robertogreco + realtime   39

Towards an Internet of Living Things – OpenExplorer Journal – Medium
"Conservation groups are using technology to understand and protect our planet in an entirely new way."

"The Internet of Things (IoT) was an idea that industry always loved. It was simple enough to predict: as computing and sensors become smaller and cheaper, they would be embedded into devices and products that interact with each other and their owners. Fast forward to 2017 and the IoT is in full bloom. Because of the stakes — that every device and machine in your life will be upgraded and harvested for data — companies wasted no time getting in on the action. There are smart thermostats, refrigerators, TVs, cars, and everything else you can imagine.

Industry was first, but they aren’t the only. Now conservationists are taking the lead.

The same chips, sensors (especially cameras) and networks being used to wire up our homes and factories are being deployed by scientists (both professional and amateur) to understand our natural world. It’s an Internet of Living Things. It isn’t just a future of efficiency and convenience. It’s enabling us to ask different questions and understand our world from an entirely new perspective. And just in time. As environmental challenges — everything from coral bleaching to African elephant poaching— continue to mount, this emerging network will serve as the planetary nervous system, giving insight into precisely what actions to take.

It’s a new era of conservation based on real-time data and monitoring. It changes our ecological relationship with the planet by changing the scales at which we can measure — we get both increased granularity, as well as adding a truly macro view of the entire planet. It also allows us to simultaneously (and unbiasedly) measuring the most important part of the equation: ourselves.

Specific and Real-Time

We have had population estimates of species for decades, but things are different now. Before the estimates came from academic fieldwork, and now we’re beginning to rely on vast networks of sensors to monitor and model those same populations in real-time. Take the recent example of Paul Allen’s Domain Awareness System (DAS) that covers broad swaths of West Africa. Here’s an excerpt from the Bloomberg feature:
For years, local rangers have protected wildlife with boots on the ground and sheer determination. Armed guards spend days and nights surrounding elephant herds and horned rhinos, while on the lookout for rogue trespassers.

Allen’s DAS uses technology to go the distance that humans cannot. It relies on three funnels of information: ranger radios, animal tracker tags, and a variety of environmental sensors such as camera traps and satellites. This being the product of the world’s 10th-richest software developer, it sends everything back to a centralized computer system, which projects specific threats onto a map of the monitored region, displayed on large screens in a closed circuit-like security room.

For instance, if a poacher were to break through a geofence sensor set up by a ranger in a highly-trafficked corridor, an icon of a rifle would flag the threat as well as any micro-chipped elephants and radio-carrying rangers in the vicinity.

[video]

These networks are being woven together in ecosystems all over the planet. Old cellphones being turned into rainforest monitoring devices. Drones surveying and processing the health of Koala populations in Australia. The conservation website MongaBay now has a section of their site dedicated to the fast-moving field, which they’ve dubbed WildTech. Professionals and amateurs are gathering in person at events like Make for the Planet and in online communities like Wildlabs.net. It’s game on.

The trend is building momentum because the early results have been so good, especially in terms of resolution. The organization WildMe is using a combination of citizen science (essentially human-powered environmental sensors) and artificial intelligence to identify and monitor individuals in wild populations. As in, meet Struddle the manta ray, number 1264_B201. He’s been sited ten times over the course of 10 years, mostly around the Maldives.

[image]

The combination of precision and pervasiveness means these are more than just passive data-collecting systems. They’re beyond academic, they’re actionable. We can estimate more accurately — there are 352,271 elephants estimated to remain in Africa — but we’re also reacting when something happens — a poacher broke a geofence 10 minutes ago.

The Big Picture

It’s not just finer detail, either. We’re also getting a better bigger picture than we’ve ever had before. We’re watching on a planetary scale.

Of course, advances in satellites are helping. Planet (the company) has been a major driving force. Over the past few years they’ve launched hundreds of small imaging satellites and have created an earth-imaging constellation that has ambitions of getting an image of every location on earth, every day. Like Google Earth, but near-real-time and the ability to search along the time horizon. An example of this in action, Planet was able to catch an illegal gold mining operation in the act in the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest.

[image]

It’s not just satellites, it’s connectivity more broadly. Traditionally analog wildlife monitoring is going online. Ornithology gives us a good example of this. For the past century, the study of birds have relied on amateur networks of enthusiasts — the birders — to contribute data on migration and occurrence studies. (For research that spans long temporal time spans or broad geographic areas, citizen science is often the most effective method.) Now, thanks to the ubiquity of mobile phones, birding is digitized and centralized on platforms like eBird and iNaturalist. You can watch the real-time submissions and observations:

[image]

Sped up, we get the visual of species-specific migrations over the course of a year:

[animated GIF]

Human Activity

The network we’re building isn’t all glass, plastic and silicon. It’s people, too. In the case of the birders above, the human component is critical. They’re doing the legwork, getting into the field and pointing the cameras. They’re both the braun and the (collective) brain of the operation.

Keeping humans in the loop has it’s benefits. It’s allowing these networks to scale faster. Birders with smartphones and eBird can happen now, whereas a network of passive forest listening devices would take years to build (and would be much more expensive to maintain). It also makes these systems better adept at managing ethical and privacy concerns — people are involved in the decision making at all times. But the biggest benefit of keeping people in the loop, is that we can watch them—the humans—too. Because as much as we’re learning about species and ecosystems, we also need to understand how we ourselves are affected by engaging and perceiving the natural world.

We’re getting more precise measurements of species and ecosystems (a better small picture), as well as a better idea of how they’re all linked together (a better big picture). But we’re also getting an accurate sense of ourselves and our impact on and within these systems (a better whole picture).

We’re still at the beginning of measuring the human-nature boundary, but the early results suggests it will help the conservation agenda. A sub-genre of neuroscience called neurobiophilia has emerged to study the effects on nature on our brain function. (Hint: it’s great for your health and well-being.) National Geographic is sending some of their explorers into the field wired up with Fitbits and EEG machines. The emerging academic field of citizen science seems to be equally concerned with the effects of participation than it is with outcomes. So far, the science is indicating that engagement in the data collecting process has measurable effects on the community’s ability to manage different issues. The lesson here: not only is nature good for us, but we can evolve towards a healthier perspective. In a world approaching 9 billion people, this collective self-awareness will be critical.

What’s next

Just as fast as we’re building this network, we’re learning what it’s actually capable of doing. As we’re still laying out the foundation, the network is starting to come alive. The next chapter is applying machine learning to help make sense of the mountains of data that these systems are producing. Want to quickly survey the dispersion of arctic ponds? Here. Want to count and classify the number of fish you’re seeing with your underwater drone? We’re building that. In a broad sense, we’re “closing the loop” as Chris Anderson explained in an Edge.org interview:
If we could measure the world, how would we manage it differently? This is a question we’ve been asking ourselves in the digital realm since the birth of the Internet. Our digital lives — clicks, histories, and cookies — can now be measured beautifully. The feedback loop is complete; it’s called closing the loop. As you know, we can only manage what we can measure. We’re now measuring on-screen activity beautifully, but most of the world is not on screens.

As we get better and better at measuring the world — wearables, Internet of Things, cars, satellites, drones, sensors — we are going to be able to close the loop in industry, agriculture, and the environment. We’re going to start to find out what the consequences of our actions are and, presumably, we’ll take smarter actions as a result. This journey with the Internet that we started more than twenty years ago is now extending to the physical world. Every industry is going to have to ask the same questions: What do we want to measure? What do we do with that data? How can we manage things differently once we have that data? This notion of closing the loop everywhere is perhaps the biggest endeavor of … [more]
davidlang  internetofthings  nature  life  conservation  tracking  2017  data  maps  mapping  sensors  realtime  iot  computing  erth  systems  wildlife  australia  africa  maldives  geofencing  perú  birds  ornithology  birding  migration  geography  inaturalist  ebird  mobile  phones  crowdsourcing  citizenscience  science  classideas  biology 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Timebound: The App That Makes Time Travel Possible by Timebound — Kickstarter
"Timebound is an app for learning about the past in an easy and exciting way. It allows you to follow important historical events hour-by-hour and minute-by-minute. You can join the Titanic on her maiden voyage, witness the hunt for Jack the Ripper, see the first landing on the Moon, experience the first Woodstock festival, and dozens of other thrilling stories.

