robertogreco + opensource   434

OnionShare
"OnionShare is an open source tool that lets you securely and anonymously share a file of any size."
encryption  filesharing  opensource  privacy  tor  windows  mac  osx  linux 
21 days ago by robertogreco
Envelop
"Listening Together

Envelop’s mission is to unite humanity through profound communal listening experiences.

We achieve our mission through community-supported immersive audio venues, inspiring events, educational programs, and free open-source spatial audio software tools.

Our immersive audio venues and free open source spatial audio tools, provide a space to deeply listen together. Envelop hosts events ranging from live performances and listening events, to wellness experiences and spatial audio education. With permanent venues in San Francisco, and Salt Lake City, and a portable listening space that can go anywhere, Envelop strives to share the social and emotional benefits of immersive listening with diverse communities. Envelop leads the future of immersive listening, bringing us back to our ancestral connection to sound, and enjoying the benefits of listening together."
envelop  sanfrancisco  saltlakecity  experience  communalexperience  sound  audio  sounds  opensource  spacial  software  listening  immersive 
27 days ago by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: Charles Broskoski on self-discovery that happens upon revisiting things you’ve accumulated over time
“How did Are.na come to be?

Around 2006, I met John Michael Boling through a social bookmarking website called Del.icio.us. Your Del.icio.us profile ended up being a nice representation of what you were interested in and actively thinking about.

Del.icio.us let you see the constellation of people with similar interests. For example, maybe you see that 20 other people saved the same link you did. Then you can look through these peoples’ saved links and learn about things you had never considered before. I met John Michael simply through us saving many of the same links and finding there was a lot of overlap.

Were you a student around then?

Yeah. Cory Arcangel, who was my professor at the time, introduced me to Del.icio.us. He made everyone in class use it. The first part of class was everyone talking through some links they found on the internet. People would bring in things that may not seem interesting at first, but Cory was amazing at parsing out why something might be interesting. It showed you it’s important to think deeply about why you like what you like.

“You’re in college and should be interested in everything” was Cory’s whole point with the link sharing. You have to open your brain to many different things and investigate them. It’s the primary time when you can develop those ideas and habits for the rest of your life.

So what happened to Del.icio.us?

Yahoo, who owned Del.icio.us, accidentally leaked a slide about their plans to “sunset” Del.icio.us late in 2010. Immediately almost everyone using it was done and left.

At that time, John Michael was working at Rhizome, and I was trying to be an artist. We started talking about what a platform would be like that could replace Del.icio.us, or replace our community that we had found on Del.icio.us.

Del.icio.us made us realize the importance of archiving casual web (and other) research. That process has a lot of positive effects that are hard to explain until you’ve built a habit out of it. For one, there’s a self-discovery that happens when you revisit things you’ve accumulated over a period of time. You look back and begin to recognize patterns in your own thinking.”



“Would you describe Are.na as a start-up?

Yeah, I think that’s the easiest shorthand. When we started looking for funding, we were also looking at grants and institutional models. However, we realized there’s a time cost to applying to those things, and the money is much less.

With the way some venture capitalists market themselves now, we started feeling like there’s common ground we could have with certain firms, where it’s more about long-term goals and less about shorter-term, explosive growth.

One of these common grounds is the current state of social media. Any normal person, at some point, will complain about what social media addiction has done to them.

My take is that it boils down to bad business models. If it’s going to be explosive growth first, and then you’ve got to tack on something to make money afterwards, it’s always going to be advertising. That’s always going to be terrible because it means that in order to keep going, you have to keep people coming back as many times as possible. In other words, you’re motivated to make people addicted. And yes, venture capitalists are partially responsible for this. But now, it’s clear that people are getting sick of this situation. Most people you talk to are simply done with it, and smart venture capitalists can see this shift as well.

So in terms of having the start-up as a model or using that term as a way to frame ourselves—yes, it’s the easiest way to explain to someone on first meeting what we are doing. But we are also trying to build community and culture, and we are motivated to make that as big as we possibly can because we want to give a real alternative to an everyday person as to what one can do on the social internet.

Maybe “providing an alternative,” isn’t the best way to phrase it. We’re not only interested in what that thing could look like—but what the primary activity could be.”
are.na  accretion  time  charlesbroskoski  2017  laurelschwulst  revisiting  collection  collecting  del.icio.us  opensource  artsy  socialmedia  online  internet  web 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
Free Bootstrap Themes, Templates, Snippets, and Guides - Start Bootstrap
“Bootstrap themes, templates, and more to help you start your next project!

Start Bootstrap creates free, open source, MIT license, Bootstrap themes, templates, and code snippets for you to use on any project, guides to help you learn more about designing and developing with the Bootstrap framework, and premium Bootstrap products.”

[Seen here: https://mayaontheinter.net/ ]
css  opensource  bootstrap  framework  webdev  startbootstrap  templates 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
Bootstrap · The most popular HTML, CSS, and JS library in the world.
“Build responsive, mobile-first projects on the web with the world’s most popular front-end component library.

Bootstrap is an open source toolkit for developing with HTML, CSS, and JS. Quickly prototype your ideas or build your entire app with our Sass variables and mixins, responsive grid system, extensive prebuilt components, and powerful plugins built on jQuery.

Get started
Download”

[Seen here: https://mayaontheinter.net/ ]
css  html  javascript  bootstrap  framework  webdev  js  jquery  opensource 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
Open Insulin Project
"About the Project

We're a team of Bay Area biology nerds who believe that insulin should be freely available to anybody who needs it. So, we're developing the first freely available, open protocol for insulin production. We hope our research will be the basis for generic production of this life-saving drug. Additionally, we hope our work inspires other biohackers to band together and create things nobody has ever thought of before!

To support Open Insulin, head to our donations page.

Why insulin?

There are currently 387 million people worldwide living with diabetes. Diabetics cannot survive without insulin. While most diabetics here in the U.S. have access to insulin, those in poorer communities and regions often go without insulin due to cost or bureaucracy. As a result, many go without and suffer complications including blindness, cardiovascular disease, amputations, nerve and kidney damage, and eventually death. Pharmaceutical companies patent small modifications to previous insulins while withdrawing those previous versions from the market to keep prices up. We're doing the scientific research necessary for a generic drug company to make a low-cost insulin and open up access to this crucial drug.

Project history

In December 2015, we successfully raised our initial funding of $16,656 on experiment.com. Now we're getting to work! Watch this blog for updates.

Cool, how do I participate?

If you'd like to participate, email openinsulin at gmail-com. If you're in the Bay Area, stop by our meetings Wednesday evenings at 7 PM at Counter Culture Labs in Oakland. All are welcome, and we're especially keen on recruiting experienced scientists."
insulin  open  medicine  sestracat  opensource  pharmaceuticals  health  healthcare  diabetes  openinsulin 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
LibreRouter
"The LibreRouter is an Open Source Hardware WiFi Router designed from the ground up for Community Networks.

Welcome to LibreRouter

Community Networks have been depending since their inception on modifying existing off-the-shelf routers to adapt them to their particular needs. Software development originated in Community Network groups and the Free Software movement as a whole, has pushed the barrier of innovation and helped comercial enterprises develop new products over the years.

This virtuous relation between hardware vendors and the community has been threatened by new regulation from the Federal Communitations Commision (FCC) – U.S.A. – which has led vendors to globally close up their routers to third party modifications, hindering open innovation and effectively closing the door to Community Networks in terms of access to the hardware they depend on.

The Libre Router project will design and produce a high performance multi-radio wireless router targeted at Community Networks needs. Global South reality and that of Latin America in particular will be specially considered in terms of cost and legal viability."
hardware  internet  mesh  networking  networks  meshnetworks  librerouter  opensource  wifi  routers 
july 2019 by robertogreco
Left by Rekka & Devine
[See also:
https://100r.co/pages/left.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QloUoqqhXGE ]

“Left is a distractionless writing tool with auto-complete, synonyms, writing statistics, markup navigation and a speed-reader.

The application is free and Open Source, its original purpose was to help Rekka with the writing of the upcoming novel Wiktopher.

Find out how to use it, view the guide.”

[via: https://usesthis.com/interviews/rekka.bell/ ]
writing  wordprocessors  applications  windows  linux  macos  mac  osx  opensource 
july 2019 by robertogreco
Bay Area Disrupted: Fred Turner on Vimeo
"Interview with Fred Turner in his office at Stanford University.

http://bayareadisrupted.com/

https://fredturner.stanford.edu

Graphics: Magda Tu
Editing: Michael Krömer
Concept: Andreas Bick"
fredturner  counterculture  california  opensource  bayarea  google  softare  web  internet  history  sanfrancisco  anarchism  siliconvalley  creativity  freedom  individualism  libertarianism  2014  social  sociability  governance  myth  government  infrastructure  research  online  burningman  culture  style  ideology  philosophy  apolitical  individuality  apple  facebook  startups  precarity  informal  bureaucracy  prejudice  1960s  1970s  bias  racism  classism  exclusion  inclusivity  inclusion  communes  hippies  charism  cultofpersonality  whiteness  youth  ageism  inequality  poverty  technology  sharingeconomy  gigeconomy  capitalism  economics  neoliberalism  henryford  ford  empowerment  virtue  us  labor  ork  disruption  responsibility  citizenship  purpose  extraction  egalitarianism  society  edtech  military  1940s  1950s  collaboration  sharedconsciousness  lsd  music  computers  computing  utopia  tools  techculture  location  stanford  sociology  manufacturing  values  socialchange  communalism  technosolutionism  business  entrepreneurship  open  liberalism  commons  peerproduction  product 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Welcome to Unfold Studio — Unfold Studio 0.4.1 documentation
"Unfold Studio is an online community for interactive storytelling powered by a programming language called Ink. Interactive storytelling brings together the power of programming with the ability of stories to represent and explore our lived realities. Free and open-source, Unfold Studio was developed as part of my PhD research on youth computational literacy practices.

Unfold Studio is used in schools, clubs, and by many individual writers. Interactive storytelling can be a way to integrate Computer Science into English, Social Studies, or other subjects. It can also be an excellent way to introduce Computer Science as a subject relevant to questions of identity, culture, and social justice. (We are currently doing research with a school which uses Unfold Studio for several months as part of its core CS curriculum.)

This documentation is meant for several audiences. If you need help using Unfold Studio or writing interactive stories, see the User Guide. (If you’re impatient, try the Quickstart.) If you are interested in using Unfold Studio with students, see Teaching Guide. And if you’re interested in Unfold Studio’s back story or research on transliteracies, CS education, etc. please see Research. We welcome questions, feedback, and random ideas. Please see Contact to get in touch.

The documentation is also available in PDF form in case you prefer to read it that way or want to print out any pages (such as the worksheets in the Teaching Guide section) for classroom use.

-Chris Proctor
PhD candidate, Stanford Graduate School of Education
Unfold Studio creator and lead researcher"
chrisproctor  if  interactivefiction  storytelling  ink  opensource  free  onlinetoolkit  compsci  education  identity  culture  socialjustice  unfoldstudio  transliteracies  multiliteracies  coding  programming  writing  twine  classideas  via:hayim  teaching 
october 2018 by robertogreco
enoki
"An experimental platform tool for peer-to-peer publishing

Free
Culture wants to be free. No monthly hosting fees or billing to keep up with.

Decentralized
Instead of being confined to a centralized platform, publish directly with Dat.

Offline first
No internet? No problem. Sync changes automatically when reconnecting.

Own your content
This is a tool! Your content stays with you, not a greedy platform.

Archival
Easily go back in time and revert to previous versions of your site whenever!

Open source
Built with open source projects; released as an open source project."
enoki  p2p  publishing  web  online  internet  webdev  webdesign  cms  free  opensource  archives  archival  offline  decentralization  beakerbrowser  dat  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed  dweb 
october 2018 by robertogreco
The Ren'Py Visual Novel Engine
"Ren'Py is a visual novel engine – used by thousands of creators from around the world – that helps you use words, images, and sounds to tell interactive stories that run on computers and mobile devices. These can be both visual novels and life simulation games. The easy to learn script language allows anyone to efficiently write large visual novels, while its Python scripting is enough for complex simulation games.

Ren'Py is open source and free for commercial use.

Ren'Py has been used to create over 1,500 visual novels, games, and other works. You can find them at the official Ren'Py Games List, and the list of Games made with Ren'Py on itch.io."
games  gaming  gamedesign  design  ren'py  visualnovels  if  interactivefiction  lifesimulation  software  mac  osx  linux  chromeos  chrome  android  ios  applications  windows  gamemaking  classideas  writing  multiliteracies  opensource  onlinetoolkit  storytelling 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Browsh
"Browsh is a fully-modern text-based browser. It renders anything that a modern browser can; HTML5, CSS3, JS, video and even WebGL. It can be used from a terminal or from within a normal browser. Its main purpose is to significantly reduce bandwidth and thus both increase browsing speeds and decrease bandwidth costs."

[See also: https://github.com/browsh-org/browsh ]
browsers  opensource  software  text  terminal  bandwidth  speed 
july 2018 by robertogreco
PureOS
"A user friendly, secure and freedom respecting OS for your daily usage.
With PureOS, you are the only one in control of your digital life.

Free/libre software
PureOS is a derivative of Debian GNU/Linux, with the best privacy-protecting software applications preinstalled.

Cutting-edge technology
With GNOME 3 and Wayland, enjoy fluid high-framerate videos, frame-perfect animations and better power management.

Security and Privacy
PureOS helps you surf the web safely, without being tracked by advertisers or marketers."
linux  privacy  security  free  pureos  debian  opensource 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Invisible Labor and Digital Utopias
"So I’ve been thinking a lot, as I said, about “permissions” and “openness.” I have increasingly come to wonder if “permission-less-ness” as many in “open” movements have theorized this, is built on some unexamined exploitation and extraction of labor – on invisible work, on unvalued work. Whose digital utopia does “openness” represent?"



"I like to remind people that with all this sweeping rhetoric about revolution and transformation, that John Perry Barlow wrote “A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace” in 1996 in Davos, Switzerland, at the World Economic Forum. I don’t know about you, but that’s neither a site nor an institution I’ve never really associated with utopia. Indeed, perhaps much of this new technology was never meant to be a utopia for all of us after all."



