robertogreco + proximity   28

Reassemblage Trinh T Minh ha 1983 - YouTube
[https://www.artandeducation.net/classroom/video/66044/trinh-t-minh-ha-reassemblage

"Who made these borders and whom do they serve? This question is taken up by Trinh T. Minh-ha in her 1983 film Reassemblage, which remains one of the most incisive and poetic critiques of the philosophical paradigm that colonialism has passed down. True to the idea that no radical statement can be uttered in inherited grammars, Trinh’s film rigorously interrogates cinematic form while flooding us with content that undoes the very logic most critique relies upon. Soundscapes extend for minutes while the screen remains dark, inviting us to know through hearing rather than through the immediate privileging of sight. And when images do come, sound is silenced so that the diegetic and non-diegetic elements of cinema are seldom operating in tandem, refusing to produce a familiar real. It is here that Trinh T. Minh-ha delivers a most profound statement: “I do not intend to speak about / Just speak near by”––a total undoing of the privileging of mastery, the form of knowing that requires distance, the one that has possession as its quiet but pervasive aim. The film is forty minutes long and this excerpt is only the first ten but my hope is that this will compel you to find it, and receive."]
trinhminh-ha  1983  film  reassemblage  colonialism  soundscapes  mastery  knowing  proximity  distance  form 
april 2019 by robertogreco
CLASS DISMISSED: A ROUNDTABLE ON ART SCHOOL, USC, AND COOPER UNION by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer, Helen Molesworth, Mike Essl, Jory Rabinovitz, Lee Relvas, Amanda Ross-Ho, Victoria Sobel, Frances Stark, A. L. Steiner, Charlie White - artforum.com / in print
[via: https://twitter.com/CaseyG/status/652215259235807232 ]

"IN AN ERA when creative economies are leading the hypermonetization of every aspect of life, from attention and identity to privacy and time, it’s not surprising that this country’s most progressive models of art education are under attack. In fact, the liberal arts and humanities are besieged across the board, increasingly expected to justify their funding, even their very existence, in universities and beyond. We are witnessing a massive cultural shift when we see the corporatization of higher education—with its top-down power structures, bloated bureaucracies, “synergistic” partnerships with the private sector, relegation of faculty to contingent adjunct labor, and reliance on students as revenue streams—spiking tuition costs and sending student debt ballooning.

All this has come dramatically to a head this past year on both coasts, at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York and the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Art and Design in Los Angeles. It is sadly predictable and all the more alarming that the ever-accelerating process of financialization should upend two of the most vital art schools in America, each of which has been based on the endangered premise of a tuition-free or fully funded education. While the specific circumstances and institutional histories make the nature of each crisis distinct, they both betray the wrenching cultural shifts produced by a head-on collision with the technocratic crusaders of contemporary capitalism.

Following its board of directors’ decision to abandon Cooper Union’s tuition-free mandate, which had stood for more than 150 years, the school’s president and five trustees resigned amid an ongoing inquiry into the institution’s finances by the New York State Attorney General. The grassroots Committee to Save Cooper Union has taken legal action to preserve the venerable institution’s founding mission of free education, and to call attention to the fiscal mismanagement and lack of accountability on the part of the school’s board of trustees. [Eds. note: As this issue was going to press, the Attorney General announced that a settlement had been reached and that Cooper Union would work to eventually reinstate free tuition.] At USC Roski, the drastic restructuring and reduction in funding for the school’s renowned graduate program by a new dean’s administration prompted high-profile, tenured faculty to resign in protest and the entire MFA class of 2016 to drop out en masse earlier this year, citing unacceptable changes to funding packages, curriculum, and faculty.

Debates over art education have a long history, of course. A groundbreaking and utopian model that remains relevant today is Black Mountain College, which nurtured cultural and pedagogical innovation at mid-century and which is the subject of a major exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, opening on October 10. Artforum invited the show’s curator, HELEN MOLESWORTH, to join eight distinguished participants—from Cooper, faculty MIKE ESSL and alumni JORY RABINOVITZ and VICTORIA SOBEL; and from USC Roski, current or former faculty members FRANCES STARK, CHARLIE WHITE, and A. L. STEINER; alumna AMANDA ROSS-HO; and LEE RELVAS, one of the seven class-of-2016 students who dropped out—to discuss the current situation at both institutions and the histories, challenges, and continued promise of art school."



"HELEN MOLESWORTH: We’ve convened today to talk about the current crises at USC and Cooper, both of which are symptoms of larger problems facing the entire concept of art education in this country. And for many schools today, Black Mountain College remains a key model for art education after World War II.

In the face of this crisis, Black Mountain is even more relevant to the current situation than one might think: It was a program born of extraordinary optimism, but it was also born of dissent, born of a firing of tenured faculty, born of a group of teachers and students deciding that they needed to own the means of production themselves and create an institution in which there were no trustees or board of regents, so they could collectively control the college. It had an extraordinary efflorescence and was a wellspring of the American avant-garde; the curriculum at BMC influenced many of the practices that define contemporary studio and liberal-arts programs—group critiques, collaboration, interdisciplinarity. It also failed beautifully and wonderfully and spectacularly at its end: It was short-lived, running only from 1933 to 1957.

Which leads me to the most basic and perhaps the most unanswerable question: Why now? Why are extremely successful, renowned arts-education departments on both coasts under attack in the way that they are at Cooper and USC? Are they—and Black Mountain—anomalies, experiments that could never last? Or are they victims of some of the nastiest tactics of our neoliberal new economy?"



"LEE RELVAS: I’m one of the seven MFA students who just dropped out from USC. We dropped out collectively to protest the school’s reneging on funding and curricular promises made to us, because that funding model and pedagogical model were clearly no longer considered valuable under the new dean’s leadership. But we also wanted to protest publicly the economics of higher education: namely, the normalization of massive student debt.

We range in age from twenty-seven to forty-one years old. So we actually did know what we were getting into as far as the debt that we thought we were going to be taking on, as well as the lack of teaching opportunities, and if we were so lucky to get a teaching job, how little most of those teaching jobs paid.

But we still wanted two years of time and space to be artists and thinkers and to be in close conversation with each other. And outside these flawed institutions, there is little material and cultural support for that."



"HELEN MOLESWORTH: In New York, do you have a similar sense that the faculty and the students at Cooper were unable to articulate the value of free tuition to the board?

MIKE ESSL: I think we did articulate it but we weren’t heard, and it was all the more disturbing to me because of my own personal understanding of that value. My dad is a mechanic and my mom is a bookkeeper. They didn’t go to college and they didn’t save for college, and me going to college was just never on their radar. And Cooper Union gave me permission to go to art school. Without that freedom, without being able to tell my parents essentially to fuck off, I don’t know where I would be now. [Laughter.]

And what that does for, say, a lower-middle-class student, that permission, the way it lowers the risk of art school and allows you to even conceive of going, is something that the board of trustees did not care about at all.

We would hear about how the cost of teaching artists is too expensive and that when artists graduate they don’t donate, and there was really no consideration of the artist as a person in the world at all. And so for those people to be the board members of a school like Cooper Union, I would argue, is criminal. They just refused to hear any arguments.

JORY RABINOVITZ: There was no dialogue, no transparency. There was never any mention of charging tuition while I was at Cooper. I started when the demolition of the Abram S. Hewitt Memorial art building, and the construction of the new Thom Mayne–designed academic center, 41 Cooper Square, in its place, was just beginning. The three-year transition phase completely displaced the art school and literally split it in two, sending half of the classes and studios to a rented building in Long Island City. Since the art school donated the least and protested the most, it really felt like we were being singled out to receive this weird form of punishment or austerity measure. Many of the school’s questionable financial decisions that are currently under investigation happened at the very same time. So when I look at the new building, it’s hard not to see a big perforated smoke screen.

MIKE ESSL: They showed up at the table already having decided that our model was old-fashioned and could no longer be supported. Which is why we have been saying all along that it’s a cultural problem, not an economic one."



"A. L. STEINER: Eighty percent of USC’s faculty is now adjunct and contingent. This is part of an ideology of austerity being embraced at the school, even though its undergraduate program ranks sixteenth in tuition nationwide and the university is one of twenty schools nationwide responsible for one-fifth of the country’s graduate-school student debt. The dean’s thinking came down to a gamble—that the graduate faculty’s interactions, and the program’s funding and curricular promises, were unnecessary. There’s a bigger agenda in play, and it’s intertwined with the value and significance of an arts education in a technocratic regime, in a world where the nonprofit sector exists as a manifestation of the private sector."



"FRANCES STARK: But you have to consider that in context. I was on the search committee for the new dean in the spring of 2013, and the problem of financial sustainability was not explicitly on the table when we were interviewing candidates. The entire process seemed perfunctory: It became clear that the interim dean was the internal candidate they wanted, and who, it was later disclosed, was somehow attached to the $70 million gift from Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre to endow a new school of “Art, Technology and the Business of Innovation” at USC. Erica Muhl, who became dean, has zero background in contemporary fine art, design, or art history. She is not conversant with these fields at all. I asked her, “What is your vision for the school?” And she responded, “To be number one.” No joke. OK? She told the graduate students: “The future of art is Mark Zuckerberg… [more]
cooperunion  blackmountaincollege  usc  art  arteducation  education  highered  highereducation  helenmolesworth  mikeessl  joryrabinovitz  leerelvas  amandaross-ho  victoriasobel  francesstark  alsteiner  charliewhite  sarahlehrer-graiwer  via:caseygollan  activism  neoliberalism  capitalism  politics  conversation  proximity  ambiguity  joy  meritocracy  organizations  institutions  bmc  arts  humanities  schools  tcsnmy  progressive  technocracy  artseducation  culture  thinking  optimism  bauhaus  calarts  community  pedagogy  teaching  learning  howweteach  howwelearn 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Unstable Territory. Borders and identity in contemporary art - we make money not art
"There's a couple of cities where i keep going over and over again just because they have an art center worth a several hour long journey. Some of them may or may not be on your usual culture map. There's Eindhoven, Hasselt, Manchester and there's Florence where i traveled again a few weeks ago to see the exhibition Unstable Territory. [http://www.strozzina.org/en/exhibitions/territori-instabili/ ] Borders and identity in contemporary art at the Centre for Contemporary Culture Strozzina.

The show presents artwork that reconsiders the notion of territory in a time when the obsolescence of concepts such as the nation state and borders coincides with new forms of nationalism and a corollary desire to affirm the individuality of a community or to protect their privileges with the construction of new physical demarcations. The map of the walls being erected to separate people from each other that The Guardian has recently published illustrates the extent of the latter tendency.

The astonishing development of mobility for both people and goods, the digitisation of communication and knowledge, migration and an increasingly global economy have all radically changed people's perception of territories, borders and boundaries. In view of the instability of these concepts crucial to the definition of personal identity, two different -though not necessarily conflicting - trends appear to be taking shape: one based on seeking shelter in the safety and proximity of the micro-territory, the region or even the family; the other, as theorised by sociologist Ulrich Beck, involving a new conception of cosmopolitanism in its most democratic and egalitarian sense."
wmmna  réginedebatty  art  borders  boundaries  economics  globalization  cosmopolitanism  richardmosse  adambroomberg  oliverchanarin  paolocirio  zannybegg  oliverressler  antonionegri  ariellaazoulay  sandromezzadra  thecoolcouple  simonesantilli  niccolòbenetton  territory  identity  glvo  mobility  migration  immigration  instability  shelter  safety  proximity  ulrichbeck 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Hauntology of Daily Life — Medium
"Next time I need to go to the café, I will know exactly where it is, just as I know that another café that I frequent is across the street — one block closer to the Pacific ocean — from a dim sum place I eat lunch at frequently, and just as I know that a favorite Vietnamese restaurant is on the same block as the movie theater that is closest to my home. I could not tell you the cross streets of any of these businesses, but I know where they all are in relation to each other. That is how memories are cemented. At least that is how my brain makes memories, through context, correlation, proximity.

And through incidence. There are different types of proximity, and though the word suggests physical nearness, there is also simply chance incident. On the way to the dim sum restaurant, there is a spot where I think about feathers, because a dead bird was left there for several weeks, and for weeks after its carcass had disappeared, individual feathers fluttered in the bushes and grass.

Key for my memory is sound, certain parallels between physical places and the sounds that I associate with them.

I do not think of alarms when I walk past the neighborhood fire station, but I do think about the crying in a nursery ward. This is because of a sign on the firehouse door that announces the place as a safe haven for unwanted newborns. The sign shows a child sleeping in a pair of hands, yet I cannot walk by that firehouse without the helpless calls of infants ringing in my mind’s ears.

There is a stretch of road between Pasadena and Glendale where I will always hear the rhythmic threadbare minimal techno of Monolake’s album Cinemascope, even if Led Zeppelin is blasting on the radio,even if I am deep in conversation on the phone or with a fellow passenger, even if the windows are open and letting in the sirens of passing police cars, all of which has happened. More than a decade ago, on a visit to the Los Angeles area, I blasted a CD of that album in a rental car after a long day of meetings, on my way to visit a friend across town, and though I have never again sat in that particular car, and I have long since parted ways with that employer, and my physical copy of the Monolake album is buried in a box in my closet, the music still hovers on the highway, waiting for me to trigger it simply by driving through it.

And I cannot step into a particular corner of my home’s small backyard without having the novelist China Miéville tell me a story — more specifically, tell me a particular part of a story. For at some point, many years ago, I struggled in that spot with a heavy ration of weeds, and while I pulled at the weeds, tried to separate them from the ground without leaving their crepuscular roots intact, a recording of Miéville reading from one of his stories played through the headphones attached to my MP3 player. I was fixed in that spot long enough for the story to take root. It is as if the story lingers there, set on a loop on an invisible jukebox, and I can access it if I get just inside a specific zone of the yard."
memory  mapping  place  senses  sound  sounds  2013  marcweidenbaum  audio  music  losangeles  context  proximity  chinamieville  brain  mameories  associations 
august 2013 by robertogreco
The Atlantic: Nature & Environment: April 1908: The Divine Soil by John Burroughs
"The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is, “Look under foot.” You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think. The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are. Do not despise your own place and hour. Every place is under the stars, every place is the centre of the world. Stand in your own dooryard and you have eight thousand miles of solid ground beneath you, and all the sidereal splendors overhead."
local  place  proximity  1908  johnburroughs  distant  distance  grassisgreener  slow  small 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Isolated and Under-Exposed: Why the Rich Don't Give - Neighborhoods - The Atlantic Cities
"Turns out lower giving among the rich likely has much more to do with where they live and who they live near.

As this accompanying article from the journal notes, when the rich are highly concentrated in wealthy enclaves, they're less likely to give as compared with the rich living in more economically diverse neighborhoods. The report found that in neighborhoods where more than 40 percent of taxpayers reported earning $200,000 or more, the average giving was just 2.8 percent of discretionary income.

In other words, concentration of wealth is also isolation from the less fortunate."
proximity  generosity  diversity  wealthdistribution  wealth  philanthropy  2012  research  isolation  charity  charitableindustrialcomplex  philanthropicindustrialcomplex  capitalism  power  control  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Caren Litherland · love
"“Technology” isn’t making us more isolated, solitary, confined, depressed, lonely. “Technology” is bringing us together. What could be better than reading or making or doing something you are passionate about, smushed up next to someone you love?"

[Don't miss the accompanying photo.]
families  togetherness  subways  nyc  2011  attention  proximity  digital  howweread  howwelive  technology  love  carenlitherland  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
Networked Knowledge and Combinatorial Creativity | Brain Pickings
"In May, I had the pleasure of speaking at the wonderful Creative Mornings free lecture series masterminded by my studiomate Tina of Swiss Miss fame. I spoke about Networked Knowledge and Combinatorial Creativity, something at the heart of Brain Pickings and of increasing importance as we face our present information reality. The talk is now available online — full (approximate) transcript below, enhanced with images and links to all materials referenced in the talk."

"This is what I want to talk about today, networked knowledge, like dot-connecting of the florilegium, and combinatorial creativity, which is the essence of what Picasso and Paula Scher describe. The idea that in order for us to truly create and contribute to the world, we have to be able to connect countless dots, to cross-pollinate ideas from a wealth of disciplines, to combine and recombine these pieces and build new castles."

"How can it be that you talk to someone and it’s done in a second? But it IS done in a second — it’s done in a second and 34 years. It’s done in a second and every experience, and every movie, and every thing in my life that’s in my head.” —Paula Scher
creativity  behavior  planning  process  combinatorialcreativity  combinations  lego  networkedknowledge  networks  mariapopova  florilegium  picasso  paulascher  pentagram  alberteinstein  breakthroughs  stevenjohnson  ideas  alvinlustig  rogersperry  jacquesmonod  biology  richarddawkins  science  art  design  wheregoodideascomefrom  books  designthinking  insight  information  ninapaley  oliverlaric  similarities  proximity  adjacentpossible  everythingisaremix  curiosity  choice  jimcoudal  claychristensen  intention  attention  philosophy  buddhism  work  labor  kevinkelly  gandhi  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
ZURB – How Design Teamwork Crushes Bureaucracy
"People who can’t communicate w/ each other get stuck making complicated ‘stuff’ to make up for it. Frustration turns into PowerPoints, complicated charts, & lots of meetings…requires layers upon layers of management to keep organized…weighs companies down…creates no direct value to customers. This is why there are so many lame products in the world. There’s not a wireframe or chart or design method that is going to save you if you can’t look your team members in the eye."

"Our teamwork made up for the lack of ‘stuff’ other companies would use because we:

Shared a clear goal that we all understood…Worked physically close to each other & stayed connected by IM and phone when we didn’t…Shared feedback w/ each other & from customers out in the open every day, which builds confidence in arguing & makes new conversations really easy to beginStayed together through thick and thin to build trust in one another"
teamwork  teams  administration  management  tcsnmy  toshare  bureaucracy  organizations  goals  purpose  community  communication  collegiality  feedback  constructivecriticism  argument  arguing  discussion  proximity  powerpoint  irrationalcomplexity  rules  control  missingthepoint  trust  2011  zurb  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Real Reason Why Bicycles are the Key to Better Cities | Sustainable Cities Collective
"The most vital element for the future of our cities is that the bicycle is an instrument of experiential understanding.

On a bicycle, citizens experience their city with deep intimacy, often for the first time. For a regular motorist to take that two or three mile trip by bicycle instead is to decimate an enormous wall between them and their communities.

In a car, the world is reduced to mere equation; “What is the fastest route from A to B?” one will ask as they start their engine. This invariably leads to a cascade of freeway concrete flying by at incomprehensible speeds. Their environment, the neighborhoods that compose their communities, the beauty of architecture, the immense societal problems in distressed areas, the faces of neighbors… all of this becomes a conceptually abstract blur from the driver’s seat…"
culture  cities  urban  urbanism  bikes  biking  community  observation  experience  enlightenment  life  proximity  engagement  transportation  understanding  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis: On real versus digital experiences (Wired UK)
"What we've discovered is that the physical experience still has meaning and, in fact, has become sharpened. Gigs are still attended not just because of the music, nor even for being in proximity to the human beings actually playing the music, but because they come with an atmosphere and shared sense of being there together. Even live albums or professional TV coverage won't give you that. I can't help feeling that watching a live stream of some distant gig you really want to be at would be somewhat saddening, if not deadening."
music  digital  online  warrenellis  experience  physical  physicality  live  performance  atmosphere  meaning  life  proximity  human  sharing  sharedexperience  camaraderie  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
olafur eliasson: your blind passenger
'for me, utopia is linked to the now, the moment between one second and the next. it constitutes a possibility that is actualized and converted into reality, an opening where concepts like subject and object, inside and outside, proximity and distance are tossed into the air and redefined. our sense of orientation is challenged and the coordinates of our spaces, collective and personal, have to be renegotiated. changeability and mobility are at the core of utopia.' - olafur eliasson
2010  art  olafureliasson  utopia  changeability  mobility  sensemaking  orientation  proximity  perception  hereandnow  change  adaptability  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Week 272 – Blog – BERG [Matt's description of "gardening a studio" sounds very much like gardening a classroom, especially the studio classroom that we have at TCSNMY.]
"One of the things that was easier, writing these notes about the studio back in 2009, was that the room was smaller. There’s something about stewing in each other’s pheromones. You share moods. If the week was tiring, you were all tired. If you had the sherbet fizz of excitement in your belly, you knew that was the collective unconscious of the studio at large.

[Now] we’re too big for that. We’re not big by any means! Eight people, a network of experts, and just taken on a ninth, but big enough for different moods and senses to sit together in the same space…

Mood transmission follows lines of physical proximity, conversations, & collaboration.

Part of the job of gardening a studio – a community of people – is to encourage the right transmissions and tides. By weaving together sources of energy, in reinforcing loops, a collective exuberance may take place…

I monitor three budgets: attention; cash; risk. All are flows to be directed…"
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  teaching  cv  management  studiogardens  studioclassroom  collaboration  conversation  proximity  mood  moodtransmission  attention  risk  cash  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
What is the (Next) Message?: Mesh-y Reflections [via: http://www.jarche.com/2007/10/new-models-for-living-working-and-learning/]
"almost all organizations that we have in our world – business corporations, non-profits, volunteer organizations, sewing circles, soccer clubs, schools, religious organizations – all look like factories...they are Bureaucratic, Administratively controlled & Hierarchical...BAH!...not because it is human nature to be BAH, but rather this is an artefact of the Industrial Age that was mechanistic (with roots in the Gutenberg Press), industrial, fragmented, & functionally oriented. Now, as I look around, I observe that we are no longer in the Industrial Age. Rather, we are living in a world in which everyone is, or soon will be, connected to everyone else – an age of ubiquitous connectivity. This brings about the effect of being immediately next to, or proximate to, everyone else – in other words, pervasive proximity. I therefore ask the question, what form of organization is consistent with the ubiquitously connected & pervasively proximate world of today, rather than with 19th century?"
hierarchy  organizations  administration  society  industrialrevolution  industrial  institutions  schools  schooling  bureaucracy  pervasive  connectivism  ubiquitous  proximity  gamechanging  lcproject  tcsnmy 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Moleskine City Blogs - Aram Bartholl, Virtual Vs Physical
"In which form does the network data world manifest itself in our everyday life? What comes back from cyberspace into physical space? How do digital innovations influence our everyday actions?" more: http://graffitiresearchlab.com/?page_id=81
virtualreality  blogs  arambartholl  proximity  privacy  space  data  location  wow  googlemaps  annotation  vr 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Disclose or Discover?
"And this is what makes Bartholl’s project so incisive and funny at the same time. How ridiculous to “broadcast” who we are in this fashion? It’s simply not consistent with the people-practices that are the norms in 1st life."
bluetooth  location  mobile  phones  proximity  socialsoftware  privacy  julianbleecker  arambartholl 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Cities and Ambition
"Even when a city is still a live center of ambition, you won't know for sure whether its message will resonate with you till you hear it...You'll probably have to find the city where you feel at home to know what sort of ambition you have."
paulgraham  cities  living  life  lifestyle  happiness  sanfrancisco  siliconvalley  nyc  paris  entrepreneurship  employment  work  careers  demographics  economics  proximity  urban  geography  society  bayarea  boston  california  education  knowledge  universities  psychogeography  location  art  restaurants  technology  science  math  research  money  business  challenge  wealth  class  social  insiders  intelligence  culture  commentary  losangeles  washingtondc  berkeley  comparison  dc 
may 2008 by robertogreco
brightkite.com
"Location-based social networking - Discover who visits your favorite places. See where your friends are and what they're up to, in real time. Meet people around you. Reveal your location, befriend, & chat with people around you.
brightkite  bikes  socialnetworking  notifications  mobile  phones  mobility  location  location-based  locative  awareness  proximity  communication  email  gps  im  services  sms  social  networks  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  geolocation  messaging  webapp  community  iphone  geotagging  twitter  tumblr  hyperlocal 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Brightkite Blog
"location-based social network that enables people to take their online profiles with them into the real-world and make real-world friends. Users can see where their friends are and what they’re up to all while maintaining comprehensive degrees of priva
brightkite  bikes  socialnetworking  notifications  mobile  phones  mobility  location  location-based  locative  awareness  proximity  communication  email  gps  im  services  sms  social  networks  socialsoftware  iphone 
april 2008 by robertogreco
How Email Brings You Closer to the Guy in the Next Cubicle
"Technology makes it more fun&profitable to live&work close to people who matter most to your life&work...cell phone, email, Facebook networks are making it more attractive to meet people in the flesh."
communication  email  proximity  socialnetworking  society  technology  cities  facebook  social  innovation 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Psychology Today: The Laws of Urban Energy
"The world is flatter than ever. But while technology may give us each the tools of creativity, it takes urban proximity and unpredictability to sharpen them...People learn, understand each other, and trust each other more when they deal in person."
architecture  cities  business  urbanism  urban  psychology  proximity  productivity  creativeclass  richardflorida  flat  worldisflat  design  innovation  relationships  creativity  place  workplace  capitalism  networking  networks  janejacobs  commons  social 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Blackbeltjones/Work: » Continuous-Partial-Apology
"As much as I was convinced otherwise it’s as much the psychographic as the geographic...I guess the difference of these presence networks is that they can have the geographic so powerfully nestled at their core. It’s both/and not either/or." [Now at: http://magicalnihilism.com/2007/07/23/continuous-partial-apology/]
geography  presence  proximity  socialnetworks  twitter  social  mattjones 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Loca - About Loca
"Loca deploys a network of bluetooth nodes around the city that enable it to potentially track anyone with a bluetooth device and send them messages. The content of these messages is informed firstly by tracking data that Loca network has gathered about y
activism  art  civilization  communication  installation  interaction  interactive  locative  location-based  local  cities  mobile  pervasive  privacy  proximity  ubicomp  ubiquitous  technology  surveillance  society  tracking  bluetooth 
may 2007 by robertogreco
outside.in
"outside.in, the best way to discover the conversations that are going on in your neighborhood—whether that's where you live, where you work, or where you want to be. See what locals are saying right now, and share your own wisdom with your friends and
aggregator  blogs  calendar  cities  collaboration  communication  community  location  local  losangeles  directory  geotagging  geography  folksonomy  events  conversation  travel  proximity  visualization  urban  socialnetworks  social  maps  mapping  locative  networking 
october 2006 by robertogreco

related tags

activism  adambroomberg  adaptability  adjacentpossible  administration  aggregator  alberteinstein  alsteiner  alvinlustig  amandaross-ho  ambient  ambientintimacy  ambiguity  annotation  antonionegri  apple  arambartholl  architecture  arguing  argument  ariellaazoulay  art  arteducation  arts  artseducation  assessment  associations  atmosphere  attention  audio  availabot  awareness  bauhaus  bayarea  behavior  belief  berg  bergcloud  berglondon  berkeley  bikes  biking  billverplank  biology  blackmountaincollege  blogjects  blogs  bluetooth  bmc  books  border  borders  boston  boundaries  brain  breakthroughs  brightkite  buddhism  building  bureaucracy  business  buttons  calarts  calendar  california  camaraderie  canon  capitalism  careers  carenlitherland  cash  celebration  challenge  change  changeability  charitableindustrialcomplex  charity  charliewhite  chinamieville  choice  cities  civilization  class  claychristensen  coding  collaboration  collaborative  collegiality  colonialism  combinations  combinatorialcreativity  comics  commentary  commons  communication  community  comparison  computing  conferences  connectivism  constructivecriticism  consumerelectronics  context  control  conversation  conviviality  cooperunion  cosmopolitanism  creativeclass  creativity  culturalinvention  culture  cultureinvention  curiosity  cv  data  dc  delight  democracy  demographics  design  designfiction  designthinking  devices  digital  directory  discussion  disruption  distance  distant  diversity  economics  education  electronics  email  employment  engagement  enlightenment  entrepreneurship  equity  events  everythingisaremix  experience  experimentation  facebook  families  feedback  film  flat  flatness  florilegium  folksonomy  form  francesstark  gadgets  gamechanging  gandhi  gardening  geethanarayanan  generosity  geography  geolocation  geotagging  globalization  glvo  goals  google  googlemaps  gps  grassisgreener  handles  happiness  helenmolesworth  hereandnow  hereandthere  hierarchy  highered  highereducation  howwelearn  howwelive  howweread  howweteach  human  humanities  hyperlocal  ideas  identity  ideo  im  immigration  industrial  industrialrevolution  information  innovation  inquiry  insiders  insight  instability  installation  institutions  integratedcurriculum  integration  intelligence  intention  interaction  interactive  internet  internetofthings  invention  iot  iphone  irrationalcomplexity  isolation  iteration  jackschulze  jacquesmonod  janejacobs  jimcoudal  johnburroughs  joryrabinovitz  joy  julianbleecker  kevinkelly  kevinslavin  knowing  knowledge  labor  lcproject  learning  leerelvas  lego  life  lifestyle  light  linear  linearity  littleprinter  live  living  local  location  location-based  locative  london  losangeles  love  making  mameories  management  manufacturing  mapping  maps  maquiladoras  marcweidenbaum  mariapopova  mastery  materiality  materials  math  mattjones  mattwebb  meaning  media  medialab  memory  meritocracy  messaging  mexico  migration  mikeessl  missingthepoint  mit  mitmedialab  mobile  mobility  money  mood  moodtransmission  music  neoliberalism  networkedknowledge  networking  networks  niccolòbenetton  ninapaley  notifications  nyc  objects  observation  olafureliasson  oliverchanarin  oliverlaric  oliverressler  online  optimism  organizations  orientation  outsourcing  paolocirio  paris  participation  participatory  paulascher  paulgraham  pedagogy  pentagram  perception  performance  persistence  pervasive  philanthropicindustrialcomplex  philanthropy  philosophy  phones  physical  physicalcomputing  physicality  picasso  place  planning  poetry  politics  portfolios  power  powerpoint  presence  privacy  process  productivity  products  progressive  prototyping  provocations  proximity  psychogeography  psychology  purpose  reassemblage  relationships  research  restaurants  RFID  richarddawkins  richardflorida  richardmosse  risk  rogersperry  rules  réginedebatty  safety  sandiego  sandromezzadra  sanfrancisco  sarahlehrer-graiwer  schooling  schools  science  self  sensemaking  senses  sensory  services  sfsh  sharedexperience  sharing  shelter  shoreditch  siliconvalley  similarities  simonesantilli  simplicity  slow  slowness  slowpedagogy  small  smallness  sms  social  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  society  software  sound  sounds  soundscapes  space  spimes  stevenjohnson  storytelling  studioclassroom  studiogardens  subjectivity  subways  surveillance  systems  tcsnmy  teaching  teams  teamwork  technocracy  technology  territory  thecoolcouple  thinking  tijuana  time  togetherness  toshare  touch  towatch  tracking  transportation  travel  trinhminh-ha  trust  tumblr  turbulence  twitter  ubicomp  ubiquitous  ulrichbeck  understanding  universities  urban  urbanism  us  usc  utility  utopia  values  via:caseygollan  victoriasobel  video  virtualreality  visualization  vr  warrenellis  washingtondc  wealth  wealthdistribution  web  webapp  wheregoodideascomefrom  wmmna  work  workplace  workshops  worldisflat  worldmaking  wow  zannybegg  zurb 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: