robertogreco + nataliejeremijenko + environment   12

The Artist Who Talks With the Fishes - NYTimes.com
"Jeremijenko suddenly jumped off the pier’s southernmost lip, landing on a weathered wooden walkway below. She withdrew the three coils of rope and used the box cutter to cut a roughly 20-foot length from each coil. She tied one end of each rope to a different pylon and cast the other end into the river. The ropes were made from both natural and artificial fibers. “It’s early in the mussel spawning season, so their spat is floating around everywhere; this is a little experiment to see which sorts of materials they’re drawn to,” Jeremijenko said. “My primary interest is in the mussels’ spectacular adaptability. That puts me in a different class from traditional conservationism. I’m interested in how organisms adapt to the Anthropocene” — the era of human activity on earth — “as opposed to the Sierra Club ‘conserve and preserve’ way of thinking.”"



"The daughter of a physician father and schoolteacher mother, Jeremijenko grew up in the coastal Australian city Brisbane, with nine siblings. An overachieving, Tenenbaum-ish brood, her brothers and sisters have worked as politicians, academics, coal miners, pilots, professional footballers and movie stuntmen. Natalie has collaborated on projects with several of them, and she integrates her creative activity with her personal life in other, more radical, ways — in a sly affront to “you can’t have it all,” she has delivered lectures while breast-feeding. “Experimenting with your own life is the most fundamental medium we have,” she told me.

Jeremijenko’s experimental streak extended to the naming of her kids. Her oldest daughter is Mister Jamba-Djang Vladimir Ulysses Hope (Jamba for short); her daughter with Conley is E (what “E” stands for is up to E, but so far she has decided to stick with the initial); and their son is Yo Xing Heyno Augustus Eisner Alexander Weiser Knuckles. “I had wanted to give our boy an ethnically ambiguous name to challenge assumptions about race and assimilation,” Conley wrote in a 2010 essay. “For all the Asian-American Howards out there, shouldn’t there be a light-haired, blue-eyed white kid named Yo Xing?”

For a spell, Jeremijenko got around, even indoors, on Rollerblades, which reflected her fascination with “alternate forms of urban mobility.” In her ideal metropolis, more people would commute by zip-line; in 2011, she and Haque installed a temporary system in downtown Toronto, which riders navigated with a large pair of wings, and she is now hoping to take it to the Bronx."



"She has the imagination of a think tank, the agenda of a nonprofit and the infrastructure of neither. In order to implement her ideas, she relies heavily on municipal programs, community organizations and the support of academic and art-world institutions. (At N.Y.U. she runs something called the Environmental Health Clinic, where anyone can make an appointment to discuss ways to remedy health hazards like airborne pollutants and storm-water runoff. She has had hundreds of meetings; one project turned cotton candy, a summer treat, into a more nutritious snack, using isomalt, a sugar substitute, edible flowers and high-protein bee pollen.)

But Jeremijenko has also begun experimenting with ideas for the free market, and one in particular seems ripe for some eco-minded venture capitalist to champion. She wants to encourage the production of water-buffalo-milk ice cream, which, in addition to being marvelously creamy, she says, would encourage the creation of much-needed wetlands, on which water buffalo graze. About a year ago, she says, she gave an informal presentation to representatives of Unilever, which owns Ben & Jerry’s, where she flaunted her fluency in “the topography and runoff issues affecting Vermont farmers” and showed mock labels she designed for the delicacy. Next, she plans to approach the company’s marketing department, hoping to leverage “the image of Ben & Jerry’s as a progressive, socially conscious brand,” she said."
nataliejeremijenko  2013  art  science  anthropocene  socialpracticeart  environment  environmentalism  sierraclub  progressivism  funding  health  conservation  conservationism  ethnicity  names  naming  life  living  glvo  howwelive  creativity 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Natalie Jeremijenko: The art of the eco-mindshift | Video on TED.com
"Natalie Jeremijenko's unusual lab puts art to work, and addresses environmental woes by combining engineering know-how with public art and a team of volunteers. These real-life experiments include: Walking tadpoles, texting "fish," planting fire-hydrant gardens and more."
nataliejeremijenko  art  climatechange  design  ecology  environment  health  nature  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
x design project: » Digesting the Information
"Although cultural ephemera is rich and important museums can archive in a variety of ways and we can design the cultural afterlife of our material artifacts. Digestion is the new medium. And information and material are not inexorably tied.<br />
<br />
Exploring the Afterlife!: You are invited to partake in an experiment to revise this cultural habit–a collective but correctable error. We simply substitute temporal materials for the longlasting, and design how they degrade and circulate thru our socio-ecolgocial systems. We use an inexpensive, enzymatically driven high=performance biodegradation process : your digestive tract. The aggregated efforts of many of us can outperform most industrial processes… you are a digesting machine!"
nataliejeremijenko  art  science  environment  digestion  enzymes  biodegradation  systems  culture  archiving  edible  2010  xspecies  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Architecture imagined as ecological « Javierest
"What is another avenue? I’m not sure I know what it looks like. I think we can see the contours of it in some of the work of artist duo Allora y Calzadilla or in the recent work of Natalie Jeremijenko. These two folks, Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, have been generating a series of works where they experiment with dialectical relations between an artifice and an organism without falling into preaching about imposing stability or balance. Along a somewhat parallel line, Jeremijenko has been using architectural devices to reveal how the city itself is not just a second nature to animals, but that these animals have already partaken in forming social networks with urban dwellers for a very long time. What architecture does is reveal them."
javierarbona  design  architecture  environment  marxism  ecology  capitalism  nature  sustainability  urbanism  housing  nataliejeremijenko  alloraycalzadilla 
april 2009 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future: Natalie Jeremijenko: The WorldChanging Interview
"EG: It's very much in the history of science in the western world, where you have these kooky Englishmen with too much time on their hands wandering off, studying botany and chemical reactions, inventing photography. And then in the last century, you have men in their basements with their little engineering projects. They didn't think of them as engineering projects, but they were essentially conducting science.
2004  nataliejeremijenko  worldchanging  interviews  surveillance  robotics  science  art  robots  activism  biology  biotechnology  technology  inventions  politics  design  hacktivism  environment  community 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Environmental Health Clinic [at NYU]
"clinic and lab, modeled on other health clinics at universities. However the project approaches health from an understanding of its dependence on external local environments; rather than on the internal biology and genetic predispositions of an individual...works like this. You make an appointment, just like...traditional health clinic, to talk about your particular environmental health concerns. What differs is that you walk out with a prescription not for pharmaceuticals but for actions: local data collection and urban interventions directed at understanding and improving your environmental health; plus referrals, not to medical specialists but to specific art, design and participatory projects, local environmental organizations and local government or civil society groups: organizations that can use the data and actions prescribed as legitimate forms of participation to promote social change.."

[ning site here: http://x.environmentalhealthclinic.net/ ]
nataliejeremijenko  science  health  art  ning  activism  nyc  nyu  change  environment  environmentalism  design  organizations 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Calit2 : Tracking Pollution and Social Movement: Love Fest for Calit2 Technologies at 'Make Fest 2007'
"For Calit2 postdoctoral researcher Shannon Spanhake, it meant putting her Calit2-funded mobile air pollution monitor through its paces - while giving press interviews between demonstrations."
mobile  phones  sandiego  ucsd  monitoring  sensors  shannonspanhake  make  personalinformatics  pollution  bluetooth  technology  art  environment  engineering  science  mobility  nataliejeremijenko  calit2  glvo  classideas  via:blackbeltjones  etech 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Shannon Spanhake: Meet Squirrel, a Personal Pollution Monitor | Visarts-Drupal
"Since 1990, San Diego’s population rose by 1.8m people, yet # of official pollution monitors increased by 1. UCSD engineer-turned-artist Shannon Spanhake has come up w/ new&better way to monitor environment: personal pollution sensor called Squirrel."
bluetooth  data  environment  personalinformatics  shannonspanhake  pollution  ucsd  classideas  sandiego  science  art  engineering  sensors  mobile  phones  monitoring  make  technology  mobility  nataliejeremijenko  calit2  glvo  via:blackbeltjones  etech 
may 2008 by robertogreco
howstuffismade.org
"visual encyclopedia that documents the manufacturing processes, labor conditions and environmental impacts involved in the production of contemporary products. It is a free, independent, academic resource published by engineering and design students, who
activism  art  awareness  manufacturing  nataliejeremijenko  engineering  science  politics  globalization  environment  consumerism  consumer  spimes 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Seed: The arts community is responding to climate change, and changing the conversation in the process. [Natalie Jermijenko]
"Artists don't give answers; they don't operate within a structure of credentials, reinforced by formal peer review. They explore nuance and subjective experience and accept multiple answers to the same question. And that's precisely the point."
climatechange  environment  nataliejeremijenko  art  science  conservation 
may 2008 by robertogreco

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