robertogreco + organisms   11

The individual defines the large scale. A city of parts. - Non-Intentional Landscape
"The individual defines the large scale[36]. A city of parts[37]. And depending on your viewpoint each entity has the characteristics of a “whole” as well as a “part”[38]. One does not live beside, but within the Tokyo landscape of gardens, a place of growth, of maximized spontaneity[39]. The individual action of gardening is personal and deliberate – a form of use-related behaviour which addresses human(e) needs through an act of creation which is not deliberately designed (‘professional’) landscape architecture/art[40] [41].

Paralleling the no-center development of Edo, everyday Tokyo takes shape as an accumulation of the activities of individuals or groups making the most of the individuality of distinct place [42] but with a horizontal solidarity that (unlike the all encompassing city visions of Europe) forms (in amorphous aggregate) Tokyo’s non-intentional landscape of not only flowers, green and edibles but memories and meanings, traditions and social norms, relationships and support (this idea is a social psychological extension of the notion of city making as landscaping present in the Edo period[43]). The living urban fabric is maintained by an enormous number of daily small-scale interventions that are an essential part of the process of organic repair[44]."
cities  urban  urbanism  chaos  messiness  complexity  japan  tokyo  organisms  2013  chrisberthelsen  yoshinobuashihara  scale  parts  landscape  architecture  landscapearchitecture  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
David Byrne's Journal: 12.14.11: "You 'Da Boss?" Collective Creation
"Others have preferred to view the social insects, not as social cities composed of individuals, but as single super organisms—more like one being made up of millions of semi-autonomous crawling “cells.” This would mean that these towering termite mounds and the tunnels of the ant colonies might represent the clothing or shell that belongs to a collective whole being…

If we make that leap, then we too can be seen as sophisticated works of “soft” architecture. Just like the cities of the ants, bees and termites, one would never imagine that our little cells would be able to individually make and organize a structure as complex as we are. If we reorient our viewpoint, and can see ourselves as a kind of ant colony, we get a frightening insight that maybe our sense of free will is not much more than that of the ants and termites. Our most beautiful cities, and maybe we too, are not much more sophisticated than those of the social insects."
deborahgordon  wikipedia  collective  collectiveaction  collectivecreation  nature  insects  occupywallstreet  ows  creation  art  music  indeterminacy  terryriley  johncage  buddhamachine  madlibs  williamsburroughs  exquisitecorpse  yvestanguy  joanmiro  manray  bernardrudofsky  hivemind  consilience  2011  freewill  timbuktu  architecture  socialinsects  networks  organisms  cities  creativity  collectivism  politics  society  economics  davidbyrne  from delicious
december 2011 by robertogreco
Geoffrey West: The surprising math of cities and corporations | Video on TED.com
"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities -- that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."
geoffreywest  cities  companies  corporations  biology  walkingspeed  walking  crime  crimerates  population  wealth  organisms  2011  urban  urbanism  urbanization  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly - Google+ ["All companies die. All cities are nearly immortal…Is the internet more like a company or more like a city?"]
"All companies die. All cities are nearly immortal.

Both are type of networks. But there are two basic network forms: organisms or ecosystems. Companies are like organisms, while cities are like ecosystems.

All organisms (and companies) have share many universal laws of growth. Creatures age in the same way, whether they are small animals, large mammals, starfish, bacteria, and even cells. All ecosystems (and cities) also share universal laws. They evolve and scale in a similar fashion among themselves — whether they are forests, meadows, coral reefs, or grasslands, or villages."
kevinkelly  cities  web  internet  biology  organizations  organisms  networks  ecosystems  companies  2011  geoffreywest  coral  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Communication Nation: The connected company
"average life expectancy of a human being in 21st century is ~67 years…average life expectancy for a company is…has dropped precipitously, from 75 years (in 1937) to 15 years in a more recent study…

I believe that many of these companies are collapsing under their own weight. As companies grow they invariably increase in complexity, & as things get more complex they become more difficult to control.

…As you triple the number of employees, their productivity drops by half (Chart here).

This “3/2 law” of employee productivity, along with the death rate for large companies, is pretty scary stuff. Surely we can do better?

…secret, I think, lies in understanding the nature of large, complex systems, & letting go of some of our traditional notions of how companies function. [Proceeds to explain]
business  management  collaboration  complexity  organizations  small  scale  flexibility  adaptability  organisms  connectivism  listening  adaptation  space  social  society  cities  urban  urbanism  design  culture  socialbusiness  planning  people  humans  inefficiency  efficiency  division  identity  ecosystems  activelistening  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
A Physicist Turns the City Into an Equation - NYTimes.com ["According to data, when a city doubles in size, every measure of economic activity increases by approximately 15% per capita.]
One quote:

“A human being at rest runs on 90 watts,” he says. “That’s how much power you need just to lie down. And if you’re a hunter-gatherer and you live in the Amazon, you’ll need about 250 watts. That’s how much energy it takes to run about and find food. So how much energy does our lifestyle [in America] require? Well, when you add up all our calories and then you add up the energy needed to run the computer and the air-conditioner, you get an incredibly large number, somewhere around 11,000 watts. Now you can ask yourself: What kind of animal requires 11,000 watts to live? And what you find is that we have created a lifestyle where we need more watts than a blue whale. We require more energy than the biggest animal that has ever existed. That is why our lifestyle is unsustainable. We can’t have seven billion blue whales on this planet. It’s not even clear that we can afford to have 300 million blue whales.” 
urban  urbanism  geoffreywest  cities  corporations  growth  physics  modeling  models  energy  density  efficience  freedom  remkoolhaas  planning  policy  economics  self-control  short-termmemory  memory  architecture  design  urbantheory  urbanscience  theory  science  data  census  walking  transportation  patternrecognition  patterns  math  mathematics  infrastructure  jonahlehrer  organic  organisms  consumption  metabolism  sustainability  interaction  janejacobs  collaboration  crosspollination  robertmoses  efficiency  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
The taxonomy of the invisible - Bobulate
"Peter del Tredici, a senior research scientist at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University and lecturer in landscape architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, argues the wildlife that surrounds us every day often has an “image problem:” it goes unnoticed, unattended, and unvalued. “There is no denying the fact that many — if not most — of the plants … suffer from image problems associated with the label ‘weeds,’ or, to use a more recent term, ‘invasive species.’ From the plant’s perspective, ‘invasiveness’ is just another word for successful reproduction — the ultimate goal of all organisms, including humans…. The term is a value judgment that humans apply to plants we do not like, not a biological characteristic.”"
iphone  applications  location  lizdanzico  weeds  plants  invasivespecies  nature  naturedeficitdisorder  urban  urbanism  childhood  chores  memories  nostalgia  noticing  danhill  cityofsound  trees  treesny  nyc  life  systems  biology  glvo  srg  edg  humans  perspective  language  words  taxonomy  wildlife  cities  value  organisms  shrequest1  ios  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Not your father's evolution
"Recent evidence of horizontal gene transfer -- in which genes are exchanged from other organisms, not from ancestors -- has some scientists thinking that the dominant form of evolution for most of the Earth's history was between non-related organisms and not among ancestors."
evolution  genes  gentransfer  science  biology  organisms 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Finding Your 'Element' With Sir Ken Robinson
“We have developed educational systems in the interests of the old industrial economy. They are industrialized systems, they are very linear, they are about standardizing. Really, human organizations are not like mechanisms, they are like organisms. A much better metaphor for education is agriculture. Farmers know, and gardeners know, they cannot make a plant grow. They can’t do it. Plants grow themselves. What they do is provide the conditions where that’s more likely to happen. And great teachers know you can’t force anybody to learn, but you can create the conditions where they’re much more likely to. If the conditions are right, it’s amazing what people will achieve.” [via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/01/16/education-is-like-agriculture/]
kenrobinson  adaptability  teaching  schools  unschooling  flexibility  change  education  schooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  society  standardization  organizations  growth  organisms  learning  students 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The Technium: Penny Thoughts on the Technium
"For many years the dogma was that evolution was offloaded from the genes into culture. Our bodies stopped evolving because culture took it over. But in fact it turns out that genetically we are actually accellerating in our evolution. That our genes are evolving faster because of technology. Reading & writing changes. Permanently rewires the brain. It’s for sure we’ll see (with enough evidence) that people who use Google and offload their memory to the cloud, it will affect our brains. So we are absolutely changing ourselves.

I‘m interested in how people personally decide to refuse a technology. I’m interested in that process, because I think that will happen more and more as the number of technologies keep increasing. The only way we can sort our identity is by not using technology. We’re used to be that you define yourself by what you use now. You define yourself by what you don’t use. So I’m interested in that process."
kevinkelly  technology  technium  evolution  internet  web  networks  organisms  identity  refusal 
december 2009 by robertogreco
ontogeny: Definition and Much More from Answers.com
"The origin and development of an individual organism from embryo to adult. Also called ontogenesis....The natural life cycle of an individual as contrasted with the natural life cycle of the race (phylogeny)."
words  science  biology  growth  organisms  change  life 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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