"When we think about “open” and labor, who do we imagine doing the work? What is the work we imagine being done? Who pays? Who benefits? (And how?)"



"Ignoring racism in the technological imagination does not make it go away."



"What do machines free us from? Not drudgery – not everyone’s drudgery, at least. Not war. Not imperialism. Not gendered expectations of beauty. Not gendered expectations of heroism. Not gendered divisions of labor. Not class-based expectations of servitude. Not class-based expectations of leisure.

And so similarly, what is the digital supposed to liberate us from? What is rendered (further) invisible when we move from the mechanical to the digital, when we cannot see the levers and the wires and the pulleys."
audreywatters  2018  utopia  technology  labor  resistance  permission  open  openness  opensource  exploitation  copyright  creativecommons  johnperrybarlow  freedom  class  leisure  work  servitude  liberation  digital 
may 2018 by robertogreco
La Scuola Open Source: Education and Research for cultural, social and technological Innovation
"We’re a community of digital artisans, makers, artists, designers, programmers, pirates, dreamers and innovators. We act together, testing new research, teaching, mentoring, co-living practices and models. We are involved with: research for public and private interest; teaching for learners, freelancers and managers of all ages. We design social and technological innovation.

☛ Non-linear learning paths
☛ Learning by doing
☛ New professions & skills
☛ A sharing space to grow up"

[from: http://lascuolaopensource.xyz/en/manifesto

"La Scuola Open Source is a space dedicated to social and technological innovation, where to perform educational activities, cultural performances and research projects:

☛ A hackerspace, where people with shared interest in the fields of craftsmanship, technology, science, visual arts, poetry, editing, robotics, domotics, biology, electronics and more can gather, socialize and/or cooperate;

☛ A re-use promotion center where obsolete technology is collected with the aim of promoting their smart upcycling;

☛ A FabLab: a small workshop offering customized digital fabrication services, equipped with a kit of fast prototyping tools (3d printing, laser cut, etc.)

♥ This opens up to new opportunities.

↓ We believe in

☆ Non-linearity
Founding principle of Plato’s accademia: “a free individual should not be forced, as a slave, to learn any discipline”, diametrically opposed to the monastic principle (and that of today’s school system), well represented by Benedict’s rule: “Speaking and teaching is a teacher’s job, staying silent and listening is what a disciple should do”.

☆ Co-design
Design as a “catalyst to collectively redefine our relationship with reality”, envisioning things for how they could be, altogether.

☆ Open work
The School’s structure allows us to build - by co-designing it - its teachings offering in an open way, allowing us to evolve each of its aspects with time.

☆ Multiverse
In modern physics, multiverse is a hypothesis postulating many co-existing universe beyond our space-time dimensions.

☆ Antifragility
The world around us is mutating and ever-changing. Upon this constant transformation we are building a model capable to adapt to mutations and making good of any erraticity and change happening. (N.Taleb, Antifragile).

☆ Learning by doing
We believe that teaching should be always combined with a continuous activity of research and exploration. Doing things and learning while doing, situational learning, are absolutely central in our vision and in the project we intend to realize.☆ Do it yourselfWe promote an alternative and aware approach to designing and production processes, stimulating self-production as a form of self-employment.

☆ Opensource
Open source, in its incremental logic, represents the blueprint for a collaborative, adaptive and recursive cultural system. We believe that such approach needs to be used in all fields of knowledge, so to enable possibilities for everyone.

☆ Hacker ethics
Linux’s big innovation was not the Operating System, but the open social dynamic that was set up to make that project happen.

☆ Sharing
We welcome people, ideas and projects to share space, knowledge and values. Through a constant and mutual exchange, both a collective consciousness and a better informative quality can be quickly developed.

☆ Osmosis
La Scuola Open Source intends to facilitate and generate osmotic processes between experiences and skills, aiming to increase everyone’s intrinsic value for the community.

↓ Our value proposition

☛ Access to future, a better one
We therefore need to train ourselves, learn by doing, fail, consult with others, cooperate, work on projects with a tangible impact on the real world.

☛ Customized and non-linear learning paths
We believe that people need to be pushed to ask questions, curiosity being the engine of progress. We therefore want to apply the open source approach to humanities as well, promoting a transversal and peer-to-peer approach to the learning topic.

☛ Spaces for social aggregation to learn in a cooperative context
It is necessary to restore sharing spaces and practices, re-discovering the ability to build relationships and team up to achieve common objectives, leveraging on education and learning as vehicles for a social and economical renewing process. Spaces where to discover and cultivate curiosity, turning it into the engine to each one’s learning path, a self-built path within a virtuous system, providing input and stimula on several channels and levels.

☛ New professional figures
Tomorrow new jobs will rise, while others could disappear. Things change, therefore we need to change things. We have to reform this educational sector in a generative way, keeping in mind the context’s evolution into account and making it mutate within time, continuously adapting."
lcproject  openstudioproject  altgdp  learning  communities  community  design  pirates  nonlinear  learningbydoing  unschooling  deschooling  sharing  space  italy  glvo  italia  bari  non-linear  opensource  linux  osmosis  hacker  hackerethics  antifragility  multiverse  co-design  resuse  hackerspaces  art  technology  alinear  linearity 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Krita | Digital Painting. Creative Freedom.
"Krita is a professional FREE and open source painting program. It is made by artists that want to see affordable art tools for everyone.
• concept art
• texture and matte painters
• illustrations and comics"
opensource  via:lukeneff  applications  windows  linux  mac  osx  illustration  painting  software 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Publish good looking Google Docs
"Google Docs are nice, but they look ugly when published to the web. Well... not anymore!"



1 Edit your document in the google doc A4/Letter document interface
2 Publish it to the web...
3 Ohhh snap, the style is completely broken
4 Thanks to gdoc.pub, you get to publish it decently"



"YOUR ARTICLE
Google Docs becomes a WYSIWYG editor instantly

YOUR RESUME
Bring your good looking resume online instantly

YOUR COVER LETTER
Edit it as a document and changes apply immediately

YOUR SPREADSHEET NEW
Works with a live dashboard or any table you like

This project is open source"

[via: https://gdoc.pub/doc/e/2PACX-1vTkYJ0qIfbMDSSPYiRoIkwcags8BV610Qf7Rt0P83Y91j2o1u9eVzcqcyNA3AYr0nf1b8UjnrvSJtaD ]
webdev  onlinetoolkit  googledocs  opensource  formatting  web  online  wysiyg  publishing  epublishing 
january 2018 by robertogreco
HemiPress –
"HemiPress is the Hemispheric Institute’s digital publications imprint, created to house and centralize our diverse publication initiatives. Using a variety of customized open-source digital humanities platforms, HemiPress includes the Gesture short works series, the Duke U.P./HemiPress digital books, stand-alone essays, and the Institute’s peer-reviewed journal emisférica, alongside interviews, Cuadernos, and other online teaching resources. It also provides state-of-the-art multilingual publication capacities and immersive formats for capturing the “live” of performance, as well as a digital “bookshelf”—the interface that houses all of the Institute’s publications and connects communities of readers across the Americas."

[Digital Books:
https://hemi.press/digital-books/

"The Hemispheric Institute's focus on embodied practice requires both methodological and technological innovation. Through our Digital Books initiative, which utilizes both the Scalar and Tome publication platforms, we seek to create media-rich scholarly publications in order to produce and disseminate knowledge across geographic, linguistic, disciplinary, and mediatic borders. Staging a unique intervention in the field of academic publishing, Digital Books allows authors to utilize not only images and video, but also multilingual subtitles, maps and geotags, audio recordings, slideshows, and photo-essays, alongside other interactive features. Whether solo-authored, collaboratively written, or compiled as an edited volume, this critical initiative invites scholars, artists, activists, and students to explore the expansive possibilities of digital publishing in a hemispheric context."



"Tome [http://tome.press/ ] is an online authoring tool that facilitates long-form publishing in an immersive, media-rich environment. Built on the WordPress framework and in collaboration with the Hemispheric Institute, Tome features a suite of custom plugins that empowers scholars, students, and artists to create innovative born-digital work. Recent Tome publications include El Ciervo Encantado: An Altar in the Mangroves (Lillian Manzor and Jaime Gómez Triana), Art, Migration, and Human Rights: A collaborative dossier by artists, scholars, and activists on the issue of migration in southern Mexico, Villa Grimaldi (Diana Taylor), and six gestures (peter kulchyski)."



"Scalar [https://scalar.me/anvc/ ] is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to write long-form, born-digital scholarship online. Scalar enables users to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways, with minimal technical expertise required. Scalar also gives authors tools to structure essay- and book-length works in ways that take advantage of the unique capabilities of digital writing, including nested, recursive, and non-linear formats. The platform also supports collaborative authoring and reader commentary."]

[See also: emisférica
https://hemi.press/emisferica/

"emisférica is the Hemispheric Institute’s peer-reviewed, online, trilingual scholarly journal. Published biannually, journal issues focus on specific areas of inquiry in the study of performance and politics in the Americas. The journal publishes academic essays, multimedia artist presentations, activist interventions, and translations, as well as book, performance, and film reviews. Its languages are English, Spanish, and Portuguese."



"Dossier: Our dossiers are organized around a given theme and feature short texts, interviews, artworks, poetry, and video."



"Essays: We publish invited essays, essays submitted through our open calls, and translations of significant previously published works."



"Reviews: We review books, films, and performances from throughout the Americas"



"Multimedios: Multimedios are digital modules that feature the work of individual artists, artist collectives, curatorial projects, and activists movements. These video and photography, interviews, catalogue texts, essays, and critical reviews."]
publishing  americas  latinamerica  ebooks  epublishing  opensource  español  spanish  portugués  portuguese  digital  digitalpublishing  books  journals  multimedia  photography  poetry  video  art  wordpress  webdev  onlinetoolkit  scalar  hemipress 
january 2018 by robertogreco
PAMELA LIOU - DOTI THE DESKTOP LOOM
"The Dot-Matrix Fabric Printer is an open source desktop jacquard loom (nicknamed Doti) which leverages digital fabrication to enable expressive textile production at home and encourage broader design literacy. I am currently developing the Doti Project as a Project Resident at Eyebeam

The Doti loom provides an alternative to commercial weaving industry-- a technology-mediated model for the cottage industry of high quality textiles. Users drag and drop an image, which is then parsed into a woven pattern. An array of motors lifts and lowers threads while the weaver passes a shuttle across the shed of the loom, generating complex fabric patterns. Patterns are easily shared over a network of looms.

[video: https://vimeo.com/127880753 ]

The Doti loom allows users to design freely. Each warp, or vertical thread, is attached to an actuator that lowers or lifts. Because each thread has a separate motor, you can individually address each warp. As the weaver shuttles thread, a pattern emerges additively. The weaver is able to change the state of each thread on the fly, and the complexity of the design is limited only by the number of motors a machine is equipped with. The project began at NYU's Interactive Telecommunication Program as my thesis.Unlike commercially available looms, the user of a Doti loom can weave any pattern, unencumbered by pre-threaded harnesses or the cognitive load of keeping track of a draft pattern.

By networking multiple machines, Doti will provide the foundation for a robust supply chain of independent small batch textile producers. Because the Doti Project is a holistic survey of this open-source model, my research process involves three concurrent threads: the fabrication of a desktop loom, the cultural context for the open source hardware model, and the development of an expressive web application.

The Jacquard loom has a storied history. Credited as the world's first computer, it is also a timeworn symbol of technology displacing human labor. Adapting the jacquard as an open hardware device for the home (cottage industry) not only requires rigorous technical execution, but exploring new modalities for developing community-driven open-source innovations.

The desktop loom is continuation of a previous project, Weavy the Smart Loom that created with Kristina Budelis, Danqing Wang, and Ma Tan. The original loom involved a single harness moving alternating warp threads up and down with a stepper motor. The user weaves manually by moving a shuttle back and forth. For Weavy, I researched traditional loom designs and the originally jacquard loom mechanism, as well as the history around the mechanization of textile fabrication and the Luddite revolution."
pamrlaliou  looms  weaving  diy  opensource  classideas  digital  kristinabudelis  danqingwang  matan 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Library Simplified · Home
"eBook Readers

DISCOVER EBOOKS
Let's face it, who knows books better than librarians? Let librarian-based recommendations lead you to your next great read with easy to navigate, browse-able eBook collections in the palm of your hand. The public library in your pocket...too cool!

BORROW WITH EASE
Tired of DRM and customer log-in schemes used to sell you more stuff? Simply enter your library card number once, and start reading, from your library, for free. If you don't have a library card…just sign up for one with the app!

SIMPLY READ
Just open the book (not another app) to read, and enjoy the full story. Library Simplified uses the next generation of eBook technology and digital rights management (DRM) technology to make reading on your phone or tablet simple and convenient.
Libraries

OPEN SOURCE
Join the community of libraries and citizen coders seeking to improve eBooks from libraries. Built with maximum use of open source software, open specifications and standards based technologies. Lean more here

SCALABLE
Wether you are a single library system, a state library or a consortium of libraries, the platform can be configured and scaled to meet your needs. The multi-tenant architecture allows mulitple libraries to exist in a single instance.

PLUG IN
We, too, follow the principles of Readers First. Libraries need solutions built to work with numerous technology systems and service providers of eBooks. Our Open Architectures allow for easy integration into your library systems.

Integrations

Integrated Library System and Metadata Providers

The platform is integrated into multiple Integrated Library System (ILS) platforms through the use of APIs, SIP or SIP2 service interfaces. This provides ready integration into multiple ILS products such as Millennial, Sierra, Polaris, Virtua, Destiny, Symphony and open source systems such as Evergreen and Koha. To enhance metadata we can work with open interfaces into VIAF and Linked Data from OCLC as well as recommendations services such as Novelist Select from EBSCO.

Ebook Distributors

The platform supports a number of ebook distribution services such as Overdrive and Overdrive Advantage, Bibliotheca Cloud Library, Access 360, RBDigital, Biblioboard, Califa's Enki Library service, Unglue.it, Plympton books and Project Gutenberg."
ebooks  libraries  opensource  software  ereaders  drm 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Wildflower Montessori
"ABOUT

Wildflower is an innovative, open-source approach to Montessori learning. Its aim is to be an experiment in a new learning environment, blurring the boundaries between home-schooling and institutional schooling, between scientists and teachers, between schools and the neighborhoods around them. At the core of Wildflower are 9 principles that define the approach.

A growing number of shopfront Montessori lab schools have been started using the Wildflower approach. These schools are listed here.

ORIGINS

Wildflower Montessori is the labor of love of our founder, Sep Kamvar. Unable to find a school which combined Montessori education, an inclusive family environment, and a small, responsive school size, Sep was inspired to create his own. A professor and scientist, Sep sought the support of experienced Montessori leaders to design the school and to identify ways in which the long-history of experimentation and scientific practice in Montessori could be linked to his research. The outcome is a collaborative team of Montessori experts, scientists and designers working together to create a child-centered learning experience.

After the first Wildflower school was created in January of 2014, there was intense interest in the school and the approach. This interest led us to open-source the model and help other family groups and teacher-leaders to create new Wildflower schools. Each teacher-leader at each Wildflower school serves on the board of at least one other Wildflower school, creating a community of schools that are linked by both a shared philosophy and a network of shared relationships. However, each school is autonomous and independently run, with no operational involvement from Sep or MIT. Sep currently serves as an advisor to the Wildflower Foundation, a foundation that was set up to support teacher-leaders at Wildflower schools."



[9 Principles]

1. An Authentic Montessori Environment: providing a peaceful, mixed-age, child-directed environment.

In identifying Montessori as our guide for Wildflower schools, we were drawn to the unique combination of a few factors. The Montessori Method emphasizes the potential of the child, if served well, to change the world. We valued its intrinsic respect for that potential, its promotion of peaceful communities, and its specific pedagogical structures. As a model which prioritizes the development of the individual child, we value the balance of Montessori's scientific approach to children's development and its assertion that childhood is a unique period of growth to be protected at its own pace.

2. A Shopfront, Neighborhood-nested Design:</strong> committed to remaining small, teacher-led, integrated in the community, and responsive to the needs of children

Inspired by the work of Christopher Alexander, Wildflower schools are shopfront schools that consist of a single classroom, with the faculty both teaching in the classroom and administrating the school. By preserving a small scale, teachers are able to make decisions in their day-to-day teaching that respond to the intellectual needs of the children, and are able to make decisions on a school-wide basis that respond to their own vision and the contextual needs of the families. The shopfront model also allows these communities to seamlessly integrate into neighborhoods. Children are visible in the community as they walk to and from school, to their local playground or garden, and to civic spaces that would otherwise be on-site in a larger institution.

3. A Lab School: serving as a research setting dedicated to advancing the Montessori Method in the context of the modern world.

Each of the Wildflower schools serves as a lab school to help us better understand and advance the Montessori Method, and to help us propose empirically-supported design for new materials. We seek to integrate modern technologies in observation and documentation without changing the concrete, didactic nature of the classroom itself. We further seek to refine the development of Montessori-consistent apparatuses that prepare children for the cognitive patterns of modern fluencies.

4. A Seamless Learning Community: blurring the boundaries of home-schooling and institutional schooling by placing high priority on parent education and giving parents and integral role in the classroom.

Wildflower schools look for ways in which children's home, school, and community environments can offer more seamless experiences, reflecting consistent perspectives on children's development and engaging them as authentic contributors in each setting. We believe that parents and families offer a knowledge about children which is equally important to the professional preparation of teachers, and seek opportunities for parent-knowledge to inform classroom practice and teacher-knowledge to inform the home.

5. An Artist-in-residence: bringing richness to the learning environment by giving the children opportunities to observe and interact with adults doing day-to-day creative work.

Because we believe that children learn best in environments that model lifelong learning and creativity, each Wildflower school engages an artist-in-residence. Each school offers their artist studio space in a place accessible to the children, where the children can see them doing the work of their lives. In exchange, artists offer their work back to the classroom weekly, teaching children about their craft and helping children to develop their own skills. Through the artists-in-residence program, we seek to increase the awareness of the inner lives of children available to artists of all kinds and to protect children's understanding that learning and creating can happen throughout their lives and beyond their formal school experiences.

6. A spirit of generosity: Reflecting a spirit of generosity to all stakeholders, to children, to parents, to those in need, and to the local community.

Often, schools are seen as a service relationship, with parents as customers, teachers as service-providers, and children as recipients of the service, to be filled with information and assessed. We see it differently -- we see that each constituency brings their special gift to one another. We see the teachers bring the gift of their love and skillfulness to the children and the parents, the parents bring the gift of nurturing and advancing the teachers in their practice and growth as teachers and leaders, and the children bring the gift of helping all of us see in a new way.&nbsp; Importantly, this spirit of gift extends beyond the walls of the school: each school seeks to bring their gifts to the broader community, by being involved in the local community, by making educational opportunities that are free to the public, and by reserving slots in our schools for those in need.

7. An Attention to Nature: emphasizing the nonseparation between nature and human nature through a unique living-classroom design and extensive time in nature.

It is both a contemporary imperative and an essential quality of our design that we think proactively about the impact of our work on the environment around us. By limiting the footprint of each school to a storefront, we necessarily limit the availability of private, outdoor space. Instead, we design the interior of the school to allow children to learn to care for their living environment and to surround them with abundant plant life. We site schools near to public play spaces and work with city partners to design sustainable urban gardens for which the school and neighborhood community can care. We carefully consider the materials used in the classroom and choose sustainable, nontoxic and earth-friendly options. Finally, we maintain nutritional standards that are earth-conscious and protect natural, healthful diets for children.

8. A Role in Shaping the Neighborhood: working with the community to improve local parks, streets, and establishments to create an urban environment that is healthier for children.

Wildflower schools should change the way their immediate communities function and, as a part of a larger network, change the nature of their entire cities. The integration of children and families into the daily fabric of the neighborhood, we believe, will influence the lives of other neighbors, the questions asked in other educational settings, and the priorities of policymakers. We implement, then, structures that make our work transparent to their communities and expand who we define as "stakeholders" to include more than just the families we serve. From opportunities for passers-by to stop and observe the classrooms to the presence of children in local eateries, from the public gardens we create and tend, to the regular, open information sessions to inform our community about our work, we judge our approach not only by its influence on enrolled children and their families but on the city beyond our rolls.

9. An Open-source Design and Decentralized Network: advancing an ecosystem of independent Wildflower schools that mutually support one another.

Finally, we recognize that issues of scale -- including increased centralized decision-making, larger administrative bureaucracies and operational overhead -- decrease the autonomy available to individual classrooms. At the same time, we value the practical benefits of a community of learners and professionals working together, and the economic efficiencies that can arise from shared resources. To balance those concerns, each school sees itself as a node in a network, maintaining autonomy in school-level decision-making while able to access the resources of the network when those resources are useful and compelling to the school. Reciprocally, each school also sees itself not only as responsible for its own operations, but as responsible for helping other schools in the network, and for helping other interested family groups to start their own Wildflower schools."
schools  education  small  microschools  montessori  via:aimee  opensource  homeschool  christopheralexander  labschools  networks  community  art  generosity  urban  cities  lcproject  sfsh  openstudioproject  decentralization  sepkamvar 
march 2017 by robertogreco
Beaker | An experimental P2P browser
"Beaker is a Peer-to-Peer Web Browser, made for users to run applications independently of hosts. Using P2P Hypermedia, Beaker separates frontend apps from backend services, so that users are completely in control of their software and data.

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bem9nRpyPEs ]

"Beaker is a Peer-to-Peer Web Browser which lets users build socially and publish independently. Using P2P web-hosting, Beaker separates the frontend app from backend servers, so that users are completely in control of their applications.

At a high level, Beaker introduces concepts from BitTorrent into the Web. Anybody can publish a site immediately, independently, and for free, using only their browser.

Sites can contain files, data, media, and fully-featured applications. Using them, users can publish content without ceding control of the content to either an app or service. There is no walled garden. The keys that control each site remain in the user’s browser.

Public Peer services provide optional cloud hosting, so users don’t have to keep their devices online to self-host. These services provide the uptime of a traditional host, but with no lockin; a user can migrate from one service to another without any disruption.

With forking, you can modify any site, and deploy it instantly. Users can rebuild applications to work exactly how they like. Our mission is to put the tools of creation back into the users’ hands. It will be weird, chaotic, and creative – just like the Web should be!

Beaker was forked from Chrome. It is free and open-source."

[Update: mentioned here https://www.are.na/blog/scene%20report/2018/08/13/decentralized-web-summit.html ]
browsers  peertopeer  p2p  software  mac  osx  applications  internet  web  online  chrome  opensource  webdev  webdesign  beaker  hashbase  dat  beakerbrowser  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed  dweb 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Fantasies of the Library | The MIT Press
"Fantasies of the Library lets readers experience the library anew. The book imagines, and enacts, the library as both keeper of books and curator of ideas--as a platform of the future. One essay occupies the right-hand page of a two-page spread while interviews scrolls independently on the left. Bibliophilic artworks intersect both throughout the book-as-exhibition. A photo essay, “Reading Rooms Reading Machines” further interrupts the book in order to display images of libraries (old and new, real and imagined), and readers (human and machine) and features work by artists including Kader Atta, Wafaa Bilal, Mark Dion, Rodney Graham, Katie Paterson, Veronika Spierenburg, and others.

The book includes an essay on the institutional ordering principles of book collections; a conversation with the proprietors of the Prelinger Library in San Francisco; reflections on the role of cultural memory and the archive; and a dialogue with a new media theorist about experiments at the intersection of curatorial practice and open source ebooks. The reader emerges from this book-as-exhibition with the growing conviction that the library is not only a curatorial space but a bibliological imaginary, ripe for the exploration of consequential paginated affairs. The physicality of the book—and this book—“resists the digital,” argues coeditor Etienne Turpin, “but not in a nostalgic way.”

Contributors
Erin Kissane, Hammad Nasar, Megan Shaw Prelinger, Rick Prelinger, Anna-Sophie Springer, Charles Stankievech, Katharina Tauer, Etienne Turpin, Andrew Norman Wilson, Joanna Zylinska"
books  toread  libraries  future  bookfuturism  anna-sophiespringer  etienneturpin  erinkissane  hammadnasar  meganshawprelinger  rickprelinger  charlesstankievech  katharinatauer  andrewnormanwilson  joannazylinska  print  prelingerlibrary  curation  opensource  ebooks  kaderatta  wafaabilal  markdion  rodneygraham  katiepaterson  veronikaspierenburg  2016 
november 2016 by robertogreco
OSP-foundry» Blog Archive » Crickx
[my favorite display font, the story = delightful, hard to believe I never bookmarked this before]

"OSP-Crickx is a digital reinterpretation of a set of adhesive letters.

The Publi Fluor shop was situated in the northern part of Brussels, Schaerbeek, and founded by the father of Madame Christelle Crickx who was a trained letter painter. In his day he is—it seems—the first to propose fluorescent colors for shopwindow signs. It proves so difficult to paint letters on site with that kind of unstable coating that he develops a technique based on vinyl that he fluo-colors and cuts by hand in the workplace, then sticks at clients shops. Around 1975, his health degrades quickly and his daughter is forced to step into the business.

[image]

Starting to cut letters with the rounded and skilled cardboard templates drawn by her father, Madame Crickx slowly morphs the shapes by analysing how typographic niceties confuse her non-trained clients and leads to bad letters placement. She progressively removes the optical compensation of rounded tops and bottoms, straightens sides, and attaches accents for less floating parts. Those moves add a very specific orientation to this otherwise quite common bold italic sans serif display typeface.

During about fifty years these craft lettres have spread across the windows of shopping streets, more and more, and after the closure of the shop in the early noughties, they seem to still hold their own to the assaults of vector vinyl cutting technology.

[image]

In 1996, Pierre Huyghebaert and Vincent Fortemps have just started to work for the cultural center les Halles de Schaerbeek. For a series of events linked to India, an interest to mix local and distant vernacular takes shape. Those letters spotted on Schaerbeek’s shopwindows years before seem to fit the job ideally. After a few wanderings in the streets nearby, the small lettershop at the bottom of the dull Avenue Rogier, shining with its fluo shapes, is finally spotted as the origin of these typographic waves… And the inside of the shop proves to be even more amazing.

First contacts with Madame Crickx follow, the first poster is typeset letter by letter, then Pierre Huyghebaert pays other visits and it becomes obvious that these letters deserve more than a one-time usage, as Madame Crickx’s work deserves more than simply buying some letters more. For the following Halles assignments, after a quick-and-dirty Fontographer vectorisation, the Crickx font is heavily used. This font is called the Crickx Rush in reference of the time constrains that characterize this kind of operation. When Jan Middendorp, then Editor of the Belgian fontshop magazine Druk, orders an article on the letters, it is the occasion for Pierre to try to investigate and understand better the process described herebefore. (Astonishingly, shortly before the magazine stops, a poll seems to have elected the article as one of the most favoured by the readers…).

[image]

When Madame Crickx follows the retirement of her postman husband, the studio Speculoos (where Pierre works) buys the whole stock of letters and dingbats and vinyle for a symbolic prize, stores it in their basement of Saint-Gilles but uses it for some of their funkiest windowshop displays. He ask Madame Crickx to cut lower-cases for her letters as with other accented and diacritics to cover more or less the Latin-1 codepage, by trying to give her just enough sample to distinguish the characters but not much to influence the way to draw them. As answers, she cut a completely new and fantasy set of letters (called the blobby in the pack)… After a discussion, she propose new lower-case, more in sync with the upper cases classical ones, but not sharing exactly the same low contrast. After years of sleeping on hard-drive and archives, in 2010, Ludi Loiseau and Antoine Begon uplift the work to redraw the outlines to produce a more complete and less trashy version (Regular), explore the non-italic more rare one (Droite Rush and Droite) and extend it with lower cases (SharkCut). Finally, the Crickx’s cabinet regains a better place at the new Constant Variable place, Rue Gallait 80, less than a kilometer far from the original shop place…

More :
– Pdf of the article in Dutch (translated by Jan Middendorp and French (original).
– Text by Femke Snelting

We are very happy to receive news from what you do or works you spot that use these fonts!
On est très heureux de recevoir des infos à propos de travaux que vous réalisez ou que vous remarquez qui utilisent ces fontes!"
osp-foundry  crickx  flip-flop  digital  fonts  typography  free  opensource  pierrehuyghebaert  vincentfortemps  christellecrickx  brussels  signs  signage  handmade  ludiloiseau  antoinebegon  janmiddendorp 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Patricio Gonzalez Vivo on Vimeo
"What Are The Chances? – This talk investigates the relationships between chaos and chance, cause and effect. It is built from volcanoes, ashes, wind, love, and new life. Along the way Patricio talks about The Book of Shaders, mapping at Mapzen, and other recent collaborations and works in progress.

Many of these slides are interactive: patriciogonzalezvivo.github.io/eyeo16/# "

[The Book of Shaders: http://thebookofshaders.com/ ]
expressivearttherapy  lygiaclark  mapzen  processing  code  coding  arttherapy  psychology  2016  eyeo  eyeo2016  psychoanalysis  freud  carljung  dreams  collectiveunconscious  caseyreas  shaders  nightmares  community  opensource  maps  mapping  openframeworks  fragility  jenlowe  thebookofshaders  mandalas  synchronicity  interconnectedness  patriciogonzalezvivo  edg  raspberrypi  classideas  interconnected  interconnectivity 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Editors' Notes
"Editors' Notes is an open-source, web-based tool for recording, organizing, preserving, and opening access to research notes, built with the needs of documentary editing projects, archives, and library special collections in mind.

A few ways projects are using Editors' Notes:

• The Margaret Sanger Papers are researching the birth control movement in India.

• The Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony Papers are collecting sources about women using direct action to test voting laws.

• The Labadie Collection is sharing items in its collection that mention Emma Goldman's visits to Detroit.

• The Emma Goldman Papers Project are researching the origins of the 1919 deportation of strikers in Bisbee, Arizona.

Project Collaboration
Teams of editors, archivists, and librarians can use Editors' Notes to manage their research and note-taking. Project administrators can assign research tasks to other team members, and they can control who has permission to edit the project's notes.

Flexible note-taking
Reseachers can create and organize their notes as they wish. Notes can be organized around documentary sources or thematically organized around topics—or both. To find notes, users can browse by topic, search the full text of notes, and filter results using bibliographic metadata.

Integration with Zotero
Editors' Notes is integrated with the Zotero citation management software. Researchers can use Zotero to collect documents and then use Editors' Notes to take notes on those documents. Document descriptions can be edited in Editors' Notes and saved back to Zotero.

Document annotation
Researchers can annotate specific passages in document transcripts. Annotations, like other notes, can include bibliographic metadata and topic keywords and are fully searchable. In addition to creating annotated transcripts, researchers can upload scanned images of documents, which can be viewed in a zoomable interface."
via:litherland  annotation  collaboration  research  tools  zotero  onlinetoolkit  notetaking  archives  opensource 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Welcome to Open Design Kit | Open Design Kit
"A living toolkit for designing with distributed collaborators."

[See also: https://github.com/bocoup/opendesignkit

"Bocoup's Design team maintains Open Design Kit as an open source tool. It's design for collaborators who are not co-located, with a variety of skill levels. No prior design experience is required for you to try out these methods, just an open mind. The Kit includes activities from ideation to implementation and is meant to evolve with use. To share your feedback or add a method, open an issue or pull request on our Github repository.

Since 2009, Bocoup has been creating, championing, and continually improving open tools and workflows used around the world. We foster environments of inclusivity and individuality as we dedicate ourselves to solving global market challenges in the public sphere. We bring diverse experience and leadership to all of our projects so developers and users can accomplish more."]
collaboration  onlinetoolkit  github  bocoup  design  opensource 
july 2016 by robertogreco
adaptive1 | Learning Library
"The Adaptive Design Association abides by the “open source” philosophy of design and fabrication. This does not mean that we simply offer our techniques and processes free of charge, but that we share them with a community who can build and expand upon what we teach. We hope that you -- whether you be a student, teacher, parent, designer, or therapist -- will in turn share your own concepts and designs with us, so that we may grow together.

Our community blog and forum is a platform for individuals to share adaptive design techniques, problems, and solutions with each other from all over the world -- and we encourage you to follow and join the conversation here.

The Adaptive Design Association also embraces a non-proprietary stance with our designs. Our work is not about the item -- but about the child -- and about children in every school or home whose environments might not be built for them.

When we focus on ownership, we delay in building -- and ultimately hinder a child from reaching their full potential. So please Take, Build, Improve, and Expand upon the things you see here -- but understand not only what you are doing -- but for whom -- and do so safely and collaboratively with others."
diy  howto  cardboard  via:ablerism  tutorials  opensource  classideas  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  adaptivedesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."
libraris  hardware  opensource  occupy.here  librarybox  piratebox  classideas  projectideas  via:unthinkingly 
june 2016 by robertogreco
manifestos/1985-GNU-manifesto.md at master · greyscalepress/manifestos
"Why I Must Write GNU

I consider that the Golden Rule requires that if I like a program I must share it with other people who like it. Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way. I cannot in good conscience sign a nondisclosure agreement or a software license agreement. For years I worked within the Artificial Intelligence Lab to resist such tendencies and other inhospitalities, but eventually they had gone too far: I could not remain in an institution where such things are done for me against my will.

So that I can continue to use computers without dishonor, I have decided to put together a sufficient body of free software so that I will be able to get along without any software that is not free. I have resigned from the AI Lab to deny MIT any legal excuse to prevent me from giving GNU away.(2)"



"Why Many Other Programmers Want to Help

I have found many other programmers who are excited about GNU and want to help.

Many programmers are unhappy about the commercialization of system software. It may enable them to make more money, but it requires them to feel in conflict with other programmers in general rather than feel as comrades. The fundamental act of friendship among programmers is the sharing of programs; marketing arrangements now typically used essentially forbid programmers to treat others as friends. The purchaser of software must choose between friendship and obeying the law. Naturally, many decide that friendship is more important. But those who believe in law often do not feel at ease with either choice. They become cynical and think that programming is just a way of making money.

By working on and using GNU rather than proprietary programs, we can be hospitable to everyone and obey the law. In addition, GNU serves as an example to inspire and a banner to rally others to join us in sharing. This can give us a feeling of harmony which is impossible if we use software that is not free. For about half the programmers I talk to, this is an important happiness that money cannot replace."
gnu  richardstallman  friendship  solidarity  opensource  law  legal  cynicism  via:caseygollan 
march 2016 by robertogreco
OpenLayers 3 - Welcome
"A high-performance, feature-packed library for all your mapping needs.

FEATURES

Tiled Layers
Pull tiles from OSM, Bing, MapBox, Stamen, MapQuest, and any other XYZ source you can find. OGC mapping services and untiled layers also supported.

Vector Layers
Render vector data from GeoJSON, TopoJSON, KML, GML, and a growing number of other formats.

Fast & Mobile Ready
Mobile support out of the box. Build lightweight custom profiles with just the components you need.

Cutting Edge & Easy to Customize
Map rendering leverages WebGL, Canvas 2D, and all the latest greatness from HTML5. Style your map controls with straight-forward CSS."

[via: http://elasticterrain.xyz/
via: https://twitter.com/moritz_stefaner/status/711850707859673088 ]
gis  javascript  mapping  maps  opensource  cartography  webdev  openlayers  webdesign 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Digital Manifesto Archive
"This collection aggregates manifestos concerned with making as a subpractice of the digital humanities."



"This archive is an academic resource dedicated to aggregating and cataloging manifestos that fall under two basic criteria. 1) The Digital Manifesto Archive features manifestos that focus on the political and cultural dimensions of digital life. 2) The Digital Manifesto Archive features manifestos that are written, or are primarily disseminated, online.

The manifesto genre is, by definition, timely and politically focused. Further, it is a primary site of political, cultural, and social experimentation in our contemporary world. Manifestos that are created and disseminated online further this experimental ethos by fundamentally expanding the character and scope of the genre.

Each category listed on the archive is loosely organized by theme, political affiliation, and (if applicable) time period. While the political movements and affiliations of the manifestos archived in each category are not universal, each category does try to capture a broad spectrum of political moods and actions with regard to its topic.

This site is meant to preserve manifestos for future research and teaching. The opinions expressed by each author are their own.

This archive was created by Matt Applegate. Our database and website was created by Graham Higgins (gwhigs). It is maintained by Matt Applegate and Yu Yin (Izzy) To
You can contact us at digitalmanifestoarchive@gmail.com.

This project is open source. You can see gwhigs' work for the site here: Digital Manifesto Archive @ Github.com"
manifestos  digital  digitalhumanities  archives  making  mattapplegate  yuyin  designfiction  criticalmaking  engineering  capitalism  feminism  hacking  hacktivism  digitalmarkets  digitaldiaspora  internetofthings  iot  cyberpunk  mediaecology  media  publishing  socialmedia  twitter  ethics  digitalculture  piracy  design  bigdata  transhumanism  utopianism  criticaltheory  mediaarchaeology  opensource  openaccess  technofeminism  gaming  digitalaesthetics  digitaljournalism  journalism  aesthetics  online  internet  web  technocracy  archaeology  education  afrofuturism  digitalart  art  blogging  sopa  aaronswartz  pipa  anarchism  anarchy 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Sandstorm
"Sandstorm is an open source operating system for personal and private clouds."

"What can I do with it?

Create
Create Google-Docs-like spreadsheets, documents, forms, etc. with EtherCalc, Etherpad, Sandforms, Draw.io, and more.

Collaborate
Share documents, diagrams, and other files with your colleagues and friends, and collaborate in real-time.

Communicate
Sync up with your colleagues securely with great chat applications like Rocket.Chat.

How is it different?

Usability | Designed for Humans
Sandstorm is the easiest way there has ever been to run a server.

Sandstorm requires no technical expertise to use.

Installing apps on Sandstorm is as easy as installing apps on your phone. No need to read documentation and edit config files – and no need to wait for IT to do it for you.

Sandstorm emphasizes users over apps.

You log into Sandstorm, not into each app separately.

All of your data across all apps (documents, chat rooms, whatever) can be found and searched in one place, rather than logging into each one separately.

You can share and collaborate on anything – or keep it private.

Security | Secure by Default
Sandstorm is ridiculously secure.

The biggest challenge to securing any server is buggy apps. Some app developers are good at security, but some are not, and it's usually impossible to know who is whom without doing a costly security audit.

Sandstorm, therefore, takes a different approach: break data down into "grains" (for example, individual documents, or chat rooms) and isolate each one in a secure sandbox from which it cannot talk to the world without your express permission. With this approach, no matter how buggy your document editor might be, each document can only possibly be accessed by the people you shared it with. No matter how buggy your chat room, only the people you permitted will ever see the logs.

Skeptical? Check out our security docs and list of security non-events to learn more.

Because Sandstorm manages access control on every document, it can tell you who has accessed your data and allow you to revoke that access at any time. Prove that your sensitive data is secure by reviewing all the systems it is connected to."
cloud  opensource  privacy  security  servers  sandstorm  onlinetoolkit  ethercalc  etherpad  sandforms  draw.io 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Apparatus: A hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams
"Apparatus is a hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams.

The Apparatus Editor runs in the browser and interactive diagrams created with Apparatus can be shared and embedded on the web (coming soon).

Apparatus is free, open-source software."



"Apparatus is under active development. Discuss how Apparatus should evolve on the Apparatus Google Group.

Source code is available on Github under the MIT license. Contributions are very welcome! Big thanks to all who have contributed code to Apparatus.

Apparatus was originally developed by Toby Schachman as a research project within the Communications Design Group (CDG) sponsored by SAP Labs. Thanks to Bret Victor, Paula Te, Matthias Graf, Michael Nagle, Chaim Gingold, Robert Ochshorn, Glen Chiacchieri, Joshua Horowitz, Ian Johnson, Simon Last, Ivan Zhao, Emily Eiffler, Vi Hart, and Monique DeSalvo for design discussions, beta testing, and encouragement!"

[via: http://roomthily.tumblr.com/post/136019466687/apparatus-a-hybrid-graphics-editor-and ]
graphics  visualization  software  opensource  onlinetoolkit  interactive  programming  classideas  tobyschachman  communicationsdesigngroup  brettvictor  paulate  matthiasgraf  vihart  moniquedesalvo  joshuahorowitz  ianjohnson  simonlast  ivanzhao  michaelnagle  chaimgingold  robertochshorn  glenchiacchieri  drawing  edg  srg 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Jacob’s Ladder of coding — Medium
"Anecdotes and questions about climbing up and down the ladder of abstraction: Atari, ARM, demoscene, education, creative coding, community, seeking lightness, enlightenment & strange languages"



"With only an hour or two of computer time a week, our learning and progress was largely down to intensive trial & error, daily homework and learning to code and debug with only pencil and paper, whilst trying to be the machine yourself: Playing every step through in our heads (and on paper) over and over until we were confident, the code did as we’d expect, yet, often still failing because of wrong intuitions. Learning this analytical thinking is essential to successful debugging, even today, specifically in languages / environments where no GUI debugger is available. In the late 90s, John Maeda did similar exercises at MIT Media Lab, with students role-playing different parts of a CPU or a whole computer executing a simple process. Later at college, my own CS prof too would often quote Alan Perlis:
“To understand a program you must become both the machine and the program.” — Alan Perlis

Initially we’d only be using the machine largely to just verify our ideas prepared at home (spending the majority of the time typing in/correcting numbers from paper). Through this monastic style of working, we also learned the importance of having the right tools and balance of skills within the group and were responsible to create them ourselves in order to achieve our vision. This important lesson stayed with me throughout (maybe even became) my career so far… Most projects I worked on, especially in the past 15 years, almost exclusively relied on custom-made tooling, which was as much part of the final outcome as the main deliverable to clients. Often times it even was the main deliverable. On the other hand, I’ve also had to learn the hard way that being a largely self-sufficient generalist often is undesired in the modern workplace, which frequently still encourages narrow expertise above all else…

After a few months of convincing my parents to invest all of their saved up and invaluable West-german money to purchase a piece of “Power Without the Price” (a much beloved Atari 800XL) a year before the Wall came down in Berlin, I finally gained daily access to a computer, but was still in a similar situation as before: No more hard west money left to buy a tape nor disk drive from the Intershop, I wasn’t able to save any work (apart from creating paper copies) and so the Atari was largely kept switched on until November 10, 1989, the day after the Berlin Wall was opened and I could buy an XC-12 tape recorder. I too had to choose whether to go the usual route of working with the built-in BASIC language or stick with what I’d learned/taught myself so far, Assembly… In hindsight, am glad I chose the latter, since it proved to be far more useful and transportable knowledge, even today!"



"Lesson learned: Language skills, natural and coded ones, are gateways, opening paths not just for more expression, but also to paths in life.

As is the case today, so it was back then: People tend to organize around specific technological interests, languages and platforms and then stick with them for a long time, for better or worse. Over the years I’ve been part of many such tool-based communities (chronologically: Asm, C, TurboPascal, Director, JS, Flash, Java, Processing, Clojure) and have somewhat turned into a nomad, not being able to ever find a true home in most of them. This might sound judgemental and negative, but really isn’t meant to and these travels through the land of languages and toolkits has given me much food for thought. Having slowly climbed up the ladder of abstraction and spent many years both with low & high level languages, has shown me how much each side of the spectrum can inform and learn from the other (and they really should do more so!). It’s an experience I can highly recommend to anyone attempting to better understand these machines some of us are working with for many hours a day and which impact so much of all our lives. So am extremely grateful to all the kind souls & learning encountered on the way!"



"In the vastly larger open source creative computing demographic of today, the by far biggest groups are tight-knit communities around individual frameworks and languages. There is much these platforms have achieved in terms of output, increasing overall code literacy and turning thousands of people from mere computer users into authors. This is a feat not be underestimated and a Good Thing™! Yet my issue with this siloed general state of affairs is that, apart from a few notable exceptions (especially the more recent arrivals), there’s unfortunately a) not much cross-fertilizing with fundamentally different and/or new ideas in computing going on and b) over time only incremental progress is happening, business as usual, rather than a will to continuously challenge core assumptions among these largest communities about how we talk to machines and how we can do so better. I find it truly sad that many of these popular frameworks rely only on the same old imperative programming language family, philosophy and process, which has been pre-dominant and largely unchanged for the past 30+ years, and their communities also happily avoid or actively reject alternative solutions, which might require fundamental changes to their tools, but which actually could be more suitable and/or powerful to their aims and reach. Some of these platforms have become and act as institutions in their own right and as such also tend to espouse an inward looking approach & philosophy to further cement their status (as owners or pillars?) in their field. This often includes a no-skills-neccessary, we-cater-all-problems promise to their new users, with each community re-inventing the same old wheels in their own image along the way. It’s Not-Invented-Here on a community level: A reliance on insular support ecosystems, libraries & tooling is typical, reducing overall code re-use (at least between communities sharing the same underlying language) and increasing fragmentation. More often than not these platforms equate simplicity with ease (go watch Rich Hickey taking this argument eloquently apart!). The popular prioritization of no pre-requisite knowledge, super shallow learning curves and quick results eventually becomes the main obstacle to later achieve systemic changes, not just in these tools themselves, but also for (creative) coding as discipline at large. Bloatware emerges. Please do forgive if that all sounds harsh, but I simply do believe we can do better!

Every time I talk with others about this topic, I can’t help but think about Snow Crash’s idea of “Language is a virus”. I sometimes do wonder what makes us modern humans, especially those working with computing technology, so fundamentalist and brand-loyal to these often flawed platforms we happen to use? Is it really that we believe there’s no better way? Are we really always only pressed for time? Are we mostly content with Good Enough? Are we just doing what everyone else seems to be doing? Is it status anxiety, a feeling we have to use X to make a living? Are we afraid of unlearning? Is it that learning tech/coding is (still) too hard, too much of an effort, which can only be justified a few times per lifetime? For people who have been in the game long enough and maybe made a name for themselves in their community, is it pride, sentimentality or fear of becoming a complete beginner again? Is it maybe a sign that the way we teach computing and focus on concrete tools too early in order to obtain quick, unrealistically complex results, rather than fundamental (“boring”) knowledge, which is somewhat flawed? Is it our addiction to largely focus on things we can document/celebrate every minor learning step as an achievement in public? This is no stab at educators — much of this systemic behavior is driven by the sheer explosion of (too often similar) choices, demands made by students and policy makers. But I do think we should ask ourselves these questions more often."

[author's tweet: https://twitter.com/toxi/status/676578816572067840 ]
coding  via:tealtan  2015  abstraction  demoscene  education  creativecoding  math  mathematics  howwelearn  typography  design  dennocoil  alanperlis  johnmaeda  criticalthinking  analyticalthinking  basic  programming  assembly  hexcode  georgedyson  computing  computers  atari  amiga  commodore  sinclair  identity  opensource  insularity  simplicity  ease  language  languages  community  communities  processing  flexibility  unschooling  deschooling  pedagogy  teaching  howweteach  understanding  bottomup  topdown  karstenschmidt 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Field Day Lab | Wisconsin Institute for Discovery
"We are a truly interdisciplinary team of educational researchers, software engineers, artists, and storytellers, exploring the intersection of contemporary learning science and media design, specializing in mobile media, video games, and simulation. Central to our educational philosophy is the process of learning through making. Why give people games when they can create games? We believe in keeping our tools free and open source, inspiring collaborative grassroots user communities and a robust network of educators and students iterating on one another’s designs. Seeking to do what’s never been done before, we constantly innovate, play, take risks, and mess-make."

[via: https://medium.com/@fielddaylab/why-situated-learning-matters-6129fd2afeaa#.qukm20mxa ]

[See also: http://wid.wisc.edu/programs/fielddaylab/platforms/ ]
education  fieldstudies  arislearning  mobile  learning  opensource  technology  edtech  game  gaming  simulation  mediadesign  fielddaylab 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Shape of the Web
"The Web is a living ecosystem that exists in a delicate balance and we all have a role to play in shaping — and ensuring — its future.

At Mozilla, we believe that the more you know about the Web, the easier it is for you to make more informed choices and be a more empowered digital citizen.

That’s why we created this site: to show you where the Web stands today, the issues that impact it and what you can do to get involved."
mozilla  web  internet  online  maps  mapping  accessibility  advertising  adtracking  adoption  affordability  civility  power  data  dataportability  identity  digital  censorship  government  policy  surveillance  content  netneutrality  opensource  security  privacy  patents  software 
may 2015 by robertogreco
K. Verlag | Press / Books / . 1 Fantasies of the Library
"… is a sequence of pages wherein the reader-as-exhibition-viewer learns, rather surprisingly—but with growing conviction—that the library is not only a curatorial space, but that its bibliological imaginary is also a fertile territory for the exploration of paginated affairs in the Anthropocene. 

Fantasies of the Library inaugurates the intercalations: paginated exhibition series. Virtually stacked alongside Anna-Sophie Springer’s feature essay "Melancholies of the Paginated Mind" about unorthodox responses to the institutional ordering principles of book collections, the volume includes an interview with Rick Prelinger and Megan Shaw Prelinger of the Prelinger Library in San Francisco; reflections on the role of cultural memory and the archive by Hammad Nasar, Head of Research and Programmes at the Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong; a conversation with media theorist Joanna Zylinska about experiments on the intersections of curatorial practice and open source e-books; and a discussion between K’s co-director Charles Stankievech and platform developer Adam Hyde on new approaches to open source publishing in science and academia. The photo essay, “Reading Rooms Reading Machines,” presents views of unusual historical libraries next to works by artists such as Kader Attia, Andrew Beccone, Mark Dion, Rodney Graham, Katie Paterson, Veronika Spierenburg, Andrew Norman Wilson, and others.

Edited by Anna-Sophie Springer & Etienne Turpin

Design by Katharina Tauer

Paperback, thread-bound, 160 pages

30 color + 15 black/white images

ISBN 978-0-9939074-0-1 15.99 €

Co-published by K. Verlag and the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin

Made possible by the Schering Stiftung

Order the book via info@k-verlag.com

+ + 6 for 4: The intercalations box set subscription offer! + +

.

Published in January 2015"
books  toread  2015  anthropocene  anna-sophiespringer  collections  libraries  prelingerlibrary  meganshawprelinger  hammadnasar  rickprelinger  opensource  publishing  ebooks  charlesstankievech  adamhyde  kaderattia  andrewbeccone  markdion  rodneygraham  katiepaterson  veronikaspierenburg  andrewnormanwilson  etienneturpin  kverlag  katharinatauer 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft — Backchannel — Medium
"I’d periodically played with Linux and other alternatives on my PC over the years, but always found the exercise tedious and, in the end, unworkable. But I never stopped paying attention to what brilliant people like Richard Stallman and Cory Doctorow and others were saying, namely that we were leading, and being led, down a dangerous path. In a conversation with Cory one day, I asked him about his use of Linux as his main PC operating system. He said it was important to do what he believed in—and, by the way, it worked fine.

Could I do less, especially given that I’d been public in my worries about the trends?

So about three years ago, I installed the Ubuntu variant — among the most popular and well-supported — on a Lenovo ThinkPad laptop, and began using it as my main system. For a month or so, I was at sea, making keystroke errors and missing a few Mac applications on which I’d come to rely. But I found Linux software that worked at least well enough, and sometimes better than its Mac and Windows counterparts.

And one day I realized that my fingers and brain had fully adjusted to the new system. Now, when I used a Mac, I was a bit confused."



"As mobile computing has become more dominant, I’ve had to rethink everything on that platform, too. I still consider the iPhone the best combination of software and hardware any company has offered, but Apple’s control-freakery made it a nonstarter. I settled on Android, which was much more open and readily modified.

But Google’s power and influence worry me, too, even though I still trust it more than many other tech companies. Google’s own Android is excellent, but the company has made surveillance utterly integral to the use of its software. And app developers take disgusting liberties, collecting data by the petabyte and doing god-knows-what with it. (Security experts I trust say the iPhone is more secure by design than most Android devices.) How could I walk my talk in the mobile age?"



"So I keep looking for ways to further reduce my dependence on the central powers. One of my devices, an older tablet running Cyanogenmod, is a test bed for an even more Google-free existence.

It’s good enough for use at home, and getting better as I find more free software — most of it via the “F-Droid” download library — that handles what I need. I’ve even installed a version of Ubuntu’s new tablet OS, but it’s not ready, as the cliche goes, for prime time. Maybe the Firefox OS will be a player.

But I’ve given up the idea that free software and open hardware will become the norm for consumers anytime soon, if ever—even though free and open-source software is at the heart of the Internet’s back end.

If too few people are willing to try, though, the default will win. And the defaults are Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Our economic system is adapting to community-based solutions, slowly but surely. But let’s face it: we collectively seem to prefer convenience to control, at least for the moment. I’m convinced more and more people are learning about the drawbacks of the bargain we’ve made, wittingly or not, and someday we may collectively call it Faustian.

I keep hoping more hardware vendors will see the benefit of helping their customers free themselves of proprietary control. This is why I was so glad to see Dell, a company once joined at the hip with Microsoft, offer a Linux laptop. If the smaller players in the industry don’t themselves enjoy being pawns of software companies and mobile carriers, they have options, too. They can help us make better choices.

Meanwhile, I’ll keep encouraging as many people as possible to find ways to take control for themselves. Liberty takes some work, but it’s worth the effort. I hope you’ll consider embarking on this journey with me."
apple  google  microsoft  dangilmour  linux  opensource  2015  community  hardware  dell  cyanogenmod  ios  android  windows  mac  osx  f-droid  ubuntu  firefoxos  firefox  os  mozilla  lenovo  richardstallman  corydoctorow  libreoffice 
march 2015 by robertogreco
mrmrs / designer + developer in sf
"Trying to make the web as fast as possible, highly readable, 100% responsive, and easy to navigate.

I like building tools that help make designing in the browser a little easier.

Advocate for users and open-source."
adammorse  via:maxfenton  webdev  opensource  css  readability  responsivewebdesign  templates  responsivedesign  webdesign 
march 2015 by robertogreco
PirateBox by David Darts
"PirateBox is a self-contained mobile communication and file sharing system. Simply turn it on to transform any space into a free and open communications and file sharing network."

[See also: http://piratebox.cc/
http://piratebox.cc/openwrt:diy

http://occupyhere.org/
http://librarybox.us/index.php ]

[via: http://www.furtherfield.org/programmes/event/piratebox-cutlery-auto-net ]
projectieas  occupy.here  hardware  darknets  networks  opensource  communication  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  tecnology  davidarts  librarybox  wifi  filesharing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Syncthing
"Syncthing replaces proprietary sync and cloud services with something open, trustworthy and decentralized. Your data is your data alone and you deserve to choose where it is stored, if it is shared with some third party and how it's transmitted over the Internet."

[via: https://ind.ie/blog/focus/ ]
sync  syncing  syncthing  dropbox  data  cloud  tools  onlinetoolkit  mac  osx  windows  linux  open  opensource  android 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Jolla - We are unlike
"Jolla Ltd., the smartphone company from Finland, is developing mobile devices and Sailfish OS, the open mobile operating system. The Jolla smartphone, powered by Sailfish OS was introduced to the public in Finland in late-November 2013. Currently Jolla smartphones are available all over Europe, and soon in Hong Kong and India.

Jolla was born in 2011 out of the passion of its founders towards open innovation in the mobile space. Jolla is about offering a true alternative to the big players in the mobile industry. Our revolutionary Jolla smartphone running on our own distinctive mobile operating system Sailfish OS, was built on the heritage of Meego, an open source operating system formerly developed by Nokia among others.

Our aim is to be open, independent, and transparent in everything we do. DIT – doing it together is in our hearts. Our developer and fan communities are an integral part of the way we operate, how we develop things and move forward. We listen, and we take feedback. Without our community, Jolla would not exist.

Currently we have 125 employees working in our offices in Helsinki and Tampere, Finland and Hong Kong."



"INDEPENDENT SAILFISH OS

It’s unlike what you’re used to. But once you get the hang of the gesture based Sailfish OS, you’ll never want to go back. Totally independent and highly adaptive, Sailfish OS is an open platform, so if you know how, you can change whatever you want, whenever you want."
mobile  tablets  alternative  jolla  jollatablet  phones  sailfish  sailfishos  meego  nokia  opensource 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Release Material Design Icons · google/material-design-icons · GitHub
"Today, Google Design are open-sourcing 750 glyphs as part of the Material Design system icons pack. The system icons contain icons commonly used across different apps, such as icons used for media playback, communication, content editing, connectivity, and so on. They're equally useful when building for the web, Android or iOS.

Read on for the release notes, view a live preview of the icons or download the icon pack now.
What's included in the release?

• SVG versions of all icons in both 24px and 48px flavours
• SVG and CSS sprites of all icons
• 1x, 2x icons targeted at the Web (PNG)
• 1x, 2x, 3x icons targeted at iOS (PNG)
• Hi-dpi versions of all icons (hdpi, mdpi, xhdpi, xxhdpi, xxxhdpi) (PNG)"

[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/100505705546/material-design-icons-google-have-open-sourced-a ]
google  design  graphics  icons  svg  googledesign  glyphs  opensource 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Open Garden
"Fixing the mobile Internet. Together.

More than 5 million people use Open Garden today. By joining Open Garden, you are joining forces to make the Internet better, faster and more reliable – for everyone, including yourself. Open Garden allows all devices (including smart phones, tablets, laptops and “wearables”) to work together and find the best connections at any time. The more people use it, the better it gets."
opensource  mesh  networking  internet  wifi  meshnetworks  meshnetworking  opengarden  connectivity 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Known: a social publishing platform
"For you
Tell your story any way you'd like. Known is a simple platform for publishing words, pictures, podcasts and more to a site that you control. Choose to share it on networks like Twitter and Facebook, or the software you already use.

For your group
Whether you're sharing quotes with your neighborhood book club or starting a grassroots campaign to change the world, Known is built around group collaboration and social publishing. Public or private, big or small; with Known, your platform is powered by people.

For your organization
Meet your colleagues around a digital water cooler. With Known you can run a private social network for your company, campus or organization. Today's teams don’t always work in the same room, but now you have a way to share inspirations, chat with colleagues, and send around company BBQ pics without getting lost in endless email threads.

Wherever you are
You already spend enough time in front of a computer, and inspiration can strike anywhere. Known is fully responsive and works on whatever device you’ve got in your hand. Whether you’re sharing a sunset picture from the beach or blogging from the road, real-time publishing is real.

Open and extensible.
Known is a fully installable platform based on an open source engine with a complete plugin architecture, an easy template system, and access control support.

Roll your own network.
You can install Known yourself if you have a server, and you can easily extend its functionality. It's your site: you're in control.

No server? No problem.
You don’t have to worry about the technical stuff if you don’t want to. Sign up for a website above, and we'll take care of the details."
via:audreywatters  opensource  publishing  indieweb  blogging  webdev  lms  known  adomainofone'sown  ownership  webdesign 
september 2014 by robertogreco
What we do – Simply Secure
"In brief, we are a service organization. We’re here to help the existing open–source security community do what it does – better. We don’t want to own it, we don’t want to invent it. We believe in collaboration and portable resources, developed with a broad coalition of smart, enthusiastic practitioners.

In the coming months, we’ll be partnering with other groups on on activities such as:

• Researching and developing usability and security auditing practices. How do we measure the two in a single assessment?

• Bringing usable-security researchers from major institutes in contact with secure-software developers, and building an academic practice focused on practical implementation.

• Sponsoring usability studies for major secure-communications tools, and working with designers and developers to act on their findings.

• Convening usability researchers and software developers to identify big problems, and crafting collaborative ideas for solving them.

Ground rules

We work on open source projects.
Security and privacy technologies must be trustworthy; to be trustworthy, they need to be open to scrutiny and validation. At the heart of open source is an openness to this type of scrutiny, and a willingness to work collaboratively to fix problems and improve as a part of earning this trust.

We aim to enable broadly-useful communications technologies.
Usability isn’t just design. It means providing pleasant, workable technology that meets users needs and expectations. We believe that this means allowing users to continue using the platforms and services they’re comfortable with. For this reason, our primary focus will be on technology that secures communication on top of existing platforms and services. How can we encrypt on top of popular name-brand, consumer-facing cloud services?

We commit to running our organization transparently.
We’re working to solve unsolved problems, which means we’ll make mistakes. We believe that our mistakes can be as instructive as our successes, and we commit to being open about both in ways that help the community learn, recycle, and improve on our methodologies."
security  opensource  transparency  technology  usability 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Making Better Digital Maps in an Era of Standardization - CityLab
"Using pre-digital techniques as inspiration, three cartographers lead the charge against cookie-cutter digital maps."



"Not at all. Many cartographers are developing digital, open-source tools that look back to a pre-digital era to make maps that are uniquely designed to a particular purpose. Here are three who are leading in the charge against cartographic standardization and toward beautiful, functional maps."
maps  mapping  cartography  aesthetics  design  2014  bernhardjenny  tompatterson  danielhuffman  laurabliss  opensource  digital 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Fattelo!™ The opensource design project.
"Fattelo!™ is a literal translation of the English phrase “DIY” or “do it yourself” – the culture of building and fixing things for yourself. Fattelo!™ promotes customer participation, trusting in the collective know-how of its customers, transcending barriers, and encouraging a return to a hands-on attitude and the capacity of every human to think, interact, and create.

Why Open source participatory? Because every object will be available on our e-commerce to buy, or on our website you can download for free the instructions to make your own version!

Fattelo's first project is 01Lamp, the opensource carboard lamp (a nice looking one though!) you can buy from www.fattelo.com or you can do-it-yourself from a regular pizza box."
via:ablerism  diy  opensource  design  lamps  cardboard 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Will Richardson Ignite Presentation ISTE 2013 [Vimeo]
[Notes from: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2012/07/19-bold-not-old-ideas-for-change.html ]

"1. Give open network tests. Forget open book / phone tests.
Let’s have open network assessments where students can use the tools they own and love for learning. School should not be a place where we force kids to unplug and disconnect from the world.

2. Stop wasting money on textbooks.
Make your own texts with things like wikis.

3. Google yourself
If we’re not empowering ourselves and our students to be Google well, we’re not doing a good job.

4. Flip the power structure from adults to learners
Empower students with the tools and resources they need to go where they want to go and explore and develop their interests and passions.

5. Don’t do work for the classroom
Support learners in doing work that is worthy of, can exist in, and can change the world.

6. Stop telling kids to do their own work
That’s not reality any longer. Support them in collaborating, interacting, and cooperating with others.

7. Learn first. Teach second.
We must come into our classrooms knowing that we are learners first. If we think we are teachers first, we are not giving our students the powerful learning models they’ll need to be successful.

8. No more how-to workshops
Educators should know how to find out how to on their own. When we come together it should be to talk about how we are doing.

9. Share everything
The best work of you and your students should be shared online. This will help us all get better.

10. Ask questions you don’t know the answer to
The learning of high stakes tests with predetermined answers is not as powerful as the learning that comes from finding our own new and unique answers.

11. Believe that you want to be found by strangers on the internet
If you think kids aren’t going to interact with strangers on the internet, you’re wrong. Let’s embrace that and support kids in being smart when doing so and learning a lot about the minds they are meeting.

12. Rethink the role of the teacher
We should not be doing the same work that 20th century teachers did. Consider how technology can and should change our roles.

13. Toss the resume
No one cares about your resume anymore. The internet is the new resume. What will people find when they look at who you are online? That is what you should be focusing on.

14. Go beyond Google to learn
Build your personal learning network and learn with and from the people you know via places like Twitter and Facebook.

15. Go free and open source
We have a budget crises, yet schools are wasting millions on things that are offered for free.

16. Create an UnCommon Core
Don’t ask how you will meet the common core, empower kids to think about how they will change the world.

17. Stop delivering the curriculum
This is no longer necessary. Information can be accessed without a teacher. Move beyond delivery to discovery.

18. Be subversive
When Lisa (was he talking about me?) is told to do a standardized test, stand up and say NO! We have to be disruptive and push back.

19, Stand up and scream
Tell everyone that education is not about publishers and politicians but rather it’s about what students and parents want and how teachers can best give that to them."
willrichardson  2013  education  unlearning  opensource  free  curriculum  howweteach  howwelearn  learning  teaching  schools  networks  systemsthinking  disruption  testing  openbooktests  opennetworktests  resumes  textbooks  power  hierarchies  hierarchy  horizontality  web  internet  access  information  collaboration  cheating  google  twitter  lifelonglearning  question  askingquestion  questionasking  subversion  empowerment  askingquestions 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Loomio
"Loomio is free and open source software for anyone, anywhere, to participate in decisions that affect them.

On this page you can explore some of the groups around the world who have opted to make their decision-making process transparent."
software  opensource  via:caseygollan  loomio  decisionmaking  transparency  consensus 
april 2014 by robertogreco
ntlk's blog: Internet of Dependent Things
"Third-party access to my domestic appliance creates a power disparity between the manufacturer (or service owner) and me. They can use their power to generate profit in ways that didn’t exist before, forcing me to pay in ways that go beyond the purchase of the appliance itself.

I make trade-offs daily about which privacies and freedoms to give up, and in exchange for what. Some are worth it and buy me closer connection with friends, or some useful convenience; others are foisted upon me because I have to make them in order to do my work; but some just to go too far.

I resent that the meaning of an acceptable trade-off is shifting toward less privacy, less control and towards tipping the balance in favour of for-profit companies and convenience for governments who want to spy on everyone.

Maciej Cegłowski puts it way better than I can:
What upsets me isn’t that we created this centralized version of the Internet based on permanent surveillance.
What upsets me, what really gets my goat, is that we did it because it was the easiest thing to do. There was no design, forethought, or analysis involved. No one said “hey, this sounds like a great world to live in, let’s make it”. It happened because we couldn’t be bothered.

It doesn’t have to be this way. Open projects could fill in the usefulness of adding connectivity to appliances. They could open-source the design of the hardware (or instructions on how to put it together), and the software it runs on. The owner wouldn’t be reliant on the manufacturer to make improvements, or to create versions that can work with different machines, or give them access from different kinds of devices. Ultimately, they could be in control of the hardware and the software involved.

Just like I would like to see a trend towards decentralisation of the web, I would like the internet of things to become full of decentralised entities, built on the premises of freedom and empowerment, before it’s entirely normal for marketers and governments to live in my washing machine."
internet  opensource  control  internetofthings  decentralization  freedom  empowerment  connectivity  appliances  maciejceglowski  2014  surveillance  provacy  security  maciejcegłowski  iot 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Manso: Jay Porter Interview #3, Part 2
[Also available here: http://jayporter.com/dispatches/san-diego-exit-interview-part-2/ ]

"I talk to people about this a lot. Because of the interviews we’ve done in the past, I know about the business, and I’m a Linkery booster. People tell me, “I really like the idea of the Linkery.” I say, “yeah, it’s an awesome idea.” But they say “I like the idea of the Linkery more than I like the Linkery itself.” And because it was a huge idea that existed in a very robust way, virtually, people could experience it without ever going there.

It was principally an idea. It was an Internet-operated idea. The thing was real, it was real people and real products, but the operations were very much facilitated by the Internet. Our fundamental marketing plan was to do remarkable things and share them in this very transparent way through a blog and by talking honestly about what we were doing. Which in 2005 was a radical idea for a restaurant.

The idea that you could start a blog and newsletter and get people into your local restaurant by saying, hey we got this one pig from this farm, and here’s what we’re doing in the kitchen today, and here’s who we want to win the soccer match…it all feels like Portlandia now, but in 2005 even Portland wasn’t doing it!

My background was, I had really followed where “Web 2.0” companies were going, and how they were communicating with their audiences, and how they were transforming the relationship between companies and their customers. And the Open Source movement really came together at that time. The essay The Cathedral and The Bazaar was such an influential thing for me, I think I read that right before we started the restaurant.

I read that. We probably read it at the exact same time.

Open Source was really catching fire. I was using all the Gnu tools because I was a geek. But it wasn’t long until, for example, my Mom knew what Linux was. Open Source was exploding. It informed so much of how I conceived of the business.

Even when, say, Michael came on as GM, or our chefs would start with us, that was just part of working for our business: We’re super transparent. We blog about things. We take pictures of things. Communication is an essential part of our jobs. We’re building enthusiasm for this kind of food. And then there was the part where we were finding farmers on the Internet, and saying, hey, we think you’re selling what we want to buy, or we think that you might be able to grow what we want to buy. And that was all very tech-driven.

But I think that, as with a lot of these kinds of projects, we also discovered the limits of this approach. Which was, it became too easy to consume the Linkery without actually experiencing the Linkery.

That’s also where I lost interest with a lot of the infrastructure of reviews and critics – I personally like the critics in town, but the infrastructure, including Yelp or whatever, is set up to treat what the restaurant does only as content to be reviewed, in order to generate more content.

Our online presence became its own, free, content that we were delivering to people who then added their own content around it, and then they sold it one way or another, without anybody ever just fucking eating a hot dog. And in the end, the guy who makes the hot dogs has to get fucking paid, no matter how many Yelp reviews get written, or how many articles get written about my blog post or whatever.

Now, the opportunity to build a new business from scratch is a great opportunity, and what’s become clear as we put the new place together is this: as a restaurant operator, I am not in the business of content. I’m not in the business of making things for people to write about. I’m in the business of creating fantastic experiences around local food. And, those experiences are really hard to have on the Internet. You gotta show up for that shit.

So we’re intentionally building our new restaurant to not have a strong online component, or a content-generation component.

But hey, if you want to pay me to write something for you, I’m happy to do that.

If you’re getting paid to write something, then that’s what you’re selling.

There’s a great quote from when Alec Baldwin had Seinfield on his podcast. Alec Baldwin says, “you could have your entire channel. Your own production company, you produce all your own shows, and you could be raking it in, because, it’s all produced by Jerry Seinfeld.” And Seinfeld says, “you could not even sell me that. You know why I wouldn’t do that.”

Baldwin says – I think in legitimate confusion – “I don’t understand.” And Seinfeld says, “because that’s not the thing. I want to connect with my audience. I want to write. That’s the thing.” And then he used this great metaphor, he says, “if you want to experience the ocean, do you want to be on a surfboard or do you want to be on a yacht? I want to be on a surfboard. People have a yacht so they can say, hey, look at my yacht.”

You realize the thing that you’re trying to do and the thing that you’re building have nothing to do with each other.

Yeah, I really misjudged. It started out as a really great way to distinguish ourselves as being different from other restaurants and to communicate what we were really about. It was highly effective for that. But in the end it became its own thing with its own overhead. I stopped feeding that beast a year or two before we sold the restaurant, I really just put up pictures at that point.

Which I think is an amazing thing about technology now. Instagram really is all you need. You can be like, “here, we made something awesome.” It takes you three seconds.

And now, the contextual cues make it clear what you’re about. In 2006, we had to really explain, here is what we believe, this is why we do this, this is who we’re buying from. But now, people understand a restaurant that blogs its ingredients and dishes. You could start a restaurant called “A Blog of Ingredients and Dishes” and people would know exactly what kind of food you serve.

Naming what farms you’re sourcing from and all that. People get it.

Yeah, it’s cool, I don’t want to eat differently than that. But there’s not much needed in terms of explaining what it’s all about. A Tumblr will do the trick fine.

You don’t need to host your own Wordpress blog anymore.

Do you know who Austin Kleon is? He’s really popular on Tumblr. He wrote a book called “Steal Like An Artist”.

I’ve seen that book.

He has a new book coming out called “Show Your Work.” Which I haven’t read obviously because it’s not out yet. But I’m already taking issue with it. Show your work, yes, because there’s real value in that, but that’s also work. To show your work, is also more work that isn’t your work. If you’re not getting paid for it, and if it’s distracting from what you’re actually trying to do, then don’t.

I just think a big thing right now is that, the Internet, and everyone who sits at work googling shit, and reads Facebook and their RSS reader – and I’m part of that Borg – it just creates such a demand for content that nobody’s ever satisfied. You’re not giving them enough free content.

This was a discussion that we’d have sometimes with people who wanted to review us, or write about us, or with Yelp or whoever. I’d say, you know, I don’t really care. I’m not in the business of giving you something to write about.

Look, a restaurant lives in an ecosystem of reviewers and there’s a give-and-take. It’s an environment, and you work with the restaurant media to make sure that they have enough content to keep interest in restaurants alive, and to keep their jobs going. And they in turn are respectful of the realities of restaurants, they don’t run hatchet pieces all the time. Those are the professionals, the professional restauranteurs and the professional writers, and they understand that this is how this thing works. There is a demand for written content and restaurant experiences, and together the restaurant media and the restaurants can create a really positive environment around it. The core professionals understand this.

But in a slightly more outer circle, there may be some slightly less sophisticated people, maybe they are working in the media – whether it’s print or small blogs or whatever – and some of those people really just look at the restaurants as ways of generating content. And when this happens, I’m kind of like, dude, not only do I not really want to help you with this, I don’t want you in my place. You’re not helping this guy, who’s sitting next to you at the bar, who just had a shitty day at work and he came to his favorite local place to be around friends and enjoy some food that he really likes – you’re not helping him have a better time. You’re not helping my employees do their jobs better or make a better living. You’re just kind of in here, trying to improve your own career on top of something that has nothing to do with you and that’s – that makes you kind of a dick.

Because he’ll be trying to create something, “there’s a narrative here”, and maybe there is, but it’s probably not what he’s going to write about…

There actually is a really interesting parallel with what I’ve been reading a lot lately, this kind of “new generation” of highly intelligent sportswriting. Writers like Spencer Hall of SBNation, David J Roth who started a magazine called the Classical…

I don’t know shit about sports, so –

Well, sports is just a way that society expresses itself. A lot of these writers see within sports how society is expressing itself and they write about that.

It’s a vessel to describe society.

So a topic that’s come up with some of these more interesting sportswriters is how sports now serves this purpose, for shitty media outlets to read narrative into everything. Today, nobody just scores a touchdown, instead the touchdown marks a point in … [more]
jedsundwall  jayporter  meta  metadata  making  doing  internet  content  sports  journalism  criticism  2014  interviews  narrative  storytelling  instagram  twitter  data  documentation  thelinkery  restaurants  process  austinkleon  alecbaldwin  howweowork  food  opensource  workinginpublic  nassimtaleb  privilege  luck  business  success  blackswans  emergence  jamesfowler  sethgodin  kurtvonnegut  vonnegut 
march 2014 by robertogreco
DIGITAL PUBLISHING TOOLKIT for the Arts and Culture | RAAK-MKB project by Institute of Network Cultures, Hogeschool van Amsterdam
"Digital Publications are slowly ascending since a couple of years. Due to the rise of tablets and smartphones this development has accelerated and by now these publications – e-books, newspaper apps and digital magazines – are forever part of our media landscape. More and more people use mobile devices to read books and magazines and the coming years this way of information processing will dominate the market. Publishers can’t stay behind in relation to digital publishing. However, many publishers in the art- and cultural sector are unfamiliar with these developments. They do not have the knowledge, resources and capacities to develop new methods of digital publishing and participate in the digital market. Moreover, the art- and culture books have an extra challenge, because the form and content are deeply intertwined.

This RAAK-MKB project will provide the research and realization of such a platform. The following research questions is formulated: “In what way can a platform be created with new tools for open source-publishing, by which publishers in the art- and cultural sector can produce interactive e-publications by themselves?”

To answer this research question, the Institute of Network Cultures (lectortaat Netwerkcultuur) of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and Knowledge center Creating 010 of the Hogeschool van Rotterdam are executing state-of-the-art research. In collaboration with an already existing consortium of eleven MKB-companies consisting of publishers, designers and developers, a fivesome subprojects will be formulated. Within these subgroups publishers, designers and developers, (research)lecturers and students of the participating applied universities will collaborate.

The result is a new developed toolkit that exists of tools for digital publishing, based on open source-software of which the source code will be published and freely accessible. As a result everyone can freely copy, adjust and distribute the tools. Five e-publications of titles of the art- and culture books fund of the participating publishers will be produced and presented on a platform that is developed for that purpose. Moreover the following manual will be created: “How to publish an e-book?” on digital publishing processes."
publishing  epub  books  digital  digitalpublishing  amsterdam  epublishing  toolkit  opensource  raak  mkb  raa-mkb  epubs 
march 2014 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."

[via: https://twitter.com/davidtedu/status/438579734922805248 ]

[See also: http://occupyhere.org/
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:a567897ee14f ]

"Expanded Hardware
LibraryBox v2.0 now runs on a wide variety of hardware, including the preferrred MR3020, but also the MR3040, the WR703N, and much more. Now you can choose the hardware best for your particular need, and build your LibraryBox to suit.

Statistics
LibraryBox v2.0 now collects statistics on its use, and displays them to users. On the homepage, you can see the top 10 most downloaded items, and on the statistics page you can see both number of users per day and a full list of all downloads. These statistics are completely anonymous, and no identifying information about users is retained.

Bootstrap 3.0
The entirety of the web interface has been redesigned. Not only is the web front end now on the USB drive (making development much easier) but it's based on the Bootstrap 3 framework. This standard makes it simple for libraries and individuals to modify the interface to suit their needs.

Auto Sync/Mesh
LibraryBox v2.0 has a service built in that will allow you to have installed Boxen located in physically inaccessible areas that can be automatically updated simply by bringing a "master" box into range of their wifi signal. The remote Boxen will automatically see the Master, and update their content to match, no intervention or attention necessary.

Easier Installation
Making your own LibraryBox couldn't be much easier than the v2.0 makes it. Copy some files, update one file via a web browser, and then just wait while the software does its work. One-step installation!

Custom Configurations
We've moved most of the request configuration options to the USB thumb drive, allowing users to very easily change things like the SSID of the LibraryBox, the power of the wifi, the wifi channel, and even the local hostname of the LibraryBox server. It's never been easier to customize to just your needs."
librarybox  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
february 2014 by robertogreco
OpenKnit | open source knitting
"OpenKnit is an open-source, low cost (under 550€), digital fabrication tool that affords the user the opportunity to create his own bespoke clothing from digital files. Starting from the raw material, the yarn, and straight to its end use, a sweater for example, in about an hour. Designing and producing clothes digitally and wearing them can now happen in the very same place, rewarding the user with the ability to make decisions regarding creativity and responsibility."

[Video: https://vimeo.com/86987828 ]
openknit  knitten  looms  glvo  opensource  wearable  wearables  textiles  clothing 
february 2014 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] Am I the only one who’s ever thought of referring to the @smithsonian logo as the “mullet sun” ?
"Increasingly the objects that all design museums collect will look more like like Planetary ["an iPad application for visualizing your music collection"] than not and they will face many of the same issues. Issues that no one is entirely sure how deal with. This may seem a little discouraging at first but that is cost of living in the present and we're certainly not going to figure anything out by standing around doing nothing."



"the common thread in all these passages [preceding slides] is the idea of motive and how we recognize it. That's an important question for all museums, but especially for a design museum since by-and-large we all have the same things in our collections. By their nature design objects come in multiples, often to the point of being mass-produced or in some cases not even being considered design objects unless they are mass-produced."



"The late painter Francis Bacon gave an interview, somewhere around the mid-point of his career, in which he said that he aspired to create paintings that defied narrative. Whether or not he succeeded or whether or not he even still believed that idea by the time of his death is sort of irrelevant. We have always celebrated works of exceptional execution and in contemporary times we increasingly afford artists the luxury to pursue a singular itch to that end.

It is interesting to consider that as the art world and the discourse that surrounds it continues to get wordier and more theory-driven we are also seeing both museums and artists create works that can only be described as spectacles. That's a whole other talk but just keep this idea in the back of your mind: That people are starting to use spectacle itself as a kind of medium in part, I think, because it remains bigger than words.

I want to mention craft and the timeless arts-and-crafts debate only long enough to describe a scene guaranteed to upset everyone involved. That capital-A art is the Abel to capital-C craft's Cain, but with a twist. If art will knowingly murder his brother the problem he faces is that his brother is also a zombie who can never die and wants to eat his brain.

It's not a very flattering picture for anyone but the reason I enjoy this fiction is because it's a useful way to consider design. That is, design is the shadow of the unresolvable struggle between an outstanding, over-achieving sociopath and a his seen-to-be lesser too who refuses to give up no matter what anyone says."



"we might consider contemporary design practice as akin to the decorative arts but with motive or deliberation. It is not the singular exceptional itch of the indivudual artist but rather the art and craft (sorry) of an elegant solution to a problem that can be articulated, in the service of a plurality.

Here’s the rub, though. No matter how impressive or elegant a solution they are not meant to be contemplative endeavours. They can't be. Imagine any thing you consider to be an elegant design solution or object and then try to imagine having a PHILOSOPHICAL MOMENT every time you used it.

We celebrate design that ultimately can be taken for granted. We celebrate a practice whose products afford us the plausible illusion of fading in to the background, of not always demanding center stage, and of not asking us to spend our already too-busy lives in a state of near-constant intellectual Rapture."



"We’re still not very good at that. We have a bad habit of falling back on how pretty a thing is or the mastery of its manufacturing prowess or a designer's access to production facilities as proxies for the merit and value of a design solution. The problem that design museums are facing, though, is that we’re increasingly collecting things which have no thing-ness about them so the rhetoric we've always used to talk about our collections make less and less sense.

Things like interaction design or service design or user-centered design or experience design. Given the challenge we already face collecting physical objects what are we supposed to do with practices that are as real as they are intangible?

Do you know who spends a lot of time trafficking in experience design, possibly more than anyone else in the aggregate? Museums.

What else are dioramas except early stage attempts at experience design? Because dioramas are basically fancy display cases for delicate or senstive objects we don't usually allow people to wander around in them. But when you consider that the film maker Peter Jackson, and his production company Weta, are creating a life-size trench experience from the Gallipoli Campaign inside Te Papa, the national museum of New Zealand, it doesn't seem like it will be long before museums can finally indulge their almost Captain Ahab like fantasy of a truly immersive experience. Personally I am waiting to see whether the trench installation offers a night at the museum style package where you can sleep in a pool of standing water, swatting away rats all while dodging ear-shattering explosions. When you stop to consider the many inevitable retrospectives that New Zealand museums will mount to celebrate the career of Peter Jackson, a native son, the crossover possibilities are endless.

For the time being we're left with stuff like this. This is a diorama from the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Punk: Chaos to Couture exhibition last year. It is a recreation of the men's bathroom at the now defunct music venue CBGB's where many of the bands that would shape the musical genre got their start. If you're wondering: It's not a functioning bathroom or, if it is, there's no way to find out because there's a short glass barrier preventing you from entering the space.

The exhibition's curators made a point of saying that the exhibition was about the influence of punk rock on the world of fashion and that they very deliberately stayed away from the politics of those involved. Which if we take them at their words makes the inclusion of an installation like this all the more problematic because it's the kind of thing where malice is almost more comforting than simple negligence.

I am going to leave the interpretation and meaning of using a tarted-up version of a gritty bathroom as a proxy object for... something as an excercise for the audience and only say that this installation was very deliberate and entirely with motive. It was designed."


"Even if we take a punt on the very real challenges of trying to create a preservation framework for still-living intellectual property, the more immediate problem we face is one where museums often won't even turn on the electronic equipment in their collections. That iPhone we've got with its version of iOS 1.0 (or maybe it was upgraded before we acquired it?) will remain forever powered-off because we risk damaging the circuit boards or simply because we've removed the battery to prevent the risk of it leaking and damaging the other objects in our collection. It all seems like a theater of the absurb, sometimes. The worst part is that in the absence of working solutions for genuinely hard problems we do these things for good reasons. But can we meaningfully talk about the iPhone without talking about the touchable interfaces, about the interaction design that was afforded by all that swiping? In short, about the software.

Aside from all its qualities as a stand-alone design object this is why we acquired Planetary. Planetary does not answer all of these questions but it does force us to address them."



"Don’t worry, though, we also printed everything out on archival paper using the approved OCR-compliant typographic conventions. Maybe one day someone will recite the source code for Planetary the way people perform Homer's Iliad or Joyce's Ullyses?

But, I want to emphasize that we did not acquire an iPad. We already had one of those.

We acquired source code that happens to have been written for an iOS device. This fact tells us something about the circumstances under which Planetary was created but I don't think that it defines what Planetary is or was trying to be. The iPad was simply the then-best representation of what Planetary was trying to be.

Had Bloom survived longer as a company they would have almost certainly released an Android version of Planetary and then what? Which one would we have acquired? Both of them? Only the iOS version because it is not so much the genesis of the project but the first manifestation of it? What if the Android version, by virtue of whatever hardware or operating system level optimizations it enjoyed, better embodied the spirit of the project?

So yeah, we acquired code because to my never-ending dismay it's just Sol Lewitt all the way down but we acquired that code as a way create an environment that will hopefully foster the preservation of the interaction design that was at the root of Planetary. Have we succeed yet? Probably not. Have we created the circumstances that will afford that preservation? I hope so."



"I like to understand what TinySpeck did in giving away all their stuff as another example of using open source as a preservation strategy for an endeavour that is very real but which lacks, by design, the known and quatifiable territory of a single work of art."



"Dan's project is not necessarily Glitch as its creators imagined but is it Glitch enough that perhaps we might look to the theater, with its multiple and on-going performaces of a single text, as our inspriration? Perhaps it allows us to imagine software preservation the way one imagines a working collection."
aaronstraupcope  preservation  software  art  craft  design  2014  cooper-hewitt  museums  motive  collections  objects  reproduction  glitch  tinyspeck  opensource  sollewitt 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Public Lab: a DIY environmental science community
"The Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (Public Lab) is a community -- supported by a 501(c)3 non-profit -- which develops and applies open-source tools to environmental exploration and investigation. By democratizing inexpensive and accessible Do-It-Yourself techniques, Public Lab creates a collaborative network of practitioners who actively re-imagine the human relationship with the environment.

The core Public Lab program is focused on "civic science" in which we research open source hardware and software tools and methods to generate knowledge and share data about community environmental health. Our goal is to increase the ability of underserved communities to identify, redress, remediate, and create awareness and accountability around environmental concerns. Public Lab achieves this by providing online and offline training, education and support, and by focusing on locally-relevant outcomes that emphasize human capacity and understanding."
diy  environment  research  science  sustainability  citizenscience  classideas  open  technology  opentechnology  community  opensource  publiclab  civicscience  hardware  software  boston  cambridge  lcproject  openstudioproject 
january 2014 by robertogreco
ownCloud.org | Your Cloud, Your Data, Your Way!
"ownCloud provides universal access to your files via the web, your computer or your mobile devices — wherever you are.

It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web."



"ownCloud gives you universal access to your files through a web interface or WebDAV. It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web. Installation has minimal server requirements, doesn’t need special permissions and is quick. ownCloud is extendable via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins.

ownCloud started with a keynote by Frank Karlitschek at Camp KDE’10 where he talked about the need of a self-controlled free and open source cloud."
cloud  dropbox  opensource  php  sync  storage  bookmarks  calendars  onlinetoolkit  rollyourown 
january 2014 by robertogreco
BuddyPress.org
"BuddyPress is Social Networking, the WordPress way. Easily create a fully featured social network inside your WordPress.org powered site.

BuddyPress is a powerful plugin that takes your WordPress.org powered site beyond the blog with social-network features like user profiles, activity streams, user groups, and more. Some fantastic uses might be:

• A campus wide social network for your university, school or college.
• An internal communication tool for your company.
• A niche social network for your interest topic.
• A focused social network for your new product.

If you’re using BuddyPress in a unique or interesting way, be sure to let people know on the forums; we’re always interested!"
socialnetworking  wordpress  opensource  social  socialnetworks  via:steelemaley  plugins  chat 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The CSS-Tricks License | CSS-Tricks
"SUPER IMPORTANT LEGAL DOCUMENT
------------------------------
I don't give two hoots what you do with any of the design or code you find here.

Actually, I do. I hope you take it and use it, uncredited, on a super commercial website and get wicked rich off it. I hope you use it at work and your boss is impressed and you get a big promotion. I hope it helps you design a website and that website impresses somebody you think is super hot and you get married and have smart, chill babies. I hope you use the code in a blog post you write elsewhere and that website gets way more popular and awesome than this one.

If you feel like telling me about it, cool. If not, no big deal. If you feel better crediting it, that's cool. If not, don't sweat it.

If you copy an entire article from this site and republish it on your own site like you wrote it, that's a little uncool. I won't be mad at you for stealing, I just think you're better than that and want to see you do better. I'm not going to come after you though. I'd rather play ball with my dog. The only time I'll be mad at you is if you go out of your way to try and hurt me somehow. And again I probably won't even be mad, just sad. Unless I'm having a bad day too, in which case I apologize in advance for my snarky replies.

I want the web to get better and being all Johnny Protective over everything doesn't get us there. I understand other people feel differently about this and might have semi-legit reasons for protecting certain code, design, writing, or whatever. I work on some closed-source projects myself. CSS-Tricks isn't one of them. Go nuts."
via:maxfenton  css-tricks  sharing  attribution  code  opensource  copyright  licensing  creativecommons 
november 2013 by robertogreco
occupy.here / a tiny self-contained darknet
"What is it?
Each Occupy.here router is a LAN island in an archipelago of affiliated websites.

Anyone within range of an Occupy.here wifi router, with a web-capable smartphone or laptop, can join the network “OCCUPY.HERE,” load the locally-hosted website http://occupy.here, and use the message board to connect with other users nearby. The open source forum software offers a simple, mobile-friendly interface where users can share messages and files.

The project has developed in parallel with the Occupy movement and seeks to offer a network of virtual spaces where both committed activists and casual supporters can communicate.

Due to its distributed and autonomous design, Occupy.here is inherently resistant to Internet surveillance. Building up a collective network infrastructure that is owned and controlled by its users can lay the groundwork for other uses and applications. We don't have to choose between abstaining from social media and entrusting our data to corporate interests. We just need to take a greater responsibility for our own online services.

The idea
The project started in October 2011, with the goal to create a written supplement to the spoken conversations in Liberty Square (aka Zuccotti park). I wasn’t able to spend as much time in the park as I wanted, so I thought about how I might connect with others who passed through intermittently via an “offline forum.” Restricting the forum to those within the local wifi range created a self-selecting audience, and also (perhaps) created one more incentive to visit the occupation.

Since Liberty Square has been cleared and the Occupy Wall Street movement is now more decentralized, the goals for the project have adjusted. Instead of (or, perhaps, in addition to) augmenting the experience of being in an OWS encampment, we are building an archipelago of virtual spaces to host conversations similar to those in Liberty Square. More than ever, both “activists” and ”non-activists” alike need to have spaces for open discussion.

The new focus is to create a distributed network of wifi locations, each serving those in its immediate vicinity. These separate networks will soon be able to connect to each other, although that functionality is still under development.

How you can help
The project seeks collaborators of all kinds. You can help write the code, build and host your own wifi node, or simply participate in the conversation.

Dan Phiffer is the founder and lead developer, with further contributions from GitHub user Phaeilo. You should join us!"

[See also; http://rhizome.org/editorial/2013/oct/1/tiny-self-contained-darknet/ ]
danphiffer  occupy  ows  occupywallstreet  codeforamerica  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
october 2013 by robertogreco
OpenDesk - Open Source Furniture — Made Locally.
"View basket Open source furniture — made locally."

[via: https://twitter.com/zachklein/status/390551937176711168 ]

[See also: http://www.wikihouse.cc/ ]

[Note: I think both Sara Hendren and Nick Sowers have made some of these.]
opensource  furniture  diy  desks  design  openstudioproject  projectideas  classroomdesign  schooldesign  schools  classideas 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Chalkstar to Rockstar #05 - ds106 Is The 5th Dimension of Teaching and Learning - EdReach
[Linkrot, so here is the audio: http://ds106.us/2013/10/02/chalkstar-to-rockstar-05/ ]

"Have you ever taken an online course and wondered if you were really doing work that was worth the effort? How much did you interact with other people in your class? Did you feel alone?

Unfortunately, that’s how a lot of online courses tend to be. But not this one. Meet Jim Groom and Alan Levine, two of the minds behind what is now known simply as ds106. In this episode, I talk with Alan and Jim about how ds106 is different from anything you’ve ever heard about. We’ve got open learning platforms, criticisms of MOOCs, and shameless self promotion. You won’t be disappointed."

Some quotes:

"There's probably very little more exciting teaching happening in online learning than ds106. And that's why it's not a MOOC as Alan has made more than clear. It is a community and I think it has learned from the MOOCs and I'm not sure its roots are completely divorced from them, but it's about experimenting with online education rather than accepting the model of 'we're gonna broadcast a lecture and there's gonna be questions every five seconds and it's gonna be awesome because it's an LMS, it's just much bigger and I'm gonna have 150 thousand people and this is the future of ed.'"



"That's the other thing about edtech — it's the stupidest field ever. Everybody in it is stupid. They're like 'oh, my god, MOOCs, this is great!' and then for two years people are like 'This great, MOOCs we're gonna blow the…' No, it's an LMS with more people and completely uncompelling as it stands right now with all these corporate Udacitys and Courseras. You know, there's something that was learned from those early experiments from Downes and Siemens and they're awesome, but I think the point got missed real quick."



"It lost its status as a class, and it gained the status as a community."



"When the class started to jump the shark, the students knew it, and so the fractioned off and they created their own class called ds107 as a kind of like revolutionary moment. But it's like what you want — you want your students revolting, you want them to say you're full of crap, you know, go and it was kind of this amazing moment."



"In the end, more than anything, ds106 isn't a class, it's a community. It's a group of people coming together to share stories and ideas on an open platform and openly accessible anytime, anywhere. So that brings us back to that original questions. What is it? It is what you make it. And I think that's the thing that Jim and Alan want you to take away from it. Your story is what you make it and ds106 can be a way for you to learn how to tell that story."

"If it's nothing else it's a place where people can experiment with what online learning could look like and might look like and the more it looks like the web, the better."

[via: http://bavatuesdays.com/developing-story-ds106-explained/ ]
ds106  online  education  edtech  jimgroom  alanlevine  mooc  community  teaching  moocs  opensource  learningnetworks  sharing  storytelling  openweb  lms  brianbennett  openness  decentralization  messiness  open  openlearning 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Unhangout
"Unhangout is an open source platform for running large scale online un-conference-style events using Google Hangouts to create many simultaneous small sessions. Think of it like a classroom with infinitely many breakout rooms. We provide a text-based chat experience that can support hundreds of participants chatting or watching a live video stream together. When you want to create more opportunity for participation, you can break out into up-to-ten person Google Hangout sessions that create opportunities for peer learning instead of just top-down information transfer that is typical in large scale online education.

Open Source
Unhangout is an open source project. You can find the code in our repository on GitHub. Please let us know if you're interested in hosting your own unhangout events - we would be happy to help you get this set up on your own servers. In some situations, we might be able to host your event on our installation, too.

The Team
Our three person design and development team is based at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, MA.

Philipp Schmidt
Drew Harry
Srishti Sethi

Acknowledgements
Unhangout is made possible by the generous support of the MacArthur Foundation and the MIT Media Lab"

[via and more: http://dmlcentral.net/blog/philipp-schmidt/unhangouts ]
edtech  unconferences  snarkmarketseminar  opensource  philippschmidt  drewharry  srishtisethi  googlehangouts  wcydwt  video  education  teaching  learning  onlinetoolkit 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Reclaim the Street Map!
"Rather than doing unpaid corporate cartography,
join us in mapping the world together as a publicly shared resource.

In April 19th 2011 Google announced its new Google Mapmaker expedition to send its users to map the US. This would seem like a great innovative platform for mapping our streets together for those who don’t know that a service like this have actually existed since 2004. Open Street Map is a great collaborative project which Google chose to compete against rather than collaborate with.

In Google Mapmaker, all of your edits would belong to Google. In Open Street Map all of our edits belong to everybody who agrees to equally share them. Google preferred to keep its map proprietary and to prevent equal access to it from those who created it, which it ironically calls “citizen cartographers”. It is sad to say that even Microsoft, Yahoo and AOL are working in collaboration with the public through Open Street Map rather than create a proprietary competitor. Think about it, it’s like undermining Wikipedia by editing a Googipedia instead…

[video]

A year of edits in Open Street Maps

You probably understand this conflict of interests and would choose to draw your streets in our map. But Google, being Google has a much wider outreach and can easily mislead people about “The Meaning of Open”. Therefore I made a very small browser plugin to install on your mom’s browser to protect her from cartographic exploitation by a corporate entity."
osm  openstreetmaps  bookmarklet  mushonzer-aviv  2011  maps  mapping  google  opensource  googlemapmaker  cartography  citizencartography  via:savasavasava 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Opt out of PRISM, the NSA’s global data surveillance program - PRISM Break
"Opt out of PRISM, the NSA’s global data surveillance program. Stop reporting your online activities to the American government with these free alternatives to proprietary software."
opensource  privacy  software  prism  nsa 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Tobias Revell on the future of art and design at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale, 24 May 2013 on Vimeo
"Tobias Revell outlines how the willing acceptance and grasping of uncertainty has led to a new way of thinking in the present and a resurgence of romantic futurism. He gives specific examples of solutions outside of a 'grand plan', new production methods that liberalise and free design and art from larger systems. He shows how science-fiction imagery and fantasy have penetrated the arts.
Opening lecture at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale on 24 May 2013, Enschede, the Netherlands."
tobiasrevell  2013  art  design  designfiction  futurism  systems  towatch  artez  uncertainty  video  debate  reflection  critique  change  futures  kickstarter  bitcoins  makerbot  3dprinting  reprap  globalvillageonstructionset  opensource  opensourceecology  cohenvanbalen  thomasthwaites  manufacturing  control  consumption  economics  systemsthinking  bigdog  robots  technology  normalization  marsone  uncannyvalley  spacetravel  space  film  nasa  hierarchy  music  vincentfournier  prosthetics  evil  googleglass  internetofthings  superflux  dance  computing  data  anabjain  iot 
june 2013 by robertogreco
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