robertogreco + neologisms   24

How to build a book: Notes from an editorial bricoleuse | HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory: Vol 7, No 3
"This piece offers an editor’s reflections on the ethos and craft of writing. General suggestions, words of encouragement, and detailed tips emerge through a discussion of unexpected affinities between writing and building. An annotated list of further readings accompanies the text.

Ce texte offre les réflexions d’une éditrice sur l’ethos et l’art de l’écriture. Des suggestions générales, des encouragements, et quelques conseils précis se dégagent d’une discussion sur les affinités inattendues entre l’écriture et la construction. Une liste annotée de lectures complémentaires accompagne ce texte."



"The inevitable risk in writing a document like this one is that authors will interpret my advice as an example of editorial fascism that is appeased only when others subsume their ambition to conformity. I would hate for that to be the lesson of this meditation (which is, in itself, something of an oddity).

Times change, architectural styles go through inevitable change and recombination, and books change too. No intelligent person would demand that every room conform perfectly to a single model or that every book do the same. Variation is one cornerstone of beauty. So, please, surprise me. But do so from a position of intimate understanding. Mastery of tradition, in writing as in other crafts, is the first condition for innovation."

[via: https://twitter.com/npseaver/status/944918352773951494

"Some nice, not obvious advice in this piece on writing academic books (aimed at anthro, but more broadly relevant), from @priyasnelson: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.14318/hau7.3.020 … (I especially like the “finding the center” metaphor.)

Not that anthropologists are unique snowflakes, but I wish we had more writing advice like this aimed at us particularly: we have some particular strengths and weaknesses that generic academic writing advice doesn’t appreciate."]
writing  editing  craft  2017  priyanelson  variation  conformity  innovation  citation  anthropology  srg  neologisms  socialsciences  academia  revision  publishing  serendipity  details  planning 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Time Traveler by Merriam-Webster: Search Words by First Known Use Date
"When was a word first used in print? You may be surprised! Enter a date below to see the words first recorded on that year. To learn more about First Known Use dates, click here."
timelines  classideas  dictionaries  words  language  english  neologisms  2017 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Insights: K-HOLE, New York — Insights: K-HOLE, New York — Channel — Walker Art Center
"K-HOLE exists in multiple states at once: it is both a publication and a collective; it is both an artistic practice and a consulting firm; it is both critical and unapologetically earnest. Its five members come from backgrounds as varied as brand strategy, fine art, web development, and fashion, and together they have released a series of fascinating PDF publications modeled upon corporate trend forecasting reports. These documents appropriate the visuals of PowerPoint, stock photography, and advertising and exploit the inherent poetry in the purposefully vague aphorisms of corporate brand-speak. Ultimately, K-HOLE aspires to utilize the language of trend forecasting to discuss sociopolitical topics in depth, exploring the capitalist landscape of advertising and marketing in a critical but un-ironic way.

In the process, the group frequently coins new terms to articulate their ideas, such as “Youth Mode”: a term used to describe the prevalent attitude of youth culture that has been emancipated from any particular generation; the “Brand Anxiety Matrix”: a tool designed to help readers understand their conflicted relationships with the numerous brands that clutter their mental space on a daily basis; and “Normcore”: a term originally used to describe the desire not to differentiate oneself, which has since been mispopularized (by New York magazine) to describe the more specific act of dressing neutrally to avoid standing out. (In 2014, “Normcore” was named a runner-up by Oxford University Press for “Neologism of the Year.”)

Since publishing K-HOLE, the collective has taken on a number of unique projects that reflect the manifold nature of their practice, from a consulting gig with a private equity firm to a collaboration with a fashion label resulting in their own line of deodorant. K-HOLE has been covered by a wide range of publications, including the New York Times, Fast Company, Wired UK, and Mousse.

Part of Insights 2015 Design Lecture Series."

[direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GkMPN5f5cQ ]
k-hole  consumption  online  internet  communication  burnout  normcore  legibility  illegibility  simplicity  technology  mobile  phones  smartphones  trends  fashion  art  design  branding  brands  socialmedia  groupchat  texting  oversharing  absence  checkingout  aesthetics  lifestyle  airplanemode  privilege  specialness  generations  marketing  trendspotting  coping  messaging  control  socialcapital  gregfong  denayago  personalbranding  visibility  invisibility  identity  punk  prolasticity  patagonia  patience  anxietymatrix  chaos  order  anxiety  normality  abnormality  youth  millennials  individuality  box1824  hansulrichobrist  alternative  indie  culture  opposition  massindie  williamsburg  simoncastets  digitalnatives  capitalism  mainstream  semiotics  subcultures  isolation  2015  walkerartcenter  maxingout  establishment  difference  89plus  basicness  evasion  blandness  actingbasic  empathy  indifference  eccentricity  blankness  tolerance  rebellion  signalling  status  coolness  aspiration  connections  relationships  presentationofself  understanding  territorialism  sociology  ne 
march 2015 by robertogreco
English 3.0 on Vimeo
"English 3.0 is a 20 minute documentary that explores how the internet has influenced the way we communicate in the digital age and whether the changes witnessed have had a positive effect on the language.

The film features interviews with renowned authors and linguistics: Tom Chatfield, David Crystal, Robert McCrum, Fiona McPherson and Simon Horobin."

[via Taryn, who notes:
"2:55 every time a new technology arrives it expands the expressive richness of the language
19:30 to try and turn language into something static and makes you happy and preserves the things you care about is understandable but this is futile and of course it means people won't listen to you"]
language  english  technology  communication  mobile  phones  internet  web  online  tomchatfield  davidcrystal  robertmccrum  fionamcpherson  simonhorobin  vocabulary  lexicography  via:Taryn  howwewrite  writing  digital  spelling  spellcheckers  change  neologisms  invention  standards  conventions 
january 2015 by robertogreco
OUTWARD FROM NOTHINGNESS » Interview: Felipe W.Martinez On Translating Joao Guimarães Rosa
"Translation is a utopian concept. In truth, all translation is impossible. This is even the case with translations that are generally accepted as “definitive” (for the time). Chapman’s 17th century translation of Homer’s Iliad was once the definitive English translation, but was replaced a hundred years later by Alexander Pope’s translation. Of course, this provisional nature of the product of translation is no reason to throw our hands up and say enough! –Which is what’s seemed to happen with the work of Guimarães Rosa in many cases, it’s been largely absent from the English language for decades now.

When I said just now that Translation is impossible, I mean the utopian concept of translation is impossible. Just as determining an ideal reader is impossible, and, essentially, communication, in many ways, is impossible. Walter Benjamin asks: “what does a work of Literature really say? A work of literature tells very little to those who understand it–even they must grapple to “understand” the work. Ultimately it is the work of effort that matters, the willingness of the translator to approach Guimarães Rosa. The process. The toil, the struggle, the attempt to point in the direction of art."



"I learned Portuguese for a year before I began the translation, not because I thought I could translate Grande Sertão: Veredas, but just because I wanted to be able to read Grande Sertão: Veredas. As I learned the language, I inched closer and closer to being able to read the original. Once I could, I realized I could record what I was reading, and that, with research and the right dictionaries, I could even translate. What are translators after all but readers who write what they read? The renowned translator, Gregory Rabassa, translated One Hundred Years of Solitude as he read the work for the first time. I’m following his lead in this translation. I’m discovering the work and translating it at the same time."