It’s a kind of time machine!

Timebound offers you access to an ever-expanding list of the most interesting and important events in history, from Ancient Greece to the beginning of the 21st century. Some events — such as the first spaceflight — last only a few hours or days; others (e.g. World War II) continue for years. Each event included in Timebound has played a crucial role in the history of humankind.

Now you can sit back, select an event, and let the time travel begin!

You’ll be notified about every twist and turn of the event you selected, and have a chance to explore its details through historical images, maps, and other media. For example, you can be living in World War II for six years and one day (its actual duration) by receiving event updates in real-time. With push-notifications, you’ll constantly keep time with history!

Live it as it happened

Push-notifications are an essential part of Timebound. They may come in the middle of the night, during a meal, or while you are commuting to work. History will become a part of your daily life.

Here is a demo of Timebound. It shows a push notification that leads to the “JFK Assassination” feed, as well as the countdown timer for “Man On The Moon.”

Is it iOS or Android?

It’s both! Right now we have an iOS beta ready for testing. But Timebound will be officially released on both platforms, and all our backers who buy a subscription will be able to choose between the two.

Examples of Timebound events

Timebound will be released in May 2017. Once that happens, we will add one new event each week. You can pick any event at any time and start following it, or wait for a specific start date and live through the event in full calendar sync.

Here are some of the events Timebound will offer (list may be subject to minor changes):

Is it free?

The Timebound app is free to download. A limited number of events will be free to follow. The full Timebound archive will be available via a monthly or annual subscription. In some cases, it will also be possible to purchase access to single events.

Why time travel?

We think of Timebound as an entry point to history. At the moment, academic historians are testing the app, and we will post their reviews as they will be coming in during the campaign. If you are teaching history and want to collaborate with Timebound, drop us a line! We’d love to give you and your students free access to the app: teachers@timeboundapp.com

What does a Timebound event look like?

…"
history  realtime  applications  ios  android  classideas 
march 2017 by robertogreco
We're sharing more photos but getting less in return
"Theoretically, we could have an up-to-the-minute photo database of any popular location. We'd just need Instagram to include more metadata by default and allow users to sort by location (or let a third-party app do the same).

If we were properly organizing the photos we're already putting online, I could see how a festival was going, and Google Maps could show me all the photos taken from the Eiffel Tower in the last five minutes. I could even see if a popular bar is crowded without any official system. We'd be able to see the world right now, as clearly as we see its past on Google Street View, as quickly as news spreads on Twitter.

We have the data and the technological infrastructure, but we're stuck because no developer can access all the data.

If anyone was going to deliver these capabilities, it would be Flickr. In 2006, it was the canonical destination for photos. If you wanted to see photos of a certain place or subject, that’s where you went. But Facebook replaced Flickr as a social network, killing it on the desktop, and Instagram released a simpler mobile app, killing it there too. That would have been fine if Facebook and Instagram kept their photos data-rich and fully exportable. But both services give fewer tagging, grouping, and other sorting options, and they built their photos into incompatible databases. Facebook won't organize photos any way but by human subject or uploader. Instagram has just a few view options and focuses solely on the friend-feed.

We're photographing everything now, building this amazing body of work, but we're getting less and less out of it.

We do get some benefits from not having one monopoly in charge of photo sharing: Instagram did mobile better than Flickr, Facebook can link a photo of someone to their whole social profile, and Foursquare efficiently arranges photos by location. These advantages, however, have replaced Creative Commons licensing, advanced search, and any other tool that relies on treating the world's photo pool as a mass data set rather than a series of individualized feeds.

Twitter, Tumblr, and Imgur siphon off bits of the photo market without giving them back into the mass set. Meanwhile, any photo service that dies off (RIP Picasa, Zooomr, Photobucket) becomes a graveyard for photos that will probably never get moved to a new service.

Why are we giving up this magical ability to basically explore our world in real-time? The bandwidth is lower than streaming video; the new-data-point frequency is lower than Twitter; the location sorting is less complicated than Google Maps or Foursquare. But no one service has an incentive to build this tool, or to open up its database for a third party. Instead they only innovate ways to steal market share from each other. Flickr recently downgraded its mobile app, removing discovery options and cropping photos into squares. The new app is an obvious Instagram imitation, but it won't help Flickr recapture the market. If any photo service beats Instagram, it won't be by making data more open.

