robertogreco + professionaldevelopment   98

The wisdom of pedagogy and the perpetual newness of teaching - Long View on Education
"The wisdom of pedagogy and the perpetual newness of teaching
longviewoneducation.org · by Benjamin Doxtdator · September 13, 2017
I am now well past those initial first few years of teaching, comfortable in my own skin and still learning. Into my tenth year in a classroom, and my 6th year at the International School of Brussels, I have seen colleagues make it through their first five years in the profession. And we all know that myth about teacher improvement: after the first three to five years, there’s not much left.

There is a whole teacher management literature based around the premise that teachers need to be pushed to change. Since I’m well past being a new teacher, this passage about mid-career teachers by Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan leapt out at me:

“We focus on the first three years to get teachers going. And then we focus on the people who may sometimes prove difficult at the end. We think we can leave the people in the middle alone. If we leave them alone, though, there’s the danger that things become too easy, that they won’t stretch themselves. And then we’re headed for a worrying end, and instead of quiet ones or disenchanted ones or especially renewed ones, we find ourselves dealing with reprobates — and we created them. We need to focus more on the teachers in the middle and to keep challenging and stretching them.”
While I’d rather not become a reprobate in my later career, I also don’t feel in need of someone to challenge or stretch me. Besides my students, that is. I’m eager to learn from others, and appreciate when my colleagues enter my room in the middle of class to see what’s going on. I want to hear advice, to collaborate on designing better assessments, to re-think my decisions in the classroom.

Let me explain my essential disagreement with Hargreaves and Fullan: drawing on business management models translates into constructing unhelpful teacher management models. As one of the caring professions, teaching involves coming to know and care about the people we serve, and there is a perpetual newness there. We constantly need to adjust to the particular individuals in our care, and as we form relationships, we have a strong internal motivation to improve our practice. We don’t want to ‘do better’ in the abstract, but to do better by those that we care about and educate. In other words, there’s no need to get us to identify with a company brand and mantra so that we internalize targets for growth.

And all too often we are presented with the wrong targets for growth: test scores and evaluations. It’s quite possible that the quantitative culture, combined with a general tendency to blame schools for many social and economic issues, leads to those ‘reprobates’. I wonder if instead of mid-career stretching, many people need continuous career care."



"The wisdom of pedagogy is something lived, like the appreciation of a song or insight into another person, not something we can capture in statement, check off in an evaluation, or find on google. The wisdom of pedagogy is about starting from a place of trust and opportunity, something easier said than lived, and it’s what teachers deserve, too."
benjamindoxtdator  2017  socialmedia  education  learning  pedagogy  care  caring  trust  opportunity  anthonycody  andyhargreaves  michaelfullan  teaching  schools  professionaldevelopment 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Oral History Summer School
"Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York, in 2012, as a rigorous training program to help students from varied fields––writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers––make use of oral history as an ethical interview practice in their lives and work (Read More: What is Oral History?).

Spanning the realms of scholarship, advocacy, media-making, and art, OHSS is a hands-on program, which means that students conduct interviews, design projects, produce radio documentary, and archive their recordings while learning the theoretical underpinnings of the field. We also offer advanced training in the form of focused workshops including those on memory loss, mixed ability interviewing, oral history-based documentary film, ethnomusicology, family history, and trauma. We're a cross-disciplinary program with a strong belief that the field is best defined and explored with the guidance of instructors from the field of oral history and from adjacent fields/pursuits: social work, disability studies, ethnomusicology, trauma studies, grassroots organizing, medicine, documentary film, and more.

Our students have come from Italy, Australia, Germany, Switzerland, China, Canada, Spain, Turkey, Brazil, Panama, and all over the United States. OHSS alumni have gone on to apply their oral history training to exhibitions, policy work, branding, art projects, and research, as well as collaborations with community organizations, institutions, and schools. You can read more about our alumni network and their accomplishments, here, and in OHSS Alumni newsletters I (2014) and II (2016).

In summer 2016, we will will offer our first workshop in Chicago, with the Studs Terkel Radio Archive and Chicago Torture Justice Memorials. Our first online class will be offered in 2016 and Oral History Winter School will return to Hudson in January 2017. Read more about our workshops, here."
oralhistory  storytelling  training  sfsh  professionaldevelopment  classideas  writing  humanrights  ethnomusicology  traumastudies  grassroots  organizing  documentary  film  audio  radio  squarespace 
july 2017 by robertogreco
manifesting roads
"The pace of change throughout this transformation - on educators and on parents has been nothing if not accelerated.

You could measure that in the amount being spent on professional development, for teachers, or by the hours spent on learning how to use any multitude of systems that are meant to make things “better”. Parents are asked to log in to a multitude of sites, to unpack learning, to share learning, to see in real-time what we’re doing inside our educational centres.

And the question I ask is - is it any better?

Do our educators feel more confident?
Do students feel more cared for or understood?
Are parents any closer to really understanding what it is their children are doing or learning when they come to school?
Do our communities have any better understandings of what it is we educators talk about - such that they feel they can trust us?

Is our understanding of the purpose of education and learning any more advanced or nuanced than say it was in 2000?

Or 1989?

Because if it’s not, then has all this “transformation” and expense been for naught? If we accelerate this change any more, will we do so while paying any attention to what’s being left behind.

Wouldn’t the only people that really, truly benefit from the rush to be transformational and significantly accelerated - be those who are self-promoting “transformation” and “acceleration” - not the ones who deal with the consequences and debris left behind."



"Promoting and ‘encouraging’ from the sidelines makes for a wonderful warm fuzzy for the tech sector, like they are "giving back" to the children - but while that's great and all - the public education sector in New Zealand has an annual budget of $14.4 billion dollars.

It’s a serious business.
And the tech sector knows this.

Schools aren’t charities, and they shouldn’t act as charities. But they also aren’t startups. Nor are they needing to change or save the world, like many in Silicon Valley and their ilk believe is their privilege.

The tech sector is aware of the wonderfully captive market that the education sector is - for their products, for their services, for their software and hardware.

Education on the whole has lapped those services and products up. Remember interactive whiteboards, 3D printers and Google cardboard VR sets?

The tech sector is also aware of the fact that schools in part, serve to produce competent workers that can fill the roles that the thriving tech sector needs and demands.

That’s fine also - and a perfectly valid role for public education to fill.

But let’s not insult each other by assuming the tech industry is mildly cheering from the sidelines of public education, for the perceived greater good of the fine citizens of New Zealand, while demanding that education shift itself to be something that serves the tech sector.

The tech sector is utterly invested in getting what’s best for itself and its shareholders..

To me it is manifestly evident, that what this document lays out is an ability to disengage from what we must strive to constantly do and be in education.

Namely - human and caring.

This manifesto removes any shred of humanity or care or concern for what it is to be an actual living human.

It talks of students and results and outcomes in such horribly abstract ways that it strips the very essence and soul out of our role as educators.

It knows nothing of humans who can’t for the life of themselves figure out why no-one likes them.

Humans who are angry and want to be liked, and for whom the digital space is just another way by which they’re excluded or made to feel small.

It knows nothing of humans who are dealing with so much other real life, off-line broken-ness, that a constant scroll through Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook is the only connection they have with any positive emotion.

It knows nothing of the realities that reading, writing, numeracy, art, dance and science bring to a child. Of course, all of these can be delivered via a small glass screen, an SSID and a series of interconnected IP addresses, but none of these subjects matter if the person viewing the screen doesn't care.

Education matters. Learning matters.

But only if we care enough as humans to be the connection."
timkong  education  edtech  2017  schools  teaching  howeteach  professionaldevelopment  pupose  transformation  change  manifestos  newzealand  humanism  humans  howwteach  influence  siliconvalley  caring  sfsh  biases  business 
may 2017 by robertogreco
TEACHERS 4 SOCIAL JUSTICE
"About:

Who We Are.
Teachers 4 Social Justice is a grassroots non-profit teacher support and development organization in San Francisco. T4SJ is project of the Community Initiative Fund.

Our Mission.
Our mission is to provide opportunities for self-transformation, leadership, and community building to educators in order to affect meaningful change in the classroom, school, community and society. See more about our goals, principles, and vision in the next pages.

What We Do.
T4SJ organizes teachers and community-based educators and implements programs and projects that develop empowering learning environments, more equitable access to resources and power, and realizing a just and caring culture.

Join us!
If you want to join us and you live in the area, come to one of our general meetings or any of the events to get plugged in and connect!"



"Mission:

Teachers 4 Social Justice is a grassroots non-profit teacher support and development organization. Our mission is to provide opportunities for self-transformation, leadership, and community building to educators in order to affect meaningful change in the classroom, school, community and society.

T4SJ organizes teachers and community-based educators and implements programs and projects that develop empowering learning environments, more equitable access to resources and power, and realizing a just and caring culture."



"Goals:

1. Maintain a network of progressive educators to develop an environment of support and professional development.

2. Sustain a membership that is engaged in a continuing process of critical self-reflection and growth.

3. Evolve an education system that is responsive to the needs of the communities it serves and promotes equitable access to resources and power.

4. A membership with a level of competency in creating empowering learning environments."



"Principles:

1. Involvement of teachers of color in all aspects of the organization is crucial.

2. Democratic decision-making processes need to be upheld, ensuring the meaningful participation of every member in systems and structures.

3. Shared accountability for our actions as individuals and as an organization.

4. Learning and collective action is a partnership between the students, teachers, parents, and community.

5. Our actions address root causes of systems of oppression at individual, group, and societal levels (racism, sexism, homophobia, age-ism, able-ism, etc.)

6. The development of our organization is based on the evolution of our individual and collective processes."



"We have established the following platform to offer a different vision for what is possible in American Public Schools:

Our Platform

1. Democratic School Governance:

TAG supports efforts to strengthen schools and communities by ensuring and protecting local parent, educator and student leadership of school governance at all levels. We believe in diverse, democratically elected local school boards and councils. We support the creation of structures that enable meaningful and informed inclusive participation.

2. School and Community-Based Solutions to School Transformation:

TAG believes that local communities and those affected by school reform should be looked to for the wisdom and knowledge to transform their local schools. This process should be bottom-up, participatory and highly democratic to engage schools and communities in school improvement and transformation. There should be mutual responsibility and accountability among educators, families, youth, and communities. This process must secure the voice, participation and self-determination of communities and individuals who have been historically marginalized.

3. Free, Public and Equitable Educational Opportunities for All Students:

TAG supports measures that ensure every student access to a fully funded, equitable public education that is not threatened by market-based reforms such as vouchers, charter schools, or turnarounds by entities that divert public funds to private enterprise. We demand increased funding to end inequities in the current segregated and unequal system that favors those with race or class privilege. We believe that resources should be distributed according to need, and particularly to those historically under-resourced by the impact of structural, racial and economic discrimination and disinvestment. Public schools should be responsive to the community, not the marketplace.

4. Curricula and Pedagogies that Promote Creative, Critical and Challenging Education:

TAG supports transformative curricula and pedagogies that promote critical thinking and creativity in our students. Curricular themes that are grounded in the lived experiences of students are built from and extend community cultural wealth and histories. We promote a pedagogy that leads to the development of people who can work collaboratively, solve problems creatively, and live as full participants in their communities. We promote a vision of education that counters the multiple forms of oppression, promotes democratic forms of participation (community activism) in our society and that generates spaces of love and hope.

5. Multiple, High-quality, Comprehensive Assessments:

TAG supports creation of assessments that identify school and student needs in order to strengthen, not punish, schools. We call for ending the reliance on standardized tests as the single measure of student and school progress and performance. Comprehensive assessment should include work sampling and performance-based assessment and should be an outgrowth of student-centered curriculum and instruction.

High stakes tests have historically perpetuated existing inequality; in contrast, fair assessments should be used to provide teachers with the information they need to meet the needs of all of their students. High-stakes tests should not be used to determine teacher and school performance. Instead, teacher evaluation should be an on-going, practice with the goal of improving teachers’ pedagogical, content, and cultural knowledge and should be based on authentic standards for the teaching profession, not student test scores.

6. Teacher Professional Development that Serves the Collective Interests of Teachers, Students, and Communities:

TAG believes that teacher professional development must support teachers to become effective partners with students and parents, and to be responsive to community needs. The form and content should be determined by teachers themselves with advice from parents and students and should work to develop social justice teaching practices.

7. Protect the Right to Organize:

TAG believes teachers have the right to organize to protect their rights as professionals and workers. Unions should be a place where teachers have a voice in creating and protecting an educational system that is set up in the best interests of students, families, and teachers. We support truly democratic governance of teacher unions and believe that they should champion policies that ultimately serve their communities.

8. School Climate that Empowers and Liberates Students:

TAG believes in working for school discipline policies and a school climate where students and teachers can thrive. Schools must be institutions that support the holistic social and emotional needs of all students, help equip young people with empathy and conflict resolution skills, and work to interrupt and transform oppressive dynamics that threaten the safety of the whole school community.

We support ending the practice of and reliance on punitive discipline strategies that push students out of school and into the military or prisons. Schools should remove zero tolerance policies, institute restorative practices and restorative justice models, and create time in the curriculum for community-building practices and social/emotional supports."
conferences  education  teaching  teachers  socialjustice  sanfrancisco  sfsh  community  society  schoolclimate  professionaldevelopment  inequality  pedagogy  curriculum  governance  democracy  equity  equality  race  racism  sexism  gender  homophobia  age  ageism  ableism  disability  disabilities 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Radical Hope: A Teaching Manifesto – The Tattooed Professor
[Especially for this line: "Teaching is a radical act of hope."]

"Every summer, I take time to reflect on the academic year that was. The classes I taught, the workshops I either facilitated or attended, what I learned from failures and successes in and out of the classroom–when it comes to my teaching, I try to be a critically reflective practitioner. Directing a teaching center on my campus gives me a chance to also ground that reflection in the larger discourse about teaching and learning in higher education.

That discourse often doesn’t give one grounds for optimism; we’re continually reminded of the toll neoliberalism has exacted from higher education. Kansas, Louisiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois are only the most dramatic examples of a larger trend where higher education is a hostage to governing elites’ Randian economic fantasies. The fetishizing of “efficiencies” continues to erode faculty effectiveness, morale, and labor conditions. A narrow and misguided rhetoric of marketability and utility slowly chokes the Humanities. And, like a constant refrain above the din, we’re repeatedly told that students aren’t prepared for college, that technology makes them stupid, that none of them knows how to read or write or declaim or interact or balance a checkbook or do laundry or whatever. It’s easy, then, to slide into a sort of existential despair. Why bother teaching when it doesn’t matter? When no one cares about what you do or why you do it?

And, honestly, that’s where I was earlier this summer. It’s hard enough to cope with the challenges inherent in higher ed; coupled with the greasy dumpster fire that is our state of public affairs at the moment, it seems downright impossible. So I did what comes naturally to a historian–I went to my books, and then I wrote. Reconnecting with some of the books that have shaped me as an educator, and taking the time to write reflectively about where I think I stand, was a reminder that despite all of its problems, higher education is still a place of transformation and possibility. But it remains so only if we continually and intentionally hold it to the standards we know it should meet. And at the heart of that enterprise is what we do in the classroom. It comes down to, as it so often doefists, a conversation about teaching and learning.

In that spirit, I share here the products of my wrestling with angst and dismay, and the renewed drive it ultimately sparked.

This is my Teaching Manifesto.

If I want my students to take risks and not be afraid to fail then I need to take risks and not be afraid to fail.

It is tempting to think that “upholding disciplinary standards” is the only thing standing between us and the collapse of western civilization. It is also comically inaccurate.

Remember what Paolo Freire meant when he criticized the “banking model” of education, and take those insights to heart.

Learning cannot occur without metacognition and reflection. This applies to both us and our students.

Kids These Days are just like Kids in My Day, or Any Other Day, if we choose to remember honestly.

Our students are not us. If we merely teach to how we prefer to learn, we exclude a majority of our students.

I cannot assume my students will be able to do something that they have not been asked to do before coming to my class, and I cannot blame them for struggling with a task that’s new to them–no matter how ingrained that task is for me.

I am not the one to decide if a student is “ready for college.” That’s the student’s decision. If they’re admitted to my university and they’re in my class, I am ethically and morally obligated to give them my best.

They’re not deficiencies, they’re data points for our pedagogical decisions.

Just as students can get better at learning, I can get better at teaching. If I expect it from them, I should expect it from me.

There is a large body of scholarly research on teaching and learning. To not be conversant with at least its major findings is to commit professional malpractice.

If pedagogy and professional development are secondary priorities for you, don’t be surprised when your class is a secondary priority for your students.

It doesn’t matter how much I know if my students aren’t learning; knowledge must be used, not set up on a shelf to be admired but not touched.

Much of what we do in the classroom cannot be quantified.

And yet…“cannot be quantified” is not the same as “cannot be measured.” If we can’t demonstrate student learning, we aren’t doing it right.

Reclaim assessment for what it is meant to do: to show what our students can do as a result our classes. If we don’t tell our stories, someone else will tell them for us.

If universities truly value education, they cannot undercompensate or adjunctify the faculty and seriously claim to adhere to that commitment. As someone in a privileged academic position, I am obligated to speak this truth loudly and often.

Everyone is fighting their own battles, some on multiple fronts. Compassion and flexibility >>> being a hardass

Things whose pedagogical impact is often underestimated: empathy and humor.

Things whose pedagogical impact is often overestimated: shaming and rigidity.

When you say “rigor,” I think of corpses.

“Coverage” for coverage’s sake is where learning goes to die.

No matter what: Teaching is a radical act of hope."
pedagogy  technology  radicalism  teaching  2016  kevingannon  howwetech  why  thewhy  whyweteach  hope  rigor  empathy  humor  shaming  rigidity  flexibility  highered  highereducation  optimism  curriculum  manifestos  learning  metacognition  reflection  professionaldevelopment  content  knowledge  howwelearn  howweteach  via:audreywatters 
july 2016 by robertogreco
New Tech Network | We support districts, teachers, administrators and students to create dynamic learning environments where students succeed.
"New Tech Network is a nonprofit organization that transforms schools into innovative learning environments. Our project-based learning approach engages students with dynamic, rigorous curriculum. Through extensive professional development and hands-on coaching, our teachers evolve from keepers of knowledge to facilitators of rich, relevant learning. New Tech Network is re-imagining education and the student accomplishments speak volumes."
education  schools  projectbasedlearning  edtech  newtech  newtechnetwork  professionaldevelopment 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Unprofessional Development
"creativity courses for (trouble)makers who teach"

"OUR BEST TEACHERS INSPIRE STUDENTS
TO BE BRAVE AND THINK DIFFERENTLY.

But professional development rarely acknowledges – or inspires – the courage and curiosity that educators bring to their own classrooms. Unprofessional Development is based on the belief that teachers must be celebrated as professional learners who find truth in discovery and joy in taking bold risks. It is a call to ignite a rigorous and personal creative habit. It is a challenge to resist judgment, perfectionism, discomfort and procrastination, and to put creativity at the root of all learning. Unprofessional Development is a charge to write, weld, cook, construct, jury-rig, sketch, stitch, bend and build both in and out of our classrooms."

"WE OFFER THREE TYPES OF COURSES.

Learn more about our Workshop 101, featuring a day of creative provocations; our Oakland Lab series on projects unrelated to classroom practice; and our Custom classes designed just for you.

We believe educators have the inspiration, intuition and experience to do creative work in every classroom. Our day-long Workshop 101 offers hands-on creative provocations and time to collaborate with other like-minded educators in a space that will refresh and inspire new ideas. We invite educators of all disciplines, grade levels and learning environments to attend together to share this experience and build creative capacity back on campus. We're committed to making creativity accessible to everyone: Please email christina@projecthdesign.org to learn about scholarships."

"Emily Pilloton is an architect, educator, and founder of the nonprofit Project H Design. She has worked for a decade designing and building community architecture projects with students, supporting teachers' creative growth through project-based learning and making, and researching the role of creativity in all aspects of learning. Her ideas and work have made their way to the TED Stage, The Colbert Report, the New York Times, and more. She is the author of two books, Design Revolution: 100 Products that Empower People, and Tell Them I Built This: Transforming Schools, Communities, and Lives with Design-Based Education. Her work is featured in the full-length documentary, If You Build It.

Christina Jenkins is a teacher and designer who developed her practice over nearly ten years in New York City classrooms. She launched a middle school technology program featured by PBS Frontline, and later taught interdisciplinary courses ranging from anthropology to cartography at the NYC iSchool. She is a Fund for Teachers fellow, an Academy for Teachers fellow, and a Blackboard award recipient, and has spoken widely about her work. She made an extremely popular animation about Kumon, and wrote a mini-comic about the time during her first year of teaching that she saw Picasso's Dora Maar au Chat sell for $95 million at Sotheby's. She's studying computer science and has a lifelong love of classical piano."
christinajenkins  emilypilloton  education  professionaldevelopment  togo  teaching  creativity  events  lcproject  openstudioproject 
november 2015 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Your Conference Session Is The Appetizer. The Internet Is The Main Dish.
"ISTE just wrapped. NCTM wrapped several months ago. What was accomplished? What can you remember of the sessions you attended? Will those sessions change your practice and in what ways?

Zak Champagne, Mike Flynn, and I are all NCTM conference presenters and we were all concerned about the possibility that a) none of our participants did much with our sessions once they ended, b) lots of people who might benefit from our sessions (and whose questions and ideas might benefit us) weren’t in the room.

The solution to (b) is easy. Put video of the sessions on the Internet. Our solution to (a) was complicated and only partial:

Build a conference session so that it prefaces and provokes work that will be ongoing and online.

To test out these solutions, we set up Shadow Con after hours at NCTM. We invited six presenters each to give a ten-minute talk. Their talk had to include a “call to action,” some kind of closing homework assignment that participants could accomplish when they went home. The speakers each committed to help participants with that homework on the session website we set up for that purpose.

Then we watched and collected data. There were two major surprises, which we shared along with other findings with the NCTM president, president-elect, and executive director.

Here is the five-page brief we shared with them. We’d all benefit from your feedback, I’m sure."

[Document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1c2Gsa3yRyJS8etrosi6KvvwNXPO_Mnzoh_AIp5vA34c/edit

"We were surprised to find that engagement in the talks was much greater on Twitter than on the website we created to host that engagement. People would watch the talks and then debate and discuss its substance through tweets on Twitter rather than through comments on our website."



"We recommend that NCTM provides each of its speakers with an anchor for their talks – a webpage – even if initially that anchor is only loosely embedded in the ground. The speakers themselves must voluntarily drive that anchor deeper by adding supporting resources, linking to conversations off site, uploading video or audio of their talks, offering a call to action, and interacting with the attendees who choose to extend their engagement. NCTM cannot do that work for the speakers, nor should they if they could, but NCTM’s current website forecloses speakers from doing that work if they want to. NCTM’s current website only allows speakers to strengthen their attachment to their audiences by uploading handouts.

We ask NCTM’s leadership to consider that the number of people who view the talks in Boston will never increase. That number is fixed at the people who were in the room on that day, at that time, limiting both engagement and access. Meanwhile, talks hosted online can increase in viewership effectively without limit, edifying viewers, spreading ideas, populating pages of search results, and promoting NCTM itself as the leading organization for math teachers for decades. We encourage NCTM to take several large steps down that path in the months and years to come." ]
danmeyer  2015  conferences  professionaldevelopment  nctm  iste  callstoaction  internet  web  twitter  video 
july 2015 by robertogreco
How MOOCs Could Reform Education Completely by Accident - The Atlantic
"Even so, it may not be time to write them off. An unexplained phenomenon in early MOOC data, now illuminated by another recent study (this one from Harvard and MIT), could help the courses live up to the education-reform hype after all—but with a somewhat ironic twist. Perhaps one of the overlooked values in MOOCs is not in sharing Ivy League wisdom with the masses, but in teaching educators—and, in turn, improving traditional K-12 schools.

From the outset, analyses of MOOC students showed that enrollees were already overwhelmingly educated. According to various MOOC enrollment data, including that contained in the UPenn study, a majority of those registering for the free classes (between 70 and 80 percent) already had college degrees. That’s about double the rate of the U.S. population at large. And in other parts of the world—where free online college classes were envisioned as tools of social mobility—the portion of already-educated students was even more dramatic. Last year, a piece of commentary that ran in The Times cited a study showing that in countries such as Brazil, China, India, Russia, and South Africa—where just 5 percent of residents have college degrees—more than 80 percent of MOOC students had one.

Although there wasn’t a lot of hard research to support it, many analysts pegged the high percentage of already-degreed students in MOOCs to an interest in freshening up job skills. Meanwhile, some MOOC backers attributed the lack of degree-seekers in the free courses to limited broadband access among lower-income populations.

Then, earlier this year, Harvard and MIT released what’s ostensibly the largest study to date of MOOCs and their participants. The joint study examined 68 courses offered by the two institutions though the edX platform, covering 1.7 million participants and more than 1.1 billion “events”—what the study defines as each participant “click” recorded in the edX servers. The report not only confirmed that MOOC students tend to be college-educated, but it also demonstrated that a striking percentage of those students are educators themselves. “What jumped out for me was that ... as many as 39 percent of our learners [in MOOCs overall] are teachers,” said Isaac Chuang, one of the study’s lead researchers. In some of Harvard’s MOOCs, half the students were teachers. And in “Leaders of Learning”—a course out of its Graduate School of Education—a whopping two-thirds of participants identified as such.

This makes sense. Teachers devote their lives to the arts and sciences of sharing information and imparting skills. That they would voluntarily participate in an online-learning experience focusing on a field they already know isn’t that surprising; as practitioners of education, teachers may also have an interest in the processes and applications of MOOCs, studying how questions, assignments, and tests are handled in online teaching environments, for example. Nor is it surprising that teachers are interested in pedagogy—watching and learning how an applauded instructor delivers a lesson. Educators may want to see how an esteemed Harvard professor, for instance, teaches topics they cover in their own classrooms. Or they may want to appropriate the learning resources used in the MOOCs.

And if teachers are flocking to MOOCs to observe their more-accomplished colleagues or pick up new ideas to apply in their own classrooms, this trend could accelerate a needed renaissance in professional development for teachers.

Nationally, professional development—the process of keeping teachers up to date on subjects and teaching methods—is a costly and (arguably) futile endeavor. Every state requires some form of ongoing education for teachers; the U.S. Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, has said the United States spends about $2.5 billion on it every year. “But when I say that to teachers they usually laugh or cry,” Duncan said. “They are not feeling it. We have to do better with professional-development money.”

And that’s probably an understatement: Teachers don’t seem to be “feeling” professional development at all. According to a 2009 study from the Center for Public Education, when asked about their experience in professional development, most of the teachers surveyed “reported that it was totally useless.”

In general, with the exception of moving from chalkboards to PowerPoints, professional-development programs for teachers over the generations have hardly changed. The programs seldom involve more than presentations and narrations on new classroom tactics or standards—even though research has shown that those teaching methods aren’t the most effective."



"Given their high rates of voluntary MOOC participation, according to the Harvard/MIT study’s authors, teachers may have discovered these benefits on their own, turning to the free courses to fill in for what traditional professional-development programs are lacking. “There is an opportunity to make the ‘secondary’ use of online course resources by teachers a primary goal,” the researchers wrote.

If MOOCs take advantage of that opportunity, and if the teaching practice improves as a result, these massive open online courses may help improve education worldwide after all. And that wouldn’t necessarily be by exposing eager minds to free higher education, as advocates once hoped, but by enhancing learning at traditional, brick-and-mortar public schools.

And the results could be powerful. More than 6,100 of the participants featured in the Harvard/MIT study were teachers who took MOOCs in subjects they already taught. That’s roughly the number of public-school teachers in San Diego. In a way, then, perhaps Friedman was inadvertently right: It’s hard to imagine many things with “more potential to lift more people out of poverty” and “unlock a billion more brains to solve the world’s biggest problems.” Perhaps that potential, however, lies in their ability to improve the quality of the country’s public-education system."
via:audreywatters  mooc  moocs  professionaldevelopment  education  pedagogy  teaching  learning  online 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Learning in Landscapes: Research, Design, Praxis | T. Steele-Maley
"One of my summer research strands is to extend the work and design I am doing around participatory and practice based learning. I have found a few works exceptionally helpful and thought I would list them here in hopes others will too.

On my desk and causing an outpouring of thought and design is Learning in Landscapes of Practice: Boundaries, identity, and knowledgeability in practice-based learning.

What I like about this work is that it builds previous works of Wenger and Lave on situational learning, perspective and identity specifically: Wenger (1998) Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity: Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives on CoP’s and the foundational work of Lave and Wenger on situational learning (1991) Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation: Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives . I will also add the book all in education should read on critical ethnography by Lave (2011) Apprenticeship in Critical Ethnographic Practice .

I find each of these works intriguing and valuable towards the design of new professional development, organizational, and ultimately educational ecologies. Learning in Landscapes of Practice…. resonates because the concept of knowledgeability is so salient to schools and educational ecologies. In education, our silos for competency are legion and attempts to integrate professional development and participatory learning for the whole organization are very difficult. One of the main reasons for this, is our lack of robust frameworks to understand and critique the whole educational system that exists, quite often at this point, to perpetuate itself, as opposed to the needs of learners and communities.

This is tough work to tackle and the space of theory in schools often neglected. A common refrain in K-12 schools, “We do not have enough time for theory, we just need to….”, or, “we will leave that to the experts”. These views are at opposition with the reality that education is a social construct, that must be theorized, constructed/reconstructed through praxis, and care-taken by individuals in the community. No educator, parent or policymaker should leave the spaces of education, specifically praxis, unexamined. So where theory can open your eyes to a million valleys of thought and wonder, ultimately praxis allows for experience, knowledge building and networking towards both the boundaries and possibilities of education. These are critical conversations to have in education and society and I feel we need to tae a much closer look at what we are doing.

If you have considered these works in the K-12, Higher Ed or informal learning space please do reach out, via comment here or by way of Twitter, email…."
thomassteelemaley  lcproject  openstudioproject  experientialeducation  education  interdisciplinary  systemsthinking  raxis  2015  étiennewenger  ethnography  theory  practice  jeanlave  situationist  situatedlearning  community  communitiesofpractice  school  tcsnmy  professionaldevelopment  educationalecologies  knowledgeability  silos  transdisciplinary  organizations  organizationaldesign  socialconstructs  society  meta  experientiallearning 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Progressive Education Lab
"What is the PEL Program?

PEL is a two year fellowship (a training year followed by an internship) designed to give young people who wish to become teachers an understanding of the fundamentals of progressive theory while learning from their experiences at four different progressive schools. PEL's mission is to prepare new teachers to become powerful educators and agents of change in the profession.
An Experiential Curriculum

The experiential curriculum will be braided with theoretical work in:

• The social foundations of progressive education
• Child, adolescent and adult development
• Brain research, learning styles and adaptive teaching
• Summative and formative assessment
• Curriculum and lesson design"
education  progressive  calhounschool  purneyschool  cambridgeschoolofweston  unquowaschool  fellowships  professionaldevelopment 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Overcoming the Assessment Culture to Achieve Real Education Reform | Dr. Richard Elmore
"Professional development for educators is a fundamental key to large-scale improvement of learning for children. Yet building the capacity of adults charged with preparing students for the future is the weakest part of our nation's reform strategy.

This is not because we don't know what to do. We understand that professional development must be sustained over time. We know it must be structured and focused, and include direct observation and support in the classroom. We know that teachers and school leaders must understand the importance of children's cognitive and emotional development and embrace it with a sense of urgency.

Our nation's record in professional development isn't weak because we don't have the knowledge or the tools to do it right. It's weak because it is difficult to do and because policymakers tend to gravitate toward what is easier. Professional development is an investment of dollars and time. And, it often demands profound culture change.

Culture change is particularly difficult in an environment with schools that have been redesigned around assessments, which measure school performance. And we have not figured out how to make this accountability system support the development of human beings. I would argue that this assessment culture is the single biggest challenge facing professional development and school improvement.

If you visit most American schools today, you'll observe instructional practices that are not designed to develop students' competencies and engagement in learning, but to teach simple recall tasks that can be transferred to test scores. Most schools know they are stuck in this territory and don't like it. They know they can get students to a certain level of performance by doing these things; however, they know these are not the right things.

We can begin to move away from this accountability environment by placing professional development experts in the classroom who are knowledgeable about instruction, who understand and are inquisitive about how students think, and who will work with teachers as learning partners. However, even that will not work if we fail to embrace a true learning culture.

Instead of fixing teachers, we need to release the energy that's already in the classroom and put strong resources in place that support teachers. These added resources will enable them to make the necessary shifts -- shifts that challenge students to struggle for, and ultimately find, meaningful answers to real problems.

If I could make one wish, it would be to create a generation of teachers who walk into the classroom every morning expecting to be surprised by what kids can do. This is not the job of professional development alone, but also our schools of education.

Can we make these cultural shifts? In working with more than 300 schools that have made a commitment to professional development, I know it can be done.

The role of national, state and local policymakers must be to ensure that every struggling school, and every struggling teacher, has the same opportunity."
richardelmore  professionaldevelopment  2014  teaching  howweteach  learning  schools  education  policy  assessment  accountability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » My Opening Keynote for CUE 2014
"I started by describing why edtech presentations often make me aggravated. Then I described my "edtech mission statement," which helps me through those presentations and helps me make tough choices for my limited resources."

[Direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRsE6mKkDjw ]

BTW. I was also interviewed at CUE for the Infinite Thinking Machine with Mark Hammons.

[That video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1J831tffJ4 ]
edtech  danmeyer  teaching  math  mathematics  technology  curiosity  cue  cue2014  perplexity  online  internet  howwework  sharing  blogging  professionaldevelopment  learning  education  noticing  interestedness  del.icio.us  rss  interestingness  keynote  documentcameras  photography  video  mobile  phones  remembering  ela  languagearts  wcydwt  2014  askingquestions  presentations  engagement  lectures  lecturing  questionasking  interested 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Finnish Education Chief: 'We Created a School System Based on Equality' - Christine Gross-Loh - The Atlantic
"We used to have a system which was really unequal. My parents never had a real possibility to study and have a higher education. We decided in the 1960s that we would provide a free quality education to all. Even universities are free of charge. Equal means that we support everyone and we’re not going to waste anyone’s skills. We don’t know what our kids will turn out like—we can’t know if one first-grader will become a famous composer, or another a famous scientist. Regardless of a person’s gender, background, or social welfare status, everyone should have an equal chance to make the most of their skills. It’s important because we are raising the potential of the entire human capital in Finland. Even if we don’t have oil or minerals or any other natural resources, well, we think human capital is also a valuable resource."



"We created a school system based on equality to make sure we can develop everyone’s potential. Now we can see how well it’s been working. Last year the OECD tested adults from 24 countries measuring the skill levels of adults aged 16-65, on a survey called the PIAAC (Programme for International Assessment of Adult Competencies), which tests skills in literacy, numeracy, and problem solving in technology-rich environments. Finland scored at or near the top on all measures. But there were differences between age groups. The test showed that all younger Finns who had had a chance to go to compulsory basic school after the reforms had extremely high knowledge; those who were older, and who were educated before the reforms, had average know-how. So, our educational system is creating people who have extremely good skills and strong know-how—a know-how which is created by investing into education. We have small class sizes and everyone is put in the same class, but we support struggling students more than others, because those individuals need more help. This helps us to be able to make sure we can use/develop everyone’s skills and potential."



"Academics isn’t all kids need. Kids need so much more. School should be where we teach the meaning of life; where kids learn they are needed; where they can learn community skills. We like to think that school is also important for developing a good self-image, a strong sensitivity to other people’s feelings … and understanding it matters to take care of others. We definitely want to incorporate all those things in education.

I also believe that breaking up the school day with different school subjects is very important. We offer a variety of subjects during the school day. We’re also testing out what it’s like to have breaks in the middle of the school day for elementary school students. At a few elementary schools recently we’ve been offering sports, handcrafts, or school clubs during the middle of the school day, rather than just in the morning or after school as we already do. This is to help kids to think of something else, and do something different and more creative during the day. "
finland  education  schools  poverty  professionaldevelopment  2014  kristakiuru  vocationaltraining  arts  autonomy  teaching  learning  policy  equality  equity  publicschools  howwelearn  howweteach 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Bat, Bean, Beam: Sixteen tales of information technology in education, 1991-2013
"1.
It was not compulsory. My father, a technician and audio engineer, belonged to an Apple Computer Users’ Group and read print publications – magazines – about computing. The resource closet adjacent to his workroom was stocked floor to ceiling with used audiocassettes, loosely classified by course code."



"4.
It was not compulsory. The new students used it differently; those who came from abroad were willing to spend their home currency on things teachers considered wasteful and expensive, like international mobile phone calls.

One student faced off a test supervisor in mutual bewilderment after he left the room to take a business call and was not allowed back in. "



"8.
It was obligatory. A widespread rumour was that a colleague whose role was made redundant had been targeted because of a refusal to use email, or any technology other than the photocopier.

Another colleague brought long handwritten essays to meetings from which to read counterarguments to whatever was under discussion. There was only ever one copy available."



"12.
It was fragmentary. A student, young and perpetually dazed, came into the office to ask for weeks-old course materials, explanations of content, assignment extensions. Haven’t you read the weekly emails on what you have to do? I asked. Oh, I don’t really check my email, said the student. Too many messages."



"14.
It was breaking into bits, even while it was new.

You can give course notices on your phone.

I only use my phone for emergencies, like in the earthquake.

The hard shell of the open laptop, raised like a drawbridge to deflect, to disconnect.

I don’t want to put a comment in the learning forum because it might be wrong and then I’ll feel dumb.

Is this for homeworks, teacher, on the Internet? Will you give us a grade?"



"16.
It was breaking into bits, even while it was new.

The contact hours in the classroom and the sporadic access in between, the logs that show who has completed the readings and who is offline.

The copyright notices at the photocopier and the ghost-stacks of extracts that chafe at the ten percent limit.

The professional futurists whose utopias will not be mocked, except through the limits of budget proposals.

The noise, the compliance, the surveillance.

The light in the cracks."
edtech  meganclayton  2013  technology  education  schools  teaching  email  mobile  phones  surveillance  compliance  control  bureaucracy  professionaldevelopment  change  computing  computers  internet  web  twitter 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Numbers | Savage Minds Backup
"1. The other day I was thinking about conferences.  Let’s say you’re in a panel with 10 people, and each person pays a total of $500 dollars to get there.  This includes conference fees, airfare, hotel, and so on.  So that’s a grand total of $5000 dollars so everyone can write a paper, fly across the country, walk into a room, present their paper for 12-15 minutes and maybe have a group conversation for another 20 minutes or so.  It’s a lot of money.  Granted, conferences are about a lot more than just going to present.  They are about going to other presentations, making connections, seeing friends, etc.  But I think there are times when it might make sense to take that collective $5000, round up 10 people who want to collaborate, find a cheap central place to meet—and then do something.  Like write a book.  Create and actually start implementing a project.  Whatever.  Again, conferences have their place.  But I think sometimes it’s also good to look at what we’re doing—and what we want to do—and know when it’s the moment to do something a little different.  Imagine what 10 people with a common goal could really do if given some serious time to really put their heads together.



6. Now let’s talk about funding your fieldwork. Everyone wants to get a grant. A lot of time goes into writing them. Now, think about the total amount of time you put into writing a grant. Let’s say you work on a grant for a year, and you average 5 hours per week (of really working on it). And, after that year, let’s say you get a grant for $10,000. That would be about $38.46 per hour of work (this does not account for the work time of your adviser or anyone who helps you edit etc). If you work on this grant for an average of 10 hours per week, that would be $19.23 per hour. If you average 20 hours per week, that translates to about $9.62 per hour. At what point does it make more sense to work slinging drinks in the local bar to fund your fieldwork?

7. How much money do undergraduate students spend on the average introductory textbook? Let’s say it’s about 100 bucks. And let’s say there are 300 undergrads in one particular department. That’s $30,000. Multiply that by 5 years. Now we’re at $150,000. Imagine what one department could do with 150 grand, a heap of political will, and all of the potential of open access publishing."
via:anne  professionaldevelopment  ideas  money  conferences  research  fieldwork  funding  grants  efficiency  academia  highered  highereducation  openstudioproject  snarkmarketseminar  self-funding  retreats  generativewebevents  2013 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Technology Integration in K-12
Q: I'm curious as to what you think the three most important things for new
teachers to know about technology integration in k-12?

"1. Community - teaching can be a lonely profession, and it's easy to think you face problems nobody else faces. One of the greatest aspect of the internet is its ability to connect people who are isolated in just that way. A teacher who is able to find an online network will find support and resources. The exact technology doesn't matter much, and has evolved over the years, from the days of email mailing lists, to community bulletin boards, to social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook.

2. Educational Resources - you want your use of the internet to be of practical value, and typically that means finding a quick and easy way to find resources for your classes. It is often a lot easier to find something than to create something. But it's important to do something better than just searching on Google; that can drain more time than you can imagine. Communities often support resource-sharing sites, or members can at least point to one.

3. Course Tools - the original LMS was called 'Web Course Tools' and the name was apt, because the desire here is to provide access to tools that make teaching in a class easier. Simple course tools can be one of the teacher's greatest assets - a place to store course documents and handhouts, to keep records and possibky grades, to develop a profile over time on each student. These tools *may* be accessible by students, in classes that have good technology integration, but the greatest value will be to help the teacher stay organized.

You'll note that I haven't included any presentation tools, like online video, or talked about having the whole class use blogs or Facebook. That's because of the question you asked, which focuses on new teachers and technology integration in the classroom. It is in my mind unwise to attempt to use technology to teach until after you have already learned to use technology for personal development and productivity.

This is partially because it is essential to develop an easy facility with technology before using it in the classroom, and partially because teachers without that experience tend to use technology as a type of television (or presentation tool). But as can be seen from the three points above, technology for personal learning and development is about connecting to community, leaning to find resources, and supporting improved productivity."
community  tools  lms  education  teaching  learning  technology  professionaldevelopment  presentations  stephendownes 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Social media, research and museums — a concrete example | iCHSTM 2013 blog
I’m not suggesting that this short exchange of tweets is particularly unique or mindbreaking. We didn’t go deep into the subject and we stopped after short number of turns. But it is typical of how social media can be used for professional purposes. In fact, over the last couple of years, I have had several conversations of this kind each month with a wide range of Twitter users, both researchers and curators and other kinds of professionals — some shorter, some longer. Discussions with Rebekah Higgitt (@beckyfh) sometimes extend over 15-25 turns with up to a handfull of interlocutors.
Social media allow for instant discussion: Within a few minutes Jaipreet, Nathaniel, David and I were engaged in a conversation about a neglected topic (the representation of smell) in the history of STM and STM museums.
Social media increase the chances of contacts between researchers and curators considerably: The four of us have never met before, and chances are low we would have had this discussion in a coffee break between conference sessions.
You don’t need to travel to meet: You can discuss at length with many people without any travel costs and minimal carbon footprint.
It’s informal: You can have a beer or take a bath while discussing serious matters.
Twitter breaks down hierarchies: It doesn’t matter who’s a senior professor and who’s a PhD candidate –the best argument creates responses, generates discussion, and increases the number of followers. It also makes turn-taking easier, and breaks down the all too common male domination in seminar discussions.
Social media nivellate cultural and linguistic barriers: It doesn’t matter if you speak with a strong accent or master the intricacies of English grammar.
Twitter isn’t built for bullshit: The 140 character limit forces you to sharpen and focus your argument.
internet  twitter  people  museums  thomassöderqvist  socialmedia  research  informal  informality  professionaldevelopment  discussion  howwework  via:tealtan 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Hive NYC Learning Network
[From the about page, which also includes a great directory of organizations.]

"Hive NYC Learning Network is a Mozilla project that was founded through The MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative to fuel collaborations between cultural organizations to create new learning pathways and innovative education practices together. Hive NYC is composed of fifty-six non-profit organizations—museums, libraries, after-school clubs and informal learning spaces—that create Connected Learning opportunities for youth. Network members have access to funding to support this work through The Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust.

Core Beliefs:
• School is not the sole provider in a community’s educational system
• Youth need to be both sophisticated consumers and active producers of digital media
• Learning should be driven by youth’s interests
• Digital media and technology are the glue and amplifier for connected learning experiences
• Out-of-school time spaces are fertile grounds for learning innovation
• Organizations must collaborate to thrive

Hive NYC operates as a city-based learning lab, where members network with each other, share best practices and pedagogies, learn about and play with new technologies, participate in events, and most importantly, collaborate to create learning opportunities for NYC youth. As part of the network, members have access to the following support and services:

• Strategic guidance in seeking funding through the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in the New York Community Trust
• Brokered connections between member organizations based on shared ideas and potential programs
• Participation in events in and beyond New York City that illustrate the work of network members and promote Connected Learning principles, digital literacy AND webmaking skills
• Access to involvement with the NYC Department of Education and others seeking to build experimental and/or sustainable partnerships with Hive NYC
• Opportunity to promote new, programs and events through Hive NYC communications channels (blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc.), as well as youth and volunteer recruitment
• A knowledge exchange for members to share models, ideas, content, tools and best-practices with each other
• Professional Development sessions that develop staff through network peer mentoring, modeling and sharing
• Monthly, in-person meet-ups and conference calls that allow for members to share program updates, best practices, and learn about new opportunities
• Additional seed funding for technology development, research, etc.

Each year, more than 6,000 tweens and teens across NYC directly engage with Hive NYC. These youth take part in projects funded by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust, private and community events, and programs resulting from network partnerships. Another 330,000 youth are indirectly impacted by these efforts, and through the broad dissemination of innovations and programs developed within the network."

[See also: http://hiveresearchlab.org/ ]
nyc  hivenyclearning  mozilla  informallearning  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  learning  youth  openstudioproject  lcproject  macarthurfoundation  homago  museums  ncmideas  afterschool  clubs  learningspaces  funding  professionaldevelopment  bestpractices  digitalliteracy  networkedlearning  networks  collaboration  digitalmedia  newmedia  technology  interestdriven  amnh  bankstreetcollege  beamcenter  brooklynmuseum  brooklynpubliclibrary  carnegiehall  centerforurbanpedagogy  citylore  children'smuseumofthearts  coderjojo  dreamyard  exposurecamp  eyebeam  facinghistoryandourselves  glovbalkids  grilswritenow  maketheroad  thelamp  nycsalt  parsons  reelworks  wagnercollege  worldup  wnyc  wnycradiorookies  urbanword  toked  thepoint  rubinmuseum  momi  nypl  moma  iridescentlearning  habitatmap  cooper-hewitt  commonsensemedia  brooklyn  bronx  manhattan  groundswell  mouse  downtowncommunitytelevision  globalactionproject  globalkids  instituteofplay  joanganzcooneycenter  people'sproductionhouse  radiorookies  stoked  queens  statenisland 
july 2013 by robertogreco
CoTA
"CoTA is a professional development program that tackles the possibilities of making the arts a lively, essential, and ongoing aspect of elementary school education. CoTA is based on the belief that integrating the visual and performing arts into other content areas promotes engagement, accessibility, and relevance for students. Since its inception in 1998, CoTA has collaborated with 500 teachers and more than 13,500 students at 26 schools throughout San Diego County."
arts  education  art  sandiego  professionaldevelopment 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Harvard Education Letter: “I Used to Think . . . and Now I Think . . .” Reflections on the work of school reform, by Richard Elmore
1. I used to think that policy was the solution. And now I think that policy is the problem. [elaborates]…

2. I used to think that people’s beliefs determined their practices. And now I think that people’s practices determine their beliefs. [elaborates, inlcuding]… The largest determinant of how people practice is how they have practiced in the past, and people demonstrate an amazingly resilient capacity to relabel their existing practices with whatever ideas are currently in vogue. …

3. I used to think that public institutions embodied the collective values of society. And now I think that they embody the interests of the people who work in them. [elaborates, including]…School administrators and teachers engage in practices that deliberately exclude students from access to learning in order to make their work more manageable and make their schools look good."
professionaldevelopment  pd  hierarchy  hierarchies  bureaucracy  organizations  stasis  radicalism  radicals  cv  2010  mindchanging  mindchanges  schools  tcsnmy  administration  policy  institutions  institutionalization  self-preservation  deschooling  unschooling  nelsonmandela  martinlutherkingjr  gandhi  leadership  change  learning  education  richardelmore  mlk  canon  schooling  unlearning 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Why Kids Should Grade Teachers - Amanda Ripley - The Atlantic
"A decade ago, an economist at Harvard, Ronald Ferguson, wondered what would happen if teachers were evaluated by the people who see them every day—their students. The idea—as simple as it sounds, and as familiar as it is on college campuses—was revolutionary. And the results seemed to be, too: remarkable consistency from grade to grade, and across racial divides. Even among kindergarten students. A growing number of school systems are administering the surveys—and might be able to overcome teacher resistance in order to link results to salaries and promotions."
why  leadership  management  administration  schooling  schools  students  grading  amandaripley  ronaldferguson  professionaldevelopment  pd  teaching  teacherevaluation  evaluation  education  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Value of Edcamp: Reclaiming Professional Development | Remix Teaching
"By creating a structure and then letting the participants take control, Edcamps become moving and powerful days, as teachers wrestle with ideas big and small, try new tools and stretch their minds to accommodate new perspectives. To give you an idea of the sheer variety, here are my three favorite sessions from the two years that I’ve been organizing and attending Edcamps.

* A session at Edcamp OC (2011), run by students of Rob Greco, about the urban adventure field trips they take as a part of their school’s program, confidently and honestly discussing what they liked and didn’t like about the program, as well as the triumphs and challenges they faced."

[Also here: http://smartblogs.com/education/2012/07/13/edcamp-reclaiming-professional-development/ ]
unconferences  professionaldevelopment  pd  urbanadventures  urbanexploration  edcampoc  edcamp  dancallahan  ego  cv  tcsnmy 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Science teacher: Doyle's School of Educharlantry
"If you want to be professional, act like one. Silence is unacceptable.

I don't need your support after the meeting. Telling me I said what everyone else is thinking after I get my ass handed to me on a platter does no good.

Join the fray, that's how democracy works. And shame the charlatans back to the ooze they came from.

Snake oil poster from Oregon state--I need to find the website..."
beenthere  education  democracy  sheeple  selfpromotion  outsiders  professionaldevelopment  experts  charlatans  speakingout  cv  teaching  comments  professionalism  michaeldoyle  outsider 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Reinventing Schools That Keep Teachers
"If we want teachers who are smart, caring, alive to students' needs, and are in it for the long haul, we need to consider how to create schools that are themselves centers for the continual learning of everyone connected to them. We've learned most of what we know about teaching K-12 from our own schooling experience. Unlearning powerful past history in the absence of equally powerful settings for relearning won't work."
education  teaching  learning  unlearning  unschooling  deschooling  professionaldevelopment  professionalism  tcsnmy  schoolculture  lcproject  experience  history  memory  conditioning  schooliness  alwaysthisway  paradigmshifts  gamechanging  change  2011  deborahmeier  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Community of Writers :: Every kid's a writer.
"Community of Writers, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the writing/literacy skills of elementary and middle school students throughout Oregon by raising the standard of writing instruction.

Community of Writers (COW) was started in 1999 by author and teacher Larry Colton, a Pulitzer Prize nominee. In the last eight years, over 1,160 teachers have participated in our program, and over 30,000 students in five districts have been impacted."
education  writing  portland  oregon  professionaldevelopment  literacy  lcproject  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
TeachPaperless: I Am Not A Great Teacher [This rings so true. Shelly is me with hair!?]
"I am not a great teacher. Many of my former students would probably agree. I'm at times flaky. And I can certainly be absent minded. I tend to ask students to do too much work all at once, probably because that's the way I do things.

I'm a terrible test-prepper. When I do give lectures, I tend to go on tangents. Sometimes I mix up names, dates, events; this happens at family BBQs, too. [Many more examples follow.]…

I am far more interested in being a conduit for ideas. A conduit for conversation. A conduit for debate. For real learning. Connecting. Rethinking. Reframing debates. Debates and discussions. The stuff of humanity…

But I'm willing to not know.

I take a lot of solace in the example of Socrates. Not because I think I'm like Socrates, but because I think deep down Socrates is a lot like all of us. Socrates was a guy who both boastfully and intimately explained that in the end, he really didn't know anything.

And that was enough to change everything."
education  teaching  learning  socrates  shellyblake-pock  cv  howwework  howwelearn  inquiry-basedlearning  conversation  relationships  human  humanism  vulnerability  uncertainty  notknowing  collaboration  professionaldevelopment  pd  honesty  openness  pedagogy  humility  improvisation  preparation  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Finland Phenomenon – a film about schools « Cooperative Catalyst [Great detail in the post, some valuable comments too]
"key takeaways…

1. Finland does not have high stakes tests

2. …worked to develop national consensus about public schools

3. Having made a commitment to public schools…few private schools.

4. …RE accountability, Finns point out they…don't have tests nor an inspectorate…find trusting people leads to them being accountable…

5. …don't have incredibly thick collections of national standards…have small collections of broadly defined standards, & allow local implementation.

6. Qualifying to become teacher is difficult

7. Teachers are well trained, supported, & given time to reflect…including during school day.

8. Finns start school later in life than we do

9. …little homework.

10. …meaningful technical education in Finnish Schools

[Also]…All students in primary & secondary schools get free meals…grow up learning Swedish & English as well as Finnish…health care in the schools…teaching force is 100% unionized. Administrators function in support of teachers, not in opposition."
education  schools  teaching  film  finland  2011  politics  policy  us  learning  standardizedtesting  testing  accountability  control  publicschools  standards  nationalstandards  trust  unions  professionalism  professionaldevelopment  reflection  poverty  healthcare  homework  training  support  technicalschools  vocational  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Making It All Worthwhile
"I've facilitated enough PD to not feel new at it. I've taken enough coursework in PD at Stanford to feel like I get some of the theory behind teaching adults about teaching children. Whenever I'm planning a session or a talk, though, I don't lean on the theory or my experience half as hard as I do on the fear that I'll be working with a teacher who's exactly like me, and he'll hate me. Which is to say, rather, that I'll hate me.

My urinal buddy helped me understand that whenever I blog or facilitate PD or give a talk or drive in traffic or cook a meal or talk to my friends, subconsciously, I'm always wondering, "Would I hate me?" It's a coin flip, really, whether that's evidence of personal integrity or flagrant self-absorption."
danmeyer  teaching  speaking  pd  professionaldevelopment  integrity  self-absorption  empathy  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Blogging About The Web 2.0 Connected Classroom: Reflections On #ISTE11
"Why would I not go to hardly anything yet still think I had a successful conference? How could that be? Because maybe all the learning doesn't happen in the sessions…

I go to places like ISTE & other conferences for the people…meeting…sitting…talking…learning, debating & sharing…allows me to catch up with people who I only get to see once a year…face-to-face interactions…are the most meaningful to me.

On a side note, one thing I did see more of this year was kids. There were students all over because there was (what seemed liked) an expanded Student Showcase. I did spend some time walking through there & listening to all the cool things kids are doing in their schools. That is one thing this conference needs more of. Kids. If there are model lessons, they should be kids involved. BYOL? Kids. So if you are going to put in for a session next year try to include kids…think about how awesome it would be to be in sessions run by kids sharing their learning & why it's important."
students  cv  iste2011  conferences  facetoface  inperson  learning  conversation  professionaldevelopment  2011  education  tcsnmy  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Contentment | Rush the Iceberg
"A while ago I noticed that I was, essentially, trying to lesson plan using on Twitter and following #edchat. The resources many of you share are amazing! I often get excited (err, reactionary) and want to try them out in class the next day.

I was a ship lost at see, rudderless, waiting for the next current to direct me. Maybe I should think more on this metaphor and look at how sail boats tack and jib.

Where is my sense of contentment?

More is not inherently better.

I understand we need to grow personally AND professionally as teachers. However, at what point does the growth become more cancerous than beneficial?

What do you think about contentment and education?"
teaching  professionaldevelopment  contentment  slow  slowness  patience  hereandnow  stephendavis  balance  growth  lessismore  well-being  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Eagle Rock School
"EAGLE ROCK IS BOTH a school for high school age students and a professional development center for adults, particularly educators. The school is a year-round, residential, and full-scholarship school that enrolls young people ages 15-17 from around the United States in an innovative learning program with national recognition.

The Professional Development Center works with educators from around the country who wish to study how to re-engage, retain and graduate students. We provide consulting services at school sites and host educators who study and learn from Eagle Rock practices."
education  curriculum  design  schools  eaglerockschool  progressive  pedagogy  colorado  estespark  residential  professionaldevelopment  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Design Thinking for Educators
"The Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators contains the process and methods of design, adapted specifically for the context of education."

"The design process is what puts Design Thinking into action. It’s a structured approach to generating and developing ideas.

The Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, available as a free download here, provides guidance through the five phases of the design process. It outlines a sequence of steps that leads from defining a challenge to building a solution. The toolkit offers a variety of instructional methods to choose from, including concise explanations, useful suggestions and tips."
education  design  designthinking  ideo  teaching  pedagogy  discovery  interpretation  ideation  experimentation  evolution  iteration  howto  pd  professionaldevelopment  tcsnmy  lcproject  projectbasedlearning  classideas  pbl  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
geek.teacher » Blog Archive » What #edcamp has to teach us about PD: A letter to administrators
"Edcamp only exists because we as teachers were compelled to take our professional development into our own hands. You see, we have a problem: most professional development stinks. It’s one of the many running jokes of being a teacher."
via:cervus  teachereducation  edcamp  blog4reform  2010  professionaldevelopment  learning  freedom  autonomy  choice  purpose  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Spencer's Scratch Pad: educational hoarding
"My problem is not that I need professional development. It's not that I need more nifty strategies to lead me on the way toward becoming a better teacher. I don't need another conference or seminar or workshop or TEN TOP WAYS TO USE TWITTER in my classroom. I don't need more hyperbole. I need more simplicity. I don't need more, I need to learn to do less. I don't need another binder. I need an anti-binder crusader who will help remind me of the essential questions that really are essential - someone to nudge me back toward the question, "Does this help us to live well?""
johnspencer  simplicity  professionaldevelopment  planning  teaching  education  schools  curriculum  less  slowessentials  minimalism  featurecreep  features  featuritis  moreisnotbetter  experience  empowerment  technology  unschooling  deschooling  learning  innovation  focus  lcproject  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Braiiins « Snarkmarket
I've been digging into the Snarkives of posts tagged with 'braiiins' (as highlighted by @tcarmody the other day) and will probably be bookmarking some of them here (if I haven't already). Reading about neuroscience is some of the best professional development a teacher can ask for. One part that I find most fascinating is how quickly our understanding of the brain changes. And I think this gets back to the importance of uncertainty and why we should place it at the center of school programs. Science provides us with the lesson that we can update our understanding without losing face: throw out the disproved model and embrace the new, but not too tightly, rather uncertainly. That's progressive—valuing what you now know, but always moving on to something more accurate when it appears.
brains  snarkmarket  uncertainty  neuroscience  science  progressive  professionaldevelopment  learning  change  certainty  brain 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The 21st Century Classroom – Alfie Kohn — Open Education
"It is interesting to note that for many children, middle & high school becomes the place where school is no longer enjoyable. It is, of course, at that time that students traditionally have been subject to a shift from student-centered classroom to teacher-centered, content-driven academic approach. The result is that school, instead of being a place where students look forward to going each day because it features an exciting atmosphere where learning new things is enjoyable, becomes a chore at best, a problem at worst. At the very age when students most resist compliance & teacher-centered approaches, too many teachers, &, by default, too many schools insist on employing such a format. Because of the sophistication needed educationally, there is no doubt that 21st century classrooms demand shift from ‘sage on the stage’ to ‘guide on the side’ approach. That move is a requirement to produce the type of student that will excel in creative, technologically-rich world we face."
21stcenturylearning  professionaldevelopment  administration  pedagogy  learning  education  leadership  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  middleschool  progressive  student-centered  teacherasmasterlearner  schools  schooling  highschool  traditional  alfiekohn 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Project Zero
"Project Zero is an educational research group at the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University. Project Zero's mission is to understand and enhance learning, thinking, and creativity in the arts, as well as humanistic and scientific disciplines, at the individual and institutional levels."
art  arts  assessment  professionaldevelopment  criticalthinking  psychology  projectzero  harvard  education  teaching  creativity  learning  language  thinking  tcsnmy  humanism  science  research 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Catch-A-Teacher Day « Human
"Until last day, we had very few staff that came to expo. They would bring groups of students down but (most of them) didn’t quite engage w/ expo in any way. “That’s for kids, not us…” was general sentiment, w/ few notable exceptions. W/ whole thing PRIMARILY for staff, we weren’t making dent...matter was raised at regular morning ‘war briefing’. We made decision that last day was going to be ‘catch-a-teacher’ day.
professionaldevelopment  edtech  technology  students  studentsteachignteachers 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Do I Dare Disturb the Universe? - What you need to know when you’re done with teacher school
Some great advice:

"Be interested.. for the students’ sake, show them that you’re interested in more than just your content area. You’ve got a passion (presumably) so don’t be afraid to let it come out in who you are in the classroom. In one of my all-time favorite blog posts ever, Russell Davies says, “The way to be interesting is to be interested.”... Be a learner... The best way for teachers to learn is not necessarily through one-size-fits-all PD sessions. Read a lot. Create an account on Google Reader or Netvibes and subscribe not only to education blogs, but blogs about what you’re passionate about (remember the first tip I gave you?). And also, keep it in balance and subscribe to blogs that you don’t necessarily agree with. Preaching to choir is always fun, but it can be a dangerous habit. ...Avoid like the plague negative people and their efforts to recruit you... Have fun... Just because you can do something with technology doesn’t mean you should do it with technology."
professionaldevelopment  teaching  interested  interesting  learning  modeling  schools  schooling  optimism  tcsnmy  interestedness 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » The PD Problem
"reading Linda Darling-Hammond’s new book The Flat World and Education, & while I’m finding it rich with detail about everything that’s troubling about the US education system (& the potential fixes), I’m also struck by the fact that there is very little here in terms of a meaningful discussion around what role technology plays in educating for a “flat world.” Kind of ironic.
professionaldevelopment  willrichardson  teaching  us  policy  technology  time  education  tcsnmy 
march 2010 by robertogreco
School in NYC's Brooklyn finds success with restructured scheduling - Related Stories - ASCD SmartBrief
"A Brooklyn school is finding success with an alternative-scheduling model that has educators teaching just three classes each day, leaving two hours a day for collaborating with colleagues while maintaining class sizes that are regularly as small as 14 students. The restructured schedule does not cost more than a traditional schedule and allows for more instructional time for students and more professional development for teachers -- all without adding workdays to the 180 set in New York City teachers' contracts."
teaching  schools  professionaldevelopment  learning  policy  scheduling  preparation  tcsnmy 
march 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Easy. Fun. Free.
"If [x] is going to change teaching practice at scale, then [x] needs to be easy, fun, and free for both the teacher and her students. [x] needs to be all three of those things at the same time. ... I don’t have any hope in the scalable transformational power of any tool that requires anything more than ten minutes of professional development."
tumblr  technology  interteaching  professionaldevelopment  learning  googlereader  schools  education  tcsnmy  lms  pln  ples  schooling  danmeyer 
march 2010 by robertogreco
The Tiger Principal: Starting a Journey
"I couldn't believe she was promoting a social networking site - I just couldn't imagine "wasting" my time on my iPhone & laptop "tweeting." What she shared with me over the course of the day opened my eyes to a whole new world of professional development. Little did I know what a vast resource she was introducing me to...

That evening, I went home and created a profile on Twitter and "followed" Nancy. To my amazement, w/in minutes (probably more like seconds) she tweeted my tweet & introduced me to a world of fabulous educators. She sent me links to lists of "people to follow". In addition, I was able to open some links she had shared with me earlier, & comment on said links. That weekend, I was able to participate in the Live audio conference with Alfie Kohn - quite the eye opener. By listening to Mr. Kohn, & following on Twitter, I was able to find even more fabulous educators to follow."
twitter  professionaldevelopment  learning  bogging  blogs  education  teaching  edtech  leadership  cv  pln  ples 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Teachers and Community Members Practice TLC with PLCs | Edutopia
""We need to let go of the idea that heroic individuals will change schools," says Richard DuFour, an education consultant who specializes in creating professional learning communities in schools. "Instead of looking for superheroes, we need to work collectively to help everyone be successful."
plc  pln  learning  schools  change  collaboration  edutopia  leadership  network  21stcentury  communities  professionaldevelopment  merit  community 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Project Zero
"Project Zero's mission is to understand and enhance learning, thinking, and creativity in the arts, as well as humanistic and scientific disciplines, at the individual and institutional levels."
education  learning  criticalthinking  arts  teaching  psychology  creativity  language  thinking  assessment  art  howardgardner  projectzero  harvard  professionaldevelopment  tcsnmy 
january 2010 by robertogreco
2¢ Worth » 10 Ways to Promote Learning Lifestyle in Your School
"Here are just a few suggestions for administrators for promoting these conversations [about new learning and about learning new things]: 1. Hire learners. Ask prospective employees, “Tell me about something that you have learned lately.” “How did you learn it?” “What are you seeking to learn more about right now?” 2. Open your faculty meetings with something that you’ve just learned – and how you learned it. It does not have to be about school, instruction, education managements, or the latest theories of learning. 3. Make frequent mention of your Twitter stream, RSS reader, specific bloggers you read. Again, this should not be limited to job specific topics. 4. Share links to specific TED talks or other mini-lectures by interesting and smart people, then share and ask for reactions during faculty meetings, in the halls, or during casual conversations with employees and parents just before the PTO meeting."
professionaldevelopment  learning  trends  administration  presentation  hiring  leadership  ideas  pedagogy  motivation  tcsnmy  schoolculture  lcproject  management 
january 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » This Blog Is Counterproductive
Dan Meyer reacts to these four quotes on his previous post: "#1 I read stuff like this, and the first thought that goes through my mind is, “Man, I suck at teaching math.” #2 I’m with Steve. I realize how far I am from where I should be. #3 I’m with Steve and Craig- I can’t teach this way yet because my brain isn’t aware/smart/intuitive/mathematical enough to first notice these things, then develop a lesson, and actually deliver and make sense of it. #4 I’ll echo Steve’s comment, I read this site and I feel like a fraud. I don’t know anything about teaching math." [Feeling like a fraud — it's not unfamiliar, but I suppose that's the product of always taking a hard look at yourself and your practices and striving to do better. Anyone who wants to improve him/herself probably has the thought on a regular basis.]
teaching  danmeyer  learning  self  cv  frauds  self-criticism  professionaldevelopment  tcsnmy  impostors  impostorphenomenon  impostorsyndrome 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Healthier Testing Made Easy: The Idea of Authentic Assessment | Edutopia
"Assessment tasks must model and demand important real-world work. Focused and accountable teaching requires ongoing assessment of the core tasks that embody the aims of schooling: whether students can wisely transfer knowledge with understanding in simulations of complex adult intellectual tasks. Only by ensuring that the assessment system models such (genuine) performance will student achievement and teaching be improved over time. And only if that system holds all teachers responsible for results (as opposed to only those administering high-stakes testing in four of the twelve years of schooling) can it improve."
professionaldevelopment  performance  21stcenturyskills  assessment  tcsnmy  testing  education  edutopia  teaching  learning  skills 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Topic Overview | Edutopia
"Edutopia's success stories about what works in public education revolve around our six Core Concepts: Integrated Studies, Project Learning, Social & Emotional Learning, Technology Integration, Teacher Development, Comprehensive Assessment"
edutopia  schools  education  projectbasedlearning  integrative  socialemotionallearning  technology  edutech  assessment  professionaldevelopment  tcsnmy  pbl  socialemotional 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Handbook of Emerging Technologies for Learning - Emerging Technologies for Learning
"This Handbook of Emerging Technologies for Learning (HETL) has been designed as a resource for educators planning to incorporate technologies in their teaching and learning activities."
professionaldevelopment  emergingtechnologies  education  learning  technology  future  teaching  pedagogy  edtech  curriculum  georgesiemens 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Classroom Learning 2.0
"Welcome to Classroom Learning 2.0. This professional development tutorial is brought to you by CTAP Region 1 and the California School Library Association (CSLA) 2.0 Team. It is designed for you to do on your own or as a part of a group. We encourage anyone to form a group. You can obtain a Management/Users Guide by clicking on the ABOUT section. On the following pages, you will learn the Web 2.0 tools that are bringing our kids in touch with the entire world through social networking, wikis, video, podcasting, and gaming sites. Enjoy."
via:jessebrand  professionaldevelopment  learning  ict  web2.0  classroom  tutorial  teaching  howto  onlinetoolkit  participatory  newmedia  classrooms 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Powerful Learning Practice, LLC
"PLP is a professional development model that immerses educators into environments and practices that allow them to learn and own the literacies of 21st Century learning and teaching."
willrichardson  education  professionaldevelopment  edtech  onlinelearning  collaboration  pedagogy  technology  reform  change  training  teaching  practice  online  learning 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Achievement First [via: http://www.tuttlesvc.org/2008/11/this-is-not-our-emergency.html see also: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/50802877/branding-and-authenticity-and-schools]
"This debilitating pattern of the "doom loop" is felt acutely in urban schools. School districts replace superintendents with alarming frequency, hailing each as the savior leader. Curricula lurch from progressive to traditional and back again, and each year a new professional development guru rolls out the program du jour. Initiatives and teams are developed without enough planning and training, and no program or leader is given enough time to produce great results. By the time any traction is made, a new program, fad, or leader is in place. Nobody is truly accountable, and no momentum toward excellent results is built up. Teachers are frustrated, and students fail to learn."
schools  fads  trends  time  investment  management  public  private  leadership  administration  policy  curriculum  progressive  traditional  learning  longevity  teaching  children  fail  failure  doomloop  professionaldevelopment 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Kusasa Cancelled ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Lesson? If a project depends on teacher training, it will likely fail. Hard to think of a greater indictment of a profession."
teaching  professionaldevelopment  training  broken  stephendownes 
october 2008 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » My Shortest-Ever Post On Presentation
"1. Unless your presentation is billed as "beginner-level" don't include information I can easily Google. What I mean is, while I know nothing about Photo Story, it was painful spending seat-time on a tutorial for adding narration to Photo Story, which is Google's top result for the same query. I can get that anytime1. 2. Instead, cover the stuff I can't Google, that stuff that makes your presence worth my district's money and my time. Here's an easy outline: a) why Photo Story; what problem were you trying to solve? should I care about that problem? b) what complications did you encounter while implementing Photo Story? how did you overcome them? c) what did you learn?"
presentations  danmeyer  conferences  professionaldevelopment  teaching  learning  speaking  education 
october 2008 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » ILC 2008 [or why I have long sinced stopped going to education conferences unless forced to do so]
"As a guy who teaches compulsory Algebra to kids who have hated Algebra, I don't see how fourteen presenters managed to blow a scenario where an audience volunteered to attend their sessions. Where the audience is interested in the session (provided the presenter didn't falsely bill it). Where the audience is pulling for the presenter. Where the audience is eager to be dazzled, fed, or inspired. ILC was like walking into eighteen car dealerships, pockets bulging with cash, declaring to every salesperson, "I'm here to buy," and discovering that fourteen of them couldn't close the sale." Follow-up post here: http://blog.mrmeyer.com/?p=1712
presentations  professionaldevelopment  learning  speaking  education  teaching  danmeyer  conferences 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Executive Summary, Teacher Quality: A Report on The Preparation and Qualifications of Public School Teachers
"Research suggests that unless professional development programs are carefully designed and implemented to provide continuity between what teachers learn and what goes on in their classrooms and schools, these activities are not likely to produce any long-lasting effects on either teacher competence or student outcomes (Fullan with Stiegelbauer, 1991). In addition to quality professional development, peer collaboration has also been recognized as important for teachers' continuous learning."
professionaldevelopment  teaching  education  learning  schools  administration  management  leadership 
october 2008 by robertogreco
AllThingsPLC — Research, education tools and blog for building a professional learning community
"This site was created to serve as a collaborative, objective resource for educators and administrators who are committed to enhancing student achievement. We invite you to share your knowledge, ask questions, and get expert insight into the issues teachers face each day in the classroom."
education  professionaldevelopment  collaboration  management  communities  curriculum  teaching  learning  resources  community  professionallearningcommunities 
october 2008 by robertogreco
mrsmaineswiki [via: http://www.edutopia.org/wiki-teacher (source of quote below), see also: http://www.edutopia.org/class-wiki-tips]
"Then she began posting class instructions and useful links, and she gave students a small space to write responses. The more she opened it up to students, the more she saw what they could do. By November, she had given over the wiki -- and with it, the control of learning -- almost entirely to her students. She calls the effect miraculous. Now, the wiki is the hub for almost all class activity. Maine sets it so that only she and her students may edit it, though anyone in the world can view it. When students enter the classroom, they automatically know to look at the wiki for daily instructions, rubrics, and resources. They post their research, lab data, and observations on individual and group pages, which they can access later from home. After hours, the Web site functions as a parallel classroom, where students hold discussions, collaborate on group projects, and post their final work."
professionaldevelopment  classroomwikis  wikis  classideas  tcsnmy  education  edtech  learning  projects  collaboration  biology  classroom  science  classrooms 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Official Google Blog: Our Googley advice to students: Major in learning
"At highest level...looking for non-routine problem-solving skills...primarily look for...analytical reasoning...communication skills...willingness to experiment...team players...passion & leadership...Learning, it turns out, is a lifelong major."
google  education  learning  careers  work  collaboration  problemsolving  curriculum  creativity  leadership  jobs  skills  professionaldevelopment  assessment  lcproject  management  innovation 
july 2008 by robertogreco
The Competitive Imperative of Learning ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"The implications of the article are that workers need to be free to learn as they work, not to take orders or courses in order to learn. An important shift in thinking in the corporate world."
learning  education  management  leadership  organizations  administration  work  professionaldevelopment  change  trends  corporations  business 
july 2008 by robertogreco
injenuity » The Formal Side of Informal Learning - "several new thoughts on Viral Professional Development...
"...While I promote an unstructured learning environment, we do have scheduled, thematic sessions based on the needs...Play to Learn Sessions...Show and Tell Sessions...Ning Network"
professionaldevelopment  technology  edtech  education  learning  informal  informallearning  experimentation 
june 2008 by robertogreco
On the Uses and Abuses of Laptops in Education | Beyond School [lots to think about here]
it’s not enough to “give professional development workshops” to teachers about 21st century education...laptop schools that don’t truly, really, really have true, true, true “coordination” of instruction risk burning students out
1to1  laptops  schools  blogging  teaching  learning  curriculum  professionaldevelopment  training  technology  leadership  administration  management  online  internet  filmmaking  students  classideas  gamechanging  change  reform  clayburell  development  edtech  education  1:1 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Constructing Modern Knowledge 2008 | 2¢ Worth - Nice list of topics..."Creativity & learning, Constructivism & constructionism,
...Project-based learning, 1:1 Computing, Problem solving, Student leadership & empowerment, Reinventing math ed, Comp sci as basic skill, Storytelling, School reform, Tinkering, Effective prof development, Sustaining innovation"
schools  change  reform  lcproject  curriculum  professionaldevelopment  projectbasedlearning  learning  sustainability  storytelling  tinkering  pbl 
april 2008 by robertogreco
The Strength of Weak Ties » Tragedy of the Commons - "The more I think about all this Twitter nonsense, the more I think about fundamentals..."
"Writing. Commenting. Reading in your aggregator. Putting links into del.icio.us, supporting that network. Reading research. Reading outside of ecochamber. Reflecting, questioning, getting uncomfortable...challenging assumptions...Personal growth"
twitter  technology  social  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  professionaldevelopment  behavior  teaching  learning  groups  online  internet  del.icio.us  rss  aggregator 
april 2008 by robertogreco
OLPC News: An Update on XO Laptops in Uruguay
"best way to train in technology...start w/ small groups. After initial training they created working teams to visit school during class time. After a few training sessions, teachers felt comfortable with XO & didn't need further technical support."
olpc  teaching  training  professionaldevelopment  technology  ict  administration  management  schools  learning  uruguay  proyectoceibal  planceibal 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Advocating for Boring
"many initiatives in current 1:3 or 1:4 student to computer ratio schools have failed not because of lack of training, but lack of ubiquity & consistency...teacher must feel that computers are here, work, aren't going away, ever."
technology  schools  professionaldevelopment  ubiquity  computers  laptops  mobile  phones  it  leadership  administration  management  teaching  olpc 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Show Me What You Believe - Practical Theory
"mission statements are meaningless unless people can point to where the pieces of their mission statement live in their school...key places to look to see what schools really value: schedule, curriculum planning/professional development, assessment"
administration  management  schools  missionstatements  professionaldevelopment  schedule  chrislehmann  sla  curriculum  assessment  learning  leadership 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Sit and Listen: On new report called Learning 2.0 from the CIM (Chartered Institute of Marketing)
"big need for change when it comes to professional development. Individuals need to do more to take the initiative, since they’re ultimately in it for themselves...employers need to open up their definitions of training and learning"
professionaldevelopment  learning  future  learning2.0  education  administration  management  leadership  training  work  careers  gamechanging  change  reform  teaching  schools  autodidactism  informal  informallearning  unschooling  deschooling  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
february 2008 by robertogreco
academhack » Blog Archive » Twitter for Academia
"Rather than cover what Twitter is or how to use it, I thought I would explain how I use it, specifically for academic related uses, and teaching...The key point to remember here is this can get sent to your phone, making it highly mobile."
twitter  academia  teaching  learning  mobile  phones  messaging  sms  classroom  microblogging  networking  professionaldevelopment  education  newmedia  edtech  academics  elearning  blogs  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  pedagogy  presence  howto  classrooms 
february 2008 by robertogreco
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