literate housewife and mother, who can also prepare lunch. Salary $4000. No lack of candidates.

A literate, willing, and intelligent high-school graduate. Salary $2000. No lack of candidates.

Such a staff can easily be racially and ethnically mixed. And it is also the case, as demonstrated by the First Street School, that in such a small setting, with individual attention paid to the children, it is easy to get racially and ethnically mixed classes; there is less middle-class withdrawal when the parents do not fear that their children will be swamped and retarded. (We have failed to achieve “integration” by trying to impose it from above, but it can be achieved from below, in schools entirely locally controlled, if we can show parents that it is for their children’s best future.)

For setting, the tiny school would occupy two, three, or four rooms in existing school buildings, church basements, settlement houses otherwise empty during school hours, rooms set aside in housing projects, store-fronts. The setting is especially indifferent since a major part of activity occurs outside the school place. The setting should be able to be transformed into a clubhouse, decorated and equipped according to the group’s own decision. There might be one school on every street, but it is also advisable to locate many in racial and ethnic border areas, to increase intermixture. For purposes of assembly, health services, and some games, ten tiny schools could use the present public school facilities.

The cost saving in such a setup is the almost total elimination of top-down administration and the kind of special services that are required precisely because of excessive size and rigidity. The chief uses of central administration would be licensing, funding, choosing sites, and some inspection. There would be no principals and assistants, secretaries and assistants. Curriculum, texts, equipment would be determined as needed—and despite the present putative economies of scale, they would be cheaper; much less would be pointless or wasted. Record-keeping would be at a minimum. There is no need for truant officers when the teacher-and-seven can call at the absentee’s home and inquire. There is little need for remedial personnel since the staff and parents are always in contact, and the whole enterprise can be regarded as remedial. Organizational studies of large top-down directed enterprises show that the total cost is invariably at least 300 percent above the cost of the immediate function, in this case the interaction of teachers and children. I would put this 300 percent into increasing the number of adults and diversifying the possibilities of instruction. Further, in the conditions of New York real estate, there is great advantage in ceasing to build four-million-dollar school buildings, and rather fitting tiny schools into available niches."



"FURTHER, I see little merit, for teaching this age, in the usual teacher-training. Any literate and well-intentioned grown-up or late teen-ager knows enough to teach a small child a lot. Teaching small children is a difficult art, but we do not know how to train the improvisational genius it requires, and the untrained seem to have it equally: compare one mother with another, or one big sister or brother with another. Since at this age one teaches the child, not the subject, the relevant art is psychotherapy, and the most useful course for a teachers’ college is probably group therapy. The chief criterion for selection is the one I have mentioned: liking to be attentive to children. Given this setting, many young people would be introduced to teaching and would continue with it as a profession; whereas in the New York system the annual turnover approaches 20 percent, after years of wasted training.

As I have said, however, there are fatal political and administrative objections to this proposal. First, the Public School administration does not intend to go largely out of business. Given its mentality, it must see any radical decentralization as impossible to administer and dangerous, for everything cannot be controlled. Some child is bound to break a leg and the insurance companies will not cover; some teen-ager is bound to be indiscreet and the Daily News will explode in headlines.

The United Federation of Teachers will find the proposal to be anathema because it devalues professional perquisites and floods the schools with the unlicensed. Being mainly broken to the public school harness, most experienced teachers consider free and inventive teaching to be impossible.

Most fatally, poor parents, who aspire for their children, tend to regard unrigidly structured education as down-grading, not taking the children seriously, and also as vaguely immoral. In the present Black Power temper of Harlem, also, the possible easy intermixing is itself not desired. (Incidentally, I am rather sympathetic to black separatism as a means of consolidating the power of black communities. But children, as Kant said, must be educated for the future better society which cannot be separated.)

In spite of these fatal objections, I recommend that, instead of building the next new school building, we try out this scheme with 1200 children."
paulgoodman  smallschools  tinyschools  education  unschooling  1968  deschooling  learning  children  schooldesign  classsize  openstudioproject  history  lcproject  minischools  small  literacy 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Studio Schools Trust
"The Studio School is a new concept in education, which seeks to address the growing gap between the skills and knowledge that young people require to succeed, and those that the current education system provides. Studio Schools pioneer a bold new approach to learning which includes teaching through enterprise projects and real work. This approach ensures students' learning in is rooted in the real world and helps them to develop the skills they need to flourish in life. For detailed information, please read the Studio Schools Brochure.

Studio Schools are designed for 14-19 year olds of all abilities. They are small schools for 300 students; and with year-round opening and a 9-5 working day, they feel more like a workplace than a school. Working closely with local employers, Studio Schools will offer a range of academic and vocational qualifications including GCSEs in English, Maths and Science, as well as paid work placements linked directly to employment opportunities in the local area. Students will gain a broad range of employability and life skills through the CREATE skills framework, and will have the option to go on to university, further training, and into employment."



"Essential Elements of a Studio School

At the heart of the Studio Schools' model are seven key features, which have been developed through extensive research and consultation with employers, education experts and young people. These essential elements provide a framework for all Studio Schools and will be built upon by individual schools who will tailor the model to meet the needs of their local community and local labour market.

Academic Excellence

Like traditional schools, Studio Schools will teach the National Curriculum and offer key academic and vocational qualifications. The qualifications offered by individual schools will vary depending on local circumstances, however all will deliver qualifications at Level 2 and above, including core GCSEs in English, Maths and Science. On leaving their Studio School, students will have the full range of progression routes available to them. They will have gained the qualifications, knowledge and skills to choose the option which is suitable to them: entering the jobs market from an advantageous position; starting an apprenticeship; or going on to further or higher education. For more detailed information about the Studio Schools curriculum model click here.

Employability and Enterprise Skills

Key employability and life skills will underpin all the activities at a Studio School through the unique CREATE skills framework. CREATE is comprised of a wide range of skills and stands for Communication, Relating to people, Enterprise, Applied skills, Thinking skills and Emotional intelligence. Four years in the making, CREATE is grounded in a wide range of skills typologies and has been developed specifically for Studio Schools inorder to equip young people with the key skills that they need to flourish.

Personalised Curriculum

In Studio Schools all students will be assigned a ‘personal coach’ who will meet with them one-to-one every fortnight to develop their own personalised learning plan. This will allow students to tailor their curriculum to their individual needs and aspirations, and track their progress towards their CREATE skills and qualifications. Personalisation of the curriculum will be further supported through a small school environment in which every young person will be able to access the tailored support that they need.

Practical Learning

Enquiry-based learning (EBL) lies at the heart of the Studio Schools' curriculum model. In Studio Schools, students will learn the National Curriculum principally through Enterprise Projects in their school, local businesses and surrounding community. To root students’ learning in the real world most projects will involve external commissions. So whether it is a health report for their local hospital or a business brief for a local employer, students’ learning will be authentic and will actively involve them in local community life.

Real Work

Students in Year 10 and 11 will participate in work experience each week - this varies from half a day per week to a day each week depending on the Studio School, and the requirements of their industry partners. In Year 12 and 13, it is the SST recommendation that students spend two days per week in work. There is considerable evidence that this direct, ‘hands on’ experience better prepares young people for life and work.

Small Schools

As small schools of around 300 students, Studio Schools offer a supportive, personalised learning environment in which strong pastoral care runs throughout the school’s activities. This helps to ensure that no young person gets lost within the institution and that young people are able to build strong relationships with their peers and coaches. Crucially, coaches know students well, making them better able to tailor the curriculum to their individual needs and aspirations.

Students of All Abilities

Studio Schools are fully inclusive and comply with the national School Admissions Code."

[See also: http://blog.ted.com/2011/09/27/a-short-intro-to-the-studio-school-geoff-mulgan-on-ted-com/ ]
openstudioproject  schools  studioschools  studioclassroom  cv  uk  education  learning  highschool  schooldesign 
may 2014 by robertogreco
verstas architects develop progressive saunalahti school
"‘saunalahti comprehensive school’ built by finnish practice verstas architects, has been designed to provide a progressive educational environment, placing a special emphasis on new ways of learning; encouraging interaction, discussion and collaboration. furthermore, the building caters for the region’s residents, providing a public library, gym and various workshops open at evenings and weekends."
finland  architecture  schools  schooldesign  education  2013  openstudioproject  lcproject 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Opinion: Alexandra Lange on design for schoos and playgrounds
"If the new design filled me with interest, joy or curiosity I might be less sad, but as a collection of tan boxes arranged along a circulation spine and presented to the community with an arsenal of contextual photos, it makes me feel nothing. Like so many other spaces for children – schools, museums, playgrounds – it looks like the box that the toys come in. Fine when the creative child can turn that box into a toy. Less interesting when the adults decide which way is up and which colours connote the most fun. In such spaces, the engagement and learning happens at the level of graphics, touchscreens, what the educators like to call "manipulatives." The buildings themselves don't speak, don't teach, they merely house while complying with all requirements. There's little to be absorbed from experience and I doubt anyone will be drawing the plan, or mentally resting her cheek against the Tectum, 36 years on.

When Rafael Viñoly updated the Brooklyn Children's Museum, he added curvaceous shapes and primary colours to the outside, the better to signify child-like wonder. But inside the new rooms were boxy and plain, the better to accommodate a rotating series of exhibits and birthday parties. The architectural excitement is all decoration; the inside is a barn. By contrast, Cambridge Seven Associates's New England Aquarium, an exact contemporary of the King School, turns the reason why you go to an aquarium (to see the fish) into the organising principle for the building's architecture. It's also a box, but one textured at key points to indicate the ocean wonders inside; a box that leads you, tank by tank, on a scenographic journey from sea lions to penguins to more fish than you've ever seen in one place. All you have to do to experience the aquarium is walk, at your own pace, up the ramp that wraps a multi-story tank. No need for IMAX, no need to read (if you're under 6) the underwater experience is right there in the dark, intriguing space.

Playgrounds offer another journey from the specific to the generic. Susan G. Solomon's book American Playgrounds describes the high points of playground experimentation in the postwar period, from Richard Dattner's Adventure Playgrounds in Central Park (some recently restored and updated) to Isamu Noguchi's experiments with sculptural dreamscapes. Architects today are interested in making playgrounds again and many interesting experiments can be found in the book Playground Design by Michelle Galindo (2012). But Solomon describes a decade-by-decade constriction of spatial ambition as the result of fears over safety and budget. The model playground became a black, rubberised surface fitted with fixed, mass-produced equipment. You can see the same equipment, often made by Kompan, in Brooklyn and in Copenhagen. Where's the adventure in that? What's missing is loose parts, idiosyncratic parts, architecture that has ideas about learning and wants to help kids figure things out. Brooklyn Boulders, a growing chain of indoor climbing spaces for adults and children, seems to have hit on a contemporary formula at their sites in Brooklyn, Somerville and San Francisco.

What is at stake here not a question of Modernity (and indeed, not even all the Modern architecture historians in Cambridge got excited about saving the King School). Rather, it is respect for children as sensitive consumers of space. I read in the built work of Cambridge Seven Associates, Sert and Noguchi that children deserve the best design can give them, even if it might be scary for a moment (that dark aquarium) or strange until you climb it (those artificial mountains). The sanding down, the rounding off, the demolition of the obdurate, makes our children's worlds more boring places, places where all they can learn are the tasks we set them. Amy F. Ogata's recent book Designing the Creative Child describes the myriad ways middle-class ambitions are translated into the toys we buy and the spaces we make for kids inside our homes. But such ambitions also need to be translated into the public sphere.

Look again at the King School, structure laid bare. What better exercise than to say, "Here's a set of concrete floors and concrete columns, kids. What do you want to put in your new school?""
alexandralange  design  children  schooldesign  2014  primarycolors  color  schools  architecture 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Mind Does Not Belong in a Cubicle - Laura Smith - The Atlantic Cities
"Stephen Kellert, a social ecologist at Yale, told me that our poor office design is a sign that we don’t see ourselves as animals, as having biological needs. “The measure of progress in our civilization,” he said, “is not embracing nature, but moving away from nature and transcending nature and becoming independent of our biology.” Kellert told me that he finds zoos ironic. We consider it “inhumane” to keep a gorilla in an indoor, concrete environment with no exposure to greenery or anything resembling its natural habitat, and yet we put ourselves in these environments all the time."
stephenkellert  laurasmith  workspace  offices  officedesign  2014  nikilsaval  schooldesign  nature  light  workspaces 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Future of Learning Environments: An Issue That Concerns the Students - Core77
"I have thought long and hard about what is needed as to create the ultimate learning environment, and come to the conclusion that it doesn't exist. The only thing we can do is to create as much of an advantageous basis for space to develop as possible. We can do this by developing a space that works in collaboration with the educators, by hiring teachers who burn for what they do, and to create spaces where students and teachers work together as a team to create a good atmosphere where learning is something that students genuinely want to do.

The school, in terms of both architecture and pedagogy, must take in consideration that people are different and they have different needs to feel good and comfortable, and ultimately fulfil their potential. Only after you have specified the needs and wishes of various individuals can you design a space that even comes close to what can be called "the ultimate learning environment," and this takes time, close collaboration between the various users and partners and the architects and engineers.

One of the things that I personally find to be important throughout the process is to design a solution that not only supports current pedagogy, but also challenges teachers and students to develop it further, and hopefully meets their future needs proactively. This is difficult, of course, since we can't possibly know what the future will bring, but what we can do is study and develop spaces that work in the present so we can stop designing and developing spaces that don't.

So let's collaborate and co-create more, let's take one another seriously when doing so, and let's develop ways of working where we truly understand what the other one is saying, and not just brush opinions under the rug because they aren't expressed in a language we can understand."
schooldesign  moadickmark  lcproject  openstudioproject  education  schools  flexibility  architecture  design  collaboration  cocreation  2014  via:willrichardson 
february 2014 by robertogreco
The Open-Office Trap : The New Yorker
"The open office was originally conceived by a team from Hamburg, Germany, in the nineteen-fifties, to facilitate communication and idea flow. But a growing body of evidence suggests that the open office undermines the very things that it was designed to achieve. In June, 1997, a large oil and gas company in western Canada asked a group of psychologists at the University of Calgary to monitor workers as they transitioned from a traditional office arrangement to an open one. The psychologists assessed the employees’ satisfaction with their surroundings, as well as their stress level, job performance, and interpersonal relationships before the transition, four weeks after the transition, and, finally, six months afterward. The employees suffered according to every measure: the new space was disruptive, stressful, and cumbersome, and, instead of feeling closer, coworkers felt distant, dissatisfied, and resentful. Productivity fell.

In 2011, the organizational psychologist Matthew Davis reviewed more than a hundred studies about office environments. He found that, though open offices often fostered a symbolic sense of organizational mission, making employees feel like part of a more laid-back, innovative enterprise, they were damaging to the workers’ attention spans, productivity, creative thinking, and satisfaction. Compared with standard offices, employees experienced more uncontrolled interactions, higher levels of stress, and lower levels of concentration and motivation. When David Craig surveyed some thirty-eight thousand workers, he found that interruptions by colleagues were detrimental to productivity, and that the more senior the employee, the worse she fared."
business  environment  productivity  work  2014  officedesign  openoffices  openclassrooms  noise  matthewdavis  privacy  quiet  psychology  nickperham  garyevans  danajohnson  heidirasila  peggierothe  alenamaher  courtneyvonhippel  distraction  attention  multitasking  anthonywagner  schooldesign 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Alberto Mendoza Day Care Center - Christian Ervin
"The central issue for the Alberto Mendoza Day Care Center is the perilous relationship between institution and community in an area whose future is uncertain. This low-density, low-income, largely Hispanic neighborhood in Houston’s Second Ward is soon to be destroyed and replaced with extensive parkland as part of the Buffalo Bayou Partnership’s master plan. The typical role of any institution-even one as small as a day care facility-is to provide a stable place for public activities. However, in this case, stability would be inconsistent with the future needs of the community. With this condition in mind, this proposal accepts that the flexibility of a nomadic architecture is necessary for the survival of a nomadic people.

The three programmatic requirements for the building--a caretaker’s house, administrative offices, and a general playroom area--are divided into three potentially transient objects. These programmatic plugs are clustered together on a given site within a site-specific armature containing the utility infrastructure for the building to form the institution, essentially from a kit-of-parts. The sizes of the volumes are designed such that they may be easily transported to a new site, rearranged, and plugged-in. The plugs are not generic; they are specific to this program but not intrinsically specific to site.

In the instance of the Neagle Street lot, the configuration of the programmatic plugs and the surface that cradles them are both carefully calibrated to local siting conditions. The caretaker’s residence is placed in the opposite corner of the site from the day care facility to allow for some privacy, but ensures the required level of safety and vision in its watchtower-like form. Indeed, as a three storey structure, it is the only plug that rises above the site-specific surface."
christianervin  2006  design  architecture  nomadism  mobility  transience  ephemerality  portability  popupschools  schools  education  schooldesign  houston  texas  ephemeral  nomads 
november 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Fabrica 2013 Informal Annual Review: from departments to studios
The studio model I had in mind was drawn from long experience—the multidisciplinary teams I had created, or tried to create, at the BBC and Arup—and recent experience, in Helsinki, with the Strategic Design Unit model pursued with my ertswhile colleages, Bryan Boyer, Justin Cook and Marco Steinberg, and documented well here. And of course, the studio as the forum for design practice generally.

I had also drawn a lot from Alex Coles' useful book The Transdisciplinary Studio—not necessarily in any direct sense (I haven't implemented any details of the various studio practices described therein: Jorge Pardo Sculpture, Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design, Studio Olafur Eliasson & Åbäke) but more in terms of concept, of not simply mixing disciplines, but going beyond them. Given the sense that Fabrica could be a new kind of factory, helping invent and construct the future ("Fabrica" is drawn from faber, to make, and also suggests the Italian word for factory, fabbrica), I was particularly interested in the hybrid products that much emerge from the synthesis of disciplines into something new. As Piaget has it, going beyond the displines.
"Transdisciplinary: between the disciplines, across the different disciplines, and beyond each individual discipline." [Jean Piaget, referenced in Coles]

Fabrica was essentially organised into discipline-based departments—film, music, product design, graphic design and so on. Although some areas, like Design, or Interactive, had the beginnings of a multidisciplinary mix, the structure was something I wanted to address. (I suggested this in something I wrote called "The New Vision", which was an internal discussion document/book—more soon—to gauge peoples' opinions.)

Fabrica, in terms of the structure of its "engine" was not a million miles from many other studios and schools. elsewhere.

Given the rest of our world—institutional or otherwise—is largely organised into such disciplinary structures, which organisations turn into silos (disciplines need not be silos; it's organisations that do that) then what would be the point of Fabrica doing that too?

Following my colleague Marco Steinberg's thought that "we have 18th century institutions facing 21st century problems", can we create a 21st century organisation? Something that faces the 21st century, in all its hybridity and complexity, on its own terms? Something that might address 21st century issues with a more appropriate, flexible and complex creative toolkit?

