robertogreco + neo-nomads   156

NOMAD
"Inquiry-Based Mobile Education

NOMAD is a mobile middle school where students drive their own learning using the resources of cities in which they live. Students work with community members and experts, engage in local issues, and explore the spaces of the Bay Area. Our converted school bus classroom is our mobile learning lab. The Depot, our home base, maker lab, and community hub.

NOMAD is centered around meaningful, inquiry-based experiences curated to provide a cross-curricular academic program in collaboration with students through thematic arcs. Each arc is comprised of phases of learning that correspond to the exploration of the topic from a variety of angles, the proposal of individual or small-group projects, and the completion and presentation of those projects to the NOMAD community. NOMAD's arc topics will vary by semester and emphasize real tools, working with real experts, and saying yes to as many ideas as possible."



"THE BUS(ES)

The NOMAD school bus is the cornerstone of the NOMAD learning experience. This mobile classroom will function as the learning lab for students as we take advantage of full mobility, driving ourselves where inquiry and exploration take us.

We just completed an Indiegogo campaign and successfully raised funds for our first bus!! We aimed to raise $25k to buy and retrofit an old school bus and are extatic to report we've already purchased a bus - the banner picture is our actual bus. Check out our campaign at https://igg.me/at/NOMAD-Education to see how it went!

The end vision for NOMAD is a fleet of buses segregated by subject matter. Each bus will have an allocated Guide (educator) who specializes in a specific set of core skills. At full enrollment, NOMAD will have 3 buses/cohorts:

1. Humanities - this bus will focus on English language arts, history, and social studies.
2. STEM - this bus will focus on science, technology, engineering and math.
3. Arts and Making - this bus will focus on written, visual, sound, music, mixed media and theatrical arts as well as building, prototyping and making.

Students will explore thematic arc topics on each of the buses throughout the week allowing them to work closely with each of our Guides (educators) and alongside all attending students."



"A Maker's Dream

The Depot, located at Folsom and 22nd, is a gorgeous 1,400 SF workshop and maker lab. We've completed the build out on our new space, The Depot will house a full wood shop, 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC routers, and digital and physical arts labs. We couldn't be happier with the results!

While the bus may be the soul of nomad, The Depot is the heart. More than just a workshop, this space allows the full student body to meet and participate in group events, social emotional learning opportunities, and large group projects. The Depot is our home - the place we start our day and come back to to warm up and reground after a day on the road."



"Experiential, Meaningful, Nimble

MOBILITY + COMMUNITY = IMPACT
NOMAD believes students have the power to enact real change. Our curriculum and projects are intended to educate and empower students to create change in their own communities. Being fully mobile allows us to participate in our communities and take advantage of all the learning potential of our entire city. By talking to our neighbors, asking questions, and collaborating with organizations and fellow city residents of all ages, we find ways to give back to the community in the projects we undertake. During the Fall 2016 semester, NOMAD students designed the Burlingame city flag with input from members of the community, requests from City Council, and research from historians and librarians. In the past, students have designed tiny homes for the homeless, volunteered with local non-profits, and created apps to prevent bullying. We are replacing the prescriptive nature of most classroom projects with meaningful, real-world impact.

PROJECTS
Learning by doing is crucial to the NOMAD experience. Projects are inspired by our exploration and multi-disciplinary study of the current thematic arc topic. Teachers explicitly teach and model effective project management strategies, guiding students through the process of proposing, planning, executing, and presenting on a project until they are prepared to produce on their own. NOMAD students complete a range of independent, small group, and whole group projects over the course of their time with us, and they are required to complete one project for each subject area per year. Students and teachers curate documentation, assessment, and portfolios of each child's work for all subjects and arcs.

CORE SKILLS
At NOMAD, we believe that core skills aren't the end goal but rather are necessary tools to create the projects of our dreams and to deeply explore the world. We define core skills as the academic basics that enable successful communication and computation required to thrive in today's world. We teach core skills through mini lessons, short but frequent skills practice, a variety of tried and true resources like NEWSELA, Howard Zinn Education Project, and Big History Project. Our educator(s) are experienced in implementing, modifying, and creating curriculum to meet the diverse needs of our mixed aged, mixed ability classes.

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Cornerstone to the learning experience at NOMAD is social-emotional development. Educators have 1:1 conferences with each child, set goals and track progress collaboratively, and have regular transparent conversations about building and sustaining relationships. We incorporate elements of council circles, restorative practices, self-awareness, reflection, and mindfulness. Open, progressive conversations about race, class, gender, and sexual orientation are paramount to our comprehensive program.

PERSONALIZATION
Each student learns differently and has unique interests and needs - personalizing education is key. To ensure that every child is deeply known and receives 1:1 academic and lifeskills mentorship, we limit our class sizes to 8 students.

EXPERTS
Because we aren't limited to a traditional classroom, we can visit professionals, experts, and influential thinkers in their natural habitats. Whether that means driving to Sacramento to sit in on federal court sessions or walking down the street to watch a local print-maker in action, we learn more by visiting members of our community in their offices, workshops and labs, not reading about them or bringing them into our classroom."



"Connect The Dots.

Each school year is defined by the exploration of an initially narrow seeming topic. Through inquiry, exploration and creation, students will discover unending depth and connection.

INQUIRE
Inquiry is driven by the initial thoughts, questions, and feelings the topic of study inspires. Through simulations, experiences, stories, and theories, we co-create a map of what we want to explore, questions that need answered, and ideas we hope to pursue. Inquiry is the foundation of our program; we created a mobile school to enable our curiosity.

EXPLORE
Following the map of our inquiry, NOMAD classes venture out into our city or surrounding cities to take advantage of the resources and untapped learning potential that is all around us. While in the community, students begin answering their initial questions and find interconnectedness in all that we learn. We pull from primary and secondary texts, literature, problems to solve, discussion, online resources, game play, and experiences to learn about and around our topic.

CREATE
After inquiry and exploring the arc topic, project ideas begin to emerge. Students pitch personal and small-group projects, identify experts and mentors they would like to consult, and work strategically to bring their ideas to fruition. Teachers become project managers who help students find their place in their work, tackle obstacles, and leverage strengths to reach a point of culmination. Their work is shared with the larger community through NOMAD culminating events held a few times per school year."



"Mobility Done Two Ways

NOMAD offers two unique ways to get on the bus -- full-time and custom-schooling.

FULL-TIME
Full-time students will attend NOMAD Monday-Friday, participating in the full curriculum. These students will belong to one of two 8-student troops (think homeroom) led by a guide (educator). They will move through the curriculum both as individual troops and as a larger group with all NOMAD students.

Two days a week will be dedicated to the Humanities curriculum, two days to the STEM curriculum and one day to Maker and Physical Arts.

CUSTOM-SCHOOL
Custom-schoolers (also called home-schoolers or indie-schoolers) are able to get their NOMADic experience a la carte. They can choose to do 2, 3 or 4 days a week. For the 2 day option, custom-schoolers can choose between the Humanities curriculum or STEM curriculum. The 3 day option allows students to add on the Maker and Physical Arts curriculum. The 4 day option allows for Humanities and STEM participation.

For the 2017/2018 school year, Monday - Thursday will be dedicated to Humanities, Tuesdays and Thursdays to STEM and Fridays to Maker and Physical Arts.

THE TWO TOGETHER
The full-time and custom-schoolers will be moving through the curriculum together. The only difference between the two groups of students will simply be the number of days they attend."
schools  sanfrancisco  mobile  neo-nomads  nomadic  middleschool  homeschool  christieseyfert  lisabishop  taylorcuffaro  brightworks  sfsh  education  cityasclassroom  learning  inquiry  community  personalization 
may 2017 by robertogreco
The things you keep On being a guest
"Yesterday I was standing in an immigration line at the tail end of a two-leg, 20 hour journey from London to Kuala Lumpur. As is to be expected under these circumstances, my patience level was critically low. As the line crept forward slowly, I noticed there were about 20 men without any carry-on baggage standing in front of me. They stood very close together, each clutching a piece of paper and a green passport, each with an expression of anxious uncertainty on their faces.

I quickly realized these little green books were the reason for the line’s glacial pace. These men were from Bangladesh, arriving in Malaysia to join the estimated 6 million migrant-laborer force that builds skyscrapers, roads, trains as well as cleans houses, bathrooms and shopping malls.

Border security guards are rarely known for their gregariousness, but those on duty yesterday at KLIA seemed downright hostile to this particular group. Each man was questioned and fingerprinted on finicky electronic machines. One guard reached over his desk and a knocked the baseball cap of a terrified Bangladeshi man to get his attention. Another unlucky fellow got chased through the arrivals hall for what I can only guess was entering the wrong way.

After the men made their way through the line, I approached a desk, said hello and handed over my UK passport. The guard didn’t even need to look at me. He stamped my little red book and waved me through in a process that took about seven seconds maximum.

Somewhat stunningly, one in seven persons in the world is a migrant. However, depending on if you’ve got the red book I had or the green one those men had, the way you experience being a migrant is wildly different. Malaysia is a perfect example of that expat versus immigrant divide. The security guards and housing staff at the complex where my cousin lives in Kuala Lumpur are one kind of migrant, who cater almost exclusively to the kind that lives within the security gates.

You’ll often hear people like those Bangladeshis referred to as “guest workers,” a preposterous euphemism if ever I heard one. As a nomad and writer—whether I’m reporting a story or crashing on a couch—I’m often a guest in people’s houses, apartments, cities, cultures, and neighborhoods. But because of the two very powerful passports I possess, I’ll never have to feel the kind of anxiety those men felt at the security gate when I arrive in these places. I will almost always be considered a guest, invited, welcomed.

There’s nothing more human than wanting to better one’s situation, to do whatever is in your power improve the life of yourself or your family. Anyone who has moved to another country can relate to that. What we can’t all relate to, is the experience we have once we get there."
guests  migration  immigration  passprorts  privilege  2015  bangladesh  malaysia  kualalumpur  london  uk  us  airports  nomads  nomadism  neo-nomads 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Gestalten: The New Nomads: Temporary Spaces and a Life on the Move
"The life of urban nomads places new demands on cities, residences, and working spaces. This book presents temporary architecture, flexible room and furniture concepts, and tools for a generation that feels at home in every corner of the globe.



Mobility is the ultimate new form of freedom: freedom from routine, traditional values, and geographic restraints. Today's creatives thrive on a lifestyle that enables them to work six months in a shared office in Berlin, spend the summer in a caravan in Chile, and show up in time for their next project at a temporary desk in New York.

This growing trend has generated visionary ways of designing products and spaces that facilitate a nomadic yet high-tech life. From a modular dwelling system on wheels to an inflatable classroom in a repurposed dumpster, this book compiles a wide range of flexible spaces and innovative products that define today's nomads. Through innovative technology, and by (literally) thinking outside the box, the designers behind these concepts give people the freedom to call the entire world their home."
nomads  nomadism  neo-nomads  2015  books  robertklanten  svenehmann  michellegalindo  mobility  temporary  architecture  design  inflatables  portability  inflatable 
april 2015 by robertogreco
furniture - T I L L Y   B L U E
"A bespoke range of travel inspired furniture that connects traditional woodworking ideals with conceptual design. Seeking to create a range that offers functionality and an innovative variation on space saving design, the furniture has been crafted to fold away to reference luggage. Inspiration is taken from the space we occupy: selecting markings, textures, colours and shapes from the landscapes we live in and applying them to surface pattern. Through this the collection evokes the idea of design that stimulates engagement and a sense of adventure in everyday life."
furniture  travel  portability  mobility  neo-nomads  nomadism  tillyblue  nomads 
december 2014 by robertogreco
POSZU
"Some thoughts about Ello, the new social network of the moment.

Spoiler Alert: Ello will one day suck.

Take this as network pessimism if you want, or take it as a dare for Ello to last as long as it can. I was excited about Facebook once, and joined because I thought it might be everything that was good about the internet communities that I knew and loved. It wasn't. So I quit. There were blogs and I loved those, Twitter was amazing, but Google killed blogs along with RSS and now Twitter takes turns being tiresome and emotionally draining. I still have a blog, and I still use Twitter. But for how long?

Networks are important to us. My entire line of work stems from Twitter--it's how I get jobs. But I'm not going to either let it suck me under or go down with it furiously trying to bail. And I know many of you do important advocacy work to make sure that networks are egalitarian in their accessibility; i.e. as potentially fun for all as they are for some. But there are so many places that need defending.

My point is, for what little it might be worth: it doesn't seem that we are going to find the one resilient network that stands the test of time. We're never going to re-invent and preserve that one moment when everything seemed like it was going to be perfect for ever. At the risk of cascading waves of nostalgia for networked bliss that echo the non-existent generation of the golden age of newspapers, novels, radio, paintings, or whatever, we must reject this Christian utopianism. It is better, I think, to live out of our cars, so to speak, than try to set up roots on a terrain that is not solid, owned by others, and often times doesn't exist.

The best situations are those in which, when someone begins complaining, I can say, "great idea, how can I support you fixing that?" Instead of complaining about being hungry, you start chopping up vegetables. We commit to things, we ally ourselves with them, and invest in the project to give it some lasting life. But networks aren't like that. You can't really crowd-source building an interstate highway (or lack of one) without a state, as it turns out. A personal boycott isn't going to thwart Walmart. States and corporations are things that are bigger than us. They don't care what we think, and see no problem in running us over rather than slowing down. That doesn't mean they are permanent. It just means that history is going to be beset by disappointment and tragedies, because the people with the right ideas throwing themselves at the system just aren't big enough. Because of the frightening scale of our current networks, some of these tragedies are large enough to potentially kill us all. Far better than preparing to throw yourself underneath the wheels, is preparing to run.

Luckily, the fate of Ello isn't as cataclysmic as all this. But I am still fairly convinced that it will one day suck. Could be six months, three years, or ten years. I don't know when, and I don't know exactly why. But this particular network is being controlled by someone other than me, and I'm not going to barge into their offices and demand that they make changes that will satisfy my idea of what is not suck. Networks couldn't be more important, but to me, they couldn't be less worth it. Instead, I'll just leave when it is time to do so. I am fairly convinced that I will use a succession of social network like things for the rest of my life. Eventually, someone might really get it, and fix all the things, so that I feel good using a particular social network for more than six years of its evolution. But right now, that seems unlikely. (Just a single example: if a social network can't figure out that it will need a block button on its own, I don't have much hope for it's survival. There are tens of other examples.)

It's been said that the ability to not be connected is the greatest privilege of all. But as someone who regularly has his cell phone shut off because he can't pay to re-up his SIM, I know where all the open WiFi networks are in my immediate area. There's two ways of dealing with the raw deal at the bottom of the network customer food chain. You either give all your money to the ISP and spend all your time begging and pleading with them to not disconnect you. Or you get ready for when the internet is shut off, and you have a contingency plan.

See you all on IRC after the fire."
adamrothstein  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  networks  twitter  ello  cv  nomadism  digitalnomadism  resilience  onlycrash  nomads  neo-nomads  ephemeral  intentionalephemeral  migration  digitalmigration  2014  ephemerality 
september 2014 by robertogreco
coffee shop best practices for the transient info-worker | THE STATE
"While the coffee shop is generally an accepted place in which to set up one’s laptop and get to work, there is a bit of social obscurity to this exchange, and some aspects of the everyday capitalist potlatch through which one must navigate. Coffee shops are still interpreted by society at large as a place for buying and selling coffee, and to utilize one as a workspace requires some knowledge and skilled negotiation of certain grey market operations coursing just underneath the surface of the associated caffeination industries.

Due to bad negotiation of these market niceties on the part of info-workers attempting to use these facilities, some coffee shops have launched a backlash against their perception as a workspace. Particularly in places like the cutthroat capitalist region of San Francisco, coffee shops have disconnected their Wifi entirely, and in some places, done away with tables altogether in an effort to disband the info-working classes that have attached themselves to their services like a lamphrey to the belly of a whale—sucking up their data, energy, and seating space without contributing anything in return. They believe they can make more money without these parasites attached. Make no mistake, renting a table from a coffee shop is a market exchange in which a service is being exchanged for a price. But it is a market with an unspoken lack of definition. To attempt to abuse this lack of definition is to crush its weak structure, and make our presence pathological. Therefore, if computer users of the world wish this grey market to perpetuate, there are certain rules of its functioning by which we must abide.

General Principle: the transient workspace can only exist as long as the coffee shop continues to exist.



Rule One: pay for your time.



Rule Two: decide upon your rate.



Rule Three: consider your footprint.



Rule Four: consider your psychological impact.



"The difficulty with being a transient info-worker is that you cannot rely upon coffee shops in the way that one might rely on a rented office space or one’s home. This economy is by nature a precarious one. You are relying upon what is available unless you pay the premium to reserve a dedicated co-working space, which requires the sort of economic investment that many of us cannot make. This puts us in a delicate position. We do not owe anything to the coffee shops where we do our daily work, and yet, we are reliant upon their continued existence. We cannot afford the guaranteed service of a real customer, nor the part-ownership of a co-op member. Given our inability to play on the level of a dedicated, contractual customer, we must negotiate this grey market. These rules, therefore, do not take the form of ethical imperative, but instead, best practices and the optimist spirit of the opportunist, not the pessimistic spirit of the parasite. These rules are not fixed, but will no doubt shift as the markets we are forced to live within also shift, taking our daily existence with them."
coffeeshops  neo-nomads  infoworkers  coworking  etiquette  2014  adamrothstein  capitalism 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Where is home for the child of nomads? – Ruth Behar – Aeon
"My connection to place is fluid and complex. In a nomadic world, do we still need a home?"



"Pondering the relationship between feeling at home and being homesick has long been an anthropological obsession. The discipline took off from the idea that an anthropologist had to leave home in order to study otherness in a distant place. Knowledge was built through reflecting on the meaning of insider and outsider, familiar and exotic, native and stranger. But in the quest to get from place to place, everything in between, the vast infrastructure of modern life, escaped our notice. We missed the transient places that the French anthropologist Marc Augé has called ‘non-places’ – airports, shopping malls, hotels, highways, bus terminals, and subways.

These ‘non-places’ have radically changed the concept of home, not only for most of us in the first world but for a growing number of those in the developing world. Perhaps nothing has left so strong a mark on our identities as the periods spent in the sky and in the airports that gather together assorted strangers before sorting them on to different planes. An airport ‘hub’ is a stopping point between places. The ‘hub’ is an apt metaphor for how many of us among the privileged are living out the meaning of home in everyday practice. Those who are frequent flyers and spend much of the year moving between places might find that the place we call home has come to seem like the route to elsewhere. Home is where you do your laundry, run to the dentist to get your teeth cleaned, and frantically rest your weary bones before embarking on the next odyssey. In turn, airport hubs are trying to become our homes, offering outlets to recharge our numerous devices so we can continue to communicate from afar, as well as shopping, restaurants, prayer rooms, and massage.

As ‘non-places’ expand from centres to peripheries all around the world, there is renewed pressure to work hard to prevent the home from becoming a long-term hotel room. Sentimental notions of the sanctity of the home are enlisted as a means of challenging the threat of ‘non-places.’ A preponderance of guides, including websites such as Apartment Therapy and Houzz, exist for the sole purpose of assisting us in making our homes uniquely charming and irreplaceable. Home Depot and Pier One have become the iconic commercial outlets offering practical supplies and decorative touches for these homemaking projects that alternately encourage us to be richly rococo or humbly Zen.

But there is another choice we can make, and that is to give up home altogether and be homeless by choice – not as a result of poverty or broken family ties, but to let go of the weight of the things that prevent us from fully engaging with the world and becoming true cosmopolitans, people at home everywhere."
ruthbehar  nomads  nomadism  neo-nomads  2014  anthropology 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Deconstructing the Experience of the Local: Toward a Radical Pedagogy of Place | Ruitenberg | Philosophy of Education Archive
"A radical pedagogy of place is a pedagogy of “place” under deconstruction, a pedagogy that understands experience as mediated, that understands the “local” as producing and being produced by the trans-local, and that understands “community” as community-to-come, as a call of hospitality to those outside the com-munis. In a radical pedagogy of place, students are taught to see the multiplicity of and conflicts between interpretations of a place, the traces of meanings carried by the place in the past, the openness to future interpretation and meaning-construction. A radical pedagogy of place does not pretend to offer answers to or “correct” interpretations of hotly contested places. A forest is a site of economic benefit to the logging and tourism industry, as well as an ecosystem, as well as land formerly inhabited by Indigenous people. An inner city neighborhood is a crime statistic, as well as an architectural site, as well as a social system held together by resilience and solidarity. A radical pedagogy of place acknowledges the local contextuality of discourse and experience, but it examines this locality for trans-local traces, for the liminal border- zones, for the exclusions on which its communal identity relies. It encourages not entrenchment in one’s locality and community but rather hospitality and openness.

It is ironic that one of the strengths of place-based education, touted by Orr and others, is that it forces educators and students alike to think and work in interdisciplinary ways: to leave the home of their discipline, to wander and engage in relationships with other disciplines. The hybridity of interdisciplinary approaches needed for place-based education is not possible without a certain nomadism. It might be objected that successful interdisciplinary work is possible only if the theorist is sufficiently rooted in the “home” discipline not to get lost in the wandering. This only underscores, however, that a home is not a home until one can leave it and open it to the other — otherwise, it is a prison.

If one wishes to educate students to have a commitment to their social and ecological environment, one needs to start with an emphasis on commitment rather than on locality or community. Despite the commonly used metaphor, human beings do not grow actual roots on which they depend for their physical, intellectual, or ethical nourishment. Instead, nomads who have learned the ethical gestures of hospitality and openness to a community-to-come will bring nourishment to any place in which they land."
claudiaruitenberg  community  communities  learning  commitment  place  location  local  2005  via:steelemaley  nomads  neo-nomads  roots  ecology  interdisciplinary  education  pedagogy  place-basededucation  environmentaleducation  davidorr  michaelpeters  jacquesderrida  thomasvanderdunk  gregorysmith  mckenziewark  robinusher  janicewoodhouse  cliffordknapp  paultheobald  shaungallagher  henrygiroux  anthropology  experience  radical  radicalpedagogy  johncaputo  drucillacornell  canon  place-basedlearning  place-based  place-basedpedagogy 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The Zero Yen House and other unimaginable habitats of Kyohei Sakaguchi | Spoon & Tamago
"As an architecture student at Waseda University in the late 90s Kyohei Sakaguchi encountered a structure that would forever shape his future career. It wasn’t Oscar Niemeyer’s Brazilian National Museum, nor was it Le Corbusier’s Unité d’Habitation. Not even Kisho Kurokawa’s Nakagin Capsule Tower. It was a home built on a budget of zero yen on the bed of Tokyo’s Sumida River. …"
neo-nomads  nomads  2012  homeless  lowcost  housing  houses  zeroyenhouse  tokyo  japan  design  architecture  kyoheisakaguchi  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
Tumblr: David Karp's $800 Million Art Project - Forbes
"“He owns, like, three items…He’s always looking for ways he can get rid of something.” Even Karp’s person is spare in the extreme: His one suit, though trimly cut, flaps around his 6-foot-1 frame when he fidgets, which he does a lot. Maybe it’s all the calories he burns this way that keeps him skinny, like a teenager who has yet to fill out his bones. “I’ve always been 40 pounds underweight,” he says.

For Tumblr’s CEO, minimalism isn’t just an esthetic choice. It’s the key to freedom. When he travels he avoids making plans more than a few days in advance, even on his trips to Japan, and packs only the sveltest of carry-ons. “It’s my Jason Bourne or James Bond fantasy, wanting to be perfectly mobile,” he says. One of Tumblr’s directors, Roelof Botha of the Silicon Valley venture firm Sequoia Capital, recalls showing up at a board meeting in New York toting only “the tiniest of duffel bags” for his trip. “David took one look at me and said, ‘You really brought all that stuff?’ ”"
packinglight  nomads  neo-nomads  postmaterialism  minimalism  davidcarp  2013  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
122. The Archipelago | I Have A Voice Too
"…Own only what you can always carry with you: know languages, know countries, know people. Let your memory be your travel bag. Use your memory! Use your memory! It is those bitter seeds alone which might sprout and grow someday.

Look around you—there are people around you. Maybe you will remember one of them all your life and later eat your heart out because you didn’t make use of the opportunity to ask him questions. And the less you talk, the more you’ll hear. Thin strands of human lives stretch from island to island of the Archipelago. They intertwine, touch one another for one night only in just such a clickety-clacking half-dark car as this and separate once and for all. Put your ear to their quiet humming and the steady clickety-clack beneath the car. After all, it is the spinning wheel of life that is clicking and clacking away there.”

[via: http://caterina.net/2012/09/29/our-memories-are-what-make-us-kathleen-dean-moore/#comment-2207 ]
cv  travel  consumerism  possessions  memories  noticing  listening  cynics  stoics  buddha  christ  living  life  languages  memory  simplicity  lightness  neo-nomads  nomadism  nomads  aleksandrsolzhenitsyn  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
cloudhead - knowmad
"if a nomad is a person that roams and wanders in search of new pastures and hunting grounds rather than settling down permanently in one location * then …

A knowmad is a person that roams and wanders in search of new knowledge, skills, and experiences, rather than settling down permanently in one specialized silo of awareness.

A knowmad is not a nomadic knowledge worker …
roaming from coffee shop to boardroom with a laptop under her arm. The term doesn’t belong to the workplace because
a knowmad doesn’t work, she plays … like a child or an artist.

“The primitive hunter or fisherman did no work, any more than does the poet, painter, or thinker of today. Where the whole man is involved there is no work. Work begins with the division of labor and the specialization of functions”—McLuhan

* (nomas = wander, nomos = pasture)"


[Previous version when first bookmarked]

"if a nomad is a person that roams and wanders in search of new pastures and hunting grounds rather than settling down permanently in one location 
(nomas = wander, nomos = pasture)

then

a knowmad is a person that roams and wanders in search of new knowledge, new skills, experiences and insights, rather than settling down permanently in one specialized silo of awareness.

A knowmad is not a knowledge worker on the run …
roaming from coffee shop to boardroom with a laptop under her arm.
The term doesn’t belong to the workplace because 
a knowmad doesn’t work, she plays … like a child or an artist. 

“The primitive hunter or fisherman did no work, any more than does the poet, painter, or thinker of today. Where the whole man is involved there is no work. Work begins with the division of labor and the specialization of functions”—McLuhan"

[McLuhan quote from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Understanding_Media:_The_Extensions_of_Man ]
informationage  generalists  specialization  cv  roaming  wanderers  wanderlust  wanderingmind  neo-nomads  wandering  hunter-gatherer  labor  work  play  knowledgeworkers  knowledge  nomads  nomadism  1964  2012  cloudhead  marshallmcluhan  knowmads  shiftctrlesc  headmine  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
An interview with Max Shron
"What would be your dream setup?

Someday perhaps I will go around carrying only a book, a change of clothes, a pen, a water bottle, a folding umbrella, and a little capsule that turns into my livelihood when opened. Rollable hi-res screen and keyboard, tiny computer the size of a cell phone or smaller but as light as a pen, with high-speed satellite connectivity anywhere on the globe. In this world, my sleeping bag, pad and windproof hammock weigh only a pound put together. For half of the year I travel the world, alone and with companions, with a small bag slung over my shoulder like Kwai Chang Caine. We sleep outdoors, travel on trains, and a few days of the week sit some place cozy and create beautiful software or solve interesting problems that improve the world."
outdoors  travel  via:bettyannsloan  2012  neo-nomads  nomads  thesetup  maxscron  usesthis  from delicious
march 2012 by robertogreco
Unknown Fields Division
"The Unknown Fields Division is a nomadic design studio that ventures out on annual expeditions to the ends of the earth exploring unreal and forgotten landscapes, alien terrains and obsolete ecologies. Join the Division as each year we navigate a different global cross section and map the complex and contradictory realities of the present as a site of strange and extraordinary futures.
 
Here we are both visionaries and reporters, part documentarians and part science fiction soothsayers as the otherworldly sites we encounter afford us a distanced viewpoint from which to survey the consequences of emerging environmental and technological scenarios."

[Blog: http://www.unknownfieldsdivision.com/blog/ ]
travel  galápagos  amazon  arcticcircle  ecuador  australia  alaska  roswell  chernobyl  sciencefiction  scifi  obsoleteecologies  exploration  unknownfieldsdivision  neo-nomads  nomads  fiction  design  architecture  from delicious
march 2012 by robertogreco
designswarm thoughts » Blog Archive » Unexportables
"As I walked through the markets of Hong Kong, staring at jade jewellery & Angry Birds paraphonalia, it occured to me that I could order everything on eBay or Amazon. The foreign land’s treasures have been globalised to a point of total consumer disinterest. The only thing that was left to consume was food & architecture…

Could it be that When you are drowning in a digital culture that says that social is everything then you might forget what makes you special? When Amazon and every ad banner online knows what you like, what happens if you forget what you like. Anti-consumption…

When you can be anywhere, you have to celebrate where you are right then and there. That’s luxury.

True affirmation of identity and uniqueness has become tricky when you are constantly forced into relationships with “friends”, Groupon deals and “other people also bought this” prompts. Perhaps travel and food, as sensorial experiences that one cannot share, will become even more prized than they are now."
ebay  amazon  transferability  nontransferable  transference  postnational  homogeneity  experienceasproduct  anti-consumption  experience  uniqueness  travel  globalization  2012  kevinslavin  digitalnow  now  place  nomadism  nomads  neo-nomads  identity  via:preoccupations  food  luxury  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Itinerant - Wikipedia
"An itinerant is a person who travels from place to place with no fixed home. The term comes from the late 16th century: from late Latin itinerant (travelling), from the verb itinerari, from Latin iter, itiner (journey, road)."

[Boomarked for the lists "Types of itinerants" AND "Itinerants throughout history and today" AND "Notable itinerants"]
drifters  migration  refugees  hobos  bedouins  people  history  glvo  nomadism  neo-nomads  nomads  travellers  mobility  itinerants  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
"Knowmads and The Next Renaissance" - My TedxBrisbane Talk - Edward Harran
"Edward Harran shares his personal story into the knowmad movement: an emerging digital generation that has the capacity to work, learn, move and play - with anybody, anytime, and anywhere. In his energetic talk, Edward gives us a compelling insight into his story and highlights what the knowmads represent: the beginnings of the next renaissance."

[See also the video, the rest of the post, and http://www.educationfutures.com/2011/11/17/knowmads-and-the-next-renaissance/ ]
edwardharran  socialinnovation  polymaths  generalists  renaissancemen  knowmads  neo-nomads  nomads  nomadism  learning  adaptability  unschooling  deschooling  glvo  cv  education  freedom  complexity  messiness  simplicity  well-being  introverts  communication  web  online  internet  2011  tedxbrisbane  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Living with 100 items. No, 50. No, only 15. Screw it, just get beautiful, useful things – marks.dk
"Bruce Sterling’s “Last Viridian Note”…puts things into the following categories:

1. Beautiful things.
2. Emotionally important things.
3. Tools, devices, and appliances that efficiently perform a useful function.
4. Everything else.

There are no numbers, no set rules for how much stuff you “must” own. I like the idea some have of only owning 100 things, or even just 50 things. But it’s only an idea. I couldn’t do it myself but I can, however, cut down on the stuff that I already own and don’t use.

DVDs go category 4…espresso machine in 3…couch, bed & chair in 3 as well…Half my clothes go in 4…& I need to buy after a pattern of 1 & 3 from now on.

…don’t think you can even buy after category 2 most of the time. That’s the kind of stuff that evolves over time…

Question yourself with everything you are about to buy; if there is a reasonable chance it will be placed in category 4 anytime soon, don’t buy it."
brucesterling  markjensen  possessions  consumption  minimalism  2011  lastviridiannote  things  simplicity  sustainability  consumerism  stuff  qualityoverquantity  viridianism  nomads  neo-nomads  materialism  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Ranu Mukherjee: Contemporary Nomads on Vimeo
"Artist Ranu Mukherjee builds expansive video visions of nomadic existence, based on fragments of experiences by strangers. Her works draws from nomadic lifestyles of all sorts, from geopolitical displacement to daily business travel."
travel  nomads  nomadism  neo-nomads  art  video  2011  ranumukherjee  glvo  film  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
The mission: never come back (Ships Not Shelters, a non-Earth heterotopia) : socks-studio
“–Evadere ad auras,
Hoc opus, hic labor est.”

To escape into the upper air,
This is the task, this is the labour.

The underlying premise behind Ships not Shelters is to abandon the idea of shelter, in favour of the development of unstatic in transit non-Earth living situations.

Published by the Peckham Outer-Space Initiative, a thinktank of sort, formed by the guys at Anvil and El Ultimo Grito, the handy manifesto (170 pages), is an overall ode to the ship (both physical and mental) as a tool for the prospect and fascination of the uncharted, aiming at the evolution of human species and its culture. A vehicle as a solution to current forms of planetary based society and living:"

[See also: http://www.shopwork.net/projects/peckham-outerspace-initiative/ via ªªhttp://nomadicity.tumblr.com/post/10174302145/evadere-ad-auras-hoc-opus-hic-labor-est-to ºº]
peckhamouter-spaceinitiative  space  shelter  ships  spaceships  nomads  neo-nomads  unstatic  design  architecture  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
On Going Feral
"Cloudworker lifestyles…create a psychological transformation that is very similar to what happens when animals go feral. In animals, it takes a couple of generations of breeding for the true wild nature to re-emerge…But in humans it can happen faster, since most of our domestication is through education & socialization rather than breeding.

You might think that the true tabby-mutt human must live outside the financial system…that’s actually a mistaken notion, because that sort of officially checked-out  or actively nihilistic person is defined & motivated by the structure of human civilization. To rebel is to be defined by what you rebel against. Criminals & anarchists are civilized creatures. Feral populations are agnostic, rather than either dependent on, or self-consciously independent of, codified social structures. Feral cloudworkers use social structures where it accidentally works for them…and improvise ad-hoc self-support structures for the rest of their needs."
mobile  cloudworkers  cloudworking  venkateshrao  2009  feral  mutts  cv  society  socialization  deschooling  unschooling  illegiblepeople  illegibles  domestication  lordoftheflies  anarchism  anarchy  conformity  lifestyle  work  thirdplaces  introverts  neo-nomads  nomadism  nomads  telecommuting  labor  thirdspaces  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
kevin cyr: home in the weeds
"brooklyn-based designer / artist kevin cyr has sent designboom images of his latest work and exhibition. known for his sculptural pieces such as 'camper kart' and 'camper bike', that explore themes of mobility and shelters in our contemporary society, cyr currently presents 'home in the weeds', a solo exhibition at 941 geary in san francisco on now until june 4th, 2011. he has developed all new work for the show, including new large-scale installations that continue to explore the idea of shelters at different stages or circumstances, each one serving a different function, expressing ideas of mobility, concealment and protectionism. 'home in the weeds' is cyr's personal reaction to the fragility of our society today, he also explores these themes through drawing, painting and photography, looking at ideas of shelter as a safe haven for a future worst-case scenario, along with more optimistic considerations of the home and self-preservation. 
kevincyr  mobility  tinyhouses  small  neo-nomads  nomads  nomadism  art  trailers  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Why I quit my job: « Kai Nagata ["Until Thursday, I was CTV’s Quebec City Bureau Chief, based at the National Assembly, mostly covering politics."]
"I’m trying to think of the reporters I know who would do their job as volunteers…people who feel so strongly about importance & social value of the evening news that, were they were offered somewhere to sleep, three meals a day, & free dry-cleaning – they would do that for the rest of their days…such zeal is scarce.

Aside from feeling sexually attracted to the people on screen, the target viewer, according to consultants, is also supposed to like easy stories that reinforce beliefs they already hold…

I have serious problems w/ direction taken by Canadian policy & politics in last 5 years. But as a reporter, I feel like I’ve been holding my breath…

“I thought if I paid my dues & worked my way up through ranks, I could maybe reach a position of enough influence & credibility that I could say what I truly feel. I’ve realized there’s no time to wait…

I’m broke, & yet I know I’m rich in love. I’m unemployed & homeless, but I’ve never been more free.

Everything is possible.”
politics  media  journalism  tv  ctv  cbc  canada  policy  kainagata  2011  neo-nomads  nomadism  meaning  purpose  meaningfulness  via:jeeves  truth  viewers  junktv  news  reporting  environment  superficiality  junknews  distraction  integrity  credibility  influence  yearoff  bias  nomads  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
On Being an Illegible Person
"For the nomad, the question of why you are temporarily somewhere is simply ill-posed. It’s like asking a settled person, “why aren’t you moving?” For the nomad, a period of rootedness is unstable, like travel for the rooted…a disturbed equilibrium that requires explanation. An explanation of non-movement, & eventual resumption of movement, are required…

It is not inconceivable that the world could be arranged to provide all these in a way that supports both rootedness & nomadism.…it is becoming easier every year. I’d like to see trains getting cheaper…health insurance becoming more portable…government identity documents becoming anchored to something other than physical addresses…executive suites and coworking spaces sprout up all over…

There is no necessary either-or between nomadism & rooted living. Technology has evolved to the point where the apparatus of the state should be able to accommodate illegible people w/out pinning them down."
neo-nomads  nomads  nomadism  venkateshrao  travel  rootedness  illegiblepeople  identity  movement  lifestyle  2011  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Roberto Bolaño's essays: More clues for detectives | The Economist
"For Bolaño, even his non-fiction defies clarity. He shows little interest in providing order or streamlining his thoughts. For him, order is a lie. The purpose of both his fiction and non-fiction then is to capture this disorder on the page and make it feel as real as possible. In Bolaño’s writing one can only recognise sanity within the context of insanity. Answers—if there are any—are found not by searching, but in searching.
 
Bolaño was a nomad of the planet and the mind. While much of this collection is standard criticism or brief observations, the pleasure is less in the writing than in experiencing—for just a brief moment—the world of a man immersed in his art."
robertobolaño  nonfiction  nomads  nomadism  essays  neo-nomads  writing  toread  books  fiction 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Dymaxion: Transnationality and Performance
"…I crossed an international border to install an app on my cellphone. That wasn't the nominal purpose of the trip, but if we step back from our understanding of internationalization & international copyright law, that interaction btwn border crossing & the performance of an effectively physical act is almost surreal. More surreal is possibility…that I could have simply traded my Icelandic SIM card for my US one &…effectively, virtually, performed that border crossing…

Like everyone else, my life is bound up mostly w/ those of some few hundred other people, & lived in a specificity of place mostly across some few square km. Unlike many other people, the future is rather more heavily salted into it, & that space is split over various countries. It is unclear if transnational culture or border performance will win, or how long a compromise of ever-increasing osmotic pressure can last. I dearly hope…immediate awareness of our ultimate interconnectedness will triumph regardless."
international  global  borders  simcards  law  copyright  interconnectedness  transnationalism  transnationality  porous  porosity  future  present  eleanorsaitta  bordertown  culture  permeability  osmosis  neo-nomads  nomads  ip  intellectualproperty  vpn  translation  history  serfdom  language  jacobapplebaum  moxiemarlinspike  us  cities  interconnected  interconnectivity  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - The Setup
"A person only flails around in regards to their rig when they don’t have a clear idea of what constitutes their work. Suitability and fit is paramount, and one is never going to find what they’re looking for if they don’t know what they need. So, I looked at my work, I watched how I used my computer for a day, and found out all I do is draw vector shapes, surf the web, listen to music, and bash words out in plain text. That’s hardly the type of activity that requires computational brute force, though I understand there are some of you out there that require just that. Not me though. Nope.

And these computers? As much as I love fiddle-faddling with the damn things, I mostly just want to forget I have one and get on with saying stuff and making things. I realized that I valued freedom more than power, flexibility more than blazing speed. I want the choice of being able to be mobile, and to carry around my whole setup with me at all times without much inconvenience."
frankchimero  setup  mac  osx  macbookair  ipad  iphone  applications  work  workflow  workspace  mobilestudio  software  cv  freedom  mobility  neo-nomads  nomadism  nomads  computers  computing  fit  howwework  thesetup  2011  workspaces  ios  usesthis  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — Settling Down Without Settling
"About six months ago, in May, my wife and I moved from San Francisco to Portland, Oregon. We expected to rent an apartment in Portland for at least a year, maybe two. Yesterday, in a major diversion from that path, we closed on our first home. We move in this coming Saturday.

In this post, I’m going to talk about why we bought a home, how we went about it, and the context of the particular socioeconomic moment we find ourselves in."

"There’s a simplicity that comes from transience, and a simplicity that comes from permanence. Both are illusions, and one will present itself before the other. For now, I’m eager to be wrapped up in the illusion of permanence, serene and arboreal."
homebuying  tips  money  portland  housing  finance  transience  simplicity  illusion  houses  alexpayne  2010  permanence  neo-nomads  nomads  lifestyle  silence  quiet  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Up In The Air | > jim rossignol
"Now, I am not trying to devalue or deride family life, because I enjoy and value it myself. I do, however, think that film was mistaken in not allowing Bingham the strength of his convictions, or some kind of ultimate vindication. Although the plot eventually okays his lifestyle, it is done almost grudgingly. He is allowed to return to his unlimited travels, but only after his lifestyle has been argued to be somehow less than those of his colleagues and relatives. The story attempts to draw what is missing from his life, and can’t really manage it, since Bingham is actually so well adapted. “I am lonely,” he says, joking but not joking, in the least convincing moment of the movie."
life  lifestyle  families  nomads  neo-nomads  relationships  jimrossignol  2010  georgeclooney  jasonreitman  travel  detachment  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Element S(urvival): A Coat-and-Sleeping-Bag-in-One for the Homeless | Design for Good | Big Think
"Homelessness is perhaps the most disconcerting reminder of the staggering gap between the rich and the poor in some of the world's wealthiest nations. In Detroit alone, more than 18,000 people are homeless – a social circumstance most grueling over the cold winter months. To address the issue, 21-year-old Detroit design student Veronika Scott has developed a clever multifunctional garment – Element S(urvival), an inexpensive but highly insulated winter coat that quickly and easily transforms into a sleeping bag."
neo-nomads  design  sleepingbags  clothing  wearable  nomads  homeless  homelessness  detroit  glvo  wearables  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
jagnefalt milton: a rolling master plan
"swedish architecture firm jagnefalt milton has been awarded third prize for 'a rolling master plan', their proposed development for the idea competition of andalsnes in norway.

the design utilizing new and existing train tracks to create a diverse system where buildings roll through the city on rails, providing an opportunity to reorganize programmatic requirements in relation to the urban space. the mobile flexibility allows the city to adjust for uses such as concerts, festivals, markets, and seasonal changes.

the integration of mobile structures - including a rolling hotel, public bath and concert hall - has the potential to transform the city into a dense, integrated and continually changing scenography. the temporary, small-scale structures sets the 'city in motion', providing an important connection between the land and the sea."

[See also: http://www.jagnefaltmilton.se/page4.html ]
design  architecture  urban  planning  mobile  mobility  nomads  neo-nomads  jagnefaltmilton  sweden  norway  rail  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Rebecca Solnit - Wikipedia
"Rebecca Solnit (born 1961) is a writer who lives in San Francisco. She has written on a variety of subjects including the environment, politics, place, and art. [1]

She skipped high school altogether, enrolling in an alternative junior high in the public school system that took her through tenth grade, when she passed the GED exam. Thereafter she enrolled in junior college. When she was 17 she went to study in Paris. She ultimately returned to California and finished her college education at San Francisco State University when she was 20.[2] She then received a Masters in Journalism from the University of California, Berkeley[3] in 1984 and has been an independent writer since 1988. Prior to this she was a museum researcher and art critic.[4] She has worked on environmental and human rights campaigns since the 1980s, notably with the Western Shoshone Defense Project in the early 1990s, as described in her book Savage Dreams, and with antiwar activists throughout the Bush era."
literature  rebeccasolnit  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  education  sanfrancisco  california  writing  writers  books  wanderlust  wandering  walking  nomads  neo-nomads  nature  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Finding Time | Rebecca Solnit | Orion Magazine
"conundrum is that language to describe ineffable splendors & possibilities of our lives takes time to master, takes a certain unhurried engagement w/ tasks of description, assessment, critique, & conversation; that to speak this slow language you must slow down, & to slow down you must have some inkling of what you will gain by doing so. It’s not an elite language; nomadic & remote tribal peoples are now quite good at picking & choosing from development’s cascade of new toys, & so are some of cash-poor, culture-rich people in places like Louisiana. Poetry is good training in speaking it, & skepticism is helpful in rejecting the four horsemen of this apocalypse [Efficiency, Convenience, Profitability, & Security], but both require a mind that likes to roam around & the time in which to do it.

Ultimately…slowness is an act of resistance, not because slowness is a good in itself but because of all that it makes room for, the things that don’t get measured and can’t be bought."

[My take: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/2393325961/slowness-is-an-act-of-resistance ]
culture  productivity  technology  music  efficiency  convenience  profitability  pleasure  poetry  sociability  security  slow  slowness  cash-poor  culture-rich  inspiration  nomads  skepticism  language  conversation  time  resistance  neo-nomads  distraction  well-being  2010  rebeccasolnit  comments  cv  canon  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
egg shaped mobile home
"undoubtedly one of the most interesting project getting featured on the world wide web, the egg-shaped mobile home by twenty-four year old dai haifei is a response to beijing's soaring rental prices. haifie, a recent architecture school graduate, has designed and lived in this temporary unit for the last two months.

the 'egg', measuring six feet in height sits on two wheels and is constructed from basket woven bamboo splints. the exterior features a patchwork of small sacks containing seeds of grass that will grow to eventually provide insulation. a south facing solar panel 'provides' power to a single lamp on the inside. during the day, natural daylight enters through an opening in the ceiling. the entrance can be propped open to facilitate natural ventilation.

given the small size and simple shape, the layout is minimal: a half circumference bed and low, built in storage line the perimeter, making the space efficient for bare living. "
design  architecture  mobile  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  realestate  china  housing  homes  minimalism  small  tinyhomes  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
LRB · Slavoj Žižek · Nobody has to be vile
"Being smart means being dynamic and nomadic, and against centralized bureaucracy; believing in dialogue and co-operation as against central authority; in flexibility as against routine; culture and knowledge as against industrial production; in spontaneous interaction as against fixed hierarchy."
zizek  communism  journalism  hierarchy  nomads  nomadic  neo-nomads  bureaucracy  anarchism  flexibility  routine  culture  knowledge  spontaneity  spontaneous  interaction  dialogue  cooperation  decentralization  dialog  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
JUST CHANGE « LEBBEUS WOODS
"At a certain point, the only attainable goal is to live within the state of change itself, like refugees, gypsies, or nomads. It seems likely that in the future, if the pace of change—social, political, economic, cultural—continues to increase, this condition will become common in all social classes.

In such a world, the design and construction of permanent buildings will become less important than it is today, and architects will turn their attention to the development of concepts and techniques of building temporary living spaces. At their most primitive, these will involve portable structures such as tents. With increasing sophistication they will involve site-specific constructions that are created and, just as importantly, disappear as needed or desired."
temporary  lebbeuswoods  architecture  design  change  future  housing  life  neo-nomads  nomads  flux  culture  society  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Camper Trailer - Bike Hugger
"So it’s attached to a electric assist comfort bike and you could cover the top of the camper with solar panels to generate electricty. It’s a Digital Bike Nomad’s hotel at SXSW or a Cargonista’s dream vacation. Even a place to stay warm at a cross race."
bikes  biking  trailers  nomads  neo-nomads  mobility  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Sign of the Times: Your Personal Hobo-mobile | Co.Design
"Naturally, you don't want to sacrifice too many comforts. And you definitely don't want a carbon-gulping RV. Designer Cornelius Comanns has a solution for you: Bufalino, which converts a simple Piaggio APE50 trike--familiar if you've ever traveled in Asia--into a full on rolling shelter with as many comforts as your local artisanal coffee shop.

Comanns, a former intern for Art Lebedev who created the design for his graduation thesis, tells Designboom: "The traveling vehicle is always with you like some kind of a base camp, while also being used for moving on in an easygoing and spontaneous way." Notice the words--"base camp," "easygoing," and "spontaneous." Spoken like a modern hobo prophet."
via:lukeneff  design  nomads  neo-nomads  mobility  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
BBC News - Cult of less: Living out of a hard drive
"Many have begun trading in CD, DVD, and book collections for digital music, movies, and e-books. But this trend in digital technology is now influencing some to get rid of nearly all of their physical possessions - from photographs to furniture to homes altogether." [More discussion here: http://www.boingboing.net/2010/08/16/article-about-extrem.html ] [Some of these examples sound like trading in physical clutter for digital clutter.]
minimalism  simplicity  consumerism  2010  ownership  future  digital  lifestyle  lifehacks  less  psychology  society  technology  culture  trends  nomads  neo-nomads  travel  homes  homelessness  possessions  materialism  via:lukeneff  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Cool Tools: Cheap RV Living
"Roomier than a car, but cheaper than an RV, a retrofitted van makes a cool inexpensive house. Once popular during hippie days, the ancient American tradition of modifying a van is undergoing a resurgence as rents continue to rise. More folks each year commute from work and then park their home, instead of parking in front of it. On this lovely free website, you can find inspiring examples of cheap nomads, detailed instructions for conversions, gear recommendations, and lots of advice for living in a low rent or homemade RV from "them that's doin' it.""

[points to: http://cheaprvliving.com/index.html ]
kevinkelly  nomads  neo-nomads  vans  travel  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
the double room - portable home
"american firm global homes has sent in images of his project 'the doubleroom' in sweden. the portable residence consists of a kitchen, bathroom, living and bedroom space all in one. the pre assembled structure can be easily transported to any location."
architecture  design  homes  housing  neo-nomads  nomads  portability  prefab  small  tiny  mobility 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Chairless by vitra.
"seating device for the modern nomad...sturdy strap of fabric allows user to sit down in relaxed manner – but w/ neither seat nor backrest...a solution par excellence for times when chairs are in short supply...so light & compact that you can carry it with you wherever you go...relieves spine & legs, so that hugging your knees or using a support is no longer necessary. because the pressure is taken off so many areas of the body, you feel relaxed all over. now your hands are free...
alejandroaravena  architecture  furniture  backpacking  design  fashion  vitra  nomads  neo-nomads  portability  fabric  gifts  glvo  srg  edg 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Learning by doing | Knowmads
"Our purpose is to create a life-long learning community that starts with a one –year-program and the possibility to add on half a year after that. We work from the principle of a team setting based on Action Learning; meaning we we work with our heads, hearts and hands. First we discover what is going on around us, then we design, then we start to build and then we amplify it in a learning setting and as a socio-economic venture. You will experience this setting with 29 other people, 3 members of staff as well as as experts invited from business, politics and media, from all over the world."
knowmads  nomds  neo-nomads  education  learning  lcproject  altgdp  nomads 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Anhoek School
"Our aim is to foster a reckless kind of genius that rips across disciplines and is always conscious that the work of the classroom should not stay in the classroom. Are we a training camp? Are we an observatory? Are we a university? It is yet to be determined.

What is certain is that we opt for a hands-on examination of marginal pedagogies that stress horizontal teaching methodologies (i.e.: the student is not an empty vessel filled with the teacher's knowledge. The student is a free agent responsible for applying a certain rigor and specificity to their investigation, interpretation and school-based collaboration with the teacher) In keeping with this sentiment, future teachers will curate syllabi that ricochet between their own field of investigation and materials that confound their expertise. Students and teachers will aid one another in navigating theories, strange and beautiful or say, repulsive but persuasive."
activism  gradschool  nyc  pedagogy  brooklyn  self-education  economics  education  nomadic  lcproject  mobility  neo-nomads  nomadism  tcsnmy  art  community  nomads 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Markasaurus » The House of the Future is in Your Pocket
"iPod = ultimate in self-contained gadgets- requires no hard-wired infrastructure connection, mouse, keyboard, peripherals...doesn’t even provide you w/ method for connecting them. While Evinrude outboard that Banham loved may have allowed you to mount motor on any boat...iPhone is limited only by what developers create for it. Banham focused on mechanical devices that did specific tasks & failed to see that in future you wouldn’t need “precise gadget” to deal w/ variety of tasks- 1 gadget can now function as phone, camera, research library, file cabinet, Rolodex & more. Social networked & augmented reality applications allow another world to be created on top of physical 1. Banham believed most futuristic home was RV that allowed residents to be endlessly mobile. Instead of needing traveling home, we live in virtual space enabled by gizmo that fits in shirt pocket. I think Banham would approve.

Today, you don’t need a new environment to live or work in. You just need a new app"
iphone  applications  reynerbanham  mobility  rvs  homes  technology  outboardmotor  nomads  neo-nomads  ipod  architecture  ios 
march 2010 by robertogreco
felipe campolina: portable housing
"brazilian architect felipe campolina has developed 'portable housing', a skyscraper design that is composed of hundred of mobile units. currently, the need to inhabit the
planet sustainably is an increasing concern for the future. thus, the concept of portable
housing was created with a construction system that deals with both, environmental and
social issues. these individual living units start from a modular system scaled from
the standard OSB plate (oriented strand board) of 1,22m x 2,44m."
design  architecture  buildings  prefab  neo-nomads  nomads  mobility  felipecampolina 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Today We Collect Nothing | varnelis.net
"We will need at least a decade to absorb the excess housing currently in the market...Mobility will rise, but homes will become less the spaces of self-realization that they were...& more shells to be filled temporarily, with only a few, highly-intelligent objects in one's possession...Is this an end condition to architecture? Maybe. But when hasn't architecture been in an end condition?...But maybe there are other possibilities? It strikes me that architects are missing a major opportunity here. All of this is very similar to what the Eameses were up to when they moved away from construction to media. They built the best house of the century but architecture couldn't hold their attention. It was too slow. Instead, they turned to media. Today's media are more spatial than film ever could be. Hertzian space—and the interface to it—is the new frontier. Architects should be sure not miss out."
neo-nomads  nomads  mobility  modernism  eames  architecture  kazysvarnelis  housing  housingbubble  realestate  future  reynerbanham  stevejobs  postdisciplinary  design  glvo  cv  unschooling  deschooling  gamechanging  change  hertzianspace 
march 2010 by robertogreco
The Dropout Economy -10 Ideas for the Next 10 Years- Printout - TIME
"Imagine a future in which millions of families live off grid, powering homes & vehicles w/ dirt-cheap portable fuel cells. As industrial agriculture sputters under strain of spiraling costs of water, gasoline & fertilizer, networks of farmers using sophisticated technique...build an alternative food-distribution system. Faced w/ burden of financing decades-long retirement of aging boomers, many of young embrace new underground economy, largely untaxed archipelago of communes, co-ops, & kibbutzim that passively resist power of granny state while building own little utopias.

Rather than warehouse their children in factory schools invented to instill obedience in future mill workers of America, bourgeois rebels will educate their kids in virtual schools tailored to different learning styles. Whereas only 1.5 million children were homeschooled in 2007, we can expect the number to explode in future years as distance education blows past the traditional variety in cost and quality."
libertarianism  unschooling  deschooling  glvo  cities  change  education  employment  freegans  resilience  government  economics  jobs  technology  culture  future  community  recession  politics  dropouts  homeschool  tcsnmy  individualism  gamechanging  nomads  neo-nomads  offgrid 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Design For The Displaced: Using Textiles To Create A Home - Core77
The Displaced Project by Raneen Nosh, of Citizen Designer, questions the emotional impact of displacement and explores the meaning of home for those who have been affected by damaging events such as natural disasters or political conflict. Nosh, a recent graduate from Emily Carr University of Art + Design, created a textile-based object that is "designed to suit the nomadic needs of a displaced person, while also serving to recreate a sense of domestic comfort to preserve personal and cultural memory."
neo-nomads  nomads  textiles  clothing  wearable  shelter  housing  design  wearables 
february 2010 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: The Atomized Library
"The basic idea was to scatter smaller information spaces throughout the city: buildings, kiosks, cafes, computer labs, public-access WiFi envelopes, media production centers, "teen spaces," public meeting rooms, and more. Importantly, though, the entire point of Young's investigation was to ask what libraries might look like if information was no longer accessed through books.



Think of it as a network of partially prefab, rapidly deployable, plug-in, book-less micro-libraries, with potential for global distribution. EasyLibrary, perhaps.
In fact, it raises an interesting question: when it comes to public libraries, whether we're referring to New York City or Ciudade del Este, what is the architectural equivalent of One Laptop Per Child? Is the future of the community library a modular shed, or has an entire building type been made obsolete by handheld devices?"

[larger images at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bldgblog/sets/72157623284161853/detail/ ]
lcproject  explodingschool  libraries  architecture  design  books  library  unschooling  deschooling  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  nomadicschool  easylibrary  prefab  tcsnmy  mobilelearning  handhelds 
february 2010 by robertogreco
We are attached to the one and long for the other. - Artichoke's Wunderkammern
"Place is security, space is freedom: we are attached to the one and long for the other.” P3 At first only the point of entry is recognised; beyond lies space. In time more and more landmarks are identified and the subject gains confidence in movement. Finally the space consists of familiar landmarks and paths – in other words, place. P71 Yi-Fu Tuan 1977 [See also: http://bit.ly/ccBvPG ]
place  identity  security  freedom  neo-nomads  nomads  artichokeblog  pamhook 
february 2010 by robertogreco
malafor: blow sofa
"malafor's blow sofa is a simple furniture idea presented at [d3] design talents during imm cologne 2010. it is made from dunnage bags. dunnage is off-cut spare pieces of scrap wood. 'blow sofa' is an easily transportable piece of furniture that is inexpensive and easily replaceable when dirty."
furniture  materials  neo-nomads  nomads  portability  design 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Los Angeles News - Living off the Grid - page 1
"You've seen them. Maybe one has even parked on your street: a conversion van, curtains drawn, or a camper with signs of everyday life. They are so ubiquitous in Venice that some locals have been trying to turn the onetime hippie enclave into a parking-permit-only town as a way to ward off these "undesirables." Who are these people who can live in a van? Some have made the choice to downsize their lives, not wanting to live conventionally or pay rent, and some have been forced to scale back their lives due to losing their job or their home. Either way, it takes a certain kind of person to give up the trappings most of us have become so accustomed to. Living in a van is not just a lifestyle but a state of mind. Many thousands in L.A. are living in their vehicles or in tents or some other temporary shelter. Four of their stories follow."
losangeles  vans  cars  homes  housing  nomads  neo-nomads  homelessness 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The WELL: Bruce Sterling: State of the World 2010
"you've treated your future as an "unpredictable lurching thing" & now you're all morose about that...your generation CREATED that situation! Ever heard of "disruptive innovation," "disintermediation," "offshoring," "small pieces loosely joined," "de-monetization," "plug & play," "the network as a platform"?...Guys w/ stacks of gold bars & working oil wells don't have stability! Much less guys like you...want some security? Demand government housing subsidies & guaranteed minimum income! They bailed out every broke mogul...might as well bail out civil population...You're Canadian always in Cali married to Briton always in Japan...you're not gonna "end up" anywhere. Forget about that...you have made your mobile bed...lie in it."..."coherent picture of your future."...imagine you're 3yo. You want to give your Dad, back in 1974, a coherent picture of 2010...something very actionable, lucid & practical...tell me what you oughta tell him about 2010, back in 1974. Use words of 1 syllable"
brucesterling  corydoctorow  2010  futurology  futurism  future  politics  business  media  environment  predictions  china  brasil  nomads  neo-nomads  technology  society  culture  commentary  google  world  life  intelligence  fear  pessimism  optimism  jonlebkowsky  jamaiscascio  brazil 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Paul Erdős - Wikipedia
"In 1938, he accepted his first American position as a scholarship holder at Princeton University. At this time, he began to develop the habit of traveling from campus to campus. He would not stay long in one place and traveled back and forth among mathematical institutions until his death.

Possessions meant little to Erdős; most of his belongings would fit in a suitcase, as dictated by his itinerant lifestyle. Awards and other earnings were generally donated to people in need and various worthy causes. He spent most of his life as a vagabond, traveling between scientific conferences and the homes of colleagues all over the world. He would typically show up at a colleague's doorstep and announce "my brain is open," staying long enough to collaborate on a few papers before moving on a few days later. In many cases, he would ask the current collaborator about whom he (Erdős) should visit next. His working style has been humorously compared to traversing a linked list."
paulerdos  neo-nomads  nomads  science  history  academia  mathematics  math  annabelscheme  eccentricity  glvo  biography 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Op-Art - The Daily Grind - NYTimes.com
"In New York City, where the unemployment rate remains at 10.3 percent, the jobless have started leaning hard on coffee shops and bookstores to get out of their tiny one-bedrooms and away from their annoying roommates. In these harsh, career-vanishing times, the members of this laptop brigade do everything they can to re-create the office environment they no longer have to complain about."
unemployment  mobile  office  work  thirdplaces  neo-nomads  nomads  laptops  thirdspaces  cafes  openstudioproject 
november 2009 by robertogreco
There’s No Place Like Home | Print Article | Newsweek.com
"Perhaps nothing will be as surprising about 21st-century America as its settledness. For more than a generation Americans have believed that "spatial mobility" would increase, and, as it did, feed an inexorable trend toward rootlessness and anomie. This vision of social disintegration was perhaps best epitomized in Vance Packard's 1972 bestseller A Nation of Strangers, with its vision of America becoming "a society coming apart at the seams." In 2000, Harvard's Robert Putnam made a similar point, albeit less hyperbolically, in Bowling Alone, in which he wrote about the "civic malaise" he saw gripping the country. In Putnam's view, society was being undermined, largely due to suburbanization and what he called "the growth of mobility."
babyboomers  economics  suburbia  future  culture  urban  travel  government  demographics  municipalities  sociology  us  nomads  neo-nomads  joelkotkin  settledness  spatialmobility  mobility  migration  rootlessness  civics  civicmalaise  society  boomers 
october 2009 by robertogreco
self-storage | neo-nomad
“Human laziness has always been a big friend of self-storage operators,” Derek Naylor, president of the consultant group Storage Marketing Solutions, told me. “Because once they’re in, nobody likes to spend all day moving their stuff out of storage. As long as they can afford it, and feel psychologically that they can afford it, they’ll leave that stuff in there forever.” Now, though, “there are people who are watching their credit-card bills closer than before,” he said. “They’re really paying attention to the stuff they’re storing and realizing that it’s probably not worth $100 a month to keep. So they just get rid of it.”
nomads  neo-nomads  possessions  self-storage  trends  economics  crisis  recession  2009  us 
october 2009 by robertogreco
designswarm thoughts » A City Experience: Canvases
"I’ve been thinking for a while about contributing to the latest design craze among my peers: cities. I’m not an architect but I like cities as a user, as a designer & I thought I’d write very short bursts about what I like about them, having lived for years in some of the best & most beautiful cities: Paris, Montreal, Milan, Amsterdam, London. I also think there’s a huge distinction to be made between travelling a lot & relocating often. It makes you actually taste the culture, get a model in your head of a city, the experience you have in it & what makes it great, special or horrible. Cities have voices, personalities, habits, just like the people who live in them. Hopefully I’ll write a little about each of those elements, but for this one, I’ll concentrate on graffiti or “tags”...My theory is that you can tell how well a city is doing creatively based on its walls. Graffiti sort of end up acting as a “creative industry barometer” of a more realistic sort for me."
cities  neo-nomads  observation  graffiti  streetart  via:preoccupations  urban  culture  art  glvo  moving  travel  nomads  measurement  creativity 
october 2009 by robertogreco
kevin cyr: camper bike
"artist kevin cyr built this pedal-powered camper for one in april 2008. the camper sits on a modified bike frame with two back wheel and one up front. the rider sits on the bike and can pedal around, moving the camper from place to place. inside the camper features all the amenities needed in a small and compact envelope. the sculptural piece also became a subject in many of cyr’s paintings. the design is perfect for a solo holiday and will definetly turn some heads along the way."
bikes  art  campers  neo-nomads  nomads  mobility  homes 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Urbia Furniture System for Small Apartments in Big Cities is an awesome idea. So what the heck happened to it? - Core77
"Obra Architects have answered my psychic pleas with their awesome Furniture Expansion System for Small Apartments in Big Cities, designed for "lifestyles of minimal materiality:""
furniture  design  homes  mobilty  neo-nomads  nomads 
august 2009 by robertogreco
taking.leaving.moving
"Global Cities, urban and mobile society, cultural transnationality are popular catchwords, which are often cited subjects in multiple contemporary research and art projects. Surprisingly, there is still real potential for new and exciting works in the intermediate field between mobility, globalization, cultural and urban studies.

Many researchers drift off into this trend, either fascinated by the multiplicity of discourses or increasingly by a self-chosen way of life, a modern urban nomadism.

Once the decision has been made to live in a foreign city for a certain period of time, most will continue searching for places to spend another episode of their life in. The fascination of the unknown traps you, life abroad becomes an addiction, where urban space is seen and consumed as a resource"
neo-nomads  nomads  moving  place  creative  glvo  cv  global  postnational  transnationalism  transnationality  society  urban  urbanism  identity  self  mobility  culture 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Terra Incognita: crossing Australia following the footsteps of the Burke & Wills expedition
"But this is nothing compared with the food and water we need to embark for some parts of our journey where we will not meet a soul or a waterhole for up to 14 days. This part could weights up to approximately 150Kg.

How are we going to carry so much weight? Even with a serious training, this is obviously not possible. We are going to carry all the necessary material along the way in 2 specially designed wheeled trolleys. These pull-along trolleys are fixed to a harness that allows transferring only a small percentage of the pack weight to the walker’s back.

These trolleys will allow us a large autonomy, particularly to carry large amounts of water during the crossing of the deserts."

[via: http://blog.neo-nomad.net/2009/07/terra-incognita-2/] [quote from this page: http://www.terraincognitatrek.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=58&Itemid=66 ]
travrl  neo-nomads  nomads  australia  trekking  history  exploration  walking  equimpment  transportation 
july 2009 by robertogreco
LAX parking lot is home away from home for airline workers - Los Angeles Times
"Buffeted by their industry's turbulence, airline employees save money by living part time in a motor home colony at LAX. ... Lancaster's 2001 Tradewinds sits among 100 trailers and motor homes that form a colony of pilots, mechanics and other airline workers at LAX, the third-busiest airport in the nation. They are citizens of one of the most unusual communities in the United States.

Their turf, just east of the Proud Bird restaurant off Aviation Boulevard, is less than 3,500 feet from the south runway. It is a drab expanse of crumbling gray asphalt, approach lights, chain-link fencing and rows of beige and white RVs -- some battered, others grand. A splash of color comes from the red and white blooms of about a dozen rose bushes along the colony's northern edge.

Many of the residents are separated from spouses, children and significant others for days -- even weeks -- at a time in order to keep their jobs or move up the pyramid of the airline industry."
losangeles  lax  airports  work  neo-nomads  nomads  motorhomes  airlines  via:regine 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Architecture - Kisho Kurokawa’s Future Vision, Banished to Past - NYTimes.com
"Founded by a loose-knit group of architects at end of 50s, Metabolist movement sought to create flexible urban models for a rapidly changing society. Floating cities. Cities inspired by oil platforms. Buildings that resembled strands of DNA. Such proposals reflected Japan’s transformation from a rural to modern society...also reflected more universal trends, like social dislocation & fragmentation of traditional family, influencing generations of architects from London to Moscow...project’s lasting importance has more to do with structural innovations & how they reflect Metabolists’ views on evolution of cities. Each of the concrete capsules was assembled in a factory, including details like carpeting & bathroom fixtures...then shipped to site & bolted, one by one, onto concrete & steel cores that housed building’s elevators, stairs & mechanical systems...became a symbol of Japan’s technological ambitions, as well as of the increasingly nomadic existence of the white-collar worker."

[video here: http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/6972/kurokawas-capsule-tower-demolition.html ]
architecture  japan  1950s  technology  structures  nakagincapsuletower  design  prefab  modular  tokyo  society  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  cities  urban  urbanism  modernism  metabolists 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Emily Davidow » Reboot and reset with Bruce Sterling
"I did a big reset one year ago moving from New York to New Zealand, and was surprised by the euphoria of liberation from so much stuff I thought I loved. Below are a few tools and resources that were awesome for virtualizing, storing data and getting rid of my stuff – perhaps they may help when it’s your turn."

[more on Sterling's talk here: http://www.zylstra.org/blog/archives/2009/07/reboot_11_the_n.html ]

[transcript of the talk here: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2011/02/transcript-of-reboot-11-speech-by-bruce-sterling-25-6-2009/ ]
brucesterling  darkeuphoria  objects  possessions  materialism  simplicity  books  craigslist  freecycle  yearoff  citymove  deliciouslibrary  downsizing  neo-nomads  nomads  moving  virtualization  sustainability  reboot11 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Design in the wild: What a product designer takes on an 18-day walk - Core77
"Here's what's coming along, categorized (with a respectful nod to the late, great Colin Fletcher, who used similar terminology in his classic Complete Walker reference series) by the "room" of the house that the gear approximates -- for a backpacker's kit is nothing more than an extreme distillation of the home he or she has left behind:"
camping  backpacking  nomads  neo-nomads  portability  design  travel  gear 
july 2009 by robertogreco
waskman and culdesac studio: vodafone mobile home
"waskman design studio, with creative space culdesac, developed a mobile home for
vodafone to promote its fixed phone and internet wireless service. the home is currently
occupied by blogger marcos morales and his family (wife and two children) who have taken it on vacation while traveling through spain. for those interested in tracking the morales' journey, go to www.lacasamovil.com to see the different towns and cities they are visiting.

the structure is made of white polyethylene panels and transparent polycarbonate.
its mobility comes from being towed by a patrol four-wheel-drive vehicle. the moving space is 6 meters in length, has a width of 2.5 meters and stands at 3.85 meters high,
divided between two floors. it has a modernized interior which is organized like a loft
with an open bedroom upstairs on the home's second floor."
homes  housing  mobile  mobility  small  travel  neo-nomads  nomads  design  interiors  architecture 
june 2009 by robertogreco
encore heureux + G studio: 'room room' - crossing dialogues: for emergency architecture
"for their concept encore heureux + G studio looked for what we need more in critical
moments of existence: when we are without roof, without place of residence, excluded
from the society. we wished to imagine an 'ally' to accompany the people who reconstruct
and remain with dignity."
architecture  emergencies  mobility  mobile  design  neo-nomads  nomads  disasters 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Male Libertarian Americans In the Computer Industry | Beyond The Beyond
"Remember those high exit costs? Friedman wondered: What if you could just move—not just you, but everything you own, including your home, and, if your neighbors agreed with you, your whole community? What if you could move all of it where no government would bother you at all, and you could make a new, better society? (((Wait a sec -- I think all of that has already been dematerialized and stuffed into my laptop here.))) Friedman called his theory “dynamic geography.” He remembered a line from his dad’s book The Machinery of Freedom about how differently terrestrial government would behave if everyone lived in trailers. ... In the past, such thoughts led many libertarians to dream of space colonization. But you don’t need to leave the planet, Friedman reasoned; just make “land” that can float on the ocean.

And so Friedman is no longer with Google. (((Gotta be their loss!))) He is president of something called the Seasteading Institute."
patrifriedman  miltonfriedman  davidfriedman  libertarianism  brucesterling  geography  seasteading  economics  government  mobility  nomads  neo-nomads 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Artichoke: If school is disturbance, is it virtuous?
"imagine “school” as an experience – a learning experience where learning & learners themselves are both flexible & ephemeral like the conversations we might hold when walking across a mall. “Future School” becomes an experience where afterwards there is little material trace – a concept where “living memory” rather than “products of learning” dominate our discourse. When school is imagined as “nomadic” experience, then pedagogy becomes a “deliberately slippery and heterogenous practice”? Raley describes the categorical unity of tactical media as “disturbance”. What if we understood “school” as disturbance?...Can “school” be imagined as a process – as a “tool for creating temporary consensus zones based on unexpected alliances”...perhaps “future school” can be an experience rather than a place – & we can understand “school” as we do art – as something transitory, precarious & uncertain that helps us learn how to inhabit the world in a better way."
schools  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  transitory  experience  education  unschooling  deschooling  explodingschool  future  place  architecture  disturbance  conversation  nomads  neo-nomads  identity  process  product  schooldesign  comments  artichokeblog  pamhook 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Waterpod Is a Floating Green Home in New York City - NYTimes.com
"The Waterpod isn’t the only project exploring water-based living. Last year, Patri Friedman, a former Google engineer, co-founded the Seasteading Institute, based in Palo Alto, Calif., which is developing a floating home based on the design of an oil rig, with $500,000 in financing from Peter Thiel, a PayPal founder. Mr. Friedman, who said he sees the ocean as “a new frontier for pioneers to try things out,” plans to have a single-family prototype built next year, and has set a goal of housing 100,000 people in the next 25 years."
nomads  neo-nomads  environment  sustainability  art  design  architecture  homes  housing  shelter  future  mobility  floating  oceans  water  waterpod 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Christopher Deam restyles the Airstream | Video on TED.com
"In this low-key, image-packed talk from 2002, designer Christopher C. Deam talks about his makeover of an American classic: the Airstream travel trailer."
airstream  design  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  travel  homes  transportation 
april 2009 by robertogreco
iPod, Kindle, Facebook — and a Nomad Called Me
"These days, we want to carry the contents of our homes with us wherever we go. Photos, once housed in beautiful frames and curated in albums, are now stuffed into our iPhones, and our relationships are nurtured on social networks via electronic address books from anywhere on the planet. I know Coltrane, Miles, Dizzy, Ella and Thievery all come for a walk with me whenever I pull the door behind me. Thanks to the rise of place-shifting and devices such as Sling Media’s SlingBox, even my television travels with me. And when that’s not possible, I just buy and download shows from either Amazon or Apple. I even took my favorite television show, “Criminal Minds,” for a ride across the country (or rather, the planet) last week.

Now I want to carry all my books with me, too."
ommalik  kindle  nomads  neo-nomads  data  music  mobility  facebook  ambientintimacy  streams  news  books  kinde  iphone 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Unpacking My Library | varnelis.net
"There is no question that I lose memories as I sell off my unwanted books, but there are other considerations. My father is proud of his collection—after all it is part of the Lithuanian National Museum now—but he is also melancholy. The amount of matter to haul around and preserve weighs heavily on the soul. Selling my books allows me to realize, if even partially, Superstudio's greatest dream: life without objects.

The global continuum of information and product flow that we live in means anything is available to anyone at any time. When that is possible, the need for permanent ownership ceases. Does life become a constant field of variation, our possessions an endlessly reconfigurable but minimal set of objects?"
books  ownership  possessions  kazysvarnelis  postmaterialism  simplicity  neo-nomads  nomads  libraries  amazon  web  internet  change  mobility  identity  memory 
february 2009 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

1950s  academia  activism  adamrothstein  adaptability  advertising  airlines  airports  airstream  alaska  alejandroaravena  aleksandrsolzhenitsyn  alexpayne  alternative  altgdp  amazon  ambient  ambientintimacy  anarchism  anarchy  annabelscheme  annotation  antarctic  antarctica  anthonytownsend  anthropology  anti-consumption  apartments  applications  archigram  architects  architecture  arcticcircle  art  artichokeblog  australia  autodidacts  automobiles  autonomous  babyboomers  backpacking  bags  bangladesh  banking  bedouins  behavior  bias  bikes  biking  bioart  biography  blogs  books  boomers  borders  bordertown  brasil  brazil  brightworks  brooklyn  brucesterling  buckminsterfuller  buddha  buildings  bureaucracy  burningman  buses  business  businessecology  buyinghabits  cabins  cafes  california  campers  camping  canada  canon  capitalism  capsula  careers  cars  cash-poor  cativaucelle  cbc  change  chernobyl  children  china  christ  christieseyfert  cities  cityasclassroom  citymove  cityofsound  civicmalaise  civics  classideas  claudiaruitenberg  cliffordknapp  climatechange  clothing  cloudhead  cloudworkers  cloudworking  clutter  coffee  coffeeshops  coldwar  collaboration  collective  collectiveintelligence  comfort  comics  commentary  comments  commitment  communication  communism  communities  community  communitycenters  commuting  competitions  complexity  computers  computing  conferences  conformity  connectedness  connectivity  constraints  consulting  consumerism  consumers  consumption  convenience  conversation  cooperation  copyright  corydoctorow  cosmopolitanism  coworking  craigslist  creative  creativeclass  creativity  credibility  crisis  crowds  ctv  culture  culture-rich  curation  cv  cynics  darkeuphoria  data  davidcarp  davidfriedman  davidorr  decentralization  deflation  deliciouslibrary  dell  dematerialization  democracy  demographics  density  deschooling  design  detachment  detroit  dialog  dialogue  digital  digitalmigration  digitalnomadism  digitalnow  disasters  distraction  disturbance  diy  documentary  domestication  downsizing  dresses  driftdeck  drifters  dropouts  drucillacornell  dustinlynn  dystopia  eames  easylibrary  ebay  eccentricity  ecology  economics  ecuador  edg  education  edwardharran  efficiency  eleanorsaitta  elearning  electronics  elite  ello  embedded  emergencies  emerging  employment  environment  environmentaleducation  environmentalism  ephemeral  ephemerality  equimpment  essays  etech  ethnography  etiquette  events  evolution  excess  exhibits  experience  experienceasproduct  explodingschool  exploration  fabric  facebook  families  fashion  fear  felipecampolina  feral  fiction  film  filmmaking  finalhome  finance  finland  fit  flexibility  floating  flux  food  france  frankchimero  freecycle  freedom  freegans  freelance  french  froogle  furniture  future  futurism  futurology  gadgets  galápagos  game  gamechanging  games  gaming  gear  generalists  geography  georgeclooney  gifts  global  globalization  glvo  google  government  gpc  gps  gradschool  graffiti  green  gregorysmith  growth  guests  handhelds  happiness  headmine  health  henrygiroux  hertzianspace  hierarchy  history  hobos  homebuying  homeless  homelessness  homes  homeschool  homogeneity  hotels  houseboats  houses  housing  housingbubble  howardrheingold  howwelearn  howwework  humans  humor  hunter-gatherer  hypermobility  ict  identity  illegiblepeople  illegibles  illusion  immigration  individualism  inflatable  inflatables  influence  informationage  infoworkers  infrastructure  innovation  inquiry  inspiration  integrity  intellectualproperty  intelligence  intentionalephemeral  interaction  interconnected  interconnectedness  interconnectivity  interdisciplinary  interiors  international  internet  interviews  intimacy  introverts  ios  ip  ipad  iphone  ipod  itinerants  jacobapplebaum  jacquesderrida  jagnefaltmilton  jamaiscascio  jamesbond  janchipchase  janicewoodhouse  japan  jasonreitman  jennifersiegal  jetlag  jimrossignol  jobs  joelkotkin  johncaputo  jonlebkowsky  joshuaklein  journalism  journals  journey  julianbleecker  junknews  junktv  k-punk  kainagata  kazysvarnelis  kevincyr  kevinkelly  kevinslavin  kids  kinde  kindle  kinetic  knowledge  knowledgeworkers  knowmads  korea  kualalumpur  kyoheisakaguchi  labor  laboratories  landscape  language  languages  laptops  lastviridiannote  latecapitalism  law  lax  lcproject  learning  lebbeuswoods  leisure  less  libertarianism  libraries  library  life  lifeasgame  lifehacks  lifestyle  lift11  lightness  lisabishop  listening  literature  living  local  location  location-based  locative  london  lordoftheflies  losangeles  lowcost  luxury  mac  macbookair  magazines  makers  malaysia  mapping  maps  marketing  markets  markfisher  markjensen  marshallmcluhan  materialism  materials  math  mathematics  mattjones  maxscron  mckenziewark  meaning  meaningfulness  measurement  media  medicine  memories  memory  mesh  messiness  metabolists  method  michaelpeters  michellegalindo  middleschool  migration  miltonfriedman  mimiito  minimalism  mobile  mobilelearning  mobilestudio  mobileweb  mobility  mobilty  modernism  modular  money  motorhomes  mountainschoolofarts  movement  movements  movies  moving  moxiemarlinspike  municipalities  museums  music  mutts  nakagincapsuletower  nature  nearfuture  neo-nomads  network  networking  networks  newbabylon  news  newyorker  nicolasnova  nokia  nomadic  nomadicschool  nomadism  nomads  nomds  nonfiction  nontransferable  norway  noticing  now  nyc  nytimes  objects  observation  obsoleteecologies  oceans  offgrid  office  ommalik  online  onlycrash  openstudioproject  opinion  optimism  organization  organizations  osmosis  osx  outboardmotor  outdoors  ownership  packinglight  pamhook  paris  passprorts  patrifriedman  paulerdos  paulsaffo  paultheobald  peckhamouter-spaceinitiative  pedagogy  people  performance  permanence  permeability  personalization  perspective  pervasive  pessimism  phones  photography  picoiyer  place  place-based  place-basededucation  place-basedlearning  place-basedpedagogy  planning  play  pleasure  poetry  policy  politics  polymaths  porosity  porous  portability  portable  portland  possessions  postdisciplinary  postmaterialism  postnational  predictions  prefab  present  privacy  privilege  process  product  production  productivity  profitability  projectideas  psychogeography  psychology  public  purpose  qualityoverquantity  quiet  radical  radicalpedagogy  rail  ranumukherjee  realestate  rebeccasolnit  reboot11  recession  refugees  relationships  renaissancemen  renting  reporting  research  residence  resilience  resistance  reynerbanham  richardflorida  roadtrip  roaming  robertklanten  robertobolaño  robinusher  rootedness  rootlessness  roots  roswell  routine  russia  ruthbehar  rvs  réginedebatty  sanfrancisco  sanjose  scenius  school  schooldesign  schools  science  sciencefiction  scifi  seasteading  security  self  self-education  self-storage  sensory  serfdom  settledness  setup  sfsh  shaungallagher  shelter  sherryturkle  shiftctrlesc  ships  shopping  silence  simcards  simplicity  singularity  situationist  skepticism  sleepingbags  slow  slowness  small  smartmobs  sociability  social  socialinnovation  socialization  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  society  sociology  software  space  spaceships  spatialmobility  specialization  speed  spontaneity  spontaneous  srg  stability  starbucks  stevejobs  stevenjohnson  stewartbrand  stoics  storytelling  strategy  streams  streetart  structure  structures  stuff  subjectivity  suburbia  subways  superficiality  superstruct  supervillains  sustainability  svenehmann  sweden  taxis  taylorcuffaro  tcsnmy  teaching  technology  technomadia  technonomadism  tedkane  tedxbrisbane  telecommuting  temporary  textiles  theory  thesetup  things  thinking  thirdplaces  thirdspaces  thomasvanderdunk  thoreau  tillyblue  time  tiny  tinyhomes  tinyhouses  tips  tokyo  tools  toread  traffic  trailers  transferability  transference  transience  transitory  translation  transnationalism  transnationality  transport  transportation  travel  travellers  travrl  trekking  trends  trendspotting  truth  tv  twitter  ubicomp  ubiquitous  uk  ullataipale  unemployment  uniqueness  unknownfieldsdivision  unproduct  unschooling  unstatic  urban  urbanism  us  usability  usesthis  utopia  vans  venkateshrao  via:bettyannsloan  via:blackbeltjones  via:jeeves  via:kottke  via:lukeneff  via:preoccupations  via:regine  via:steelemaley  video  viewers  villains  viridianism  virtualization  visualization  vitra  vpn  walking  walkingcity  wanderers  wandering  wanderingmind  wanderlust  water  waterpod  wealth  wearable  wearables  web  web2.0  webdesign  webdev  well-being  wifi  williammitchell  wireless  wmmna  work  workflow  workplace  workspace  workspaces  world  worlplace  writers  writing  yasmineabbas  yearoff  yurts  zeroyenhouse  zizek 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: