robertogreco + openstreetmap   48

Open Infrastructure Map
"Open Infrastructure Map is a view of the world's hidden infrastructure mapped in the OpenStreetMap database.

By and large, this data isn't exposed on the main OSM map, so I built Open Infrastructure Map to visualise it.

If you want to edit the data and you're new to OSM, check out learnOSM.

If you already have some OSM experience and want to start tagging infrastructure things, take a look at the tagging guidelines for power and WikiProject Telecoms.

How is OIM made?
The following mess of tools and services make Open Infrastructure Map run:

• Postgres/PostGIS for data storage
• Imposm3 for filtering and importing the OSM data
• Tegola for vector tile rendering and serving
• The Mapbox GL JS web interface

Where's the code?
You can find some bits of OIM on the openinframap Github organisation. More to come, soon.

Who made this?
I'm Russ, and I like infrastructure. Please don't contact me about copyright claims or similar, these should properly be directed to OpenStreetMap."
maps  mapping  infrastructure  osm  openstreetmap 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Six maps that show the anatomy of America’s vast infrastructure - Washington Post
"The maps you are about to see show the massive scope of America’s infrastructure using data from OpenStreetMap and various government sources. They provide a glimpse into where that half-trillion dollars may be invested."
maps  mapping  infrastructure  us  visualization  2016  electricgrid  electricity  energy  coal  naturalgas  hydropower  wind  windenergy  bridges  pipelines  rail  railroads  airports  ports  waterways  osm  openstreetmap 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Drifter - Mitchell Whitelaw
[via: https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717891312683356160
https://twitter.com/mtchl/status/717907711459872770
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717917873969102849
https://twitter.com/mtchl/status/717919016463896576
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717920437041168384 ]

"Drifter is a multilayered portrait of the Murrumbidgee river system, made out of data. Historic images, newspaper articles, scientific observations and digital maps; tens of thousands of data points come together in three ever-changing views.

Map uses digital newspaper articles to trace fragments of the river's (white) history, from everyday life to large-scale interventions. Alongside these human stories, thousands of scientific observations reveal some of the nonhuman life of the river.

Sifter transforms text into texture, drifting through text snippets from newspaper articles discussing the Murrumbidgee and its tributaries, piecing together the names of some of the living things that go unmentioned in these accounts.

Compositor combines historic images from library and archive collections with contemporary images from fieldwork monitoring the health of the river's wetland ecology.

About

Drifter is a work by Mitchell Whitelaw, created for exhibition at the Wagga Wagga Art Gallery in conjunction with the Land Dialogues conference. A big-screen, non-interactive version is on show there until June 2016.

This web version works best with a modern browser and a big-ish screen.

Drifter is part of a research project on combining digital scientific and cultural heritage materials to create rich representations of landscape. It builds on the speculative, generative approaches to digital heritage developed in Succession.

Sources

Geospatial data sources

• US Geological Service HydroSHEDS River network
• Digital Chart of the World water areas
• Open Street Map towns and rivers
• Australian Department of the Environment, Interim Classification of Aquatic Ecosystems in the Murray Darling Basin based on the Australian National Aquatic Ecosystems (ANAE) Classification Framework - Wetlands

Newspaper articles: Trove, National Library of Australia

Frog observations: Atlas of Living Australia

Frog audio

• Amphibiaweb
• Australian National Botanic Gardens
• Frogwatch ACT - recordings by Ederic Slater
• Museum Victoria Biodiversity Snapshots
• North Central Catchment Management Authority Frogwatch resources - recordings by Murray Littlejohn

Images from the National Library of Australia and Flickr Commons where credited.

Wetland fieldwork images courtesy of Dr Skye Wassens and her team, Institute for Land Water and Society, Charles Sturt University.

Built With

• The Trove API
• The Atlas of Living Australia API
• Leaflet.js
• jQuery
• howler.js"
maps  mapping  osm  openstreetmap  drifter  murrumbidgeeriver  australia  audio  nature  mitchellwhitelaw  waggawaggaartgallery  landdialogues  lansdscape  sound  soundscapes  webdev  gis  frogs  webdesign 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Explore your world through field mapping with OpenStreetMap | Mapbox
"Now that you have started mapping the world on OpenStreetMap from the comfort of your chair, let’s see how to add addresses, street names, and amenities using first-hand observations with field mapping. Field mapping is a survey technique to capture the details of one’s physical surroundings. Let’s use a simple paper map to survey the location of a waste basket in a neighborhood.

Mapping tools

To get started, gather the following items:

• A printed map from field papers, or a notepad
• Pencil or pen
• Camera (optional)
• Fellow explorers (optional)

Begin your journey

Make sure you are in an area that is safe for field mapping. A residential neighborhood, shopping street or a park are all great places to start. Doing this as a group activity with friends makes it even more interesting to compare notes after you are done.

The general idea with field mapping is to collect the details of what you observe around you while navigating a space. Details could include anything that catches your attention: shops and street signs, public amenities like benches and ATMs, street information like cycle lanes and pedestrian crossings or important facilities like hospitals and police stations.

Here are some tips:

• When mapping in groups, make sure to divide the area to cover maximum ground.
• It helps to think about what you are interested in mapping to allow you to be more focused on the field.
• If you are taking photos or recording an audio narration, make sure to note the locations on a paper map or using a GPS.
• Above all else, enjoy your walk!