If we look at a city council organisational structure, you see that it is largely in a 19th century mode, and so ill-equipped to deal with a complex, interdependent challenge like climate change? All of the following departments—and more—are implicated in solving the problem. In my experience, even getting a meeting to discuss a citizen-centred project like Brickstarter can be an issue with this form of organisation.

If you look at the departments and divisions of Oxford University, say, can we really say it has moved far from the organisation of the medieval university?

So why, for instance, should Fabrica have a music department? There are a million places to go and study or practice music. Probably many better. Juillard, for instance. Yet there are few places that sit a musician or sound designer next to a coder, next to a filmmaker, next to an industrial designer. (The same applies to other departments, obviously.)

Given our size, agility, mission and the fact that we are not interested in formal academic certification (that is another "trap" that reinforces silos) this environment is something that Fabrica can uniquely forge. This is the possibilty behind the idea of Fabrica.

Ten months in we have moved to a new studio-based model of organisation, addressing thematic areas via a transdisciplinary mode.

• Each studio has a mix of disciplines; for example, code, graphic design, film making, writing, industrial design, sound, art, and so on.
• Each studio has a range of projects addressing the theme, from big to small, slow to quick, client-led to self-directed.
• Each is led by a studio lead, or leads.
• Each has a dedicated studio space at Fabrica.
• These are the studios we have now (overlapping to indicate the possibility of fluid movement between them, and shared projects.) …

[Read on.]
[Rest saved here too: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:7b2f1be990dc ]
transdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  studioclassroom  danhill  fabrica  cityofsound  2013  organization  disciplines  crossdisciplinary  openstudioproject  tcsnmy  schooldesign  education  projectbasedlearning  innovation  creativity  thematiclearning  fluidity  projectorientedorganizations  pbl 
october 2013 by robertogreco
A Kickstarter for co-working space Makeshift Society raises questions about what we freelancers need to be productive.: Observatory: Design Observer
"Rena Tom and Bryan Boyer have been thinking about how freelancers work, personally and professionally, for much of their careers. Rena owned and operated the cult design store and gallery Rare Device, and has also worked as a designer of jewelry, stationery and web pages. Bryan, trained as an architect, was most recently Strategic Design Lead at Sitra, the Finnish Innovation Fund. Among his projects there was Brickstarter, about which I wrote here. But rather than industrial design machines like cubicles, cases or office landscapes, they've created an idiosyncratic place to which freelancers can bring their laptops, headphones, and caffienated beverages. A space in which, they hope to create a sense of community and strenth in numbers.

In September 2012, Tom opened Makeshift Society in San Francisco. The society is,
an organization that fosters creativity, collaboration and community through a coworking space/clubhouse, innovative programming, and support for freelancers and small business owners. We want to enable everyone to make, learn, teach, and think.
Now they are bringing that model to Brooklyn, in a larger space in Williamsburg. They have the money to build it out, but they are currently running a Kickstarter campaign to create a creative tool lending library for that space. New York apartments make it hard to store, and use, the books, materials and equipment one needs once and a while.

In the Q&A below, Rena and Bryan talk about their lessons learned about workspace, community, and how to develop a business out of your own needs."



"Makeshift was at first just going to be a lending library for design books, and I’d split the rent with a couple friends Victoria Smith (sfgirlbybay blogger) and Suzanne Shade (creative director/muse at Minted) and eventually it turned into what it is today."



"As a place, we focus on having a diversity of micro-environments that suit our members at different times and in different moods. Even though SF is not quite 1000 square feet we have bright corners and darker ones, work desks and softer spots like sofas, seats for up to 20 and even a nap loft if someone needs down time. Despite making claims of freeing their members from the corporate grind, a number of the coworking spaces we saw when doing research for Makeshift look rather like a nicely appointed corporate office."



"Fast internet, WiFi, and copious power outlets are the starting point. A printer helps. We’ve thought about adding a fax machine in NYC because it’s the sort of thing that you use very seldomly, but when you do it’s often the only option and finding one can be so annoying.

The qualities of the space are the more important amenities, really. Things like an easily-accessible location; a nice, calm, well-designed environment; great daylight. These relate to aspects of the community as well: being able to leave your things around while you step out for a bit saves a lot of the hassle that one endures when working as a constant guest. Being surrounded by people who are working as hard as you are helps create a contagious sense of motivation. And being in a place where your peers are working on interesting things is critical."



"As you think about opening the Brooklyn space, what are you designing differently?

RT: I have a feeling that Brooklyn members will more results-oriented than the San Francisco crew, or at least they are in a greater hurry to get there! We’ll accommodate that with tighter programming (events and classes), but we also want to import some of the West coast vibe, which has a somewhat longer-term and broader definition of “results”, along with acting in a mutually beneficial manner. (Adam Grant’s book Give and Take has quite a bit more to say about that.) We want to show that flipping roles and being a teacher sometimes and a student other times is extremely valuable.

One of the ways that this will be expressed architecturally is a very slight emphasis on the more traditional studio model. In SF we do not have dedicated desks, but in NYC we will. In SF we have one small conference room, in NYC we’ll have one small room for focused discussion as well as one larger room for presentations, and a number of phone booths.

BB: I also want to mention something that’s not going to change in BK. We’re making a commitment in this location to having an open workspace, so you will not see any miniature glass cubicles. We’re going to keep BK as open as possible, just like SF."



"How do you see your spaces as interacting with the cities and neighborhoods around them?

We’re deliberately choosing neighborhoods that are lively, with bubbling street life and a significant number of local residents. Makeshift Society works best on the ground floor where big windows encourage passers-by to enter, and where the view of the street provides visual stimulation for our members.

Most of the SV companies you’ve written about start from the premise that they need to protect their secrets and capture 100% of their workers’ intellectual capital, which has the effect of turning them inwards as closed campuses where every idea has a whiteboard to land on, and every door secured by a keycard. The city itself is humanity’s best engine for connections and inspiration, but again and again we see corporations recreate a sanitized, interior version of a city all for themselves. The city-within-a-city architectural strategy becomes irrelevant or even counter-productive if you’re not constrained by the same IP concerns.

Makeshift has the freedom to embed ourselves in the existing networks of the city itself, and to benefit from the actual, spectacular diversity that’s already there. We don’t need to have our own privatized transportation system, we need to be located near public transit like the subway and citibike; we don’t need to go through the gymnastics of creating ‘interior streets’ or plazas. We have a real street right outside our windows!"
workspaces  makeshifsociety  bryanboyer  renatom  howwework  openstudioproject  classroomdesign  schooldesign  interiors  alexandralange  2013  coworking  community  lighting  openspaces  tcsnmy  cv  lcproject  workspace 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Dan Hill Opinion on MOOCs and design education
"(Ah these names. "Coursera." "Udacity." They sound like recently-privatised former state assets. I next expect a slew of social media oriented services, with monickers like Smugly and Learnr, Swotly and Examinr, Cramly and Testr.)"



"And yet despite attempts to fold in collaboration and sharing, it will tend to a solitary pursuit of those exercises. At least currently. The whole point of MOOCs - one of their core values - is that they are *not* social and collaborative. Their dematerialised and dislocated state means they fit into your schedule, but in doing so, it cannot - by definition - bring you together with people at the same time and in the same space.

Design and architecture education however is, I believe, more than ever about collaboration, on working through holistic projects together, face to face, in transdisciplinary teams, learning through doing on real projects with real clients. While digital tools can support this, affording some new patterns of activity, the pull back to the physical, embodied and genuinely social is profound, particularly as systems and outcomes become more complex, more entwined, more hybridised. Schools and research centres like Strelka, CIID, Sandberg Instituut or the work we're doing at Fabrica, are exploring exactly this, as post-institutional learning environments.

It's difficult to see how MOOCs will really shift that aspect of design education.

The great graphic designer and typographer Erik Spiekermann once said: "You can teach yourself everything there is to be learned by observing, asking, taking things apart and putting them back together again. Teachers can help with that process as long as they stay credible. The only way to achieve that is to keep on learning themselves.""



"For me, the ideal design education space - showing my prejudices, here - looks more like the wonderfully messy SCI-Arc in Los Angeles or Royal College of Art in London. The RCA, especially in Tony Dunne's Design Interactions space, can sometimes feel like some kind of gloriously generative cyberpunk favela.

How will MOOCs fit alongside this? Or put it another way, what do you think the student bar at Coursera is like?

The huge opportunity behind non-certified, transdisciplinary learning is that it can be tuned to the 21st century's needs, rather than the last century's. Collaborative project-based learning ought to be intrinsically holistic in nature, with tangible outcomes. This is how design is practiced, and this is how design ought to be practiced in the context of learning. Putting lectures online is really just putting 20th century education on the internet, and there must be more to 21st century education than that."
mooc  moocs  danhill  2013  design  designeducation  openstudioproject  lcproject  schooldesign  sciarc  rca  teaching  learning  collaboration  education  howwetech  howwelearn  learningspaces  messiness 
october 2013 by robertogreco
OpenDesk - Open Source Furniture — Made Locally.
"View basket Open source furniture — made locally."

[via: https://twitter.com/zachklein/status/390551937176711168 ]

[See also: http://www.wikihouse.cc/ ]

[Note: I think both Sara Hendren and Nick Sowers have made some of these.]
opensource  furniture  diy  desks  design  openstudioproject  projectideas  classroomdesign  schooldesign  schools  classideas 
october 2013 by robertogreco
MAKOKO FLOATING SCHOOL | NLÉ
"Makoko Floating School is a prototype floating structure, built for the historic water community of Makoko, located on the lagoon heart of Nigeria’s largest city, Lagos. As a pilot project, it has taken an innovative approach to address the community’s social and physical needs in view of the impact of climate change and a rapidly urbanizing African context. Its main aim is to generate a sustainable, ecological, alternative building system and urban water culture for the teeming population of Africa’s coastal regions."

[via: http://www.designindaba.com/news/staying-afloat ]
architecture  design  schooldesign  floating  climatehange  lagos  nigeria  africa  urbanization  sustainability  mobility  kunléadeyemi  nlé  makokofloatingschool 
august 2013 by robertogreco
SCHOOLHAUS
"Schoolhaus is a design studio classroom inspired by our desire to remedy the growing divide between learning and education. While learning is a universal way of life, education is the institutionalization of that way of life— at times to the detriment of learning, and at excessive cost to the student. But there are aspects of both education and learning that are valuable, and not necessarily mutually exclusive. Schoolhaus is Aesthetic Apparatus’ attempt to combine what we consider the best of education (a social community, invested and informed guidance) with the best of learning (self-motivation, one-on-one mentorship) and embed them into a studio discipline (working-world applications with opportunities for invention and entrepreneurship.)

Schoolhaus works like a group-mentorship, held on-site during operating hours at Aesthetic Apparatus. Similar to a studio, each student submits an application or letter of intent for consideration. Enrollment is limited to 12 students at any one time — the size of a comfortable classroom. Schoolhaus can be used as a stand-alone design education or to supplement a previous design education. Anyone of any ability is welcome to apply; beginners, amateurs, even seasoned veterans. Once accepted, students may stay with the Schoolhaus as long as they and the studio feel is necessary. The curriculum begins with the student’s own self-initiated goals for learning. As the studio gains better understanding of the student’s strengths and weaknesses, learning is augmented with suggested and mentored study. Client-based or studio-based projects may be introduced, as well as inter-student mentorships or new creative ventures. The curriculum is amenable, the goal is to create a shared place for human-scale learning.

This program offers neither an earned degree or certification. We question the requirement of either in the working profession of graphic design. That said, higher education is essential for those who wish to pursue a deeply academic or pedagogical pursuit of graphic design. If this is the case, we suggest attending an undergraduate and graduate degree path at an accredited institution, as is required for future consideration of professorship. What Schoolhaus does offer is intimate, responsive, one-on-one creative guidance within the context of a close-knit group studio in preparation for a creative position in graphic design.

We are now accepting initial applications for an initial 2-month preliminary Schoolhaus starting August 1. The current tuition subscription for Schoolhaus is $500/month."

[Aesthetic Apparatus: http://aestheticapparatus.com/ ]
studiohaus  aestheticapparatus  openstudioproject  certification  design  learning  education  unschooling  deschooling  mentoring  mentorship  openstudio  studioclassroom  schooldesign  via:ethanbodanr  graphicdesign  minneapolis 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Big Ideas Group » Philosophy
Our pedagogy centers around the following tenets:

• Learner Co-Designed Coursework: Our kids state the target of their learning before a teacher ever begins to design a lesson. We believe the path towards reaching a student’s target will be littered with ancillary and contextual learning that can only be found when the student is driving the bus.

• Competency-Based Education: Learners do not receive grades, they demonstrate their ability to learn and do. Learners work to produce a portfolio and resume showing how they have mastered common content standards. Unlike traditional school, learners do not finish working until they have the content.

• Intense Community Integration: Community resources are tapped as a necessary part of nearly every student project and learning cycle. Our learners develop the “soft” skills associated with working in diverse situations while nurturing professional connections and relationships; all the while deepening the validity of their learning through community context.

• Art & Design: Our learners experience design and art thinking in everything they do. We embrace failure and iteration as the actual process of learning.

• The Information Revolution: The Big Ideas School believes in the Internet. We believe in using the web as a leveler and an inspirational tool. The tepid and often confrontational relationship traditional schools have with the Internet is as mind boggling to us as it must be to you and your child.
thebigideasschool  shawncornally  iowa  education  educationalphilosophy  art  design  internet  technology  community  competency  curriculum  coursework  schooldesign 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Hogwarts for Hackers: Inside the Science and Tech School of Tomorrow | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
"“I had to learn what the programming language was, learn what a compiler was,” he remembers. “I found books on it and talked to upperclassmen. But basically had to learn it on my own.”

The IMSA Wednesdays are like Google’s “20 percent time” — only better. “At Google, 20 percent time is actually tacked on to the rest of your job. ” says Daniel Kador, another former IMSA student. “At IMSA, it really is built into your schedule.” And though Kador and other students admit that they spent more than a few Wednesdays just goofing off — as high school students so often do — they say the environment at IMSA ends up pushing many of them towards truly creative work. And it pays off."



"That’s IMSA in a nutshell. IMSA students help each other learn, and they continue to help each other, even after they graduate. Alums are invited back to teach mini-courses during the first week of the winter semester, and this has become of one of the highlights of the year — for everyone involved. “As a student, it was the most fun thing,” says Wild, “and as an alum, it’s even more fun.”"
imsa  illinois  education  schooldesign  schools  learning  google20%  technology  robotics  stem  collaboration  projectbasedlearning  cv  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  openstudioproject  lcproject  pbl 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Coalition of Essential Schools - Wikipedia
"The Common Principles

The Coalition was founded on nine "Common Principles" that were intended to codify Sizer's insights from Horace's Compromise and the views and beliefs of others in the organization. These original principles were:

1. Learning to use one's mind well
2. Less is More, depth over coverage
3. Goals apply to all students
4. Personalization
5. Student-as-worker, teacher-as-coach
6. Demonstration of mastery
7. A tone of decency and trust
8. Commitment to the entire school
9. Resources dedicated to teaching and learning
10. Democracy and equity (this principle was added later, in the mid-nineties)"
tedsizer  principles  learning  education  deschooling  unschooling  schooldesign  lcproject  openstudioproject  habitsofmind  coalitionofessentialschools  democracy  equity  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  teaching  decency  trust  mastery  personalization  coaching  depth  dpthoverbreadth 
june 2013 by robertogreco
A “Starbucks” classroom… | Inquire Within
"We decided that couches, books, free wifi, public art (done by students), comradeship, friendliness and the “coolness” of it all would be easy to emulate.

We got rid of the desks and put tables in their place. We found a couch and a coffee table. We hung (and continue to hang) art created by students. We put some mats on the floor. We created a private corner office that we take turns using each day. We already had free wifi. We created some cool lighting effects with a couple of lamps. Recently we even took a donation of a free electric fireplace! How cool is that?

So now we learn in a “Starbuck`s classroom,” and we really like it."
classrooms  classroomdesign  schooldesign  starbucks  teaching  learning  classideas  2013  seangrainger  classroom 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Can collaboration in school ever really be Collaboration? - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Learning
"Schools have an opportunity to prepare their young people with the robustness and acuity that is required to survive and thrive in this fast-paced, anything-is-possible world. It involves schools spending time like they've never spent it before understanding what constitutes collaboration, real collaboration and not just 'group work'.

It means the construction of new spaces, and the overhauling of existing ones. Rows of chairs and the same group of students sitting with each other all year long is not preparation for collaboration 'out there'. Students of the same ability working with each other doesn't chime with the notion that, in true collaboration, you reach out to those smarter than you to fill your gaps in understanding - we need more cross-age coaching, joint projects, younger students bringing their different perspective on the world to older students who might have lost it on the way.

And these aren't just great for collaboration. Education research is mounting that it is the skill set for collaboration in the real world that also brings the most to learners' progress in school."
schools  schooling  teaching  education  learning  ewanmcintosh  2013  collaboration  agesegregation  abilitygrouping  tcsnmy  cv  tbs  schooldesign  howwelearn  howweteach  unschooling  deschooling 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Brand Relaunch at JohnMcneilStudio
"On the occasion of their 50th anniversary, The Berkeley School wanted to refresh their brand positioning to capture the elementary school’s inventive approach to education. We created a marketing and branding effort that included a new identity, website, messaging, original photography, print collateral, signage, art installations and a new color palette for the buildings. All these efforts mapped to the theme: “What matters in education matters in life.” We also developed a digital communication strategy deeply rooted in social media engagement. Through the “Bulletin Board” blogs, we helped bridge the gap between the classroom and a student’s home life."
design  branding  theberkeleyschool  johnmcneil  berkeley  logos  evolvinglogos  2012  schools  schooldesign  identity  marketing  tbs 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Beginner's Mind for Rethinking Schools (with tweets) · willrich45 · Storify
"A brief yet thought-provoking exchange on Twitter about starting from a place of "emptiness" when it comes to thinking about what schools might become."

[See also: http://smartblogs.com/education/2013/05/13/a-beginners-mind-for-thinking-about-schools/ ]
beginner'smind  comments  willrichardson  josieholford  storify  grantlichtman  billivey  schools  education  schooldesign  2013 
may 2013 by robertogreco
The University as a Googleplex | MPG
"When you hear people say - now and in our present context - that they want the university to be run like a business - full of "sherpas" but not "coasters" - what they really mean is that they don't want it to exist. At all. They don't want it to be dependent on public dollars, or "welfare," or that they don't want "tenured radicals" to be rewarded for obscure, narrowly applicable research agendas, or that they want higher education to be cheap and affordable. This is a certain kind of business model. More like Wal-Mart. It cheapens education. And it spells, down the road, the end of schooling, generally, as anything other than a bestowal of bare skills on a prospective worker."



"Yes, there are serious structural problems with interdisciplinarity. Many clever deans and provosts and chancellors see the metaphors of "bridges" and "switching points" and "nodes" as cutting-edge cost-saving measures, since, in many cases, a single jointly-appointed faculty isn't a truly new hire; he or she is a reallocated budget line, once wholly in one department or another, and now split. Budget problems are real and ongoing. Your average administratrix does the best that he or she can in an age of limited resources to keep the antique disciplines strong and to open the curriculum up to the avante-garde at the same time. Sometimes, they figure - or hope? - that a single person, allocated in two directions, can do the institutional work of many.

If you are trying to foster new knowledge, hiring is the start of it, not the end. What comes next, though, is what often gets skipped: building a more robust interdisciplinary infrastructure - a Googleplex for academics.

So, then, build bridges, where and when you can. Worry as much about sidewalks as that new humanities building. Offer faculty and staff subventions for a bicycle, or give them away. Don't get too caught up with putting the cognate units close together. Make the process of connection over space easier, so that the practice of articulation between units and fields and offices is generative. Keep your faculty moving. Good ideas often come on the road, in transit, in the spaces between destination and departure. If budgets are tight, worry less about clustering like-minded units; worry more about the creation of scenic walkways with flat, safe sidewalks, and benches.

But, then, don't skimp on the tech. You know what kills ideas? It isn't the sprint from one office to another. It is the discovery, on the end of the route, of dodgy wifi, spotty ethernet, and the chatter of the prehistoric desktop computer. Or it is the grinding weight of that 10 lbs. laptop from 2005. So, really, ipads for everyone and segways, too, along with moleskine notebooks, whiteboards, and color pens. Pay for iphones and cover the data costs. Spend the extra 10 million (a tenth of the cost of a big new LEED building) for the best internet connection. And, while you're at it, set up a shuttle bus. And if someone wants to see if the new google chromebook works for them - just as an experiment - say "yes." This isn't pampering. It is dreamscape infrastructure.

When the time comes to hire someone, embrace the weird. Hire people who don't mind wearing running shoes, or who text while they run, or who gchat through meetings. People who love to be in two places, or three, at once. People who aren't just working on three books at once, but who can actually make progress on each. People who can speak to a handful of fields and not just one. Hire foxes, not hedgehogs. And, above all else, hire people who can work with other people.

And then, finally, don't screw it all up by hanging these people out to dry: change the rules about tenure and promotion to protect interdisciplines, groupwork in the humanities, and digital publishing. Make it possible for new forms of knowledge production to be recognized as equally important and valuable. In the humanities, this means that we need to stop the unthinking worship of the book, and remember that the book is a vehicle for ideas, which get expressed - fully and richly - in many ways.

All of this stuff costs about as much as one lab for one scientist, which sounds pretty efficient to me. And the payoff, which may not come in the form of grant money or retail teaching, is worth every penny. If we want to measure our "best" and our "brightest" universities by their movement of the conversation, by their reorientation of everything we know about anything, then let's steal some good ideas from the Googleplex.

But let's also remember that the Googleplex and Google are different. The former is a structure of innovation, while the latter, just like Wal Mart, exists chiefly to market a product, in this case an eco-system through which an enhancement can be bought and downloaded. So build a Googleplex, but don't be Google. Because the central point here is that while universities can learn some useful things from studying corporate cultures of innovation, they can't ever be businesses. And anyone who says otherwise really, truly, and seriously just wants to kill them off."
highered  google  highereducation  education  business  publicgood  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  schooldesign  organization  2013  academics  technology  crosspollination  lcproject  openstudioproject  hiring  hierarchy  flatness  money  matthewprattguterl 
may 2013 by robertogreco
TEDxTijuana - Aaron Gutierrez - Logica de enjambres - YouTube
"Born in Tijuana, Baja California, Aaron Gutierrez Cortes was raised in the dual sensibilities of the Tijuana-San Diego region. He studied at The Southern California Institute of Architecture [SCI-Arc] and at the University of London. Founded Amorphica Design Research Office in 1999. His body of work has been published internationally in publications such as Arquine [Mexico City], La Tempestad [Mexico City], Pasajes de Arquitectura y Critica [Madrid], Architectural Design [London] and Architectural Review [London] among others. Since 2006, Aaron has lectured at several universities and international institutions like the University of Calgary, MIT in Boston, Colegio de Arquitectos of Mexico City, Louisiana State University and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art among others. Since 2009 he serves as professor of architectural design at the Universidad Iberoamericana del Noroeste. He is currently the Principal Architect at Amorphica, an emerging Architecture, Urban Design and Research collective studio that evolves projects internationally with the intention of developing reactive design intelligence passionately focused on social and spatial self-sufficiency."

[See also: http://amorphica.com/
http://amorphica.com/tierra.html
https://vimeo.com/25884670 ]
aarongutierrezcortes  tijuana  mexico  architecture  2011  schools  design  poverty  sandiego  amorphica  schooldesign  lcproject  sustainability  environment  studioclassroom  self-sufficiency 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Dalton School ~ The Dalton Plan in the High School
"Through the Dalton Plan, High School students learn to make educated choices, employ their free time constructively, and appreciate the unique worth of each individual. House, Assignment, and Lab provide the underpinnings for the High School's focus on courage and empathy, creativity and scholarship, and independence and collaboration.

House is the daily gathering of sixteen to twenty-two students with either one or two faculty advisors. Each House consists of students from all four grades who serve as resources for each other. The relationship between House Advisor and advisee is generally a four year relationship. The House Advisor gets to know the student advisee well and is an academic advisor, an advocate, and a confidant.

The Assignment structures the classroom experience. Individual Assignments generally take four to six weeks to complete and serve as guides to student learning. Often, Assignments offer opportunities for students to pursue a topic in a unique way and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of forms. Ideally, an Assignment is a starting point for learning and, through Lab, students may individualize and extend their learning. The one-to-one or small group format of Lab fosters close relationships between students and teachers."

[See also:
Middle School Plan: http://www.dalton.org/program/middle/dalton_plan
Primary School Plan: http://www.dalton.org/program/first_program/the_dalton_plan ]
dalton  daltonschool  nyc  schools  schooldesign  teaching  learning  advising  projectbasedlearning  projects  attention  via:steelemaley  lcproject  howweteach  education  pbl 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Outstanding Video About Modern Knowledge Construction
"I shot this amateur video at the Constructionism 2012 Conference in Athens, Greece. It is a recording of Dr. Mike Eisenberg‘s remarkable plenary address based on his paper, “Constructionism: New Technologies, New Purposes.”

Anyone interested in learning, emerging technology, creativity, the arts, science or craft would be wise to watch this terrific presentation."

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/49891132 ]
anthropology  bedrooms  economics  displays  hangouts  traditions  rituals  interest  passion  misfits  weirdos  schooldesign  design  settings  setting  popularity  uptonsinclair  vannevarbush  arts  art  craft  doing  making  deschooling  unschooling  science  projectbasedlearning  arduino  3dprinting  spaces  meaningmaking  purpose  agency  networks  activities  openstudioproject  lcproject  environment  srg  edg  glvo  education  technology  learning  children  constructionist  constructionism  2012  mikeeisenberg  pbl  ritual 
september 2012 by robertogreco
sprout & co.
"sprout is a community education and research organization devoted to creating and supporting the community-driven learning, teaching, and investigation of science. We're united by a passion to reclaim science as a richly personal and creative craft. Through our PROGRAMS & STUDIOS, we're working to make our vision real in Somerville.

You might say we're working to create a community college that lives up to its name—not a college in a community or a school in a building, but a community of people who work together as colleagues to explore questions they care about."

[From the Studios page]

"Our studios are a bit unusual. Here you can find out WHERE they are, how you can use them as a COWORKING space, a community VENUE, a WORKSHOP AND LABSPACE for independent investigation, or WHATEVER ELSE you have in mind. And if you're interested, you can read about WHY we run our studios the way we do."
deschooling  unschooling  schooldesign  venues  workshops  labspace  coworking  glvo  shaunalynnduffy  alecresnick  michaelnagle  lcproject  openstudioproject  mit  massachusetts  somerville  learning  community  diy  sprout  makerspaces  hackerspaces  education  science  design  boston  sprout&co 
september 2012 by robertogreco
General Assembly
"General Assembly is a global network of campuses for individuals seeking opportunity and education in technology, business, and design."

"We offer a wide variety of learning opportunities, from 90-minute classes to long-form courses. With new options added daily, your only limit is scroll speed."

"A whole may be greater than the sum of its parts, but it's our parts that make us great. From members and instructors to knowledge-seekers and partners, our community defines what we are: collaborative learning advocates, forward-thinking envelope-pushers, and capri-pant enthusiasts.

We're excited to serve as a base for so many creative, innovative, and passionate thinkers and makers. Here are some of the Member Startups in our Community: [list]"
schooldesign  learning  classes  coding  philadelphia  sanfrancisco  boston  berlin  sydney  toronto  london  coworking  nyc  startups  openstudioproject  lcproject  sharedspace  technology  design  entrepreneurship  education  generalassembly  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
San Francisco School Takes Experiential Learning to the Next Level - Education - GOOD
"Imagine receiving an electric drill to use at school—and the freedom to learn and explore while building things with it. That’s what happens at Brightworks, a year-old nonprofit private alternative school located in San Francisco’s Mission District.

The school is tiny—just 20 students between 6 and 13 years old—but it's building quite the reputation for its innovative learning philosophy. Brightworks takes its cues from the maker and tinkering movements, which do away with formal classroom instruction in favor of project-based experiential learning.

Students aren’t divided into traditional grade levels, either: The school allows kids to interact naturally across age groups—older students work on more sophisticated projects while younger ones learn primarily through play. And, instead of relying on tests to measure learning, the school's students create portfolios. …"

[Video embedded]
hybridskills  behavior  social  kidcity  learning  confidence  radicalschooling  alternative  radical  projectbasedlearning  mixed-age  smallschools  lcproject  video  sanfrancisco  make  making  learningbydoing  democraticlearning  democraticschools  democraticeducation  deschooling  unschooling  collaboration  schooldesign  schools  cv  education  lizdwyer  assessment  self-directedlearning  2012  brightworks  gevertulley  pbl  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Ursula Franklin Academy
"Ursula Franklin is a small community of learners that offers integrated liberal arts and science packages, preparing students for academic programs at post-secondary level. The learning experiences offered at Ursula Franklin Academy will reflect not only the learning expectations identified by the Province and the Toronto District School Board, but also the students' own interests, developing a sense of responsibility and individual accomplishment. Integrated and cross-curricular future-oriented skills related to electronic research and conferencing, conflict resolution and problem solving, global and social justice issues, and student leadership will be emphasized."

[via: http://www.designculturelab.org/2012/07/17/from-the-plsj-archives-an-extraordinary-mind/ ]
[See also: http://theagenda.tvo.org/blog/agenda-blogs/qa-my-alternative-schooling-ursula-franklin-academy and http://www.ufacademy.org/v5/school/wednesday.php ]
cv  tcsnmy  responsibility  conflictresolution  learningculture  learningcommunities  education  learning  google20%  schooldesign  ontario  toronto  schools  ursulafranklinacademy  ursulafranklin 
july 2012 by robertogreco
A Pop Up Learning Space by Brendan O'Keefe - GoFundMe
"Mission: Encourage life-long learning, promote alternative learning environments and equip young people with 21st Century skills.

One answer: A Pop Up Learning Space. 

Our pop up learning space will debut over the summer 2012-2013 school holidays in shopping malls, food courts, galleries, libraries, museums, public spaces, festivals and other events. 

Drop in and play, Learn, Tinker, Teach, Create, Make, Share. The Elastic Learning Centre is a pop up project of The Elastic Learning Network (ELN) which is is a flexible network that delivers 21st Century learning experiences in & around Melbourne. The long term aim of the pop up space is to create a sustainable, independent enterprise which can be replicated.

ELN is made up of a community of designers, educators, youth workers, mentors, parents and subject matter experts who collaborate within this network. Members partner with libraries, museums, galleries, youth services, community groups, business, schools, and universities."
schooldesign  community  elasticlearningnetwork  make  making  schools  education  eln  lcproject  learning  popupschools  pop-ups  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Is Sweden's Classroom-Free School the Future of Learning? - Education - GOOD
"Jannie Jeppesen, the principal of Vittra Telefonplan writes on the school's website that the design is intended to stimulate "children's curiosity and creativity" and offer them opportunities for both collaborative and independent time. Vittra doesn't award traditional grades, either—students are taught in groups according to level—so maximizing diverse teaching and learning situations is a priority.

The open nature of the campus and the unusual furniture arrangements reflect the school's philosophy that "children play and learn on the basis of their needs, curiosity, and inclination." That's true for kids all over the world, so let's hope educators in other countries begin to pay attention."

[Not sure what the program is, waiting to read more. Previously: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665867/school-without-walls-fosters-a-free-wheeling-theory-of-learning ]
2012  classrooms  schools  children  design  unschooling  deschooling  democraticschools  freeschools  architecture  schooldesign  sweden  learning  education  classroom  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
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