Our collective photo pool suffers from a tragedy of the commons, where each service snaps up our photos with as few features as it can, or by removing features. (Snapchat, for example, actively prevents photos from joining the pool by replacing the subscription model with a one-to-one model, efficiently delivering photos straight from my camera to your feed.) We are giving our photos to these inferior services, they are making billions of dollars from them, and what we're getting back is pathetic.

The best agnostic tool we have is the archaic Google Image Search, which doesn't effectively sort results, doesn't distinguish between image sources, and doesn't even touch location search. The lack of agnostic metadata is keeping us in the past. As Anil Dash pointed out in 2012, the photo pool (like blogs and status updates) is becoming fragmented and de-standardized. Everything we're putting online is chopped up by services that don't play well together, and that's bad for the user.

Dash wrote, "We'll fix these things; I don't worry about that." I do. I don't think technology has to work out right. We can build expressways where we should have built bullet trains. We can let an ISP monopoly keep us at laughable broadband speeds. We can all dump our memories into the wrong sites and watch them disappear in 10 years. We can share postage-stamp-sized photos on machines capable of streaming 1080p video.

Even if we do fix this, it will not be retroactive. There are stories about whole TV series lost to time because the network stupidly trashed the original reels. Now that we take more photos than we know what to deal with, we won't lose our originals—we'll just lose the organization. When Facebook and Instagram are inevitably replaced, we'll be left without the context, without the comments, without anything but a privately stored pile of raw images named DCIM_2518.JPG.

Just a heap of bullshit, really."
nickdouglas  flickr  metadata  photography  2014  instagram  tags  tagging  search  storage  facebook  tumblr  imgur  twitter  picasa  zooomr  photobucket  archives  archiving  creativecommons  realtime  foursquare  googlemaps  snapchat  anildash  googleimagesearch  technology  regression  socialmedia  fragmentation  interoperability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
earth
"a visualization of global weather conditions
forecast by supercomputers
updated every three hours

ocean surface current estimates
updated every five days"
climate  weather  wind  maps  mapping  earth  visualization  oceans  currents  temperature  realtime 
january 2014 by robertogreco
OpenStreetMap + MapBox | MapBox
"OpenStreetMap is constantly improved in real time by thousands of volunteers around the world. Here's what they're doing now."
maps  live  editing  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  mapping  realtime  via:vruba 
may 2013 by robertogreco
MOOC completion rates
"While Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) may allow free education on an enormous scale, one of the biggest criticisms raised about MOOCs is that although thousands enrol for courses, a very small proportion actually complete the course. The release of information about enrollment and completion rates from MOOCs appears to be ad hoc at the moment - that is, official statistics are not published for every course. This data visualisation draws together information about enrollment numbers and completion rates from across online news stories and blogs."
mooc  moocs  completionrates  data  realtime 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Kerouapp
"A new mapping service, tracking your moves in real time, or in the past."
location  photography  twitter  realtimeweb  realtime  movement  mapping  maps  applications  lawrencebrown  riklomas  denielbower  benjilanyado  kerouapp  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Slow Web – Jack Cheng
"Timely not real-time. Rhythm not random. Moderation not excess. Knowledge not information. These are a few of the many characteristics of the Slow Web. It’s not so much a checklist as a feeling, one of being at greater ease with the web-enabled products and services in our lives.

Like Slow Food, Slow Web is concerned as much with production as it is with consumption. We as individuals can always set our own guidelines and curb the effect of the Fast Web, but as I hope I’ve illustrated, there are a number of considerations the creators of web-connected products can make to help us along. And maybe the Slow Web isn’t quite a movement yet. Maybe it’s still simmering. But I do think there is something distinctly different about the feeling that some of these products impart on their users, and that feeling manifests from the intent of their makers."
2012  thewayitshouldbedone  moderation  speed  fast  timeliness  realtime  rhythm  flow  knowledge  information  random  stockandflow  jackcheng  slow  slowweb  web  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Webs and whirligigs: Marshall McLuhan in his time and ours » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
"And so are our media, made newly social. Facebook & Twitter & Google+ & all the rest swim with time’s flow, rather than attempting to stanch it. & they are, despite that but mostly because of it, increasingly defining our journalism. They are also, as it were, McLuhanesque. (Google+: extension of man.) Because if McLuhan is to be believed, the much-discussed & often-assumed human need for narrative may be contingent rather than implicit. Which means that as conditions change, so may — so will — we. We may evolve past our need, in other words, for containment, for conclusions, for answers.

McLuhan’s vision is, finally, of a world of frayed ends rather than neat endings, one in which stock loses out to flow — a media environment, which is to say simply an environment, in which all that is solid melts…and then, finally, floods. And for journalism and journalists, of course, that represents a tension of rather epic, and certainly existential, dimensions."
journalism  media  marshallmcluhan  paulford  digitalmedia  stockandflow  time  2011  megangarber  realtime  web  internet  endings  storytelling  unfinished  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - First Orbit - the movie
"A real time recreation of Yuri Gagarin's pioneering first orbit, shot entirely in space from on board the International Space Station. The film combines this new footage with Gagarin's original mission audio and a new musical score by composer Philip Sheppard. For more information visit http://www.firstorbit.org "
yurisnight  yurigagarin  space  spaceexploration  spacetravel  history  documentary  realtime  recreation  2011  firstorbit  ussr  russia  spacerace  audio  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Archive Fever: a love letter to the post real-time web | mattogle.com
"By providing us with new ways to share what we’re doing right now, the real-time web also captures something we might not have created otherwise: a permanent record of the event. We’ve all been so distracted by The Now that we’ve hardly noticed the beautiful comet tails of personal history trailing in our wake. We’ve all become accidental archivists; our burgeoning digital archives open out of the future."

"The current philosophy underlying most of the real-time web is that if it’s not recent, it’s not important. This is what we need to change."

"I believe we, as makers of online services, have an incredible opportunity to ground the things we create in both the present and the past, making them — and thus ourselves — richer, more beautiful, and more human.

But first we need to catch archive fever."

[via: http://log.scifihifi.com/post/2348978639/by-providing-us-with-new-ways-to-share-what-were ]
twitter  internet  memory  memoryplatforms  realtime  realtimeweb  now  archives  archiving  search  2010  foursquare  web  facebook  last.fm  memoryretrieval  cv  commonplacebooks  perspective  hereandnow  past  present  lastfm  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: By providing us with new ways to share what we’re...
"brings us full circle back to “Web 2.0’s” origins in what Delicious creator Joshua Schachter has called a “memory platform.” …there are some powerful social memory experiences possible that aren’t yet appreciated by an industry (and public) preoccupied with “The Now.” The immediacy of services like Twitter, Foursquare, and Instagram is a powerful incentive for average people to fit journaling into their daily lives. But, as Matt Jones points out, in many ways “The Now” is the least interesting part of the spacetime light cone. Without deep access to archives, and compelling ways to navigate them, real time services are falling short of their true potential."
buzzandersen  mattjones  now  hereandnow  realtime  realtimeweb  memory  memoryplatforms  joshuaschachter  2010  twitter  del.icio.us  web2.0  archives  archiving  commonplacebooks  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Network Realism: William Gibson and new forms of Fiction | booktwo.org
"the world becomes increasingly Gibsonian—Bigendian—when you’re reading the books. [examples]…

So, if Gibson was originally writing “on top of Firefox”, he’s now writing on top of Twitter…

Gibson’s been talking a lot lately about atemporality, this idea that we live in a sort of endless digital now. In “Zero History” we have an echo of “No Future”: everything compressed into the present…

Network Realism is writing that is of and about the network. It’s realism because it’s so close to our present reality. A realism that posits an increasingly 1:1 relationship between Fiction and the World. A realtime link. And it’s networked because it lives in a place that’s that’s enabled by, and only recently made possible by, our technological connectedness. …

Future scholars of Network Realism will have to decide if information visualisation and in particular projects like We Feel Fine fit into this definition. I suspect not, because I want to keep this to literature, and capital-A Authors, but I suspect there’s a connection. Perhaps in data griotism or whatever we end up calling that."
datagriotism  networkrealism  williamgibson  atemporality  2010  fiction  zerohistory  jonathanharris  robinsloan  writing  twitter  networks  nearnearfuture  adjacentfuture  digitalnow  realtime  technologicalconnectedness  wefeelfine  literature  scifi  sciencefiction  network  networked  via:preoccupations  jamesbridle  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Invisible Cities, a project by Christian Marc Schmidt & Liangjie Xia
"By revealing the social networks present within the urban environment, Invisible Cities describes a new kind of city—a city of the mind. It displays geocoded activity from online services such as Twitter and Flickr, both in real-time and in aggregate. Real-time activity is represented as individual nodes that appear whenever a message or image is posted. Aggregate activity is reflected in the underlying terrain: over time, the landscape warps as data is accrued, creating hills and valleys representing areas with high and low densities of data.

In the piece, nodes are connected by narrative threads, based on themes emerging from the overlaid information. These pathways create dense meta-networks of meaning, blanketing the terrain and connecting disparate areas of the city."
maps  cities  mapping  geotagging  socialnetworking  twitter  visualization  urban  flickr  realtime  socialmedia 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Why Old Spice matters « Snarkmarket
"blogs are actu­ally more related to live the­ater than they are to, say, news­pa­pers. The things that make a blog good are almost exactly the things that make a live per­for­mance good...most impor­tant...is inter­play w/ the audience...

...this cam­paign [also] made me think of 48 Hour Mag­a­zine...same sense of you-gotta-see-this...can-they-really-do-it. It was an event..."But [an event’s] urgency—its live­ness, human vital­ity, &, frankly, its risk & unpredictability—is what makes it more than just another link in the stream"...

one final rea­son to take this for­mat seriously:

...It’s tons of fun. Any­body who’s writ­ten a blog, got­ten deep into Twit­ter, run a Kick­starter project, pulled strings on an ARG will tell you...There’s a spe­cial sat­is­fac­tion to see­ing its impact on the world immediately—and adjust­ing based on what you see. It’s alive, it’s elec­tric, it’s addic­tive. It’s con­nected and communal."
robinsloan  socialmedia  storytelling  advertising  oldspice  2010  theater  analysis  marketing  media  digital  creative  casestudy  video  events  ted  realtime  twitter  blogs  blogging  feedback  interactive  interactivity 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Eddy
"Eddy is a media aggregation platform built for the public display of up-to-the-minute activity on realtime services like Twitter. It offers three primary features: rapid collection and curation of what people are saying about an event, moderation of acceptable material, and speedy, reliable republishing of these conversational streams. Setup of the application is fast and easy, and made specifically for use by interactive media designers. Eddy makes data available in formats specifically designed for publishing on the web, allowing developers to quickly iterate design concepts with real world data and to launch without fuss."
stamen  twitter  twittertools  visualization  aggregation  aggregator  applications  realtime  media  live 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Slow IT | The Fifth Conference
"Slow doesn’t necessarily mean being slow in the literal sense of the word. Slow is about doing things with the right timing, the right concentration, the right approach...using good quality materials or resources, & if necessary, taking your time. & it also refers to the way we consume, or eat: slow eaters take their time to savor the meal, to experience the flavors...Consider the difference in eating culture between US & Italy. Dinner in US is one-hour business. Therefore when Americans spend time in Italy they really suffer. First they have to wait until about 9:00 for dinner & then they have to stay put at the table for hours...highlights a cultural clash between Anglo Saxon world, which is all about speed & a ‘just do it’ attitude, versus Rhineland model which is more contemplative & reflective. Not that the one is better than the other of course. Anglo Saxon approach tends to be more dynamic & innovative while in the Rhineland model we can get stuck in endless discussions."

[via: http://liftlab.com/think/laurent/2010/05/21/slow-it-did-we-actually-even-%E2%80%98think%E2%80%99-today/ ]
slow  slowfood  education  learning  slowit  rontolido  schools  schooling  deschooling  unschooling  food  culture  society  reflection  realtime  technology  time  slowness  sloweducation  attention  discussion  conversation 
may 2010 by robertogreco
TitanPad
"TitanPad was launched to provide an EtherPad setup which is unrelated to any commercial and political entities. Its goal is to offer a stable service through proper operating.
etherpad  tcsnmy  onlinetoolkit  collaboration  writing  realtime  sharing  editing  documents  collaborative 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Google Docs Gets More Realtime; Adds Google Drawings To The Mix
"Google Drawings is not really a drawing app, it’s more of an online whiteboard. The app is designed to help people visualize ideas through flow charts, diagrams, and stencils. There is a chat window where participants can chime in. Images can be imported and moved around. But sadly there is no freehand drawing option. Google Drawings is best experienced in an HTML5 browser (Chrome, Safari, Firefox, IE9 if it supports SVG). Google Docs will also be discontinuing offline access via Google Gears on May3, and will bring it back later via HTML5.
virtualwhiteboard  googledocs  realtime  tcsnmy  cloud 
april 2010 by robertogreco
hello typepad: Real Fans Watch
"Sippey put to rest forever the debate about spoilers sometime in 2008 with the simple declaration "Real fans watch."
davidjacobs  realtime  twitter  criticism  tv  television  spoilers  blogging 
february 2010 by robertogreco
the living: amphibious architecture
"'amphibious architecture' is a new project by the new york city design studio the living. the project specifically uses water as a surface, since it is so ubiquitous in the world, yet under-explored in art and design. the project consists of two networks of floating interactive tubes that feature light beacons on top and a range of sensors below. these sensors 'monitor water quality, presence of fish, and human interest in the river ecosystem', while the lights respond and 'create feedback loops between humans, fish, and their shared environment'. 'an SMS interface allows citizens to text-message the fish, to receive real-time information about the river, and to contribute to a display of collective interest in the environment.’"

[more: http://www.thelivingnewyork.com/ AND http://www.thelivingnewyork.com/amphibiousarchitecture.htm ]
realtime  fish  pollution  water  waterquality  art  design  sensors  iphone  nyc 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Black&White™ — Slaves of the feed – This is not the realtime we’ve been looking for
"Constantly checking our feeds for new information, we seem to be hoping to discover something of interest, something that we can share with our networks, something that we can use, something that we can talk about, something that we can act on, something we didn’t know we didn’t know.

It almost seems like an obsession and many critics of digital technology would argue that by consuming information this way we are running the danger of destroying social interaction between humans. One might even say that we have become slaves of the feed."
aggregation  rss  overload  feeds  information  attention  twitter  realtime  internet  cv  infooverload  flow  filtering  curation 
december 2009 by robertogreco
city murmur
"city murmur is a project by writing academic english that maps cities in real-time based on media
citymurmur  media  mapping  realtime  madrid  neworleans  tracking  attention  nola 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Mediactive » Toward a Slow-News Movement
"Like many other people who've been burned by believing too quickly, I've learned to put almost all of what journalists call "breaking news" into the categories of gossip or, in the words of a scientist friend, "interesting if true." That is, even though I gobble up "the latest" from a variety of sources, the closer the information is in time to the actual event, the more I assume it's unreliable if not false.

It's my own version of "slow news" -- an expression I first heard on Friday, coined by my friend Ethan Zuckerman in a wonderful riff off the slow-food movement. We were at a Berkman Center for Internet & Society retreat in suburban Boston, in a group discussion of ways to improve the quality of what we know when we have so many sources from which to choose at every minute of the day... "

[via: http://www.boingboing.net/2009/11/08/slow-news-designing.html ]
slow  news  literacy  journalism  slownews  dangillmor  speed  quality  media  criticalthinking  online  realtime  gossip  ethanzuckerman 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Google's Eric Schmidt on What the Web Will Look Like in 5 Years
"# internet will be dominated by Chinese-language content.

# Today's teenagers are the model of how the web will work in five years - they jump from app to app to app seamlessly.

# 5 years is a factor of 10 in Moore's Law, meaning that computers will be capable of far more by that time than they are today. # there will be broadband well above 100MB in performance - & distribution distinctions between TV, radio & web will go away.

# "We're starting to make significant money off of Youtube", content will move towards more video.

# "Real time information is just as valuable as all the other information, we want it included in our search results."

# There are many companies beyond Twitter & Facebook doing real time.

# "We can index real-time info now - but how do we rank it?"

# It's because of this fundamental shift towards user-generated information that people will listen more to other people than to traditional sources. Learning how to rank that "is the great challenge of the age.""
ericschmidt  facebook  twitter  realtime  chinese  china  content  trends  internet  future  web  video  business  socialmedia  media  google  technology  search  mooreslaw 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Fractal learning | Teemu Arina
"In the digital world, entropy is information overload and order is the pattern that emerges from the interconnection of such information. Knowledge is like a hologram. In holograms, even smaller pieces of it include the picture of the whole object. Knowledge is like a hologram. The experience changes as your point of view towards the object changes. The knowledge is not in a single image, but distributed on a network. This is pattern recognition. And it's the culmination of fractal learning."
realtime  education  learning  ict  connectivism  information  visualization  knowledge  teemuarina  infooverload  patternrecognition  patterns  web  online  fractals  fractallearning 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Relevance Over Time
"Chronological order became more common on web as social networks, such as Facebook, blogs, feeds, feed readers, FriendFeed & services like Twitter designed around the same paradigm – leading to most recent being most important. Some call it real-time, others call it information overload. A default view of chronological order presents a natural barrier to the # of information sources that can be managed effectively...W/ only a few dozen feeds, 100 or so emails a day & following 100 or so people on Twitter, I find myself constantly behind & not being able to manage...Chronological order needs to be abandoned in favor of relevance. Without relevance, our ability to manage large sets of information is inefficient. The technology for relevance exist today, for eg. spam filters are able to tell us what we definitely don’t want to read. Real world information retrieval & organization is based on relevance, either what somebody else believes is relevant to us, or what we decide is relevant."
relevance  information  infooverload  email  facebook  chronoogical  realtime  aggregator  communication  technology  time 
october 2009 by robertogreco
pachube.apps | connecting environments, patching the planet
"Pachube is a service that enables you to connect, tag and share real time sensor data from objects, devices, buildings and environments around the world. Here, we collect together Pachube apps that create/modulate input feeds or make use of output feeds. Sign up for Pachube here!"
applications  pachube  visualization  realtime  sensing  sensors  tracking  rss  sharing  interface  feeds  api  software 
june 2009 by robertogreco
EtherPad
"EtherPad is a collaborative, real-time text editor created by, among others, two ex-Google employees*. An EtherPad document is quickly set up without any need for registration. You can then share the URL of the document, and others who will visit that page will then be able to see, in real-time, whatever you’re typing**. This has an interesting feel to it because there’s no “security buffer” as in typical chat programs: every letter you write will be shown as you write it, including occasional errors before you fix them."
via:preoccupations  collaborative  onlinetoolkit  writing  coding  realtime  wordprocessor  texteditor 
november 2008 by robertogreco
TOPP [Tagging of Pacific Predators] - "Follow the adventures of leatherback turtles, white sharks, elephant seals, salmon sharks, albatross, and 18 other species on TOPP"
"began in 2000 as one of 17 projects of the Census of Marine Life, an ambitious 10-year, 80-nation endeavor to assess and explain the diversity and abundance of life in the oceans, and where that life has lived, is living, and will live."
via:tomc  sharks  animals  biology  birds  classideas  data  environment  fish  geography  maps  mapping  reference  research  science  interactivity  locative  location-based  tagging  oceans  wildlife  nature  turtles  realtime  tracking  pacific  marine 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Sense Networks
"Sense Networks, Inc. indexes the real world using real-time and historical location data for predictive analytics across multiple industries."
mobile  phones  geotagging  gps  geocoding  data  location  location-based  location-aware  locative  mapping  datamining  maps  statistics  sensors  sensing  aggregator  realtime  privacy  geolocation  tracking 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Peers -- The Missing Search for Firefox
"Peers provides realtime search previews for your searchbar. It makes your web experience much more comfy."
firefox  extensions  search  browser  addons  realtime  browsers 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Worldometers - real time world statistics
"Worldometers is managed by a team of developers and researchers with the goal of making world statistics available in a thought-provoking and time relevant format to a wide audience around the world."
statistics  data  realtime  world  international  demographics  planet  population  globalization  government  economics  education  food  energy  literacy  health  media  environment  water  death  disease  ecology  crisis  sustainability  reference  visualization  live 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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