Mapping on paper

Pen and paper are the most convenient way to capture observations from the field. It is simple, low cost and helps build a stronger sense of space and distance. The important aspect of paper mapping is to maintain a consistent scale. To help maintain scale, you can print an existing map and use it as a reference to add missing details on top. A tool called field papers allows you to conveniently make a printable atlas for this purpose.

While field mapping:

• Always begin by marking your starting point on paper. This could be anything from a house address, a known landmark or a shop.
• To orient yourself, make sure to keep an eye out for navigational aids like street signs, building names and addresses.
• Use symbols to represent common features like a medical store or a post box that do not have a name. Specifically, note features that you wish to map.
• If you are using field papers, you can upload your scan and use it as a background in iD or JOSM to map the missing details on OpenStreetMap.

Once you have become comfortable with basic field mapping using a pen and paper, you can explore other tools for collecting data and mapping on OpenStreetMap.

Other tools for field mapping

Collecting data for field mapping can also be done by taking photographs and recording GPS traces. For example, you could:

• Capture crowdsourced street view imagery with your phone using Mapillary.
• Accurately record GPS locations and trails using apps like OSMTracker for Android or Pushpin for iOS.

For more mapping techniques take a look at the OpenStreetMap Wiki."
aarthychandrasekhar  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  fieldmapping  maps  mapping  exploration  2016  fieldpapers  howto  tutorials 
february 2016 by robertogreco
OpenStreetMap | pratikyadav's diary | Mapbox Mapping Project Guide
"Over the last few months, we've begun and completed several mapping projects. As our team has grown, we've needed clear guidance for the team to run a lead a mapping task from inception to completion in line with the best practices of mapping and ensuring the highest quality of contributions to the map.

We have put together a simple guide to how the data team approaches a mapping project on OSM.

Broadly the guide provides a checklist for a project lead to work through during the different phases of a mapping project:

• Inception : Background research on the project and identify the Why? question.

• Getting Started : Capture scope, tools and mapping workflow on a ticket.

• Trial Workflow : Involve the community in a clear and effective mapping workflow. Do a trial run with a small team to find do's and don't.

• Scale Up : Train the whole team for scaling up the project.

• Mapping : Publicise the project on relevent channels and involving active members of local OSM community. Constantly monitor progress, and identify tools and process to improve the workflow.

• Wrap Up : Improve mapping documentation, capture statistics and publish a final report on the OSM diary.

We invite everyone to have a look at our Mapping Project Guide [https://gist.github.com/pratikyadav/21e86a309733423bb844 ], and give us feedback, or track any of our recent and ongoing projects in the Mapbox mapping repository."
mapbox  osm  via:unthinkingly  2015  openstreetmap  mapping  maps 
december 2015 by robertogreco
How straight or bendy are the roads?
"Where in the world has the straightest roads?

Using OpenStreetMap (OSM) data, I was able to see how bendy or straight the roads are all over the world. One theory I had was that Europe, where current roads are based on older roads that predate cars, would have more bends and curves than the USA, where current roads were (in many places) only put in in the last 150 → 100 years, and probably put in directly and dead straight.

[embedded map]

The Mid-west USA and Canadian prairies have the most straight roads. Nearly all of the roads there are straight. This broadly matches my theory.

Netherlands is very straight, but I'm not sure if that's because the Netherlands is just very flat, or due to the "way splitting" inaccuracy incorrectly reporting it as straight.

Measure the bendyness of a road

For all the highway's in OpenStreetMap, the 'bendyness ratio' is calculated as the length of the road divided by the straight line difference between it's end points. A dead straight road will have a ratio of 1.0, and the more bendy the road, the higher the ratio.

The I split the world into little boxes, and measured all the roads that were within that box. A road was considered 'straight' if the ratio was below 1.001, so this includes dead straight, and almost straight roads. The percentage of roads in the box which were straight (weighted by how long the road is), is considered the bendyness of that box. That's the colour in the above map.

Flaws and inaccuracies with this approach

Incompletness

Obvious one: OpenStreetMap is not complete yet, and is missing many roads that exist in the real world.

Roads in many boxes

In order to speed up the SQL query, it counts the enterity of a way (incl it's ratio) in the bbox's results if any part of the way is in the bbox. This means a very long way that passed through 2 (or more) bboxes will be counted twice.

Roads split into 2

It treats each single way element as a different road. If a way is split (into 2 ways) these will then count separately and one road that's very bendy, will appear as several less bendy roads. (e.g.: this way http://www.openstreetmap.org/?way=72436076 ). As an extreme example of this '2 element' ways, which will obviously count as perfectly straight roads. Ways in OSM are often split, not because they are separate roads, but due to how OSM stores data. To solve this, one needs a way to merge connecting ways together.

One approach to merge ways together to get 'real roads', is to merge ways whose endpoints touch if they have the same 'ref'. The ref(erence) of a road (e.g. "N1"), will often show you what is the "natural course of the road", as decided by local planners. Refs, unlike names, often have very little symbolic or sentimental connection, so local road planners are able to assign them much more freely, giving more accurate results. Here in Ireland, it's not uncommon for one long 'real road' to change names at arbitrary junctions.

Source code

The source code I used to generate is on Github: openstreetmap-bendy-roads.