"I think Guimarães Rosa once said something to the effect of You can tell a man by the way he tells his stories, the words he uses. I’m paraphrasing. So, man creates himself through his language, and that language gives shape to his world. The only way to change himself and the world, is to change his language. Essentially: the words make the man. But Guimarães Rosa’s neologisms were not invented merely to complicate the work. True, a single neologism might be made up of three similar words, from three different languages, with two or three possible meanings–but, he knew what he was doing. He was drawing life out of every language he could touch upon, modern and ancient, present and lost, new and, sometimes, invented, all in attempt to more fully translate the world around and inside of him. This does complicate the translation process, but only to the extent that we can’t ever be certain we’ve grasped the author’s complete intention. I consult an array of dictionaries when translating. To translate a fragment of the author’s intention, I think, can be just as amazing as anything we might expect from a perfect/complete translation. The Brazilian poet, Haroldo de Campos, quotes Goethe in an epigram to one of his poem: “Every entelechy is, namely, a fragment of eternity.” I always think about this."
felipemartinez  2013  guimarãesrosa  joãoguimarãesrosa  brasil  brazil  translation  portuguese  walterbenjamin  goethe  haroldodecampos  neologisms 
december 2013 by robertogreco
this is tomorrow - A Small Hiccup
"If you have ever spent any time considering how language mutates, from marvelling at how swiftly neologisms like ‘omnishambles’ enter the dictionary to bemoaning how IAU (incessant acronym use) is degrading the English language, then maybe it will not be too great a leap for you to imagine a world in which language itself has become diseased. ‘Pontypool’ (2008), a low budget horror film, which does what ambitious low budget horror should by working within its limited means to convey a disturbing but compelling idea, introduces a new form of viral infection: a linguistic disease spread through speech.

George Vasey takes inspiration from ‘Pontypool’ in curating ‘A Small Hiccup’, a travelling exhibition, events programme, publication and online commission exploring ‘diseased language’. This multi-format approach allows for an impressive number of manifestations of such a disease to be pursued, moving across page, screen, airwaves, internet and beyond to ask, ‘Is it always good to talk?’

The exhibition, which launched at Grand Union in Birmingham and will travel on to The Newbridge Project in Newcastle, and later in event-form to Limoncello, London, features newly commissioned works by Jeremy Hutchison, Leah Lovett, Fay Nicolson & Oliver Smith, Siôn Parkinson, Erica Scourti, Simon Senn, Holly Pester and Charlie Woolley, who variously take on the idea of compromised speech. The artists instigate and investigate moments within which the instability of language is demonstrated; its quirks, limitations and failings, the moments when the ‘small hiccup’ disrupts the flow and leaves the meaning obscured.

For a show about communication the gallery is strangely hushed, the works holding a polite distance from each other and often requiring a careful approach and examination to discern that anything is being said to you at all. Erica Scourti’s ‘Unsent Letters’ are like magic eye puzzles, for which the viewer must relax into a hazy half-focus in order to receive their corrupted message; as what has been written becomes clear it remains ambiguous as to whether the words have been degraded by force of emotion or encrypted against detection.

Every five minutes Holly Pester’s ‘News Piece’ murmurs into life from a pair of speakers, delivering a short sing-song cut-up of this week’s affairs, the words washing over you until a fragment of a recognisable news item emerges from the fog. Similarly riffing on the media, Fay Nicholson and Oliver Smith crunch the news down to symbols printed in punkt pro, a coded font, on a series of tabloid newsprint posters, paring down the already absurdly succinct headlines of the red tops to a series of icons: a Newspeak for the emoticon generation.

The publication, designed by An Endless Supply and printed in newspaper format, extends out the pool of contributors to take in further artists alongside writers and curators. In this format Vasey poses two questions: ‘What does it mean to miscommunicate?’ and ‘Can mistranslation be a productive situation?’ with the ‘answers’ across the subsequent pages building up a dense and intermittently incomprehensible visual babble of cartoon sketches, screen grabs and ventriloquism.

While some areas of the project seem to be bursting at the seams, the central exhibition is more sparing and maintains a varied pace, landing a few heavy hitting one-liners but for the most part allowing for a slower unveiling of meaning, requiring an in-depth reading rather than a skim across the surface. The newspaper, along with the project’s Tumblr blog of extra-curricular materials, feel entirely necessary to hold the curator’s expansive research, which develops the themes of the exhibition even as it pulls them loose into all sorts of tangential directions. This is a highly engaging project for the most part due to its velocity; the huge enthusiasm that the curator shows to keep piling in and travelling on, creates a feeling of near infinite possibility, the elasticity of language being its only potential limitation."
newspaperclub  jeremyhutchison  leahlovett  faynicolson  oliversmith  siônparkinson  ericascourti  simonsenn  hollypester  charliewoolley  georgevasey  art  exhibitions  communication  language  text  neologisms  deathoflanguage  anendlesssupply  elasticity  newmedia  glvo  projectideas  tumblr  curation 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 211, William Gibson
"“I was walking around Vancouver, aware of that need, and I remember walking past a video arcade, which was a new sort of business at that time, and seeing kids playing those old-fashioned console-style plywood video games. The games had a very primitive graphic representation of space and perspective. Some of them didn’t even have perspective but were yearning toward perspective and dimensionality. Even in this very primitive form, the kids who were playing them were so physically involved, it seemed to me that what they wanted was to be inside the games, within the notional space of the machine. The real world had disappeared for them—it had completely lost its importance. They were in that notional space, and the machine in front of them was the brave new world…"

"When I’m writing a book I get up at seven. I check my e-mail and do Internet ablutions, as we do these days. I have a cup of coffee. Three days a week, I go to Pilates and am back by ten or eleven. Then I sit down and try to write. If absolutely nothing is happening, I’ll give myself permission to mow the lawn. But, generally, just sitting down and really trying is enough to get it started. I break for lunch, come back, and do it some more. And then, usually, a nap. Naps are essential to my process. Not dreams, but that state adjacent to sleep, the mind on waking."
writing  literature  fiction  williamgibson  cyberspace  parisreview  interviews  neologisms  videogames  arcades  gaming  exquisitecorpse  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
William Gibson says cyberspace was inspired by 8-bit videogames
"I was walking around Vancouver, aware of that need, and I remember walking past a video arcade, which was a new sort of business at that time, and seeing kids playing those old-fashioned console-style plywood video games. The games had a very primitive graphic representation of space and perspective. Some of them didn’t even have perspective but were yearning toward perspective and dimensionality. Even in this very primitive form, the kids who were playing them were so physically involved, it seemed to me that what they wanted was to be inside the games, within the notional space of the machine. The real world had disappeared for them-it had completely lost its importance. They were in that notional space, and the machine in front of them was the brave new world."
williamgibson  cyberspace  definitions  neologisms  vancouver  britishcolumbia  games  videogames  sciencefiction  scifi  bc  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Volokh Conspiracy » There Should Be A Name for This One, Too:
"To begin with, how odd is it that they’d invoke Shakespeare in this context? “We need stronger copyright or else we won’t get the next Shakespeare” is like arguing “We need the designated hitter, or how will we ever get the next Babe Ruth?” In a copyright-free world — not that I’m advocating such a thing, but hey, you brought it up — we’ll get the next Shakespeare the way we got the last Shakespeare, in a copyright-free world. The first copyright statute, the Statute of Anne, wasn’t passed until 1709, long after Shakespeare was a-moulderin’ in the grave. [That’s what we need a name for — this kind of absurdly misplaced historical argument]"
ip  copyright  shakespeare  history  accuracy  neologisms  truth  fact  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - The KidDictionary V2 :More Words Parents Need To Describe Their Kids -- www.TheKidDictionary.com
"If youre a parent or a teacher or someone whos ever around kids or someone who used to be a kid, then youre likely well aware that a kids primary mission is to complicate the lives of grownups. One way they achieve this mission is to exhibit traits and behaviors that there are no words to describe. The KidDictionary seeks to supplement your vocabulary with brand new humorous words to help you describe your humorous kids. Watch the video looking inside The KidDictionary and youre on your way to being better able to talk about your children. Talking TO your children remains a challenge were yet to figure out. Enjoy!"
neologisms  parenting  humor  words  dictionary  classideas  via:rushtheiceberg  dictionaries  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Rogue Semiotics » Love’s lemmas [On the death of Stanislaw Lem]
"Lem…didn’t really see himself as doing science fiction.

Reading Lem in English was always a curious experience. Whole books are predicated on fecund streams of puns, portmanteau words & neologisms. He was fortunate in his translators, but the suspicion always lingered in the mind…that perhaps there was no Polish original, & that the translation was a free-flying construct boiling out from the mind of the biggest computer in the world.

But Lem was real, despite being denounced to the FBI by the increasingly paranoid Philip K. Dick as being a collective of communist writers aiming to subvert the USA.

Lem was also second only to Borges in his creation of imaginary books. I recall my surprise on finally reading Solaris & finding that much of it is a survey of various (invented) books. There ought to be a term for this tendency: bibliofantasism? What’s unarguable is that a list of books invented by Lem would be almost as interesting as his books themselves."
borges  stanislawlem  scifi  sciencefiction  writing  toread  portmanteau  neologisms  polish  poland  translation  obituaries  communism  bibliofantasism  imaginarybooks  books  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
A family resemblance of obsessions « Snarkmarket
"Blogs — the best blogs — are public diaries of preoccupations. The reason why they are preoccupations is that you need someone who is continually pushing on the language to regenerate itself. The reason why they are public is so that those generations and regenerations and degenerations can find their kin, across space, across fame, across the likelihood of a connection, and even across time itself, to be rejoined and reclustered together.

Because that is how language and language-users are reborn; that is how the system, both artificial and natural, loops backward upon and maintains itself; because that is how a public and republic are made, how a man can be a media cyborg, and also become a city. That’s how this place where we gather becomes home."
timcarmody  language  blogs  blogging  definitions  cyborgs  regenerations  degenerations  connections  neologisms  words  time  etymology  ego  cv  obsessions  obsession  snarkmarket  robinsloan  timmaly  family-resemblance  ludwigwittgenstein  meaning  conversation  gamechanging  perspective  learning  understanding  misunderstanding  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Small batch businesses
"A few weeks ago, Matt Linderman asked the readers of 37signals' Signal vs. Noise blog for suggestions for a word or phrase to describe a certain type of small, focused company. ... Boutique was deemed too pretentious...small, indie, and QOQ didn't cut it either. Readers offered up craftsman, artisan, bespoke, cloudless, studio, atelier, long tail, agile, bonsai company, mom and pop, small scale, specialty, anatomic, big heart, GTD business, dojo, haus, temple, coterie, and disco business, but none of those seems quite right.

I've had this question rolling around in the back of my mind since Matt posted it and this morning, a potential answer came to me: small batch. ... The term is most commonly applied to bourbon whiskey: ...but can also be used to describe small quantities of high quality products such as other spirits, baked goods, coffee, beer, and wine."

[see also: http://37signals.com/svn/posts/1807-seeking-a-less-pretentious-boutique ]
glvo  names  naming  language  smallbusiness  kottke  business  boutique  bespoke  startups  words  definitions  neologisms 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Ruins of the Present | Beyond The Beyond
"*We’ve long had a term of art for old buildings that are ruined...“ruins.” *However, we lack a term of art for “ruins” that are actually buildings never completed. Sometimes they’re completed buildings that are never sold...start falling over before they were ever inhabited...*Another version is the abandoned, incomplete high-rise...In Brazil a skeleton framework of this kind is called a “squelette.” *Occasionally squatters move into “squelettes” & bring in some breeze-block, corrugated tin and plastic hoses, transforming squelettes into high-rise favelas. This doesn’t work very well because it’s tough to manage the utilities, especially the water...*It bothers me to use clumsy circumlocutions like “unfinished ruins” or “partially built, yet abandoned structures” or “stillborn highrises” for a phenomenon that is so common and so obvious to billions of urban people, so henceforth I am going to call them “squelettes.” They don’t have to be Brazilian, French, or 80 stories tall, either."
brucesterling  neologisms  language  ruins  squellettes  culture  architecture  crisis  abandoned  abandonment  decay  squatting  unfinished  cutshort  structures  buildings  wabi-sabi 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Disemvoweling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"In the fields of Internet discussion and forum moderation, disemvoweling (also spelled disemvowelling), which appears to model the word disemboweling, is the removal of vowels from text either as a method of self-censorship, or as a technique by forum moderators to censor unwanted posting, such as spam, internet trolling, rudeness or criticism, while maintaining some level of transparency."

[via: http://www.boingboing.net/2008/08/02/nyt-on-trolls.html ]
disemvowelling  trolls  digitalculture  moderation  blogging  blogs  commenting  community  neologisms  internet  web  online  forums 
august 2008 by robertogreco
The asymmetry of the indescribable :: Architectures of Control :: Dan Lockton
"If you’re in search of a term, how about ‘Philological Cladistics’ to describe the exploration of ways in which knowledge/fields-of-study can be compartmentalised (also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dewey_decimal ), and ‘Philological determinism’ to describe how any compartmentalisation inhibits interdisciplinary exploration."
research  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  neologisms  terminology  taxonomy  categorization  invention  innovation  academia  language  description  compartmentalization 
august 2008 by robertogreco
News & Culture in Silicon Valley | Technology News: Geowanking
"a group of high-tech map enthusiasts whose areas of expertise range from making customizable web maps (often built out of polygons) and geolocation software to map-based online storytelling and handheld devices that provide information about your environ
geocoding  geowanking  maps  mapping  location  location-based  humor  neologisms  annaleenewitz  webapps  geolocation  storytelling 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium - Scenius, or Communal Genius: "the intelligence and the intuition of a whole cultural scene. It is the communal form of the concept of the genius."
"Scenius is like genius, only embedded in a scene rather than in genes. Brian Eno suggested the word to convey the extreme creativity that groups, places or "scenes" can occasionally generate." "When it happens, honor and protect it."
brianeno  kevinkelly  community  creativity  education  learning  lcproject  genius  culture  intelligence  organic  scenius  words  neologisms  collaboration  groups  art  environment  crowdsourcing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Flexknowlogy » Defining “Creepy Treehouse”
"A place, physical or virtual, built by adults with the intention of luring in kids...Any institutionally-created, operated, or controlled environment in which participants are lured in either by mimicking pre-existing open or naturally formed environment
education  twitter  learning  elearning  technology  academia  connectivism  myspace  walledgardens  facebook  edtech  definitions  neologisms 
may 2008 by robertogreco
On meetings | Decentralized Information Group (DIG) Breadcrumbs
"Meetingboarding: (n) the sensation of being unable to breathe arising from continuous immersion in meeting after meeting"..."The problem with email is that it has low emotional bandwidth."
meetings  email  work  organizations  communication  decisionmaking  administration  management  leadership  via:preoccupations  neologisms  words  phrases  language 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Geekipedia: Webtwitch -- What Do You Need to Know Now?
"Our new-found need to immediately look something up online the moment it comes up in the context of our daily lives."
words  neologisms  search  google  internet  web  online  society  memory  learning  research 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Word Spy - avoision
"The gray area of ambiguous acts that fall between legal avoidance and illegal evasion of the law's proscriptions."
crime  law  neologisms  words  english  legal 
november 2007 by robertogreco
An Ugly New Word [globfag=globalization+fragmentation] — KCRW | 89.9FM
"scattered+uncertain state of mind created by increased technology+contradictory knowledge...inability to focus...from knowing very little about a great # of things...feeling you get when clarity breaks up in an ocean of infinite and ever-changing data."
journalism  blogging  sabelotodos  newspapers  future  information  data  words  terminology  neologisms 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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