robertogreco + paris + french   4

Departures, Cont. - Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Atlantic
"I felt myself as horrifyingly singular there. A language is more than grammar and words, is the movement of The People, their sense of appropriate laughter, their very conception of space. In Paris the public space was a backyard for The People and The People's language was not mine. Even if I learned the grammar and vocab so part of it must be off-limits to me. it could never really be "mine." I had a native language of my own. I felt like a distant friend crashing a family reunion. Except the family was this entire sector of the city. I could feel their nameless, invisible bonds all around me, tripping my every step."



"I got my ticket, boarded the train. and descended further into the European continent.

The loneliness was intense. I knew at a least few people in Paris. But this train winding through high and gorgeous country, leaving behind small Hallmark towns, was truly taking me into foreign depths. For most of the ride there were English translations. But when I transferred at Lausanne, the pretensions dropped away and there was only French. I have spent almost as much time away from my family in the past year as I've spent with them. Is this how it's supposed to be? Is learning forever winding through these strange and foreign places? Is study the opposite of home?

In Vevey, I was met at the station by a mother and her daughter. They gave me the layout of the town. They showed me how to catch the train to school. They told me how to lock up their house. They poured me red wine, served bread and cheese. This was immersion. I was given a room. I called my wife then went to bed. That night everyone in my dreams spoke French.  I could not understand a word they said."
paris  switzerland  language  learning  ta-nehisicoates  2013  dreams  dreaming  french  france  languagelearning  languageacquisition  solitude  cultureclash  loneliness  belonging  safety  risk 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Foodie Time Travel: A Preview of What Grant Achatz Will Be Serving at Next - TIME
"Achatz, whose soulful molecular gastronomy restaurant, Alinea, just won three Michelin stars, is getting ready to open his second restaurant in Chicago this February, and the new place, called Next, is ridiculously ambitious. Its menu and style will completely change every three months, jumping from one time-and-place pairing to another every three months — starting with Paris in 1906, then likely jumping to spring in Kyoto, Sicily in 1949 and so on. With this menu concept, he's basically saying that he can build the best French, Japanese, Italian, anything restaurant and then tear it down and start over again every few months."
food  cooking  history  grantachatz  alinea  french  paris  timetravel  next  restaurants  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
mobizen fabrik: bougez futé
""Vous connaissez tous Velib' et c'est vrai qu'avec le métro c'est souvent le mode de déplacement le plus rapide d'un point A à un point B (ok sans bagage, ni enfant !)... .... et à condition de trouver un vélo près de soi, et de trouver une place libre à l'arrivée. C'est là que l'iphone devient réellement un outil révolutionnaire pour l'homo urbanus mobilitis.... Alors pour savoir ce qui se passe pres de vous, je recommande chaudement abikenow sur iphone. Top, à condition que le websevice de JCDecaux soit opérationnel, bien sûr !"

[via: http://blog.neo-nomad.net/mobizen/1154/ ]
iphone  transportation  applications  france  french  bikes  buses  taxis  maps  mapping  subways  paris  neo-nomads  nomads  mobility  mobile  transport  ios 
december 2008 by robertogreco
May 1968 Graffiti
"These graffiti are drawn primarily from Julien Besançon’s Les murs ont la parole (Tchou, 1968), Walter Lewino’s L’imagination au pouvoir (Losfeld, 1968), Marc Rohan’s Paris ’68 (Impact, 1968), René Viénet’s Enragés et situationnistes dans le mouvement des occupations (Gallimard, 1968), Maurice Brinton’s Paris: May 1968 (Solidarity, 1968), and Gérard Lambert’s Mai 1968: brûlante nostalgie (Pied de nez, 1988).

Some were written by the situationists or the Enragés, or are quotes from SI writings, but many of the others clearly reflect a more or less situationist spirit, whether they were directly influenced by the SI, or because situationist ideas were in the air, or simply because the liberated reality was generating situationist-style feelings and insights."

[French here: http://www.bopsecrets.org/French/graffiti.htm ]
situationist  anarchy  french  france  psychogeography  paris  quotes  anarchism  activism  politics  culture  history  graffiti  1968  via:preoccupations  revolution  protest  slogans 
november 2008 by robertogreco

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