Tools used

I used Osmosis to extract and slim down the original OpenStreetMap planet dump, and imported that into PostGIS with osm2pgsql. I used my own python script to create (in postgres) a new table with the results. Initially I used Quantum GIS (aka QGis) to explore the results, pick the right metric to use, and generate the colour scheme and how to split the data. The boxes were split using Jenks natural breaks classification method. After I had the right data to display, TileMill (which uses Mapnik) was used to generate the tiles in a MBTiles format. I used mbutil (again from MapBox) to split that mbtiles file into directory of tile images that can be uploaded to a dumb web server. The map on this page uses Leaflet to display on this page."
maps  mpping  data  osm  openstreetmap  streets  curves  rorymccann  2013 
june 2015 by robertogreco
6, 53: Mapping
"Doing Nepal-related things, some of them involving fancy new satellite imagery and such, but also the simple, repetitive work of contributing to HOT OSM, the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team. This is easy and makes the delivery of supplies incrementally faster. I don’t know what it’s like in and around Kathmandu right now. It’s almost certainly a lot of traumatized people trying to help injured people as fast as possible, probably without enough clean water or shelter. Some aid agencies I mostly trust (which ain’t all of them) say they need to know where there are roads and potential helicopter landing sites, and we can tell them that.

If you want to, orient yourself with the HOT website, read @meetar’s guide, find other resources (in a pinch, ask me, though I’m not an expert), and pick up some tasks from the tasking manager. I recommend the vanilla, in-browser iD editor for beginners – I still use it mostly. I think the main barrier for many people is an impression that they don’t know enough to help: like you have to be a trained cartographer or something. That is, politely, false. If you can trace a road, you’re helping. This is a case where a bad map is better than no map. Your work will be checked and polished by more experienced people, and then given to responders who understand that it’s the best available, not authoritative. Your help is welcome."
maps  mapping  osm  openstreetmap  charlieloyd  peterrichardson  nepal  2015  hotosm  via:lukeneff 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Mapbox's Landsat-live Ushers In a New Era for Online Cartography, Using Satellite Imagery to Show the Earth as It Is Now - CityLab
[RE: https://www.mapbox.com/bites/00113/

See also: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/landsat-live-live/ ]

"On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday, a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite. Above is an embedded version you can explore.

The USGS has controlled operations of the satellite since 2013. That Landsat's images are freely and rapidly available is to the credit of USGS, as well as to Amazon Web Services, which hosts and shares the data at no charge to the public.

"This is really new in terms of what’s been available," says Camilla Mahon, a satellite-imagery engineer at Mapbox who helped spearhead the project. "This is one of the fastest ways we can grab imagery, and that’s what's allowing us to do this in real time."

Virtually every spot displayed on this map is 16 days old or younger (occasionally, weather or maintenance will mean some displays will be up to 32 days old). Labels indicating cities and highways are layered onto Landsat's ribbons of imagery using open-source OpenStreetMap data (as most Mapbox projects do).

"Anyone has the data to make this kind of map," says Charlie Loyd, also a Mapbox imagery engineer. But the project is key to the company's larger aims. "We’re trying for an ecosystem where any geo-spatial image can go on a map and be useful immediately."

That's also the philosophy behind this other, truly astonishing experiment in cartography—a moving California coastline. "That's actually drone imagery," Loyd says nonchalantly of the video that's layered on the satellite image map. Five years from now, real-time maps might be as ubiquitous as YouTube videos—but for now, they feel as futuristic as movies might have to Victorians.

They might also seem as superfluous, to the average map user. Yet Landsat-live has the potential for all kinds of applications, says Mahon, including environmental and agricultural monitoring.

Plus, there's that whole awe and wonder of the planet thing. "I think there is an intrinsic value and beauty to this," says Loyd. "Everyone has an inherent interest in seeing the world as it is.""
mapbox  imgery  seasons  change  time  landsat  charlieloyd  2015  drones  video  osm  openstreetmap  camillamahon  usgs  laurabliss 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Missing Maps: nothing less than a human genome project for cities | Cities | The Guardian
"A huge number of the world’s most vulnerable human settlements have remained unmapped ... until now. Enter an unprecedented plan to map the world’s forgotten places"
osm  openstreetmap  cartography  mapping  maps  2014  edg  cities 
january 2015 by robertogreco
unMonastery
"“When it comes to work it is increasingly difficult to reconcile making money with making sense. People do work to make a living. Others do work to make meaning. But the two works are not the same work.”

THE STORY OF UNMONASTERY

unMonastery, a place-based social innovation, is aimed at addressing the interlinked needs of empty space, unemployment and depleting social services by embedding committed, skilled individuals within communities that could benefit from their presence.

unMonastery is a non-profit project that aims to challenge existing dependency chains and economic fictions, developed in collaboration with EdgeRyders LBG over the course of 18 months. Edgeryders started out as a project by the Council of Europe and the European Commission, which after termination developed into an international, community-run social enterprise.

The first unMonastery opened its doors February 2014 in Matera, Italy. Working with Matera2019, the prototype hosted projects including CoderDojo Matera, a node of the international initiative to teach children coding, Mapping the Commons, placing the city's cultural assets on OpenStreetMap, unTransit, an app to follow the city's transport system in real-time, and more. For an overview of projects, people, and the community involved in the prototype visit the website below."

[See also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:eef0f21ccc4e ]
unmonastery  matera  italy  coderdojo  openstreetmap  osm 
october 2014 by robertogreco
LearnOSM
"OpenStreetMap is a free street level map of the world, created by an ever growing community of mappers.

Anyone can edit OpenStreetMap. Here you can learn how LearnOSM provides easy to understand, step-by-step guides for you to get started with contributing to OpenStreetMap and using OpenStreetMap and using OpenStreetMap data. If you are interested in running an OpenStreetMap workshop, check out the LearnOSM trainer resources."

[via: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvH02nwB_X4

See also: http://mapgive.state.gov/learn-to-map/
https://gist.github.com/meetar/b9929dfec129d1d7f5f2 ]
openstreetmap  osm  mapping  maps  howto  tutorials 
august 2014 by robertogreco
How to get started contributing to a Humanitarian OpenStreetMap task
"Overview

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is an open-source map of the world that anyone can edit. But like any map, it's incomplete.

The Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) helps organize people to improve the OSM map for crisis areas, mostly so aid workers can find their way around and make decisions about undermapped places. The data in these crisis areas is often very poor, or completely non-existent. Therefore any contribution you make at all will be a vast improvement, and could materially help people who are on the ground right now, looking at this data as you edit it, and deciding where to go and who to help.

There are many HOT tasks active at once. Right now the highest-priority tasks are Gaza and areas affected by the West African Ebola outbreak."

[Video tutorial by Charlie Loyd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvH02nwB_X4

See also: http://mapgive.state.gov/learn-to-map/
http://mapgive.state.gov/learn-to-map/ ]
osm  openstreetmap  peterrichardson  2014  humanitarianopenstreetmap  mapping  maps  howto  edg  charlieloyd 
august 2014 by robertogreco
OpenGeofiction
"OpenGeofiction (OGF) is based on the OpenStreetMap software platform, which means that all map editors and other tools suitable for OpenStreetMap can be used to build OGF's fictional world. This world is set in modern times, so it doesn't have orcs or elves, but rather power plants, motorways and housing projects. But also picturesque old towns, beautiful national parks and lonely beaches."
maps  mapping  fiction  ogf  osm  openstreetmap 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Border Check
"What is Border Check?

Border Check (BC) is a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the internet’s infrastructure while you surf the web. It will show you through which countries and networks you surf to illustrate the physical and political realities of the internet’s infrastructure. using free software tools.
It maps the internet

Why is this relevant?

As one surfs the net, data packets are sent from the user’s computer to the target server. These data packets go on a journey hopping from server to server, potentially crossing multiple countries, until the packets reach the desired website. In each of the countries that are passed different laws and practices can apply to the data, influencing whether or not authorities can inspect, store or modify that data.

Who?

Border Check is a project by Roel Roscam Abbing. Programming by Lord Epsylon. Design by Bart Van Haren. BC was developed during Summer Sessions 2013 with with the support of V2_ Institute For The Unstable Media at Laboral Centro De Arte and the MP19 Openlab. It uses Python, OpenStreetMap, Leaflet and others."
data  borders  bordercheck  infrastructure  roelroscamabbing  lordepsylon  bartvanharen  openstreetmap  osm  python  firefox  chrome  safari  browsers  extensions  plugins  addons  browser 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Drone Imagery for OpenStreetMap | MapBox
"Last weekend we captured 100 acres of aerial imagery at 4cm resolution. It took less than an hour to fly, and it was easy to publish the imagery on the web using TileMill and then trace in OpenStreetMap. Autonomous flying platforms like Sensefly's eBee paired up with a nimble software stack are changing aerial mapping. Drones like the eBee can cheaply and accurately photograph medium-sized areas, and then the imagery can be made immediately available to everyone.

The drone operates less like an RC plane and more like a Roomba. You can define an area of interest on a laptop, beam it to the eBee, and then just toss the drone in the air where it will autonomously collect imagery. Within 40 minutes, the drone took 225 photos covering 100 acres from an altitude of 120 meters. Larger areas of 2,500 acres and more are possible, but this was sufficient for our needs.

As soon as the drone landed, the images were loaded into Postflight/Pix4D for georeferencing and mosaicing and then into TileMill for resampling and tiling for the web. Afterward the imagery is easily added as a custom layer in OpenStreetMap's iD editor for tracing.

The high resolution of the stitched mosaic is really useful for editing in iD. As you can tell, we're excited about what Sensefly's eBee means for the future of open-source mapping. Small autonomous aircraft are excellent for capturing timely imagery or where other aerial imagery is not available."
mapbox  maps  mapping  drones  droneproject  osm  openstreetmap  2013  gis 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Little Mystical - Some Obvious Things About Drawing Maps
"As single-user tools (since we’re talking about personal construction of knowledge), I wonder at the gap between the activity beneath the surface and what a visitor sees – a canonical-looking map or article.

Criticism of Wikipedia’s factual accuracy is often (1) It can change anytime! and (2) Any random person can change it! – which, well, are also the reasons why it works. But the disconnect happens because a unstable work, that’s under constant negotiation, looks stable. How many people look at Wikipedia history frequently? How many people understand – explicitly understand – that this is knowledge construction?

There are some obvious ideas that fall out of making that level of change clearer to people – you could highlight areas that have changed since you last looked at it, you could fade out areas under heavy negotiation and only show the stable parts by default.

Or with personal map-making / map-reading, when you have these layers of structured data, you can do a little paint-by-layers – say you’re drawing a map of your neighborhood, you drag out lines following the path of the main streets you walk on, and Sim-City-style, they get drawn-in using live data. You get both the explicitness of someone’s “drawing out” their map’s contours and the benefit of the latest satellite mapping data."

[Full conversation here: http://storify.com/rogre/legible-maps-of-places-and-infospaces ]
allentan  2013  maps  mapping  wikipedia  osm  openstreetmap  charlieloyd  comments  history  information  knowledge  undertsanding  change  accuracy  time  memory  legibility  infospace  infospaces 
august 2013 by robertogreco
iD
"iD is a new, friendly editor for OpenStreetMap. It offers newcomers an easy way into editing OSM and is intended to complement existing editing software."

[via: http://mapbox.com/openstreetmap/#live ]
javascript  mapping  openstreetmap  maps  osm  mapbox 
may 2013 by robertogreco
OpenStreetMap + MapBox | MapBox
"OpenStreetMap is constantly improved in real time by thousands of volunteers around the world. Here's what they're doing now."
maps  live  editing  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  mapping  realtime  via:vruba 
may 2013 by robertogreco
a brief history of participation
"These activities were not always congenial to the program of government reform towards democratization. Many of them used participatory methods instead to net poor peoples into networks of debt and reliance on hierarchical authorities.

The reasons for the failures of participatory technology are actually quite specific.

Participation was appropriated during the 1970s as a means of cheap development without commitment of resources from above. The theme of participatory ownership of the city, pioneered in discussions about urban planning in the West, remained strong in the context of the developing world, and even grew in a context of spiraling urbanization. In India, the Philippines, and much of Africa and Latin America, postwar economies pushed peasants off of the land into cities, where the poor availability of housing required the poor to squat on land and build their own homes out of cheap building materials. At first, the governments of these towns collaborated with the World Bank to take out loans to provide expensive, high-rise public housing units. But increasingly, the World Bank drew upon the advice of western advocates of squatter settlements, who saw in western squats the potential benefits of self-governance without interference from the state. In the hands of the World Bank, this theory of self-directed, self-built, self-governed housing projects became a justification for defunding public housing. From 1972 forward, World Bank reports commended squatters for their ingenuity and resourcefulness and recommended giving squatters titles to their properties, which would allow them to raise credit and participate in the economy as consumers and borrowers.

Participatory mechanisms installed by the Indian government to deal with water tanks after nationalization depend on principles of accountability at the local level that were invented under colonial rule. They install the duty of the locality to take care of people without necessarily providing the means with which to do so.

We need developers who can learn from the history of futility, and historians who have the courage to constructively encourage a more informed kind of development. "
peertopeer  web2.0  joguldi  2013  conviviality  participation  participatory  government  centralization  centralizedgovernment  self-rule  history  1960s  democracy  democratization  reform  networks  mutualaid  peterkropotkin  politics  activism  banks  banking  patrickgeddes  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  planning  self-governance  worldbank  dudleyseers  gandhi  robertchambers  neelamukherjee  india  thailand  philippines  gis  geography  latinamerica  1970s  squatters  economics  development  africa  cities  resources  mapmaking  cartography  maps  mapping  googlemaps  openstreetmap  osm  ushahidi  crowdsourcing  infrastructure 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Maps, Maps And MOAR Maps At The Society Of Cartographers And Expedia | Gary's Bloggage
"History has a habit of repeating itself and so does the map. From primitive scratchings, through ever more sumptuous pieces of art, through to authoritative geographical representations, the map changes throughout history. Maps speak of the hopes, dreams and prejudices of their creators and audience alike, and with the advent of neogeography and neocartography, maps are again as much art as they are geographical information.

... will that do?"
noaa  bigdata  data  exploration  aaronstraupcope  flickr  googlemaps  bingmaps  agi  osm  openstreetmap  yahoo  nokia  geography  stamen  mattbiddulph  garygale  2012  history  neocartography  mapping  maps  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
fieldpapers.org
"Field Papers allows you to print a multipage paper atlas of anywhere in the world and take it outside, offline, in the field. You can scribble on it, draw things, make notes.

When you upload a snapshot of your print to Field Papers, we'll do some magic on the server to put it back in the right spot on the map. You can transcribe your notes into digital form and share the result with your friends or download the notes for later analysis.

You don't need a GPS to make a map or learn complicated desktop GIS software to use Field Papers. It's as easy as print, mark, scan.

This project is a continuation of Walking Papers, which was built for the OpenStreetMap (OSM) editing community. Field Papers allows you to print multiple-page atlases using several map styles (including satellite imagery and black and white cartography to save ink) and has built in note annotation tools with GIS format downloads. Field Papers also supports user accounts so you can save “your stuff” for later, or use the service anonymously. Maps from the two systems work together if you want OSM editing (see below)."

[Updated 10 July 2013: http://content.stamen.com/fieldpapers-v2 ]
mapping  annotation  fieldpapers  cartography  maps  stamen  stamendesign  michalmigurski  walkingpapers  2012  osm  openstreetmap  via:litherland  gis 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Benedikt Groß – Metrography – London Tube Map to large scale collective mental map
"Nowadays our orientation is very often not longer based exclusively on the actual geography & their landmarks. There are loads of alternatives, from street numbers to GPS routing in our smartphones, to guide us to a destination…those wayfinding devices have in common that they are abstracted projections of real world’s spatial arrangement. Which brings us to 2 interesting implications:…[1] because abstraction means in this case a decrease of information, something is lost…[2] the longer you are using a device the more you accept it or get used to it. For instance the geographical structure of transportation networks are often reshaped to provide users w/ more understandable transit maps. These distortions have a major influence on people’s perception of city’s geography, to the point they get stored mentally & become collective representation of real world’s geography.

‘Metrography’ attempts to explore this phenomenon using the most famous of of transit maps: the London Tube Map."
deformation  osm  openstreetmap  SAX  scriptographer  maperitive  noamtoran  bertrandclerc  benediktgroß  landmarks  gps  cities  transportation  perception  collectiverepresentation  abstraction  mentalmaps  distortion  geography  via:mayonissen  metrography  londontube  processing  mapping  maps  london  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Kindle Specific Map Style
"One of the great things about Open Data and OpenStreetMap is that you can control what the map looks like. You are not limited to just what the data looks like and you can customise it yourself.

I have made a custom Mapnik style file that's optimized for Amazon Kindle display.

Here's a sample image of the new Kindle OpenStreetMap style:<

[image]

As you can see it's all greyscale (like the Kindle display) and it's very sparse, so it's easy to see the roads and the streets. The default OpenStreetMap Mapnik style is great for the web, but the colour scheme isn't suited for the Kindle. Since we're making a book of pages (rather than a slippy map where you can zoom in), I tried to show as much street names as possible, and used Mapnik's dynamic label text resizing. Once the new Mapnik Text Placement stuff is in trunk, it'll allow some really nice new stuff."
maps  mapping  osm  openstreetmap  kindle  2011  slippymaps  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
[map=yes]
"Most online maps are designed to help you get around in a car. This generally means displaying: roads, businesses, buildings, on-ramps, parks, oceans and traffic congestion. Nothing wrong with that! Designers get handed a tool kit that has as many tools as a good swiss army knife, and the maps reflect these tools. Millions of people use them to make appointments across town, find restaurants, and drive home for the holidays.<br />
<br />
But what if, instead of a swiss army knife, we used a box of crayons? Or charcoal and newsprint? Or play-doh? What would those maps look like? What could they tell us about the world?<br />
<br />
"map=yes" is a collaboration between MapQuest Open and Stamen Design, using data from the OpenStreetMap project. The project is an exploration of new frontiers in online cartography and the mapping of open data.<br />
<br />
All the code used to generate these maps is available for download and liberal re-use."
design  art  maps  mapping  data  stamen  mapquest  openstreetmap  osm  2011  code  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Geographically densest Wikipedia coverage
"Wikipedia articles can be tagged with latitude/longitude coordinates. I was recently curious to know: which areas have the most coverage? It's important not to read too much into the answer, because the density of coordinates is due to a mixture of: how active different Wikipedia language projects are, how active at geo-tagging they are, which regions have had lots of short articles mechanically imported (e.g. on small towns, or metro stations), and finally, the actual landmark density (e.g. dense urban cores versus sprawling suburbs). But nonetheless it might be interesting to know.

So, here are the most densely Wikipedia-article-populated parts of the world, at several scales."
history  cities  maps  mapping  visualization  density  wikipedia  openstreetmap  osm  2011  michalmigurski  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
OpenStreetMap: Google Sketchup as OSM editor
"The first building tagged source = sketchup2osm is already in the OSM database: <br />
http://www.openstreetmap.org/browse/way/99697450/history<br />
<br />
I'll release the source code by the 23th of February. I need to clean up the source code and write documentation.<br />
<br />
It will be possible to map buildings using 1-2 ordinary photos via Photo Matching feature of Google Sketchup.<br />
<br />
Main features: <br />
- Import of an OSM file to Google Sketchup <br />
- Import of a gps-track in NMEA format to Google Sketchup (support of GPX format comes a bit later) <br />
- Export from Google Sketchup to an OSM-file"
googlesketchup  sketchup  osm  openstreetmap  editing  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Polymaps
"Polymaps provides speedy display of multi-zoom datasets over maps, and supports a variety of visual presentations for tiled vector data, in addition to the usual cartography from OpenStreetMap, CloudMade, Bing, and other providers of image-based web maps.

Because Polymaps can load data at a full range of scales, it’s ideal for showing information from country level on down to states, cities, neighborhoods, and individual streets. Because Polymaps uses SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) to display information, you can use familiar, comfortable CSS rules to define the design of your data. And because Polymaps uses the well known spherical mercator tile format for its imagery and its data, publishing information is a snap."
stamen  simplegeo  mapping  maps  visualization  javascript  gis  geo  polymaps  tiles  cartography  cloudmade  osm  openstreetmap  bing  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
prettymaps
"prettymaps is an experimental map from Stamen Design. It is an interactive map composed of multiple freely available, community-generated data sources:

All the Flickr shapefiles rendered as a semi-transparent white ground on top of which all the other layers are displayed.

Urban areas from Natural Earth both as a standalone layer and combined with Flickr shapefiles for cities and neighbourhoods.

