robertogreco + radio   180

Pirate Radio: a special series from The Verge - The Verge
"WHERE DOES YOUR MIND GO WHEN YOU HEAR THE PHRASE “PIRATE RADIO”?

Maybe you think of revolutionaries, deploying broadcasts to subvert an oppressive regime. Or maybe you imagine a raucous boat of rock stars, buoyed by the consequence-free promise of international waters. Maybe it evokes something far away, distant, from the past.

But once you remove the idea of pirate radio from its mythology, you realize that it exists largely for people who live in the margins. The Haitian Americans of Brooklyn. The Hmong people of the Midwest. The Pashtuns across Afghanistan. The space between the frequencies, it turns out, is vast. The stories and people explored in these pages present a complicated narrative of what illegal transmissions can do and who they reach. Because that’s always been the power of radio — its reach."
radio  pirateradio  classideas  glvo  2019  broadcasting  fm 
4 days ago by robertogreco
Pi-rate radio: how to make your own FM station for less than $35 - The Verge
"FM radio stations are basically just two things: a transmitter to create the signal, and an antenna to broadcast it, which means that building your own pirate radio station is actually really, really easy.

Those FM transmitters you used to use to get music from your iPod on to your car stereo? Full-fledged radio transmitters, just ones with severely limited outputs to avoid violating any FCC laws. If you’re handy with a soldering iron, those simple car transmitters can actually be hacked to get a much better range by adding a bigger antenna and removing internal resistors.


Alternatively, you can get everything you need to build a decent long-range system on Amazon for a couple hundred bucks (although you’ll want to check local FCC rules for when it actually comes to broadcasting things).

But the easiest (and cheapest) option is a Raspberry Pi. The same principles apply: use the tiny computer to create and broadcast the signal, and attach an antenna to give it the broadcast range.


1. Set up your Raspberry Pi

You’ll need to get Raspbian, the Linux-based operating system for the Raspberry Pi.

2. Install the FM radio software

Once your Pi is up and running, you’ll need software. Specifically, PiFM, created by Oliver Mattos and Oskar Weigl.

Alternatively, if you’d like something even simpler to use, Make Magazine’s Sam Freeman and Wynter Woods built a modified version of the PiFM code back in 2014, which you can find at the Make website. Simply flash that to a microSD card, add music, and just plug the Pi into a power source and it’ll automatically start broadcasting on your frequency of choice.

3. Choose some music

Get your tracks set and copy them over to the Raspberry Pi. If you’re using the base PiFM software, you’ll need 16-bit .wav files. Make Magazine’s code supports broader file support, though.

4. Add an antenna

Plug a strip of wire into the GPIO4 pin on your Raspberry Pi (the fourth pin down on the left side on most Pi hardware). You’ll want something at least eight inches long, although closer to 25 inches is recommended for better range. Depending on your setup and surrounding environment, the Pi can broadcast between about a foot to roughly 300 feet away.

5. Broadcast

Run the PiFM code. You’ll do that by running a command like “sudo ./pifm awesomejams.wav 100.0”, where that “100.0” is the frequency in MHz on which you’re broadcasting.

6. Tune your radio and enjoy

Get your FM radio of choice, tune to your broadcast station, and enjoy!"
classideas  radio  fm  raspberrypi  2019  chaimgartenberg  olivermattos  oskarweigl  samfreeman  wynterwoods  pifm  raspbian  broadcasting  pirateradio 
4 days ago by robertogreco
Remediation: Understanding New Media, by Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin | The MIT Press
"Summary

A new framework for considering how all media constantly borrow from and refashion other media.

Media critics remain captivated by the modernist myth of the new: they assume that digital technologies such as the World Wide Web, virtual reality, and computer graphics must divorce themselves from earlier media for a new set of aesthetic and cultural principles. In this richly illustrated study, Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin offer a theory of mediation for our digital age that challenges this assumption. They argue that new visual media achieve their cultural significance precisely by paying homage to, rivaling, and refashioning such earlier media as perspective painting, photography, film, and television. They call this process of refashioning "remediation," and they note that earlier media have also refashioned one another: photography remediated painting, film remediated stage production and photography, and television remediated film, vaudeville, and radio."

Review:

"The authors do a splendid job of showing precisely how technologies like computer games, digital photography, film television, the Web, and virtual reality all turn on the mutually constructive strategies of generating immediacy and making users hyperaware of the media themselves...The authors lay out a provocative theory of contemporary selfhood, one that draws on and modifies current notions of the 'virtual' and 'networked' human subject. Clearly written and not overly technical, this book will interest general readers, students, and scholars engaged with current trends in technology."]

[via:
https://twitter.com/thezhanly/status/1135170311941492736

in this exchange:

Venkatesh Rao (@vgr): "I think several new genres of fiction are being born right now that will break the Industrial Age ones (SFF, mystery, romance, horror, thriller).

One I think is alt-realism. Or adjacent-realism. Not counterfactuals, more like fictional conspiracy theories."

Me (@rogre): "Have you done the same for *form* of fiction? (Think length, type of prose, formatting, use of multimedia, etc.) I think there is something similar going on there too. I also think that these genres and forms are not necessarily as new as they seem, just finally gaining traction?"

Venkatesh Rao (@vgr): I think that’s probably overtheorized already by all the hypermedia studies people. I’m more interested in content. I suspect @thezhanly has good knowledge on state of art there. But overall I think media form evolves much less quickly than people want it too.

Zhan Li (@thezhanly): Bolter & Grusin’s remediation concept is a crucial perspective for this https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/remediation ]
books  media  jaydavidbolter  richardgrusin  1998  photography  film  painting  art  writing  howwrite  publishing  theater  filmmaking  radio  television  tv  refashioning  culture 
june 2019 by robertogreco
BBC Radio 4 - New Ways of Seeing - Episode guide
[See also:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000458m

"A four-part series authored by journalist and artist James Bridle examining how technology is changing visual culture."]
jamesbridle  technology  radio  culture  tolisten  2019  visualculture 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Homelands Productions
"Homelands Productions is an independent, nonprofit journalism cooperative. Our work brings the voices of ordinary people to tens of millions of listeners, viewers, readers, students, and teachers around the world.

Since our founding in 1989, we have reported from more than 60 countries, produced nine special series for public radio and television, and won 22 national and international awards.

We work in radio, video, photography, print, and on online platforms. We also teach, speak, write books, consult, and serve as fiscal sponsor for projects that move us."
documentary  journalism  media  nonprofit  ruxandraguidi  bearguerra  radio  video  srg  photography  photojournalism  nonprofits 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Fonografia Collective
[via: https://clockshop.org/project/south-of-fletcher-fonografia-collective/ ]

"Fonografia Collective believes in empathetic and culturally-sensitive documentary storytelling about everyday people around the world. We find and craft compelling stories about human rights, politics, the environment, and social issues (or any combination thereof) and share them with the general public using radio, oral histories, photography, the printed word, multimedia, public installations, gatherings and events.

Since 2005, we've been working together to advance our vision of a more inclusive and diverse approach to nonfiction storytelling, focusing on communities across the U.S. and Latin America that are often underrepresented or misunderstood by the mainstream media or the public. As consultants with a variety of institutions, nonprofits, and individuals, we strive to do the same. We also run Story Tellers, a social media platform connecting storytellers from around the world to gigs, funding, collaboration opportunities, and to one another.

We are producers and board members of Homelands Productions, a 25 year-old independent documentary journalism cooperative. Until Spring 2017, we collaborated with public radio station KCRW on a year-long multimedia storytelling series about aging called "Going Gray in LA." At present, we are developing a storytelling project about the Bowtie in conjunction with Clockshop, an arts organization in Los Angeles, and California State Parks.

*******

Bios

Ruxandra Guidi has been telling nonfiction stories for almost two decades. Her reporting for public radio, magazines, and various multimedia and multidisciplinary outlets has taken her throughout the United States, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she assisted independent producers The Kitchen Sisters; then worked as a reporter, editor, and producer for NPR's Latino USA, the BBC daily news program, The World, the CPB-funded Fronteras Desk in San Diego-Tijuana, and KPCC Public Radio's Immigration and Emerging Communities beat in Los Angeles. She's also worked extensively throughout South America, having been a freelance foreign correspondent based in Bolivia (2007-2009) and in Ecuador (2014-2016). Currently, she is the president of the board of Homelands Productions, a journalism nonprofit cooperative founded in 1989. She is a contributing editor for the 48 year-old nonprofit magazine High Country News, and she also consults regularly as a writer, editor, translator and teacher for a variety of clients in the U.S. and Latin America. In 2018, she was awarded the Susan Tifft Fellowship for women in documentary and journalism by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Throughout her career, Guidi has collaborated extensively and across different media to produce in-depth magazine features, essays, and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service, BBC Mundo, The World, National Public Radio, Marketplace, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Orion Magazine, The Walrus Magazine, Guernica Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, National Geographic NewsWatch, The New York Times, The Guardian, Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Atlantic, among others. She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

*

Bear Guerra is a photographer whose work explores the human impact of globalization, development, and social and environmental justice issues in communities typically underrepresented in the media.

In addition to editorial assignments, he is consistently working on long-term projects, and collaborates with media, non-profit, and arts organizations, as well as other insititutions. His photo essays and images have been published and exhibited widely, both in the United States and abroad.

He was a Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism for the 2013-2014 academic year at the University of Colorado - Boulder; a 2014 Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative Fellow; as well as a 2014 International Reporting Project Health and Development Reporting Fellow. In 2012, he was chosen as a Blue Earth Alliance project photographer for his ongoing project "La Carretera: Life Along Peru's Interoceanic Highway". Other recognitions have included being selected for publication in American Photography (2005, 2015, 2016) and Latin American Fotografía (2014, 2016, 2017); an honorable mention in the 2012 Photocrati Fund competition for the same project. Bear has also been a finalist for a National Magazine Award in Photojournalism (2010).

A native of San Antonio, TX, Bear is currently based in Los Angeles.

For more information, a CV, or to order exhibition quality prints please contact Bear directly.

Editorial clients/publications (partial list): The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Le Monde, The Atlantic, Orion Magazine, The Boston Globe Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, OnEarth, ProPublica, National Public Radio, BBC's The World, California Watch, High Country News, Quiet Pictures, Texas Monthly, Time.com, Earth Island Journal, O Magazine, Glamour, Ms. Magazine, NACLA Magazine, Yes! Magazine, SEED Magazine, The Sun, The Walrus, Guernica, and others.

Nonprofit/NGO clients & other collaborators: International Rescue Committee, Doctors Without Borders, Lambi Fund of Haiti, Children's Environmental Health Institute, Community Water Center, Environmental Water Caucus, Collective Roots, Other Worlds Are Possible, Immigration Justice Project/American Bar Association, Fundacion Nueva Cultura del Agua (Spain), Chinatown Community for Equitable Development, St. Barnabas Senior Services, Jumpstart, Global Oneness Project, Quiet Pictures."
bearguerra  ruxandraguidi  radio  photography  audio  storytelling  everyday  documentary  humanrights  politics  environment  society  socialissues  print  multimedia  oralhistory  art  installation  gatherings  events  inclusion  inclusivity  diversity  nonfiction  latinamerica  us  media  losangeles  kcrw  fronterasdesk  sandiego  tijuana  kpcc  globalization  sanantonio  fonografiacollective  srg  photojournalism 
september 2018 by robertogreco
RWM - RWM
"RWM is a nonprofit online radio project for popular education.

We have done everything in our power to identify the copyright owners of the works we present. Any and all accidental errors and omissions that RWM is notified of in writing will be corrected as soon as possible. For a list of authors, see the details of each program.

Available under a Creative Commons license the following contents.

Part of our programme is possible through Re-Imagine Europe, a four-year project presented by ten cultural organisations from across Europe, funded by Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe is initiated by Sonic Acts (NL) and coordinated by Paradiso (NL) in collaboration with Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) and Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Online interview on the project.
[http://www.perfomap.de/map3/kapitel4/ramos ]

Follow us on Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contact us: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonia: Magnitude that expresses the level of sonorous sensation produced by an intense sound.

The RWM emits SON[I]A, its first program, since May 2 2006.

SON[I]A aims to be an alternative way to receive the information produced during Museum activities; audio information brought to us by characters who take part in activities in and around the MACBA.

This series is produced by: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, Lúa Coderch, André Chêdas, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos and Matías Rossi."



"RWM es un proyecto de radio online con vocación divulgativa y sin ánimo de lucro.

Se han hecho todas las gestiones para identificar a los propietarios de los derechos de autor. Cualquier error u omisión accidental tendrá que ser notificado por escrito a RWM y será corregido en la medida de lo posible. Para consultar el listado de autores, ver detalle de cada programa.

Disponible bajo licencia Creative Commons Creative Commons los contenidos enlazados aquí.

Parte de nuestra programación es posible a través de Re-Imagine Europe, un proyecto de cuatro años que agrupa diez organizaciones culturales europeas, financiado por Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe ha sido iniciado por Sonic Acts (NL) y coordinado a través de Paradiso (NL) en colaboración con Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) y Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Entrevista online sobre las líneas discursivas del proyecto.

Síguenos en Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contacto: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonía: Magnitud que expresa el nivel de sensación sonora producida por un sonido de intensidad.

SON[I]A fue el primer programa de la plataforma RWM y se emite desde el 2 de mayo de 2006.

El SON[I]A se presenta como una alternativa de consumo de la información que produce la actividad del Museo, aprovechando sinergias que se generan a partir de la presencia de personajes, actividades y sonidos que transcurren por el MACBA.

Esta serie está producida por: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, André Chêdas, Lúa Coderch, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos y Matías Rossi."



[via: https://twitter.com/Radio_Web_MACBA/status/1014437790359138304

"🔊 Most listened podcast this June 🔊
1/ @Jenn1fer_A https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/jennifer-lucy-allan/capsula
2/ PROBES by Chris Cutler https://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
3/ Griselda Pollock https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/griselda-pollock-main/capsula
4/ Domènec https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/domenec-main/capsula
5/ val flores https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/val-flores-main/capsula "]
audio  podcasts  tolisten  sound  sounds  rwm  macba  barcelona  radio 
july 2018 by robertogreco
BBC Radio 4 - Pick a Sky and Name It
"How did Momtaza Mehri go from net savvy 6th former to successful millennial poet?

A house belonging to her grandmother is the closest poet Momtaza Mehri has ever come to having a permanent home. Aside from summer months in London, Momtaza's family picked its way across the Middle East.

"Then I just realise, I'm having this typical Somali experience where we're literally going to the places that would be considered the bad 'hoods."

Across a sea, another gulf, was the country her parents no longer called home.

Talking with her mother, Momtaza revisits the childhood experiences that shaped her outlook and her coming of age as a millennial poet.

Poetry extracts are taken from:
I believe in the transformative power of cocoa butter and breakfast cereal in the afternoon
Manifesto for those carrying dusk under their eyes
The Sag
Shan
Wink Wink
November 1997

"The internet just switched up the entire game," Momtaza says.

Producer: Tamsin Hughes
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4."
momtazamehri  poets  poetry  poems  howwelearn  online  internet  web  blogging  autodidacts  somalidiaspora  tamsinhughes  2018  interviews  radio  profiles  somalia  middleeast  london  experience  childhood  dubai  mogadishu  civilwar  tumblr  publishing  howwewrite  freedom 
july 2018 by robertogreco
'An oasis of calm': Quakers broadcast 30 minutes of silence | Media | The Guardian
"It’s not the most obvious subject for a podcast, but a group of young Quakers in Nottingham have recorded their 30-minute silent meeting so as to share their “oasis of calm” with the world.

In an episode of the monthly Young Quaker Podcast, called the Silence Special, you can hear a clock ticking, pages being turned and the rain falling, as the group meets and sits in silence at the Friend’s Meeting House in Nottingham.

Quakerism was founded in the 17th century by the dissenter George Fox during the years of Puritan England. The group’s meetings are characterised by silence, which is occasionally broken when someone present feels the urge to speak, say a prayer or offer a reading.

The idea for the silent podcast first came from Tim Gee, a Quaker living in London, who was inspired by the BBC’s season of “slow” radio, which treated audiences to – among other things – the sounds of birds singing, mountain climbing and monks chatting.

Gee said he had wanted to “share a small oasis of calm, and a way to provide a moment of stillness, for people on the move”.

Jessica Hubbard-Bailey, 25, from the Nottingham Young Quakers, who recorded the podcast, said they had jumped at the opportunity to broadcast something “immersive and unusual”. She added: “We have very different ways of worship to most people of faith and we thought this was a really unique opportunity to give people a little slice of what the Quakers do. Also, we are really good at being quiet because we’ve made a practice of it and I think that is of value. These days everyone is so busy, everyone is working all the time, so it’s really valuable to have the opportunity to sit down once a week and just be quiet and listen.”

Hubbard-Bailey, who was brought up as an atheist but became attracted to Quakerism for its egalitarian principles, said that the podcast had had a good reception, with nearly 400 uses of it.

“I think that makes it the biggest Quaker meeting this year technically,” she said. “I’ve had one couple say that they’ve listened to the silence episode and are going to go to a Quaker meeting for the first time this Sunday. We’ve also had some people saying ‘oh, I’m not sure about this, seems like a bit of a waste of time’. But I think that’s really indicative of how we as a society view silence and stillness.”"
quakers  silence  sound  2018  via:subtopes  religion  georgefox  slow  slowradio  radio  atheism 
april 2018 by robertogreco
ORBITAL OPERATIONS: Alive And A King - OO 18 Feb 18
"2

Damien Williams on a book about animal tool-use [https://social-epistemology.com/2018/02/13/deleting-the-human-clause-damien-williams/ ] and the "human clause" -

Shew says that we consciously and unconsciously appended a “human clause” to all of our definitions of technology, tool use, and intelligence, and this clause’s presumption—that it doesn’t really “count” if humans aren’t the ones doing it—is precisely what has to change.

Tracking Elon Musk's car through space.

Eight reasons why Facebook has peaked.

Does anyone else find it odd that selfies still get more likes and engagement on Instagram than anything else?


3

Via Nabil, this interview with Jason Kottke [http://orbitaloperations.createsend1.com/t/d-l-ojdgtl-iroiiuht-i/ ], a survivor of the first wave of "professional bloggers," is interesting.
The way I’ve been thinking about it lately is that I am like a vaudevillian. I’m the last guy dancing on the stage, by myself, and everyone else has moved on to movies and television. The Awl and The Hairpin have folded. Gawker’s gone, though it would probably still be around if it hadn’t gotten sued out of existence.

On the other hand, blogging is kind of everywhere. Everyone who’s updating their Facebook pages and tweeting and posting on Instagram and Pinterest is performing a bloggish act.

The Republic Of Newsletters.

The Invisible College of Blogs.

Kottke notes that he gave up on RSS when Google Reader shut down. So did some websites. But not all of them, not by a long chalk. And RSS readers like Feedbin work just fine, even in tandem with phone apps like Reeder. (I know other people who swear by Feedly.)

In part of a long thread about the Mueller indictments, my old acquaintance Baratunde Thurston said:
We build a giant deception machine called marketing and advertising, and an adversary used it against us.

We build a giant influence machine called social media, and an adversary used it against us.

These two lines apply to pretty much everything on and about the internet in the 2010s, too.
When I was young, living down the road in Essex, where radio was born (in a Marconi hut outside Chelmsford), radio came out of wooden boxes. Switches and dials. I liked the way my old radios imposed architecture on a world of invisible waves. A red needle, numbers, a speedometer for signals. Physical switching between Medium Wave, FM and Long Wave. Ramps and streets and windows. To me, it gave radio a structure like the false topology of the Tube map.

That was me, from a few years ago. I bet, at some point, there were Tube maps made for certain blogging continuums.

Why am I going on about this again? Because you like reading. You wouldn't be here if you didn't like reading. The "pivot to video" narrative of last year turned out to be basically Facebook's way to kill publishers, and it was a great doomsday weapon. Get publishers to fire all their writers and get video makers in. Then kill publishers' ability to reach people on Facebook with video! It was genius, and you need to understand how insidious that was.

(Also ref. Chris Hardwick's recent Twitter rant about the terrible timeshifting Instagram is doing.)

Tumblr's so fucked up that you could probably take it over between you. And set up systems with IFTTT as simple as mailing your posts to yourself so you have an archive for when the ship goes down.

The Republic and the College are pro-reading, pro-thinking, pro- the independence of voices.

In 2015, I also wrote:
I’m an edge case. I want an untangled web. I want everything I do to copy back to a single place, so I have one searchable log for each day’s thoughts, images, notes and activities. This is apparently Weird and Hermetic if not Hermitic.

I am building my monastery walls in preparation for the Collapse and the Dark Ages, damnit. Stop enabling networked lightbulbs and give me the tools to survive your zombie planet.
"



"4

Back in 2012, I had the great honour of introducing reporter Greg Palast to an audience in London, and this is part of what I said:

I'm a writer of fiction. It's fair to wonder why I'm here. I'm the last person who should be standing here talking about a book about real tragedies and economics. I come from a world where even the signposts are fictional. Follow the white rabbit. Second star to the right and straight on til morning. And a more recent one, from forty years ago, the fictional direction given by a mysterious man to an eager journalist: follow the money.

Economics is an artform. It's the art of the invisible. Money is fictional.

The folding cash in your pocket isn't real. Look at it. It's a promissory note. "I promise to pay the bearer." It's a little story, a fiction that claims your cash can be redeemed for the equivalent in goods or gold. But it won't be, because there isn't enough gold to go around. So you're told that your cash is "legal tender," which means that everyone agrees to pretend it's like money. If everyone in this room went to The Bank Of England tomorrow and said "I would like you to redeem all my cash for gold, right here, in my hand" I guarantee you that you all would see some perfect expressions of stark fucking terror.

It's not real. Cash has never been real. It's a stand-in, a fiction, a symbol that denotes money. Money that you never see. There was a time when money was sea shells, cowries. That's how we counted money once. Then written notes, then printed notes. Then telegraphy, when money was dots and dashes, and then telephone calls. Teletypes and tickers. Into the age of the computer, money as datastreams that got faster and wider, leading to latency realty where financial houses sought to place their computers in physical positions that would allow them to shave nanoseconds off their exchanges of invisible money in some weird digital feng shui, until algorithmic trading began and not only did we not see the money any more, but we can barely even see what's moving the money, and now we have people talking about strange floating computer islands to beat latency issues and even, just a few weeks ago, people planning to build a neutrino cannon on the other side of the world that actually beams financial events through the centre of the planet itself at lightspeed. A money gun.

Neutrinos are subatomic units that are currently believed to be their own antiparticle. Or, to put it another way, they are both there and not there at the same time. Just like your cash. Just like fiction: a real thing that never happened. Money is an idea.

But I don't want to make it sound small. Because it's really not. Money is one of those few ideas that pervades the matter of the planet. One of those few bits of fiction that, if it turns its back on you, can kill you stone dead."
warrenellis  2018  damienwilliams  multispecies  morethanhuman  blogging  economics  communities  community  newsletters  googlereader  rss  feedly  feedbin  radio  reading  chrishardwick  instagram  timelines  socialmedia  facebook  selfies  aggregator  monasteries  networks  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  gregpalast  fiction  money  capitialism  cash  tumblr  ifttt  internet  web  online  reeder 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Ask Dr. Time: Orality and Literacy from Homer to Twitter
"So, as to the original question: are Twitter and texting new forms of orality? I have a simple answer and a complex one, but they’re both really the same.

The first answer is so lucid and common-sense, you can hardly believe that it’s coming from Dr. Time: if it’s written, it ain’t oral. Orality requires speech, or song, or sound. Writing is visual. If it’s visual and only visual, it’s not oral.

The only form of genuine speech that’s genuinely visual and not auditory is sign language. And sign language is speech-like in pretty much every way imaginable: it’s ephemeral, it’s interactive, there’s no record, the signs are fluid. But even most sign language is at least in part chirographic, i.e., dependent on writing and written symbols. At least, the sign languages we use today: although our spoken/vocal languages are pretty chirographic too.

Writing, especially writing in a hyperliterate society, involves a transformation of the sensorium that privileges vision at the expense of hearing, and privileges reading (especially alphabetic reading) over other forms of visual interpretation and experience. It makes it possible to take in huge troves of information in a limited amount of time. We can read teleprompters and ticker-tape, street signs and medicine bottles, tweets and texts. We can read things without even being aware we’re reading them. We read language on the move all day long: social media is not all that different.

Now, for a more complicated explanation of that same idea, we go back to Father Ong himself. For Ong, there’s a primary orality and a secondary orality. The primary orality, we’ve covered; secondary orality is a little more complicated. It’s not just the oral culture of people who’ve got lots of experience with writing, but of people who’ve developed technologies that allow them to create new forms of oral communication that are enabled by writing.

The great media forms of secondary orality are the movies, television, radio, and the telephone. All of these are oral, but they’re also modern media, which means the media reshapes it in its own image: they squeeze your toothpaste through its tube. But they’re also transformative forms of media in a world that’s dominated by writing and print, because they make it possible to get information in new ways, according to new conventions, and along different sensory channels.

Walter Ong died in 2003, so he never got to see social media at its full flower, but he definitely was able to see where electronic communications was headed. Even in the 1990s, people were beginning to wonder whether interactive chats on computers fell under Ong’s heading of “secondary orality.” He gave an interview where he tried to explain how he saw things — as far as I know, relatively few people have paid attention to it (and the original online source has sadly linkrotted away):
“When I first used the term ‘secondary orality,’ I was thinking of the kind of orality you get on radio and television, where oral performance produces effects somewhat like those of ‘primary orality,’ the orality using the unprocessed human voice, particularly in addressing groups, but where the creation of orality is of a new sort. Orality here is produced by technology. Radio and television are ‘secondary’ in the sense that they are technologically powered, demanding the use of writing and other technologies in designing and manufacturing the machines which reproduce voice. They are thus unlike primary orality, which uses no tools or technology at all. Radio and television provide technologized orality. This is what I originally referred to by the term ‘secondary orality.’

I have also heard the term ‘secondary orality’ lately applied by some to other sorts of electronic verbalization which are really not oral at all—to the Internet and similar computerized creations for text. There is a reason for this usage of the term. In nontechnologized oral interchange, as we have noted earlier, there is no perceptible interval between the utterance of the speaker and the hearer’s reception of what is uttered. Oral communication is all immediate, in the present. Writing, chirographic or typed, on the other hand, comes out of the past. Even if you write a memo to yourself, when you refer to it, it’s a memo which you wrote a few minutes ago, or maybe two weeks ago. But on a computer network, the recipient can receive what is communicated with no such interval. Although it is not exactly the same as oral communication, the network message from one person to another or others is very rapid and can in effect be in the present. Computerized communication can thus suggest the immediate experience of direct sound. I believe that is why computerized verbalization has been assimilated to secondary ‘orality,’ even when it comes not in oral-aural format but through the eye, and thus is not directly oral at all. Here textualized verbal exchange registers psychologically as having the temporal immediacy of oral exchange. To handle [page break] such technologizing of the textualized word, I have tried occasionally to introduce the term ‘secondary literacy.’ We are not considering here the production of sounded words on the computer, which of course are even more readily assimilated to ‘secondary orality’” (80-81).

So tweets and text messages aren’t oral. They’re secondarily literate. Wait, that sounds horrible! How’s this: they’re artifacts and examples of secondary literacy. They’re what literacy looks like after television, the telephone, and the application of computing technologies to those communication forms. Just as orality isn’t the same after you’ve introduced writing, and manuscript isn’t the same after you’ve produced print, literacy isn’t the same once you have networked orality. In this sense, Twitter is the necessary byproduct of television.

Now, where this gets really complicated is with stuff like Siri and Alexa, and other AI-driven, natural-language computing interfaces. This is almost a tertiary orality, voice after texting, and certainly voice after interactive search. I’d be inclined to lump it in with secondary orality in that broader sense of technologically-mediated orality. But it really does depend how transformative you think client- and cloud-side computing, up to and including AI, really are. I’m inclined to say that they are, and that Alexa is doing something pretty different from what the radio did in the 1920s and 30s.

But we have to remember that we’re always much more able to make fine distinctions about technology deployed in our own lifetime, rather than what develops over epochs of human culture. Compared to that collision of oral and literate cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean that gave us poetry, philosophy, drama, and rhetoric in the classical period, or the nexus of troubadours, scholastics, printers, scientific meddlers and explorers that gave us the Renaissance, our own collision of multiple media cultures is probably quite small.

But it is genuinely transformative, and it is ours. And some days it’s as charming to think about all the ways in which our heirs will find us completely unintelligible as it is to imagine the complex legacy we’re bequeathing them."
2018  timcarmody  classics  homer  literature  poetry  literacy  orality  odyssey  walterong  secondaryorality  writing  texting  sms  twitter  socialmedia  technology  language  communication  culture  oraltradition  media  film  speech  signlanguage  asl  tv  television  radio  telephones  phones 
january 2018 by robertogreco
SublimeFrequencies
"SUBLIME FREQUENCIES is a collective of explorers dedicated to acquiring and exposing obscure sights and sounds from modern and traditional urban and rural frontiers via film and video, field recordings, radio and short wave transmissions, international folk and pop music, sound anomalies, and other forms of human and natural expression not documented sufficiently through all channels of academic research, the modern recording industry, media, or corporate foundations.

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES is focused on an aesthetic of extra-geography and soulful experience inspired by music and culture, world travel, research, and the pioneering recording labels of the past."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/sublimefrequencies/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BaHOtRtF4T8/ ]
asia  world  worldmusic  music  hishammayet  sound  film  video  fieldrecordings  radio 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Radio Atlantic - The Atlantic
"We're living in historic times. Who better than a 160-year-old magazine to help you make sense of them? Each week, The Atlantic's top editors—Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief; Matt Thompson, deputy editor; and Alex Wagner, contributing editor and CBS anchor—sit down with leading voices to explore what's happening in the world, how things became the way they are, and where they're going next. Take a listen to our trailer for a sneak preview:"
mattthompson  alexagner  jeffreygoldberg  podcasts  radio  politics  currentevents 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Oral History Summer School
"Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York, in 2012, as a rigorous training program to help students from varied fields––writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers––make use of oral history as an ethical interview practice in their lives and work (Read More: What is Oral History?).

Spanning the realms of scholarship, advocacy, media-making, and art, OHSS is a hands-on program, which means that students conduct interviews, design projects, produce radio documentary, and archive their recordings while learning the theoretical underpinnings of the field. We also offer advanced training in the form of focused workshops including those on memory loss, mixed ability interviewing, oral history-based documentary film, ethnomusicology, family history, and trauma. We're a cross-disciplinary program with a strong belief that the field is best defined and explored with the guidance of instructors from the field of oral history and from adjacent fields/pursuits: social work, disability studies, ethnomusicology, trauma studies, grassroots organizing, medicine, documentary film, and more.

Our students have come from Italy, Australia, Germany, Switzerland, China, Canada, Spain, Turkey, Brazil, Panama, and all over the United States. OHSS alumni have gone on to apply their oral history training to exhibitions, policy work, branding, art projects, and research, as well as collaborations with community organizations, institutions, and schools. You can read more about our alumni network and their accomplishments, here, and in OHSS Alumni newsletters I (2014) and II (2016).

In summer 2016, we will will offer our first workshop in Chicago, with the Studs Terkel Radio Archive and Chicago Torture Justice Memorials. Our first online class will be offered in 2016 and Oral History Winter School will return to Hudson in January 2017. Read more about our workshops, here."
oralhistory  storytelling  training  sfsh  professionaldevelopment  classideas  writing  humanrights  ethnomusicology  traumastudies  grassroots  organizing  documentary  film  audio  radio  squarespace 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Nick Kapur on Twitter: "Today we speak of "BBC English" as a standard form of the language, but this form had to be invented by a small team in the 1920s & 30s. 1/"
"Today we speak of "BBC English" as a standard form of the language, but this form had to be invented by a small team in the 1920s & 30s. 1/

It turned out even within the upper-class London accent that became the basis for BBC English, many words had competing pronunciations. 2/

Thus in 1926, the BBC's first managing director John Reith established an "Advisory Committee on Spoken English" to sort things out. 3/

The committee was chaired by Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, and also included American essayist Logan Pearsall Smith, 4/

novelist Rose Macaulay, lexicographer (and 4th OED editor) C.T. Onions, art critic Kenneth Clark, journalist Alistair Cooke, 5/

ghost story writer Lady Cynthia Asquith, and evolutionary biologist and eugenicist Julian Huxley. 6/

The 20-person committee held fierce debates, and pronunciations now considered standard were often decided by just a few votes. 7/

Examples included deciding "garage" would rhyme with "carriage" rather than "barrage" and "canine" (the tooth) sounding like cay-nine. 8/

In 1935, there was a crisis over what word BBC radio should use for "users of a television apparatus" (whom we now call "viewers"). 9/

To solve this conundrum, a 10-member "Sub-Committee on Words" was set up, chaired by the American, Logan Pearsall Smith. 10/

The Sub-Committee came up with the following list of possible new words for the users of the television apparatus: 11/ [contains screenshot of text: "auralooker glancer, looker, looker-in, optavuist, optovisor, seer, sighter, teleseer, teleserver, televist, teleobservist, televor, viewer-in, visionnaire, visionist, visor, vizior, vizzior"]

The Sub-Committee ultimately chose none of these, settling on "televiewer," which was shortened by the main committee to just "viewer." 12/

Emboldened by this early "success," the Sub-Committee on Words began to run amuck, inventing new words willy-nilly out of whole cloth. 13/

In particular, Sub-Committee chair Logan Pearsall Smith wanted to beautify English and "purify" it of foreign influences. 14/

He also disliked words with too many syllables and preferred English plurals to foreign plurals (eg. hippopotamuses over hippopotami). 15/

Some of the new coinages were reasonable and have survived. For example, "airplane" replaced "aeroplane" and "roundabout" was invented 16/

to replace the then-common "gyratory circus." Similarly the word "servicemen" was invented to describe members of the armed forces, and 17/

BBC radio was instructed to stop saying "kunstforscher" and instead say "art researcher," which has since become "art historian." 18/

Other ideas were...less successful. E.g. Smith proposed the BBC call televisions "view-boxes," call traffic lights "stop-and-goes," and 19/

call brainwaves "mindfalls." Other members of the Sub-Committee also came up with bizarre new words. 20/

Edward Marsh devised "inflex" to replace "inferiority complex," and Rose Macaulay wanted "yulery" to replace "Christmas festivities." 21/

By June of 1936, things were getting out of hand, and the BBC's Director of Program Planning Lindsay Wellington urged: 22/ [contains screenshot of text: "[H]aving read the minutes of the Sub-Committee's meeting, at which all kinds of suggestions had been made with regard to new words, some sort of restraint should be placed upon the Sub-Committee. It was not the Corporation's policy to initiate proposals of this kind, which were rather the function of some outside body… [S]ome of the suggestions — e.g. 'halcyon' in place of 'anti-cyclone' or 'view-box' for television set — were so ludicrous that irreparable harm to the main Committee's prestige might be done should any of these suggestions be broadcast."]"

Finally in January 1937, Chairman of the Governors R.C. Norman shut down the Sub-Committee on Words for good, arguing that: 23/ [contains screenshot of text: "The Corporation has read with interest the minutes of the Sub-Committee appointed to make recommendations as to the framing of new words. It feels that it must define more closely the extent to which it can accept the advice of the Sub-Committee. Such advice will be sought by the Corporation when new words have to be found for its own purposes — as in the creation of vocabulary of television terms. The Sub-Committee, however, has recommended the introduction to the public of new words for general use (e.g. 'halcyon', 'stop-and-go'). This responsibility is one which the Corporation feels it cannot accept."]
bbc  english  history  language  words  classideas  sfsh  structuredwordinquiry  radio  television  johnreith  standardization  georgebernardshaw  loganpearsallsmith  ctonions  kennethclark  alistaircooke  cynthiaasquith  julianhuxley  pronunciation  tv  edwardmarsh  rosemacaulay  rxnorman  1937  1926  nickkapur  invention 
june 2017 by robertogreco
BBC World Service - The Compass, Where Are You Going?, Where Are You Going: Reykjavik
[via: "Simple conceit, great radio. 'Where are you going?'"
https://twitter.com/justinpickard/status/878376504064790529 ]

"Where Are You Going: Reykjavik
The Compass, Where Are You Going? Episode 2 of 3"

In the world’s northernmost capital, Reykjavik, Catherine Carr talks to a swimmer bequeathed a poignant request from a friend, to the shopkeeper who makes beautiful handbags out of fish skin; from the sister who makes an apology to a sibling with fresh pastries, to the roller derby girls walking on thin ice. These portraits capture something of the city’s DNA, its sense of isolation, mythical beauty and rugged adventure."

[See also:

"Where Are You Going: Hong Kong
The Compass, Where Are You Going? Episode 3 of 3"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p055v3d4

In a city where East meets West and old meets new, Catherine randomly approaches a man in a taxi queue to ask him about where he is going. A funny conversation about the parcel he is taking to a friend soon leads to a riveting account of his near-death experience. Such is the currency of this series where strangers reveal unexpected details about their lives. Catherine also chats to an exhausted Philippine maid enjoying downtime with her friends, meets the “Lolita Goths” who want to feel like princesses and the devoted gay couple who wooed each other with love letters.

These snapshots of people’ lives, mixed with an evocative soundscape of the city create an audio collage which is an unpredictable and poetic listen.



"Where Are You Going: Brussels
The Compass, Where Are You Going? Episode 1 of 3"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p054gp23

An interrupted journey is like a portal into somebody else’s life. Catherine Carr interrupts strangers on everyday journeys asks them where they are going. The encounters which follow reveal funny, poignant and sometimes astonishing details about the lives of others.

In cosmopolitan Brussels, she meets a multilingual Bulgarian translator who is mad about dancing and whose wife thinks he’s “a little bit weird” – not least because he is openly gay. In a freezing park, we bump into a choreographer who is doing his best to help a vulnerable young Romanian man. And on the cobbled streets of the European capital, a young couple on a mini-break are starting to realise they are in love."]
classideas  radio  audio  people  cities  reykjavík  hongkong  brussels  2017  catherinecarr  iceland  swimming  swimmingpools 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Latino USA
"Our Mission
Futuro Media creates multimedia content for and about the new American mainstream in the service of empowering people to navigate the complexities of an increasingly diverse and connected world.

Who We Are
The Futuro Media Group is an independent nonprofit organization producing multimedia journalism that explores and gives a critical voice to the diversity of the American experience. Based in Harlem and founded in 2010 by award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa, Futuro Media is committed to telling stories often overlooked by mainstream media. Futuro Media produces Latino USA, NPR’s only national Latino news and cultural weekly radio program, currently celebrating its 20th anniversary at its new hour-long format. Futuro Media also produces America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa a new half-hour television series for PBS that examines how America’s growing multicultural population is influencing every aspect of contemporary life."
podcasts  radio  mariahinojosa 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Radio Garden
"About Radio Garden

By bringing distant voices close, radio connects people and places. Radio Garden allows listeners to explore processes of broadcasting and hearing identities across the entire globe. From its very beginning, radio signals have crossed borders. Radio makers and listeners have imagined both connecting with distant cultures, as well as re-connecting with people from ‘home’ from thousands of miles away – or using local community radio to make and enrich new homes.

In the section Live, you can explore a world or radio as it is happening right now. Tune into any place on the globe: what sounds familiar? What sounds foreign? Where would you like to travel and what sounds like ‘home’?

In the section on History you can tune into clips from throughout radio history that show how radio has tried to cross borders. How have people tried to translate their nations into the airwaves? What did they say to the world? How do they engage in conversation across linguistic and geographical barriers?

Click over to Jingles for a world-wide crash course in station identification. How do stations signal within a fraction of a second what kind of programmes you are likely to hear? How do they project being joyful, trustworthy, or up to the minute?

Then stop and listen to radio Stories where listeners past and present tell how they listen beyond their walls. How do they imagine the voices and sounds from around the globe? How do they use radio to make themselves at home in the world?

Radio Garden incorporates results from the international research project Transnational Radio Encounters directed by Golo Föllmer at Martin-Luther University Halle, in co-operation with the Universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus in Denmark, London Metropolitan and the University of Sunderland in the UK, and Utrecht University in the Netherlands. The project was funded by HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area) from 2013-2016.

Concept & Production by Studio Puckey in collaboration with Moniker.

Technology & live section by Studio Puckey.

Design, UI & UX by Studio Puckey in collaboration with Phillip Bührer.

Radio Garden is developed in co-ordination with the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision.

Enquiries:
Mail contact@puckey.studio
Twitter @studiopuckey

If you want to submit your radio station to Radio Garden, please fill in the station submission form.

If you to make a change to an existing station on Radio Garden, please contact us at submissions@radio.garden."
radio  classideas  music  maps  mapping  via:davidtedu  languages  studiopuckey  sound  audio 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Everyday Media Culture in Africa: Audiences and Users (Hardback) - Routledge
"African audiences and users are rapidly gaining in importance and increasingly targeted by global media companies, social media platforms and mobile phone operators. This is the first edited volume that addresses the everyday lived experiences of Africans in their interaction with different kinds of media: old and new, state and private, elite and popular, global and national, material and virtual. So far, the bulk of academic research on media and communication in Africa has studied media through the lens of media-state relations, thereby adopting liberal democracy as the normative ideal and examining the potential contribution of African media to development and democratization. Focusing instead on everyday media culture in a range of African countries, this volume contributes to the broader project of provincializing and decolonizing audience and internet studies."



"Table of Contents

Foreword
Paddy Scannell

1. Decolonizing and provincializing audience and internet studies: contextual approaches from African vantage points
Wendy Willems and Winston Mano

2. Media culture in Africa? A practice-ethnographic approach
Jo Helle Valle

3. ‘The African listener‘: state-controlled radio, subjectivity, and agency in colonial and post-colonial Zambia
Robert Heinze

4. Popular engagement with tabloid TV: a Zambian case study
Herman Wasserman and Loisa Mbatha

5. ‘Our own WikiLeaks’: popularity, moral panic and tabloid journalism in Zimbabwe
Admire Mare

6. Audience perceptions of radio stations and journalists in the Great Lakes region
Marie-Soleil Frère

7. Audience participation and BBC’s digital quest in Nigeria
Abdullahi Tasiu Abubakar

8. ‘Radio locked on @Citi973’: Twitter use by FM radio listeners in Ghana
Seyram Avle

9. Mixing with MXit when you're ‘mix’: mobile phones and identity in a small South African town
Alette Schoon and Larry Strelitz

10. Brokers of belonging: elders and intermediaries in Kinshasa’s mobile phone culture
Katrien Pype

11. Agency behind the veil: gender, digital media and being ‘ninja’ in Zanzibar
Thembi Mutch"
africa  media  books  everyday  culture  communication  2017  wendywillems  winstonmano  thembimutch  katrienpype  aletteschoon  larrystrelitz  seyramavle  marie-soleilfrère  abdullahitasiuabubakar  admiremare  hermanwasserman  loisambatha  robertheinze  johellevalle  paddyscannell  decolonization  audiences  radio  zambia  zimbabwe  nigeria  uganda  rwanda  ghana  southafrica  congo  drg  kinshasa  zanzibar  digital  twitter  bbc 
december 2016 by robertogreco
The Alternative Art School Fair Radio | Clocktower
"The Alternative Art School Fair at Pioneer Works presents an introduction to alternative art schools from around the US and the world, November 19-20, 2016. The entire event, including workshops, discussions, and keynote presentations by Carol Becker, Luis Camnitzer, Craig Wilkins and Dorothea Rockburne, will be streamed live and archived on clocktower.org.

See the radio schedule below to plan your listening party. The live listening link can be found HERE.

Art education is a reflection of social and cultural evolution; it engages with structures of meaning-making and considers different frameworks for experience. The impetus to create an alternative art school is rooted not only in a desire to create “better” art, but to create the conditions for greater freedom of expression. Often run as free, artist-run initiatives, the values and visions of alternative art schools vary widely in methodology, mission and governance. But even when they are relatively small in scale they provide vital models of cultural critique and experimentation.

Listening Schedule:
November 19
Keynote panel -- 12:00-1:30PM
Carol Becker
Luis Camnitzer
Dorothea Rockburne
Victoria Sobel
Interviewer/Moderator: Catherine Despont

How can alternative systems impact traditional arts education? -- 2-3:30PM
Ox-Bow
Daniel Bozhkov
School of the Future
Interviewer/Moderator: Regine Basha

Art and Democracy -- 3:45-5:15PM
UNIDEE
The Black Mountain School
UOIEA (Anna Craycroft)
Interviewer/Moderator: Provisions Library

Self-Governance as Pedagogy: Of Other Spaces -- 5:30-7:30PM
Art and Law Program
Interviewer/Moderator: Associate Director Lauren van Haaften-Schick
Art & Law Program Fellows: Abram Coetsee & Alex Strada (Fall 2016), Damien Davis (Spring 2016)

November 20
Keynote -- 12:00-1:30PM
Dr. Craig L. Wilkins, PhD, RA

Hybrid Practice -- 2:00-3:30PM
SFPC
Zz School of Print Media
Southland Institute
Interviewer/Moderator: Archeworks

Responsive Programming: A Conversation Between The Ventriloquist Summerschool and Sheila Levrant de Bretteville -- 3:45-5:15PM
The Ventriloquist Summerschool
Sheila Levrant de Bretteville

(Re)incorporating Art in Everyday Life -- 5:30-7:00PM
Chad Laird (Sunview Luncheonette)
Tal Beery (School of Apocalypse)
Tatfoo Tan (NERTM)
Moderator/Interviewer: Grizedale Arts"
tolisten  education  altgdp  openstudioproject  lcproject  sfsh  schools  artschools  2016  radio  art  pioneerworks  alternative  diy  small  democracy  local  play  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  architecture  nyc  brooklyn  chicago  uk  guatemala  london  egypt  puertorico  sanjuan  northcarolina  portonovo  benin  statenisland  design  michigan  saugatuck  curriculum  pedagogy  learning  howelearn  organizations  cooperatives  publishing  networks  fairfax  virginia  losangeles  oslo  accrá  edinburgh  making  craft  mexicocity  mexicodf  df  mexico  noray  stavanger  paris  france  brussels  mutlidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  kansascity  missouri  seoul  biella  italia  italy  systemsthinking  socialjustice  independence  carolbecker  victoriasobel  reginebasha  transart  marywallingblackburn  craigwilkins  sheilalevrantdebretteville  michaelnewton  shannonharvey  hragvartanian  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  communication  technology  socialnetworks  artschool 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Listening to Jupiter on a DIY Radio | Hackaday
"By Jove, he built a radio!

If you want to get started with radio astronomy, Jupiter is one of the easiest celestial objects to hear from Earth. [Vasily Ivanenko] wanted to listen, and decided to build a modular radio receiver for the task. So far he’s written up six of the eight planned blog posts.

The system uses an LNA, a direct conversion receiver block, and provides audio output to a speaker, output to a PC soundcard, and a processed connection for an analog to digital converter. The modules are well-documented and would be moderately challenging to reproduce.

NASA maintains a list of receivers suitable for Jovian listening, although you can use basically any receiver that covers the right frequency band. If you want to hear what the giant planet sounds like, check out the video, below.

If you are interested in a cheap way to listen to some of our other cosmic neighbors, you might think about converting a satellite dish. Or, you can try something smaller."
audio  jupiter  planets  space  radio  howto  classideas  astronomy 
november 2016 by robertogreco
MIRACLE NUTRITION with Hearty White
[See also: http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/HA ]

[via: "my kids enjoy listening to @HeartyWhite with me!multigenerational exhortations, southern inspirational dada"
https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/755197692662341632

"the recent circus train episode had my guys on the floor."
https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/755198907886338048 ]
radio  podcasts  children  kids  sfsh  classideas  heartywhite  wfmu 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Tinybop Loves: Radiolab | Tinybop
"Radiolab asks great questions. Each show explores a single idea through story, interview, and inquiry. The lushly produced hour is usually split into three acts that explore the idea from unique angles to try to get to the center of the question being asked. The episodes can be heard on public radio, as a podcast, and through an app. But perhaps the best experience of Radiolab is via the show’s website which—in addition to the shows—houses a blog, videos, and other stories that supplement each episode.

While Radiolab is not specifically geared towards children, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better way to introduce kids to big ideas. Some episodes will not be appropriate for children, but those that are —about zoos, the gut, cities, or time—will be richly rewarding for young curious listeners. We like to play Radiolab shows during long car rides. Almost invariably the kids will tune in and start asking questions."
radio  radiolab  podcasts  children  kids  tinybop  raulgutierrez  science 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Brains On
[See also: https://tinybop.com/loves/sites/brains-on

"We’re big fans of podcasts at Tinybop HQ. I’ve whiled away entire days and hours in the car listening to This American Life, Serial, The Mystery Show, Invisibilia, and RadioLab. But it’s surprisingly hard to find great podcasts that are made for kids. Thankfully, there's Brains On! Narrated by kids and adults, each episode dives into something kids wonder about: why and how do jellyfish sting? How can you control your dreams? How does GPS know where you are?

Brains On! boasts that it’s "serious about being curious." And it is! The episodes aren’t dumbed down — the science and the language used to talk about it rises to kids’ intelligence. Kids questions are answered by experts on the topic — astronauts, scientists, and sometimes kids themselves. As a bonus, there’s a good sprinkling of kid humor throughout. Plus, many of the episodes are excellent companions to our Explorer’s Library apps."]

[via: http://mentalfloss.com/article/68193/pod-city-14-podcasts-your-kids-will-and-wont-drive-you-nuts ]
radio  podcasts  children  science  kids 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Escuchatorio | UN ESPACIO QUE REPOSICIONA LA ESCUCHA COMO EJERCICIO POLÍTICO UN FLUJO SONORO DESDE EL CUAL TU ERES LA FUENTE MANDA TU SONIDO Y LO EMITIREMOS
"Este es un llamado a los caminantes, a sus pies y a sus oídos.

Caminar como acto de resistencia.
Caminar para perderse, para reencontrarse.
Caminar es estar alejándose de algo.
Caminar también como encuentro con la incertidumbre.
Caminar hacia el futuro y de regreso.
Caminar más lento, tomarse el tiempo, reducir el paso hasta detenerse.

Graba el sonido que hacen tus pasos.
Graba un camino imaginario, el cotidiano, el diferente.
Graba un paisaje sonoro de tu andar.
Tu grabación es un recorrido.

Manda tu sonido antes del 30 de abril. Todos los audios recibidos se difundirán en las radios y espacios participantes.

transmisión: 1 de mayo de 2016.

Escuchatorio #Camina se emitirá en una jornada de sol a sol de 7:09 a las 19:59 (12h 50m de duración) desde la Ciudad de México.

Moverse no es suficiente hay que caminar…"

[See also:
https://soundcloud.com/escuchatorio
https://www.instagram.com/escuchatorio/
https://twitter.com/escuchatorio ]
mexico  mexicodf  walking  resistance  via:felixblume  audio  sound  radio  df  mexicocity 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Ello | illllllllllllli
"national public radio

let's start with the notion "public",
no, it's a disturbing half-measure.

national, be serious it is a federation,
you have these wyoming pyramids broad-
casting new york city programs

and radio? it's mostly online
these days.

Zero for Three. Or Oh for Three
as they say in baseball."
npr  radio  public  2015  poetry  baseball  humor  via:javierarbona 
july 2015 by robertogreco
U.S. npr podcast affected voice - Clyp
"All my favourite US podcasts are being ruined by this universally adopted affectation. Planet money, This American Life, Radiolab, Startup.. Why? Why would you do this? Please stop. It's so boring."

[Update 24 Oct 2015:

See also: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/fashion/npr-voice-has-taken-over-the-airwaves.html ]
npr  affectation  radio  2015  via:vruba  radiolab  thisamericanlife  speech  voice  narration 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Being 12: The Year Everything Changes - WNYC
"It's no secret that being 12 years old can be tough. At 12, kids shed layers, test new roles and transform before our eyes as they explore what kind of adult they want to be. Their brains and bodies change at alarming rates. At the same time, school gets harder. In New York City, academic performance in seventh grade largely sets a student's path in high school.

New Yorkers this age often start commuting to school alone. For girls, it may be the year they buy their first bra or get their period. For everyone, it's an age for plugging in to the digital world, and tuning out adults more and more. Some may also have jobs or look after younger siblings. Friendships shift. Romantic feelings may blossom. The stakes get higher in so many ways. WNYC’s series, Being 12, brings to life the array of faces, voices and perspectives of these young New Yorkers.

See what they look like. Hear what they have to say. They are the city’s future. We think you should get to know them better."

[See also:
http://beingtwelve.tumblr.com/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/nbc-young-new-yorkers-open-about-tweenage-years/

“Being 12: The Year Everything Changes”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3Gxgv6-H3E

“What Romance Is Like in Middle School”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2HH72_AeCw

“If You Give a 12-Year-Old a Phone....”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzQ469WS9C8

and the many specific articles and episodes linked within the collection post. Examples:

http://www.wnyc.org/story/being-12-most-awkward-exhilarating-essential-year-our-lives/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/being-12-year-everything-changes-kids-schools-and-marketing/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/top-12-things-about-being-12/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/first-person-new-yorkers-being-12/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/meet-teachers-crazy-enough-teach-middle-school/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/being-12-when-relationships-reign-supreme/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/cutting-through-distractions-with-care/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/kids-and-technology/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/12-year-old-brain-peer-pressure/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/chancellor-seventh-grade-matters-lot/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/opinion-power-students-teaching-students/ ]
children  adolescence  12  age12  via:lizette  wnyc  radio  interviews  middleschool  nyc  technology  socialmedia  schools  education  learning  behavior  gender  teaching  youth  video  documentary  projectideas  classideas 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Campo Santo - Firewatch
"A VIDEO GAME BY CAMPO SANTO

Firewatch is a mystery set in the Wyoming wilderness, where your only emotional lifeline is the person on the other end of a handheld radio.

In Firewatch you play as a man named Henry who has retreated from his messy life to work as a fire lookout in the Wyoming wilderness. Perched high atop a mountain, it’s your job to look for smoke and keep the wilderness safe. An especially hot, dry summer has everyone on edge. Your supervisor, a woman named Delilah, is available to you at all times over a small, handheld radio —

and is your only contact with the world you've left behind.

But when something strange draws you out of your lookout tower and into the world, you’ll explore a wild and unknown environment, facing questions and making interpersonal choices that can build or destroy the only meaningful relationship you have."

[See also (via: http://blog.tanmade.com/post/113092344186/migurski-firewatch-is-a-mystery-set-in-the ):

“Campo Santo Shows You Firewatch”
http://www.twitch.tv/camposanto/c/5068947

developer's blog
http://blog.camposanto.com/ ]
games  gaming  wilderness  videogames  outdoors  wyoming  camposanto  edg  radio  toplay 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The 60-second interview: Tim Carmody, independent technology journalist | Capital New York
"CAPITAL: You were a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania before becoming a journalist. Why did you decide to leave academia?

CARMODY: “Decide” might be the wrong word. I was on the academic job market for two years, 2008 and 2009, which were really just a slaughterhouse. Getting a tenure-track job or a good postdoc in the humanities is kind of like getting drafted into the N.B.A. in any year, but schools were cancelling searches and trimming their adjunct budgets right and left, and more and more jobless PhDs were piling up. I was in the top two or three for a couple of really good jobs, which was harder in some ways because it felt really close. Some people keep playing the lottery for years and years, but I just didn’t have the heart to keep doing it.

But I was really lucky; I’d been writing online for popular and crossover publications while I was still in grad school, a couple of essays in The Atlantic. I wrote a future-of-media blog with Matt Thompson and Robin Sloan called Snarkmarket that was really smart and fun and popular with the right people. Jason Kottke liked my writing and asked me to guest-edit his blog. Then Wired took a chance and hired me—I really couldn’t have asked for a better first job in journalism. After that, all the momentum for me was in journalism, so I’ve been doing that ever since.

Still, I’d totally be Professor Carmody in UC-Santa Barbara’s English department if things had gone my way, and I don’t know, maybe that would have been a happy ending too.

CAPITAL: Does your academic background still inform your reporting, or have you found that the skills valued by academia and those valued by journalism are total opposites?

CARMODY: I think the tools of journalism and scholarship complement each other. I had to learn how to be a reporter: do phone interviews, develop sources, write up different genres of articles. In some ways, I appreciated the tools of reporting more, because when you’re writing about Citizen Kane, you can’t get Orson Welles or Gregg Toland on the phone. If you’re writing about Netflix, you might be able to get Reed Hastings or Ted Sarandos on the phone. That’s pretty amazing.

In other cases, I think my training gave me some significant advantages. I’m really good at research, at context. I’m good at breaking down a document, whether it’s a press release or a letter to shareholders or an interview, and digging out what’s important. I’m good at linking things that are happening right now to big changes that happen over decades. I’m really comfortable with the publishing and media industries; I speak their language.

Also, besides research, I was a teacher for ten years. I love working with younger writers, whether it’s as an editor or just helping them think about what they do, because that was my job. And a lot of the students I taught in college have gone on to have really great careers in the industries I write about, which is really satisfying too."



"CAPITAL: You've extensively studied the history, theory, and future of writing. So what’s the future of writing?

CARMODY: I’m bullish on writing. Movies, radio, television, and now digital media—everything was supposed to push us away from text, to video or “back” to speech. First, there’s no going back. We’re always stumbling forward. Second, writing is invincible. Thirty years ago, we thought we’d all be talking to our computers; instead, we’re all typing on our phones. Can you believe we get to play and work on machines that give you new things to read all day? If you’d told me this when I was six years old, I’d have fainted from happiness.

We live in such a hyperliterate world, soaked and saturated in writing: on our machines, on the streets, on our television screens. It’s just that writing doesn’t live in the boxes that it used to. The genie is out of the bottle. But that just means that the magic could be anywhere."
timcarmody  interviews  academia  journalism  highered  highereducation  writing  text  media  snarkmarket  context  research  television  radio  film  literacy  multiliteracies  hyperliteracy  2015  howweread  howwewrite  cellphones  mobile  phones  voicerecognition  readingmachines 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Radio Re-Volt [at the Walker Art Center]
"If the broadcasting power of the most powerful radio station in the Twin Cities is 100,000 watts, we propose a network of microradio transmitters, which can cumulatively match this power. A movement should be set into motion in the spirit of de-centralization and diversity in ownership and programming of the radio waves. Radio Re-Volt! - Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla

RADIO RE-VOLT: ONE PERSON .00ONE WATT

Radio Re-Volt
This project seeks to rethink the voltage (who has the power to transmit, who owns this power, how can this power be re-thought, re-formed, re-directed) in order to recover radio as a self-controlled tool and generate diversity in the ownership and programming of the radio waves.

Workshops
There will be a series of free radio workshops held throughout the Twin Cities led by different technicians (media activities, radio aficionados, etc.). Participants will receive and learn how to operate a one milliwatt transmitter and create a personal sculpture to house the electronic equipment The programming for each radio is to be determined by each radio owner-transmitter.

Radio Stations
Each radio transmitter has the potential to become a meeting station, a place for people within their one block (walking or bicycling distance) transmission range to meet and exchange ideas. These stations could generate a different type of community radio--a dialogue between the transmitters and the listeners, and, as a result, generate new identifications and community formations: block by block, house by house, person by person.

Mob-ile Power Stations
Hundreds of mini-FM radio stations can relay and transmit together through this radio network that will be formed throughout the Twin Cities.

Exercise your Communicative Rights: Transmit Now!"

[See also:
http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2004/09/17_robertsc_radiorevolt/
http://archive.wired.com/culture/lifestyle/news/2004/10/65137 ]
activism  audio  radio  commons  2004  fmradio  jenniferallora  guillermocalzadilla  edg  radiore-volt  minneapolis  minnesota  broadcast  fcc  transmission  twincities  microradios  art 
january 2015 by robertogreco
goTenna | No service, no problem.
"goTenna pairs wirelessly with your smartphone, enabling you to text and share your location with anyone who has the device even if you don't have service. No towers, routers or satellites required!"
location  gotenna  hardware  communication  radio  via:tcarmody 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Why the Landline Telephone Was the Perfect Tool - Suzanne Fischer - The Atlantic
"Illich's achievement was a reframing of human relationships to systems and society, in everyday, accessible language. He advocated for the reintegration of community decisionmaking and personal autonomy into all the systems that had become oppressive: school, work, law, religion, technology, medicine, economics. His ideas were influential for 1970s technologists and the appropriate technology movement -- can they be useful today?

In 1971, Illich published what is still his most famous book, Deschooling Society. He argued that the commodification and specialization of learning had created a harmful education system that had become an end in itself. In other words, "the right to learn is curtailed by the obligation to attend school." For Illich, language often pointed to how toxic ideas had poisoned the ways we relate to each other. "I want to learn," he said, had been transmuted by industrial capitalism into "I want to get an education," transforming a basic human need for learning into something transactional and coercive. He proposed a restructuring of schooling, replacing the manipulative system of qualifications with self-determined, community-supported, hands-on learning. One of his suggestions was for "learning webs," where a computer could help match up learners and those who had knowledge to share. This skillshare model was popular in many radical communities.

With Tools for Conviviality (1973), Illich extended his analysis of education to a broader critique of the technologies of Western capitalism. The major inflection point in the history of technology, he asserts, is when, in the life of each tool or system, the means overtake the ends. "Tools can rule men sooner than they expect; the plow makes man the lord of the garden but also the refugee from the dust bowl." Often this effect is accompanied by the rise in power of a managerial class of experts; Illich saw technocracy as a step toward fascism. Tools for Conviviality points out the ways in which a helpful tool can evolve into a destructive one, and offers suggestions for how communities can escape the trap.

So what makes a tool "convivial?" For Illich, "tools foster conviviality to the extent to which they can be easily used, by anybody, as often or as seldom as desired, for the accomplishment of a purpose chosen by the user." That is, convivial technologies are accessible, flexible, and noncoercive. Many tools are neutral, but some promote conviviality and some choke it off. Hand tools, for Illich, are neutral. Illich offers the telephone as an example of a tool that is "structurally convivial" (remember, this is in the days of the ubiquitous public pay phone): anyone who can afford a coin can use it to say whatever they want. "The telephone lets anybody say what he wants to the person of his choice; he can conduct business, express love, or pick a quarrel. It is impossible for bureaucrats to define what people say to each other on the phone, even though they can interfere with -- or protect -- the privacy of their exchange."

A "manipulatory" tool, on the other hand, blocks off other choices. The automobile and the highway system it spawned are, for Illich, prime examples of this process. Licensure systems that devalue people who have not received them, such as compulsory schooling, are another example. But these kinds of tools, that is, large-scale industrial production, would not be prohibited in a convivial society. "What is fundamental to a convivial society is not the total absence of manipulative institutions and addictive goods and services, but the balance between those tools which create the specific demands they are specialized to satisfy and those complementary, enabling tools which foster self-realization."

To foster convivial tools, Illich proposes a program of research with "two major tasks: to provide guidelines for detecting the incipient stages of murderous logic in a tool; and to devise tools and tool systems that optimize the balance of life, thereby maximizing liberty for all." He also suggests that pioneers of a convivial society work through the legal and political systems and reclaim them for justice. Change is possible, Illich argues. There are decision points. We cannot abdicate our right to self-determination, and to decide how far is far enough. "The crisis I have described," says Illich, "confronts people with a choice between convivial tools and being crushed by machines."

Illich's ideas on technology, like his ideas on schooling, were influential among those who spent the 1970s thinking that we might be on the cusp of another world. Some of those utopians included early computer innovators, who saw the culture of sharing, self-determination, and DIY that they lived as something that should be baked into tools.

Computing pioneer Lee Felsenstein has spoken about the direct influence Tools for Conviviality on his work. For him, Illich's description of radio as a convivial tool in Central America was a model for computer development: "The technology itself was sufficiently inviting and accessible to them that it catalyzed their inherent tendencies to learn. In other words, if you tried to mess around with it, it didn't just burn out right away. The tube might overheat, but it would survive and give you some warning that you had done something wrong. The possible set of interactions, between the person who was trying to discover the secrets of the technology and the technology itself, was quite different from the standard industrial interactive model, which could be summed up as 'If you do the wrong thing, this will break, and God help you.' ... And this showed me the direction to go in. You could do the same thing with computers as far as I was concerned." Felsenstein described the first meeting of the legendary Homebrew Computer Club, where 30 or so people tried to understand the Altair together, as "the moment at which the personal computer became a convivial technology."

In 1978, Valentina Borremans of CIDOC prepared a Reference Guide to Convivial Tools. This guide to resources listed many of the new ideas in 1970s appropriate technology -- food self-sufficiency, earth-friendly home construction, new energy sources. But our contemporary convivial tools are mostly in the realm of communications. At their best, personal computers, the web, mobile technology, the open source movement, and the maker movement are contemporary convivial tools. What other convivial technologies do we use today? What tools do we need to make more convivial? Ivan Illich would exhort us to think carefully about the tools we use and what kind of world they are making."
ivanillich  2012  suzannefischer  technology  technogracy  conviviality  unschooling  deschoooling  education  philosophy  history  society  valentinaborremans  leefelsenstein  telephone  landlines  radio  self-determination  diy  grassroots  democracy  computing  computers  internet  web  tools  justice  flexibility  coercion  schools  schooling  openstudioproject  lcproject  learningwebs  credentials  credentialism  learning  howwelearn  commodification  business  capitalism  toolsforconviviality 
july 2014 by robertogreco
6, 12: Tiles
"Thinking about gaps.

Things that are interesting to a lot of people who are interested in things I am, and which I always enjoy hearing them talk about, but which I don’t go out of my way for on my own:

• Disney

• cyborgs

• architecture

Distinctions that many people in my position care about but I don’t:

• Typeface v. font. Desktop publishing ruined this; it’s over; it’s fine.

• “Photograph” for a unitary exposure v. “image” for everything else. I call push-broom and whisk-broom–acquired pixels photos in my head sometimes, and feel no shame. Satellite imagery is heavily processed before it looks like what we see, but so is a conventional photograph: film chemistry and Bayer demosaicing are quite elaborate and, often, less controlled and less eye-mimicking than many of the composites that are, to the pedant, mere images. (And oh, the long history of photomanipulation! Pull up some high-res scans of old negatives from the Library of Congress and sometimes you can see brushwork where something was fixed up. Ansel Adams was dodging and burning with what we would now think of as a heavy hand.)

• Jacket v. coat. I think one is longer? I don’t care.

Gaps and being willing to say no. It’s so admirable when someone has decided not to do something important but unnecessary. I know people who buy only one kind of each item of street clothes, people who refuse to follow the news, who never drive, who will not talk with anyone the least bit trollish, who teetotal without a particular medical or religious reason, who won’t get a smartphone, and so on. I can’t remember someone telling me one of these things that didn’t make me happy to hear. I think the value in these nos is mostly in the very small scale, where it lets people talk with themselves and find their own edges. I can see this as a political act but it helps to understand it as personal first."



"Michael Yahgulanaas has been doodling in the margins of Hokusai. For a sense of what he’s up to, here he is punching a little humanity through a smotheringly dumb TV profile."



"The archaeologist Beverley McCulloch’s description of the heavy-footed moa, quoted by Nic Rawlence on RNZ’s Our Changing World, which incidentally is a paragon of science broadcasting (the interviewer, Veronika Meduna, used the word “poo”, ★★★★☆, and, instead of playing dumb, asked questions showing that she was trained in a relevant field, ★★★★★), just as their Spectrum is a paragon of general-interest broadcasting, and so on. If you share a desire to enjoy Radiolab and The Moth and such but just can’t, I commend RNZ to you. Without ever using the words, they connected the new kiwi bird cladistics study that’s been making the rounds with pressing issues of the anthropocene. Something good and strange is in New Zealand’s water lately."
charlieloyd  2014  gaps  knowledge  delight  newzealand  radio  michaelyahgulanaas  radiolab  themoth  npr  rnz  notknowing  unknowing  blindspots  ignorance  typefaces  fonts  conversation 
june 2014 by robertogreco
New Barrio Logan Radio Station Ready To Start Broadcasting | KPBS
"Barrio Logan officially is "radio active." Well, almost.

A new community radio station called Radio Pulso del Barrio is about to start broadcasting out of Bread & Salt, a huge shared artist’s space in Barrio Logan that started life as a Weber’s bread bakery.

Artist Roberto Salas showed the way around the radio station’s future home, winding his way through narrow halls, up a set of steep stairs and through a graffiti-scrawled men’s locker room.

“Eventually when this is remodeled, we’ll have this as a green room,” he said.

The windows in the future radio studio open out over Chicano Park with a partial view of the Coronado Bridge.

“We hope to give reports on traffic,” Salas said, laughing.

El Pulso del Barrio means “The Pulse of the Barrio,” or, alternately, “The Barrio’s Heartbeat.” It will be a bilingual, low-power station for neighborhoods around the Greater Logan Heights area, the only one of its kind in San Diego. Salas hopes the station will showcase the rich arts and music community south of Interstate 8.

Salas got interested in community radio when he lived in the Central Valley and first heard Radio Bilingue out of Fresno, which is the only Spanish-language public radio service in the country.

“I knew some of the people who were just starting like we’re starting now. It was grassroots, a few grants… but you would not believe how that opened up the world there for people,” he said.

The radio station will showcase stories about neighborhood events and art shows. It will also serve as a hands-on learning lab for young people who want to try the basics of radio and journalism.

Sixteen-year-old Karla Chavez, who will host a weekly “teen hour” on El Pulso del Barrio, said that it will be a way for young people to hang out and socialize.

“I think (it will be) for us to invite teen people, like my age, to come and get help for homework or… here, like, have a hangout or have little meetings, talk about what’s going on in your lives, stuff like that,” Chavez said.

The funding for Radio Pulso del Barrio comes from grants through Open Spaces, an outreach program from the San Diego Museum of Arts."
radio  barriologan  sandiego  2014 
may 2014 by robertogreco
No, Tech Adoption Is Not Speeding Up
"Well, what do you know? The graph doesn't show a progressively faster rate of technology adoption by the American public. What was once a clean graph that fit convenient and largely unquestioned ideas about exponential growth in tech suddenly becomes more complex.P

But please don't go passing around this new graph either. Because it's nearly as worthless as Vox's graph as a way to understand the history of technology. Why would it matter how long a technology took to go from "invention" (a really messy and complex concept) to 25 percent adoption?P

Fun With Arbitrary Numbers

If we really want to play this game, perhaps we can look at a different measure of adoption: from about 5 percent to 50 percent. To be clear, this is just as arbitrary as trying to pin down an invention date and seeing how many years it took to reach 25 percent adoption. But it feels like a slightly more honest way to measure tech growth.P

When a technology is in about 5% of American households, this means it's still in the hands of early adopters, tinkerers, and the wealthy. Breaching 50 percent usually means that it's within the reach of the middle class. So what if we look at TV technology through this lens?"
data  mattnovak  2014  technology  radio  television  internet  electricity  statistics  adoption  mobile  phones  cellphones  telephones  computers  pcs 
april 2014 by robertogreco
The Conet Project - Recordings of Shortwave Numbers Stations [ird059] : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive
"For more than 30 years the Shortwave radio spectrum has been used by the worlds intelligence agencies to transmit secret messages. These messages are transmitted by hundreds of Numbers Stations.

Shortwave Numbers Stations are a perfect method of anonymous, one way communication. Spies located anywhere in the world can be communicated to by their masters via small, locally available, and unmodified Shortwave receivers. The encryption system used by Numbers Stations, known as a one time pad is unbreakable. Combine this with the fact that it is almost impossible to track down the message recipients once they are inserted into the enemy country, it becomes clear just how powerful the Numbers Station system is.

These stations use very rigid schedules, and transmit in many different languages, employing male and female voices repeating strings of numbers or phonetic letters day and night, all year round.

The voices are of varying pitches and intonation; there is even a German station (The Swedish Rhapsody) that transmits a female child's voice!

One might think that these espionage activities should have wound down considerably since the official end of the cold war, but nothing could be further from the truth. Numbers Stations (and by inference, spies) are as busy as ever, with many new and bizarre stations appearing since the fall of the Berlin wall.

Why is it that in over 30 years, the phenomenon of Numbers Stations has gone almost totally unreported? What are the agencies behind the Numbers Stations, and why are the eastern European stations still on the air? Why does the Czech republic operate a Numbers Station 24 hours a day? How is it that Numbers Stations are allowed to interfere with essential radio services like air traffic control and shipping without having to answer to anybody? Why does the Swedish Rhapsody Numbers Station use a small girls voice?

These are just some of the questions that remain unanswered.

Now you will be able to hear this unique and extraordinary phenomenon for yourself, as Irdial-Discs releases THE CONET PROJECT: the first comprehensive collection of Numbers Stations recordings released to the public.

This Quadruple CD is an important historical reference work for research into this hitherto unreported and unknown field of espionage. The CDs contain 150 recordings spanning the last twenty years; taken from the private archives of dedicated shortwave radio listeners from around the world."
archives  audio  radio  numberstations  shortwave 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Why Audio Never Goes Viral
"With a community of creators uncomfortable with the value of virality, an audience content to watch grainy dashcam videos, and platforms that discourage sharing, is a hit-machine for audio possible? And is it something anyone even wants?"
via:tealtan  audio  viral  culture  virality  stanalcorn  internet  web  radio  2014 
january 2014 by robertogreco
IMS - Instituto Moreira Salles [Radio Batuta]
"A série A canção no tempo passeia por sucessos da nossa música a partir do início do século XX, contando histórias sobre seus compositores e intérpretes, e contextualizando cada canção em seu tempo. A inspiração para a série é o livro A canção no tempo, de Jairo Severiano e Zuza Homem de Mello, em que se baseia a pesquisa para o roteiro de cada programa."
music  brasil  brazil  history  jairoseveriano  zuzahomemdemello  timelines  rádiobatuta  institutomoreirasalles  radio 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Live storytelling packs a powerful punch – Richard Hamilton – Aeon
"My first job was as a lawyer. I was not a very happy or inspired lawyer. One night I was driving home listening to a radio report, and there is something very intimate about radio: a voice comes out of a machine and into the listener’s ear. With rain pounding the windscreen and only the dashboard lights and the stereo for company, I thought to myself, ‘This is what I want to do.’ So I became a radio journalist.

As broadcasters, we are told to imagine speaking to just one person. My tutor at journalism college told me that there is nothing as captivating as the human voice saying something of interest (he added that radio is better than TV because it has the best pictures). We remember where we were when we heard a particular story. Even now when I drive in my car, the memory of a scene from a radio play can be ignited by a bend in a country road or a set of traffic lights in the city.

But potent as radio seems, can a recording device ever fully replicate the experience of listening to a live storyteller? The folklorist Joseph Bruchac thinks not. ‘The presence of teller and audience, and the immediacy of the moment, are not fully captured by any form of technology,’ he wrote in a comment piece for The Guardian in 2010. ‘Unlike the insect frozen in amber, a told story is alive... The story breathes with the teller’s breath.’ And as devoted as I am to radio, my recent research into oral storytelling makes me think that Bruchac may be right."



"Why do we love stories? And why do we love hearing them spoken aloud, in person? Psychologists and literary scholars have devoted a good deal of thought to the first question. Perhaps, they suggest, fiction helped mankind to evolve social mores. In a 2008 study by the psychologist Markus Appel, professor at the University of Koblenz-Landau in Germany, people who watched drama and comedy on TV as opposed to news had substantially stronger beliefs in a just world. Stories do this ‘by constantly marinating our brains in poetic justice’, according to Jonathan Gottschall, author of The Storytelling Animal (2012). On the other hand, perhaps storytelling is a sort of flight simulator that allows us to practise something without getting hurt. Keith Oatley, professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, believes that stories are an ancient virtual reality technology: we get to imagine what it would be like to confront a dangerous man or seduce someone else’s spouse without suffering the consequences."



"In a 2001 study by Robin Mello at the University of Wisconsin, children were asked for their responses to stories they heard in class. To her surprise, Mello found that the children focused less on the story’s content and more on how it was told. They enjoyed the way the teller made up funny voices for the different characters, and said reading the stories silently from books was boring. Stories may be how we make sense of the world, but the heart of the story is the human voice."



"Perhaps it is in this accepting spirit that many people, even as they feel sad about the demise of the Moroccan storytellers, ultimately say ‘So what?’ The world has lost many things, from dodos to snuff boxes, and we cannot lament them all. Why is storytelling so important? When my daughter can read for herself, she might not want me to read to her. The same has happened on a global scale. When societies learn to read they no longer need storytellers to read to them. But then, not that many societies even learn to read and write. Out of an estimated 6,000 languages spoken in the world today, two thirds never had a written form. On average, one of those oral languages dies every two weeks. When a language that has never been written down dies, it is as if it has never been. We have then lost a unique interpretation of the world and our existence. This reminds me of a saying in Marrakech: ‘When a storyteller dies, a library burns.’

Abderrahim rarely performs in the main square any more. I asked him why and he gazed at a point in the distance. ‘Look, there is no room and it is too noisy.’ Nowadays, he said, Moroccans would rather watch DVDs or use the internet than listen to him. Modernity and electronic media in particular is killing the storyteller. ‘When electricity came,’ as they say in Ireland, ‘the fairies flew out the window.’

Bruchac warns that we ignore the power of oral narration at our peril: ‘If we imagine that technology can take the place of the living human presence experienced through oral tradition, then we diminish ourselves and forget the true power of stories.’"
stories  storytelling  oraltradition  radio  imagination  humans  human  creativity  narrative  fritzheider  mariannesimmel  2013  robinmello  thinking  meditation  performance  giacomorizzolatti  reynoldsprice  troubadours  richardhamilton  journalism  morocco  markusappel  jonathangottschall  keithoatley  josephbruchac 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Call in the Night
"Call in the Night is an experimental radio show and telephone network documenting the nighttime experience. Anyone with a phone can participate!

Here's how it works…

1. Once a week, sometime after 2am eastern time, we'll call your phone

2. After a short prompt, you'll be connected with another caller to discuss your night, your dreams, or whatever comes to mind

3. Your call is recorded and saved. If your call is selected we'll use it in our podcast (preview here)"



"Call in the Night was created by Max Hawkins, a Computer Science and Art student at Carnegie Mellon.

If you ever get connected to someone named Max, it's probably me!"
insomnia  sleep  dreams  art  night  radio  callinthenight  maxhawkins 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Youth Radio
"Youth Radio is an award-winning media production company that trains diverse young people in digital media and technology. Partnering with industry professionals, students learn to produce marketable media for massive audiences while bringing youth perspectives to issues of public concern.

Our mission is to launch young people on career and education pathways by engaging them in work-based learning opportunities, creative expression, professional development, and health and academic support services.

Founded in 1992 in Berkeley during a period of heightened youth violence and homicide, Youth Radio was established as an outlet for Bay Area youth to process their experiences and provide an alternative perspective to the prevailing media dialogue. In 2007, Youth Radio moved its headquarters to downtown Oakland, helping transform an under-invested part of the city into a world-class center of art, commerce, and culture.

Youth Radio operates bureaus in Los Angeles, Atlanta, and Washington, DC."
oakland  youthradio  radio  youth  journalism  losangeles  washingtondc  atlanta  bayarea  media  mediaproduction  dc 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Matt Thompson on NPR's Code Switch on Vimeo
"NPR’s Code Switch team manager Matt Thompson discusses the newly launched race, ethnicity, and culture initiative, and how it seeks to enrich NPR coverage while also bringing new audiences to public media.

July 12, 2013 at the Public Media Development and Marketing Conference (PMDMC) in Atlanta, GA. This session was sponsored by NPR."
mattthompson  2013  codeswitch  race  ethnicity  journalism  culture  npr  radio  blogging 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Teenage Diaries Revisited
"Beginning in 1996, Radio Diaries gave tape recorders to teenagers around the country to create audio diaries about their lives. NPR’s All Things Considered aired intimate portraits of five of these teens: Amanda, Juan, Frankie, Josh and Melissa. They're now in their 30s. Over this past year, the same group has been recording new stories about where life has led them for our series, Teenage Diaries Revisited."

[See also: http://www.radiodiaries.org/ ]
[Via: http://npr.tumblr.com/post/49360747287/on-all-things-considered-may-6-10 ]
teens  youth  storytelling  npr  radio  radiodiaries  1996  2013  time  change 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Deep map - Wikipedia
"Deep map refers to an emerging practical method of intensive topographical exploration, popularised by author William Least Heat-Moon with his book PrairyErth: A Deep Map. (1991).

A deep map work most often takes the form of engaged documentary writing of literary quality; although it can equally well be done in long-form on radio. It does not preclude the combination of writing with photography and illustration. Its subject is a particular place, usually quite small and limited, and usually rural.

Some[who?] call the approach 'vertical travel writing', while archeologist Michael Shanks compares it to the eclectic approaches of 18th and early 19th century antiquarian topographers or to the psychogeographic excursions of the early Situationist International[1] http://www.mshanks.com/2012/07/10/chorography-then-and-now/ [2] http://documents.stanford.edu/michaelshanks/51.

A deep map goes beyond simple landscape/history-based topographical writing – to include and interweave autobiography, archeology, stories, memories, folklore, traces, reportage, weather, interviews, natural history, science, and intuition. In its best form, the resulting work arrives at a subtle, multi-layered and 'deep' map of a small area of the earth.

In North America it is a method claimed by those interested in bioregionalism. The best known U.S. examples are Wallace Stegner's Wolf Willow (1962) and Heat-Moon's PrairyErth (1991).

In Great Britain, the method is used by those who use the terms 'spirit of place' and 'local distinctiveness'. BBC Radio 4 has recently undertaken several series of radio documentaries that are deep maps. These are inspired by the 'sense of place' work of the Common Ground organisation."
via:selinjessa  writing  williamleastheat-moon  verticaltravelwriting  documentary  documentation  radio  photography  illustration  place  rural  michaelshanks  topography  psychogeography  situationist  autobiography  archaeology  stories  storytelling  memory  memories  weather  interviews  naturalhistory  bioregionalism  parairyerth  wolfwillow  wallacestegner  localdistinctiveness  bbcradio  bbs  radio4  deepmaps  maps  mapping  commonground  folklore  science  intuition 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Radio Ambulante
"Radio Ambulante es un programa de radio que cuenta historias latinoamericanas provenientes de todos los países de habla hispana, incluyendo Estados Unidos. Buscamos llevar la estética de la buena crónica de prensa escrita a la radio.

Nuestro podcast pronto podrá escucharse en nuestra web o descargarse a través de iTunes desde cualquier parte del mundo.

Además, estamos creando alianzas con emisoras de Latinoamérica y Estados Unidos, para así alcanzar una audiencia de habla hispana en todo el continente.

Una de nuestras metas es formar una comunidad de cronistas de radio en distintos países, aprovechando los avances tecnológicos para producir, distribuir e intercambiar historias."

[via http://99percentinvisible.org/post/43419720763/episode-73-the-zanzibar-and-other-building-poems

"Our reporter this week is Daniel Alarcón, host and executive producer of Radio Ambulante, a new podcast which has been called “This American Life en Español” (though some stories are in English)." ]
podcasts  spanish  radio  radioambulante  tolisten 
february 2013 by robertogreco
RPM.fm - Revolutions Per Minute | Indigenous Music Culture.
"RPM is a new music platform to discover the most talented Indigenous musicians from across Turtle Island and beyond.

RPM brings together musicians, fans, and listeners by providing a centralized place for emerging and established Indigenous, First Nations, Aboriginal, Inuit, and Métis musicians to share and promote their work.

We curate, interview, and profile Indigenous artists from around the world to help bring them an international audience, and to give music lovers the opportunity to discover the very best of Indigenous Music Culture."
aboriginal  métis  inuit  firstnations  turtleisland  music  rpm.fm  rpm  canada  indigenous  media  radio  audio  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
Comfort noise - Wikipedia
"Comfort noise (or comfort tone) is synthetic background noise used in radio and wireless communications to fill the artificial silence in a transmission resulting from voice activity detection or from the audio clarity of modern digital lines.

Some modern telephone systems (such as wireless and VoIP) use voice activity detection (VAD), a form of squelching where low volume levels are ignored by the transmitting device. In digital audio transmissions, this saves bandwidth of the communications channel by transmitting nothing when the source volume is under a certain threshold, leaving only louder sounds (such as the speaker's voice) to be sent. However, improvements in background noise reduction technologies can occasionally result in the complete removal of all noise. Although maximizing call quality is a primary importance, exhaustive removal of noise may not properly simulate the typical behavior of terminals on the PSTN system.

The result of receiving total silence, especially for a prolonged period, has a number of unwanted effects on the listener, including the following:

* the listener may believe that the transmission has been lost, and therefore hang up prematurely.
* the speech may sound "choppy" (see noise gate) and difficult to understand.
* the sudden change in sound level can be jarring to the listener.

To counteract these effects, comfort noise is added, usually on the receiving end in wireless or VoIP systems, to fill in the silent portions of transmissions with artificial noise. The noise generated is at a low but audible volume level, and can vary based on the average volume level of received signals to minimize jarring transitions."
sound  noise  comfortnoise  comforttone  silence  backgroundnoise  radio 
november 2012 by robertogreco
As Media Lines 'Blur,' We All Become Editors : NPR
[link to transcript: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=140118092 ]

"We function as our own editors. We create our own news diet for ourselves. We create our own front page, if you will. ... We're no longer relying on seven white males at The New York Times to do that for us."

"But conventional wisdom didn't tell us how to ferret out the truth amid the farrago on radio and TV, on the newspapers and in the Internet. So whether you're a cop or a teacher or lawyer or an accountant, what technique from your job do you apply to judge whether a news story is fact or opinion? "

"Right, portable ignorance. He would go and say, I don't get this; explain it to me. What are you going to try and do? As opposed to being seduced into trying to look like you know everything and you're very knowledgeable, and that you're sort of in, you know - that you're astute. He used being not astute as a powerful tool."
editors  press  journalism  evidence  ignotance  knowledge  portableignorance  web  radio  internet  news  nealconan  infoliteracy  informationliteracy  blur  crapdetection  truth  information  infooverload  books  2012  tomrosenstiel  billkovach  via:lukeneff  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Welcome to Destination DIY
"Destination DIY is an independently produced public radio show and podcast bringing you stories about all kinds of creativity.

Taking the DIY lens beyond home improvement and crafts, we explore all kinds of ways people are working with limited resources to create rather than consume the world around them. Destination DIY blends recorded field sound, in-studio interviews and personal narration to create an arc that takes listeners on a journey and brings them back inspired.

*Host, creator & producer Julie Sabatier*

In addition to hosting and producing Destination DIY, Julie has produced quality radio for outlets such as Oregon Public Broadcasting, Pacifica and American Public Media. In her brief stint as a print reporter, her work was published regularly in Willamette Week, Just Out and the Portland Sentinel."
destinationdiy  edg  srg  glvo  creativity  sustainability  audio  opb  juliesabatier  podcasts  radio  diy  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
How 'Radiolab' Is Changing the Sound of the Radio - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic
"What's different about Radiolab (&…changing about the web) is that it *is* a production…one of a very new kind. Radiolab is actually post-blog & post-livestream…not aping oratory of old or raggedness of new…a hybrid that takes lessons from the past, recent & deep.

That's where…web journalism is headed…"No one wants to read a 9,000-word treatise online. On the Web, one-sentence links are as legitimate as 1000-word diatribes—in fact, they are often valued more."

While this might have been true at one point, it simply no longer is…at The Atlantic, there is a very strong positive correlation between length of post & readers attracted. The genre conventions of blogging are changing. Few old-style linkblogs exist & a whole culture has developed around the longread. New online publications…look beautiful.

This is the Radiolab effect extended: expect less pretension to authority, greater understanding of one's nodeness, but greater respect for the production culture of the pre-web era."
post-livestream  post-internet  pretension  radiolabeffect  robertkrulwich  twitter  blogging  journalism  storytelling  productionvalues  authority  longformjournalism  longform  theatlantic  online  web  radio  alexismadrigal  jadabumrad  2012  radiolab  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
CBC.ca | Q | tUnE-yArDs on Q
"The lively Oakland, California-based experimental pop band tUnE-yArDs dropped by Studio Q today for an interview and trio of live performances from their new record w h o k i l l. Frontwoman Merrill Garbus discussed her history in theatre and puppeteering, the Afro-Caribbean influences in the band's music, and her role as a political artist. tUnE-yArDs also stuck around to record a web-exclusive performance of the song Powa. Hear all the music and Jian's conversation with Merrill below."
interviews  radio  music  2011  jianghomeshi  tuneyards  merrillgarbus  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Worklog
"My name is Jordi Parra and this Tumblr is a personal worklog to keep track of the process of my degree project: a device to listen to Spotify at home."
spotify  arduino  electronics  rfid  music  design  radio  jordiparra  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
Jad Abumrad, Radiolab’s ‘genius’ storyteller, on what public radio needs now: ‘more joy, more chaos’ » Nieman Journalism Lab
How do you hang on to a successful formula while also trying to break free from it?

“I think about Stefan Sagmeister,” the Austrian graphic designer, “who every six years, I think it is, seven years, he just quits his life and moves to some distant spot on the globe and just throws himself into some new art and comes back, refreshed. I think to myself, how can I do that without actually leaving?” he said.

“It’s also going to be about, frankly, it’s going to be about sucking, you know? The only way to really loosen the reins a little bit is to say to yourself, ‘Let’s do an experiment that makes me actually deeply nervous, because it could be bad.’ I’m prepared to suck for awhile.”…

“It needs more joy. It needs more chaos. It needs more anarchy. And it needs more moods. The range of human experiences is covered and reported about on NPR, but it’s not reflected in the tone, and it’s not reflected in the style…"
radiolab  radio  npr  jadabumrad  2011  stefansagmeister  sabbaticals  cv  risktaking  sucking  chaos  anarchy  messiness  work  disruption  thisamericanlife  iraglass  anarchism  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Transom » Radiolab: An Appreciation by Ira Glass
"Artists compete. Not head to head like athletes, but in their souls. Within the appreciation of our fellow artists is the tiny wince, “I wish I’d done that.”

Ira Glass joins us again on Transom, this time for a loving and envious homage to our friends at Radiolab, Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich. A radio master salutes his comrades.

The great thing about Ira’s analysis is that it’s so detailed. He breaks down exactly what’s so good about Radiolab and why. You could almost learn the tricks and do it yourself. Almost. Honestly, though, you’d lose. It’s better sometimes just to appreciate."
art  science  media  storytelling  jadabumrad  iraglass  robertkrulwich  2011  radio  thisamericanlife  radiolab  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Talk - Preoccupations
""How many people turn on the radio and leave the room, satisfied with the distant and sufficient noise? Is this absurd? Not in the least. What is essential is not that one particular person speak and another hear, but that, with no one in particular speaking and no one in particular listening, there should nonetheless be speech, and a kind of undefined promise to communicate, guaranteed by the incessant coming and going of solitary words." — Maurice Blanchot

The experience of hearing someone in the family turning on a radio somewhere in the house, and then to become aware that they are no longer attending to the radio, if they ever were, but the radio continues, is surely very common. Yet this is the first time I’ve ever read anyone remarking and reflecting on this.

‘There should nonetheless be speech … a[n] … undefined promise to communicate, guaranteed by the incessant coming and going of solitary words’.

Yes. That."
davidsmith  mauriceblanchot  sound  speech  radio  communication  listenting  hearing  promise  talk  talking  2011  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Audio Recordings of John Holt
"This early interview of John, done in Philadelphia in-between speaking engagements, is a very good overview of Holt's work, and is particularly focused on homeschooling. John Holt interviewed by Teri Gross on Fresh Air, NPR, 1981

Though homeschooling is discussed, the bulk of this talk show focuses on how schools can be changed and Holt's thoughts about that. John Holt interviewed on Boston radio, WBOS, about the "A Nation at Risk" report [1983]

This is the raw interview tape that Holt owned, not the final broadcast version. Covers lots of political and educational reform ground about homeschooling, including Holt's thoughts about the influence of religious fundamentalists, are homeschoolers abandoning schools, unqualified parents teaching their own, and much more. John Holt interviewed by David Freudberg/Kindred Spirits Radio, April 11, 1985

[via: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/07/compilation-of-work-from-john-holt-one.html ]
johnholt  terigross  audio  1981  1983  1985  radio  education  unschooling  deschooling  schooling  learning  children  parenting  homeschool  publicschools  policy  politics  anationatrisk  rote  backtobasics  rotelearning  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
CBC.ca | Q
"Q is an energetic daily arts, culture and entertainment magazine that takes you on a smart and surprising ride, interviewing personalities and tackling the cultural issues that matter.

Hosted by Jian Ghomeshi, with his trademark wit and spontaneity, Q covers pop culture and high arts alike with forays into the most provocative and compelling cultural trends.

From music icons like Van Morrison and Neil Young; smart conversations with everyone from Al Gore to Barbara Walters; CNN operas; to the branding of politicians... Q brings you big names, big ideas, and those paving the way on the cultural landscape.

 Q is your cultural intervention!"
cbc  kpbs  art  culture  radio  music  media  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
How 'Radiolab' Is Transforming the Airwaves - NYTimes.com
"they seem to share is a blend of curiosity & skepticism, willingness to be convinced—& delight in convincing."

“Normally reporter goes out & learns something, writes it down & speaks from knowledge…Jokes & glitches puncture illusion of all-knowing authority, who no longer commands much respect these days anyway. It’s more honest to “let audience hear & know that you are manufacturing a version of events…

“It’s consciously letting people see outside frame…those moments are really powerful. What it’s saying to listener is: ‘Look, we all know what’s happening here. I’m telling you a story, I’m trying to sort of dupe you in some cosmic way.’ We all know it’s happening—& in a sense we all want it to happen.”

This is how “Radiolab” addresses tension btwn authenticity & artifice: capturing raw, off-the-cuff moments…& editing them in gripping pastiche…hope…is to preserve sense of excitement & discovery that often drains away in authoritative accounts of traditional journalism."
via:lukeneff  radiolab  radio  npr  robertkrulwich  jadabumrad  2011  storytelling  science  journalism  classideas  authority  authenticity  humility  humor  fun  artifice  attention  engagement  curiosity  skepticism  convincing  knowledge  honesty  uncertainty  perspective  teaching  knowing  understanding  transparency  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Daily Kos: Paid callers for RW radio means free speech is a joke.
"If there are banks of paid callers calling Limbaugh and other right wing talkers from right wing think tanks or government agencies Americans need to know about it.<br />
<br />
This level of coordinated misinformation makes national discussions of important problems impossible and short circuits the feedback loops that democracy depends on."
politics  rushlimbaugh  callers  radio  misinformation  propaganda  journalism  rightwing  2011  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
YOUrban — Immaterials: Light painting WiFi
"The city is filled with an invisible landscape of networks that is becoming an interwoven part of daily life. WiFi networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile phones are starting to influence how urban environments are experienced & understood. We want to explore & reveal what the immaterial terrain of WiFi looks like & how it relates to the city.

This film is about investigating & contextualising WiFi networks through visualisation. It is made by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen, Einar Sneve Martinussen. The film is a continuation of our explorations of intangible phenomena that have implications for design & effect how both products & cities are experienced. Matt Jones has summarised these phenomena as ‘Immaterials’, & uses sociality, data, time & radio as examples. Radio & wireless communication are a fundamental part of the construction of networked cities. This generates what William Mitchell called an ‘electromagnetic terrain’ that is both intricate & invisible, & only…"

[More: http://www.nearfield.org/2011/02/wifi-light-painting AND http://yourban.no/2011/03/07/making-immaterials-light-painting-wifi/ ]
timoarnall  jørnknutsen  einarsnevemartinussen  wifi  urban  urbanism  cities  immaterials  mattjones  williammitchell  visualization  wireless  networkedcities  invisible  maketheinvisiblevisible  electormagneticterrain  radio  sociality  data  time  design  context  landscape  invisiblelandscape  networks  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Salt Institute for Documentary Studies
"At Salt, we train aspiring writers, radio producers, and photographers in the art of documentary storytelling — creating thought-provoking, richly worded stories. In the process, our students struggle to find their own voice, learn to sit comfortably with discomfort, and to ask hard questions not only of their subjects, but also of themselves. We encourage students to value and pursue truth, using journalistic skills and ethics to produce powerful, fair-minded, technically astute documentary work."
documentary  radio  education  photography  salt  portland  maine  schools  writing  journalism  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
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