Road, highway and path data collected by the OpenStreetMap (OSM) project.

In all there are four different raster layers and six data layers (that means all the map data is sent in its raw form and rendered as visual elements by the browser) that may be visible depending on the bounding box and zoom level of the map."
cartography  crowdsourcing  flickr  stamen  maps  osm  mapping  location  openstreetmap  agitpropproject  the2837university  aaronstraupcope  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Airspace Rebooted on Vimeo
"A visualisation of the northern European airspace returning to use after being closed due to volcanic ash. Due to varying ash density across Europe, the first flights can be seen in some areas on the 18th and by the 20th everywhere is open.

The flight data is courtesy of flightradar24.com and covers a large fraction of Europe. There are a few gaps (most noticeably France) and no coverage over the Atlantic, but the picture is still clear.

The map data is CC-by-SA openstreetmap.org and contributors."
2010  airlines  airplanes  transportation  traffic  openstreetmap  osm  visualization  iceland  europe  animation 
april 2010 by robertogreco
hello typepad: 'Citizen cartographers' map the microcosms of the world
"I've been trying but OpenMaps and OffMaps on my phone. I prefer OffMaps, but they're both great, and they both rival Google & Apple's "Maps" in terms of user experience. OffMaps lets you download maps onto your phone for local storage, which is especially useful when you are roaming or travelling."
offmaps  offline  maps  mapping  iphone  mobile  application  cartography  openstreetmap  open  travel 
february 2010 by robertogreco
OffMaps: Offline Maps for iPod Touch and iPhone
"OffMaps lets you take your maps offline. It is the ideal companion for any iPhone and iPod Touch user, who wants to access maps when travelling abroad (and avoid data roaming charges) and who wants to have fast access to maps at all times. This app (and the icon) just has to be on the right hand side of Apple's built-in maps app. OffMaps uses OpenStreetMap that include a lot more information than simple road maps: from ATMs and train stations to restaurants and pubs! You choose which areas to download instead of buying a new app for every city you want to visit. Our guides include all data from OpenStreetMap and lets you browse a wide array of points of interest offline. Check out the Guides section to see our ever-expanding Guide library." [Update: Kottke approved]
googlemaps  openstreetmap  mapping  ipod  ipodtouch  itunes  gps  maps  iphone  applications  navigation  offline  software  mobile  travel  handhelds  osm  offmaps  ios 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Map Kibera
"Kibera's first complete free and open map: November 2009: Kibera, widely known as Africa's largest slum, remains a blank spot on the map. Without basic knowledge of the geography of Kibera it is impossible to have an informed discussion on how to improve the lives of residents of Kibera. Young Kiberans will create the first public digital map of Kibera."
via:migurski  mapping  africa  kibera  kenya  openstreetmap  maps  cities  informal  osm 
november 2009 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Technology | US city to start giant 'mapathon'
"Atlanta, the capital of the US state of Georgia will soon be the world's most digitally mapped city, according to organisers of a massive "mapathon".
openstreetmap  crowdsourcing  maps  mapping  osm  atlanta  georgia  via:migurski 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: architectural arteries
"After seeing James’ quick attempts at making maps with Cloudmade, I had a play, and made some maps of the UK, pulling out everything apart from the roads and rail. Sure, it’s a well-worn metaphor, but there’s something in the infrastructure making the landscape."
maps  mapping  cloudmade  cartography  openstreetmap  chrisheathcote  via:migurski  infrastructure  landscape  visualisation  geography  osm 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Kosmos - OpenStreetMap [via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/3481]
"Kosmos is a lightweight OpenStreetMap (OSM) map rendering platform developed by Igor Brejc (User:Breki). It was primarily designed to be used by OSM users on their own computers to:
osm  openstreetmap  maps  mapping  rendering  software  gis  print  printing 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Tile Drawer
"Tile Drawer makes designing and hosting custom maps simple and straightforward. The project lets anyone run their own OpenStreetMap server in the cloud with one-step configuration and zero administration. Tile Drawer is a product of Stamen Design’s Michal Migurski.

[intro here: http://mike.teczno.com/notes/tile-drawer.html ]
maps  mapping  drawing  cartography  gis  osm  openstreetmap  michalmigurski  utility  stamen 
august 2009 by robertogreco
route-me - Project Hosting on Google Code
"A slippy map library for the iPhone. Fast! Completely written in objective-c using CoreAnimation. Runs like the built-in app. Currently OpenStreetMap Microsoft VirtualEarth and CloudMade are supported as map sources. Use it in your iPhone project. It's licensed under the new BSD license. You are responsible for getting permission to use the map data."
mobile  software  maps  mapping  iphone  opensource  openstreetmap  osm  programming  gis  gps  iphonesdk  api  google  code  open  cloudmade 
july 2009 by robertogreco
App Review: oMaps — Offline Mapping for iPhone
"Due to hefty 3G roaming rates, Apple’s Maps app just won’t cut it when you’re out of the country. The oMap app lets you download maps for offline viewing — dodging a shocking bill post-vacation. The iPhone is an almost perfect companion for travels to distant lands. With a bit of foresight and time set aside for planning, it’s possible to mix and match the perfect blend of vacation apps, ensuring you make the most of your journey. My own package of essential travel tools includes Evernote, QuadCamera, Gengo Flashcards and HearPlanet. Without a 3G connection overseas, though, Apple’s Maps app proves utterly redundant — if I can’t connect, I can’t use it. oMaps brings offline mapping to the iPhone. The app includes GPS, multiple zoom levels, map bookmarking and search functionality."
iphone  applications  maps  mapping  offline  openstreetmap  opensource  location  osm  geography  mobile  ios 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Walking Papers [more here: http://mike.teczno.com/notes/walking-papers-lives.html]
"Print maps, draw on them, scan them back in and help OpenStreetMap improve its coverage of local points of interests and street detail. Make A Print: OpenStreetMap is a wiki-style map of the world that anyone can edit. In some places, participants are creating the first freely-available maps by GPS survey. In other places, such as the United States, basic roads exist, but lack local detail: locations of traffic signals, ATMs, cafés, schools, parks, and shops. What such partially-mapped places need is not more GPS traces, but additional knowledge about what exists on and around the street. Paper Walking is made to help you easily create printed maps, mark them with things you know, and then share that knowledge with OpenStreetMap."
openstreetmap  papernet  stamendesign  walking  maps  mapping  crowdsourcing  paper  neocartography  cartography  michalmigurski  osm 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Cloudmade - Make Maps Differently
"CloudMade help you make the most of map data. We source our maps from OpenStreetMap, the community mapping project which is making a free map of the world. Our aims are to continue the democratization of geo data and to expand access to open geo data through a range of simple yet powerful tools and APIs.
opensource  maps  mapping  cloudmade  openstreetmap  geocoding  crowdsourcing  googlemaps  geography  cartography  gis  geodata  open  osm 
february 2009 by robertogreco

related tags

1960s  1970s  aaronstraupcope  aarthychandrasekhar  abstraction  accuracy  activism  addons  africa  agi  agitpropproject  airlines  airplanes  airports  allentan  animation  annotation  api  apple  application  applications  arizona  art  atlanta  audio  australia  banking  banks  bartvanharen  benediktgroß  bertrandclerc  bigdata  bikes  bing  bingmaps  border  bordercheck  borders  bridges  browser  browsers  buildings  california  camillamahon  cartography  centralization  centralizedgovernment  change  charlieloyd  chrisheathcote  chrome  cities  cloudmade  coal  code  coderdojo  collectiverepresentation  comments  commoditization  communities  connectivity  conviviality  crisismapping  crowdsourcing  curves  cv  dariusthegreat  data  datavisualization  deformation  democracy  democratization  density  design  development  distortion  drawing  drifter  droneproject  drones  dudleyseers  economics  edg  editing  electricgrid  electricity  energy  esri  europe  exploration  extensions  fiction  fieldmapping  fieldpapers  filetype:pdf  firefox  flickr  frogs  gandhi  garygale  geo  geocoding  geodata  geography  geoloacation  georgia  geotagging  gis  google  googlemaps  googlesketchup  government  gps  haiti  handhelds  history  hotosm  howto  humanitarianopenstreetmap  hydropower  iceland  imgery  india  inequality  infomapping  informal  information  infospace  infospaces  infrastructure  internet  internetofthings  interviews  ios  iot  iphone  iphonesdk  ipod  ipodtouch  italy  itunes  javascript  joguldi  kenya  kibera  kindle  knowledge  landdialogues  landmarks  landsat  landscape  lansdscape  lanyrd  latinamerica  laurabliss  legibility  live  location  london  londontube  lordepsylon  ludacorp  lukeneff  mapbox  maperitive  mapmaking  mapping  mapquest  maps  mapzen  matera  mattbiddulph  media:document  memories  memory  mentalmaps  metrography  mexico  michalmigurski  mitchellwhitelaw  mobile  mpping  muji  murrumbidgeeriver  mutualaid  naturalgas  nature  navigation  neelamukherjee  neocartography  nepal  network  networkedcities  networks  newmexico  noaa  noamtoran  nokia  offline  offmaps  ogf  open  opencyclemap  opensource  openstreetmap  optimism  osm  paper  papercraft  papernet  participation  participatory  patrickgeddes  paulford  peertopeer  perception  persia  personalinformatics  peterkropotkin  peterrichardson  philippines  pipelines  planning  plugins  politics  polymaps  ports  print  printing  privacy  processing  programming  python  rail  railroads  realtime  reform  rendering  resources  richziade  robertchambers  roelroscamabbing  rorymccann  safari  savasahelisingh  SAX  scriptographer  seasons  self-governance  self-rule  semanticweb  services  simplegeo  sketchup  slides  slippymaps  socialnetworks  socialweb  software  sound  soundscapes  spimes  squatters  stamen  stamendesign  stemdesign  storify  streets  techcommoditization  texas  thailand  the2837university  themirrorproject  tiles  time  tomcoates  traffic  transportation  travel  tutorials  twitter  ubicomp  undertsanding  unmonastery  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  us  usgs  ushahidi  utility  via:litherland  via:lukeneff  via:mayonissen  via:migurski  via:unthinkingly  via:vruba  video  visualisation  visualization  waggawaggaartgallery  walking  walkingpapers  walmart  waterways  weather  web2.0  webdesign  webdev  who'sonfirstproject  wikipedia  wind  windenergy  worldbank  yahoo  yandex 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: