robertogreco + multimedia   173

The UX design case of closed captions for everyone // Sebastian Greger
"Are video subtitles really chiefly for users who cannot hear or lack an audio device? A recent Twitter thread on “closed captions for the hearing” triggered a brief qualitative exploration and thought experiment – there may well be a growing group of users being forgotten in the design of closed captions.

Most commonly perceived as an auxiliary means for the hearing impaired, video subtitles, a.k.a. closed captions (CC), have only recently started to be widely considered as an affordance for users in situations with no audio available/possible (think mobile devices in public settings, libraries, shared office spaces); the latter to the extend that contemporary “social media marketing guidelines” strongly recommend subtitling video clips uploaded to Facebook, Twitter et al.

So: subtitles are for those who cannot hear, or with muted devices?

Who else uses closed captions?

I’m personally a great fan of closed captions, for various reasons unrelated to either of the above, and have often noticed certain limitations in their design. Hence, the user researcher inside me just did a somersault as I randomly encountered a Twitter thread [https://twitter.com/jkottke/status/1091338252475396097 ] following Jason Kottke asking his 247.000 followers:
After seeing several photos my (English-speaking, non-deaf) friends have taken of their TV screens over the past week, I’m realizing that many of you watch TV with closed captions (or subtitles) on?! Is this a thing? And if so, why?

The 150+ replies (I guess this qualifies as a reasonable sample for a qualitative analysis of sorts?) are a wonderful example of “accessibility features” benefiting everybody (I wrote about another instance recently [https://sebastiangreger.net/2018/11/twitter-alt-texts-on-db-trains/ ]). The reasons why people watch TV with closed captions on, despite having good hearing abilities and not being constrained by having to watch muted video, are manifold and go far beyond those two most commonly anticipated use cases.

[image: Close-up image of a video with subtitles (caption: "Closed captions are used by people with good hearing and audio playback turned on. An overseen use case?")]

Even applying a rather shallow, ex-tempore categorisation exercise based on the replies on Twitter, I end up with an impressive list to start with:

• Permanent difficulties with audio content
◦ audio processing disorders
◦ short attention span (incl., but not limited to clinical conditions)
◦ hard of hearing, irrespective of age
• Temporary impairments of hearing or perception
◦ watching under the influence of alcohol
◦ noise from eating chips while watching
• Environmental/contextual factors
◦ environment noise from others in the room (or a snoring dog)
◦ distractions and multitasking (working out, child care, web browsing, working, phone calls)
• Reasons related to the media itself
◦ bad audio levels of voice vs. music
• Enabler for improved understanding
◦ easier to follow dialogue
◦ annoyance with missing dialogue
◦ avoidance of misinterpretations
◦ better appreciation of dialogue
• Better access to details
◦ able to take note of titles of songs played
◦ ability to understand song lyrics
◦ re-watching to catch missed details
• Language-related reasons
◦ strong accents
◦ fast talking, mumbling
◦ unable to understand foreign language
◦ insecurity with non-native language
• Educational goals, learning and understanding
◦ language learning
◦ literacy development for children
◦ seeing the spelling of unknown words/names
◦ easier memorability of content read (retainability)
• Social reasons
◦ courtesy to others, either in need for silence or with a need/preference for subtitles
◦ presence of pets or sleeping children
◦ avoiding social conflict over sound level or distractions (“CC = family peace”)
• Media habits
◦ ability to share screen photos with text online
• Personal preferences
◦ preference for reading
◦ acquired habit
• Limitations of technology skills
◦ lack of knowledge of how to turn them off

An attempt at designerly analysis

The reasons range from common sense to surprising, such as the examples of closed captions used to avoid family conflict or the two respondents explicitly mentioning “eating chips” as a source of disturbing noise. Motivations mentioned repeatedly refer to learning and/or understanding, but also such apparently banal reasons like not knowing how to turn them off (a usability issue?). Most importantly, though, it becomes apparent that using CC is more often than not related to choice/preference, rather than to impairment or restraints from using audio.

At the same time, it becomes very clear that not everybody likes them, especially when forced to watch with subtitles by another person. The desire/need of some may negatively affect the experience of others present. A repeat complaint that, particularly with comedy, CC can kill the jokes may also hint at the fact that subtitles and their timing could perhaps be improved by considering them as more than an accessibility aid for those who would not hear the audio? (It appears as if the scenario of audio and CC consumed simultaneously is not something considered when subtitles are created and implemented; are we looking at another case for “exclusive design”?)

And while perceived as distracting when new – this was the starting point of Kottke’s Tweet – many of the comments share the view that it becomes less obtrusive over time; people from countries where TV is not dubbed in particular are so used to it they barely notice it (“becomes second nature”). Yet, there are even such interesting behaviours like people skipping back to re-read a dialogue they only listened to at first, as well as that of skipping back to be able to pay better attention to the picture at second view (e.g. details of expression) after reading the subtitles initially.

Last but not least, it is interesting how people may even feel shame over using CC. Only a conversation like the cited Twitter thread may help them realise that it is much more common than they thought. And most importantly that it has nothing to do with a perceived stigmatisation of being “hard of hearing”.

CC as part of video content design

The phenomenon is obviously not new. Some articles on the topic suggest that it is a generational habit [https://medium.com/s/the-upgrade/why-gen-z-loves-closed-captioning-ec4e44b8d02f ] of generation Z (though Kottke’s little survey proves the contrary), or even sees [https://www.wired.com/story/closed-captions-everywhere/ ] it as paranoid and obsessive-compulsive behaviour of “postmodern completists” as facilitated by new technological possibilities. Research on the benefits of CC for language learning, on the other hand, reaches back [https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19388078909557984 ] several decades.

No matter what – the phenomenon in itself is interesting enough to make this a theme for deeper consideration in any design project that contains video material. Because, after all, one thing is for sure: closed captions are not for those with hearing impairments or with muted devices alone – and to deliver great UX, these users should be considered as well."
closedcaptioning  subtitles  closedcaptions  text  reading  genz  generationz  audio  video  tv  film  dialogue  listening  howweread  2019  sebastiangreger  literacy  language  languages  ux  ui  television  ocd  attention  adhd  languagelearning  learning  howwelearn  processing  hearing  sound  environment  parenting  media  multimedia  clarity  accents  memory  memorization  children  distractions  technology  classideas 
23 days ago by robertogreco
The Parasitic Reading Room | dpr-barcelona
"“[Books] can show you a different world. It can take you somewhere you’ve never been. Once you’ve visited other worlds, like those who ate fairy fruit, you can never be entirely content with the world that you grew up in. Discontent is a good thing: discontented people can modify and improve their worlds, leave them better, leave them different.”

—Neil Gaiman
‘Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming.’ The Guardian, 2013

Aristide Antonas and Thanos Zartaloudis define ‘The Parasitic Council’ as that place “where a public space can be the plateau for the occupancy of a commonhold in order that it performs multiple parasitic functions of common use without claims to property.” Following this protocol of action and occupancy of the city, and connecting them with the 4th Istanbul Design Biennial ‘A School of Schools,’ dpr-barcelona and the open raumlabor university joined forces to set up a Parasitic Reading Room for the opening days of the IDB, in September 2018, a nomad, spontaneous and parasitic set of reading spaces that took place along the biennale venues and other spots in the city, with the intention to ‘parasite’ the event participants, visitors, ideas, contents and places, and to provoke a contagion of knowledge. The Parasitic Reading Room is a spontaneous school, made by reading aloud a selection of texts that are related with the biennale’s scope.

On his book Deschooling Society, Ivan Illich states that most learning happens casually, and training of young people never happens in the school but elsewhere, in moments and places beyond the control of the school. When claiming for the revolutionary potential of deschooling, Illich makes a call to liberating oneself from school and to reckon that “each of us is personally responsible for his or her own deschooling, and only we have the power to do it.” This is why the wide domain of academia needs to be challenged in radical and unexpected ways and we need to envision other spaces of encounter and knowledge exchange out of its walls. Similarly, Michael Paraskos rightly pointed on his essay The Table Top Schools of Art, that “we might well say that if four individuals gather together under a tree that is a school. Similarly four individuals around a kitchen table. Or four individuals in the café or bar. By redefining the school in this way we also redefine what it means to be a student in a school or a teacher.”

Perhaps the essential question at this point is what kind of readings should form this alternative bibliography on different pedagogical models, about other sources of knowledge, that come not only [but also] from the pages of our favourite books? This question can have multiple answers which all of them are to be intertwined, multi-connected, overlapped. Poems, films, instagram photos—and its captions—, songs, e-mail exchanges, objects, conversations with friends over a glass of wine or a coffee, dreams; we learn from all of them albeit [or often because] the hectic diversity of formats, and sometimes its lack of seriousness.

By reading aloud we share a space of intimacy, a time and place of learning not only from the contents, but from the nuances, the accents, the cadence of the reading. Abigail Williams called this ‘the social life of books,’ “How books are read is as important as what’s in them,” she pointed—we call it ‘the book as a space of encounters.’ This means spaces where different books coexist and enrich each other; books as the necessary space where the author can have a dialogue with the reader, where different readers can read between the lines and find a place of exchange, where to debate, and discuss ideas. Books and encounters as an open school.

If everywhere is a learning environment, as we deeply believe, and the Istanbul Design Biennial intended to prove by transforming the city of Istanbul into a school of schools, we vindicate the importance of books—be them fiction, poetry or critical theory—as learning environments; those spaces where empathy and otherness are stronger than ideologies, where we can find space to ‘parasite’ each other’s knowledge and experience and create an open school by the simple but strong gesture of reading aloud together.

Because, what is a school if not a promise?"

[See also:

"For the 4th Istanbul Design Biennial ‘A School of Schools,’ dpr-barcelona and the open raumlabor university will set up for the opening days of the IDB a Parasitic Reading Room, a nomad, spontaneous and parasitic set of reading spaces that will take place along the biennale venues and other spots in the city, with the intention of 'parasite' the event participants, visitors, ideas, contents and places, and to provoke a contagion of knowledge. 'The Parasitic Reading Room' is a spontaneous school, made by reading aloud a selection of texts that are related with the biennale's scope. As initial readings—that can be paratised afterwards—we have collected some remarkable texts about education, radical thinking, literature, and many other sources of knowledge, and published them at The Parasitic Reader 01 and The Parasitic reader 02. Feel free to parasite them as well and share them."
https://issuu.com/ethel.baraona/docs/parasitic_reader_01
https://issuu.com/ethel.baraona/docs/parasitic_reader_02

"Based on previous conversations around the topic in the frame of “Body of Us”, the Swiss contribution to the London Design Biennale 2018, the project’s curator Rebekka Kiesewetter has invited friends to continue the discussion around political friendship: dpr-barcelona, initiators of the “Parasitic reading room” [along with the Open raumlabor University] at the 4th Istanbul Design Biennial 2018; architect Ross Exo Adams, one of the contributors to Body of Us publication, and continent., the experimental publishing collective, initiators of “Reading Friendships Paris“ at Centre Culturel Suisse 2016. At this same venue, three years later, the stage opens for an edition of the “Parasitic Reading Room” and a reprise of “Reading Friendships”, an evening of readings, thinkings, creating and discussion. A collective reading in Paris on March 20th, 2019."
https://issuu.com/ethel.baraona/docs/friend_ships_reader ]
ethelbaraonapohl  césarreyesnájera  2019  reading  howweread  learning  informallearning  informal  sharing  books  bookfuturism  aristideantonas  thanoszartaloudis  deschooling  unschooling  ivanillich  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  michaelparaskos  libraries  multimedia  multiliteracies  intimacy  encounters  experience  howwelearn  schools  schooling  film  instagram  raumlabor  dpr-barcelona 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
New American Outline 1
"These days, the mirrors we most often use to check our makeup or see if there’s gunk in our teeth are found on our phones — “smart” devices that coordinate an array of sensors and cutting-edge “image display” and “image capture” technologies to render reality within the boundaries of a powered physical display.

What’s interesting about smart-devices-as-mirrors is that the eventual representation of the “image of the world” is explicitly and wholly a “model” of the world — a “model” meaning a “ human-constructed representation (abstraction) of something that exists in reality”. Physical mirrors are interesting because they have the ability to render reality and even warp it, but what they depict is “a physical reality” in the truest sense; The physical qualities of a mirror can be seen as akin to seeing the world through air, or seeing the world through water. While a human being can physically manipulate a physical mirror to alter the final reflection, the reflection in and of itself is a product of the physical world and unalterable in totality.

To a degree, film photography was an extension of this physical realization (rendering) of reality. At a certain point, what else is the capture of light on paper but a wholly physical process? While people intervened in the path of light’s travel with lenses and apertures and specifically-designed crystal-studded paper, what emerges as a process is less a constructed model of reality and more a continually warped representation of what actually exists in the world. Film and paper photography was a deeply labor-intensive art, full of cutting and cropping and poisoning and brushwork, all serving the act of rendering what was once a beam of light into an image-rendering of a particular summer day. Impressionism lives on in this sense.

It wasn’t until recently that most photographs became literal abstractions or literal models of thought with the advent of digital photographic capture. While the earliest digital photographs presented terrible image quality/resolution, they were possibly the most honest representations of what they actually were: a product of humans manipulating bits through clever mathematic compression to render blocks of color accordingly.

“How can mirrors be real if our eyes aren’t real?”

What we “see” in our screens is wholly a model of reality, wholly an abstraction of the natural world, wholly determined and manufactured by people sitting in an office in California somewhere, typing away at an IDE. When we strip away the image rendered on a screen, when we deconstruct an algorithm, what’s left?

What does it mean when most models (abstractions) of our digital representations are constructed in California, or completely in America for that matter?

When I look at myself on my phone camera, why do I get the haunting feeling I’m not situated in New York anymore? When I scroll through all the photos of friends and strangers on Facebook or Twitter, why does it all feel so flat? When I tap through my friend’s stories on Instagram and get interrupted by an ad for shoes, why does the shoe ad feel more real than the stories it’s sandwiched between?"



"New American Interfaces

When we talk about “New American Interfaces”, it’s important to expand upon the meaning of each word for a complete sense of the conceptual picture we’re trying to paint.

We should imagine “New American Interfaces” to be less a definition, more an expansion. Less an encircling and more an arrangement collage [https://www.are.na/block/736425 ] of existing realities.

“New”ness is a direct reference to developments in human technology that span the last 10 years or so. “New” American technology does not refer to technology that was developed in the 1970s. “New” American Technology is not a reference to networking protocols or personal computers proliferating in the 90s. “Newness” refers to mobile phones finding themselves in billions of people’s hands and pockets. “Newness” refers to the viability of video streaming over wireless networks. “New” implies cameras directly imbued with the capability to re-model reality and assign social value through “the arrangement of certain interfaces” only found in the most cutting-edge devices. “New”ness implies the forgetting of the massive stacks of technology that exist to show us images of our friends and their lives in chronological order.

“America” speaks to the “Americanness” of the current world. Totalizing global governance, military might, far-reaching memetic saturation the rest of the world cannot escape from. “America” means pop culture, “America” means world police. “America” retains the ability to wobble the economy of the world when executives shitpost on Twitter. When we talk about “America”, we mean the hegemonic cultural-economic infrastructure the rest of the world rests upon whether they like it or not.

“Interfaces” speak to not any button, slider, or like button physical or digital or otherwise. “Interfaces” in the sense of “New American” interfaces refer to what Kevin Systrom meant when he called Snapchat a “format”. A replicable stack(s) of technology is an “interface”. An “interface” under this definition means every chat application is fundamentally the same and completely interchangeable. Linear conversation will always be linear conversation, and the pattern of linear conversation is what we call a messaging app, and we call this an “interface”. Every search interface is the same, every index is the same, every captive portal is the same. To take our example to the physical world, imagine this scene:

You see two chairs side by side with one another. From afar, they are completely the same. You inspect them close and they are the same, you notice they both are built from the same beautiful ash wood, every single detail is perfectly mirrored in both chairs.

One of these chairs was wholly made by human hands and the other was cut to shape by a machine, assembled by people on a factory line, and produced in the millions.

One of these chairs is an interface —"

[See also: https://www.are.na/edouard-urcades/new-american-interface ]
édouardurcades  mirrors  interfaces  ui  ux  cameras  stories  instagram  storytelling  reality  2019  snapchat  multimedia  media  kevinsystrom  format  form  newness  technology  smartphones  mobile  phones  images  imagery  buttons  jadensmith  lukaswinklerprins 
9 weeks ago by robertogreco
Fonografia Collective
[via: https://clockshop.org/project/south-of-fletcher-fonografia-collective/ ]

"Fonografia Collective believes in empathetic and culturally-sensitive documentary storytelling about everyday people around the world. We find and craft compelling stories about human rights, politics, the environment, and social issues (or any combination thereof) and share them with the general public using radio, oral histories, photography, the printed word, multimedia, public installations, gatherings and events.

Since 2005, we've been working together to advance our vision of a more inclusive and diverse approach to nonfiction storytelling, focusing on communities across the U.S. and Latin America that are often underrepresented or misunderstood by the mainstream media or the public. As consultants with a variety of institutions, nonprofits, and individuals, we strive to do the same. We also run Story Tellers, a social media platform connecting storytellers from around the world to gigs, funding, collaboration opportunities, and to one another.

We are producers and board members of Homelands Productions, a 25 year-old independent documentary journalism cooperative. Until Spring 2017, we collaborated with public radio station KCRW on a year-long multimedia storytelling series about aging called "Going Gray in LA." At present, we are developing a storytelling project about the Bowtie in conjunction with Clockshop, an arts organization in Los Angeles, and California State Parks.

*******

Bios

Ruxandra Guidi has been telling nonfiction stories for almost two decades. Her reporting for public radio, magazines, and various multimedia and multidisciplinary outlets has taken her throughout the United States, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she assisted independent producers The Kitchen Sisters; then worked as a reporter, editor, and producer for NPR's Latino USA, the BBC daily news program, The World, the CPB-funded Fronteras Desk in San Diego-Tijuana, and KPCC Public Radio's Immigration and Emerging Communities beat in Los Angeles. She's also worked extensively throughout South America, having been a freelance foreign correspondent based in Bolivia (2007-2009) and in Ecuador (2014-2016). Currently, she is the president of the board of Homelands Productions, a journalism nonprofit cooperative founded in 1989. She is a contributing editor for the 48 year-old nonprofit magazine High Country News, and she also consults regularly as a writer, editor, translator and teacher for a variety of clients in the U.S. and Latin America. In 2018, she was awarded the Susan Tifft Fellowship for women in documentary and journalism by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Throughout her career, Guidi has collaborated extensively and across different media to produce in-depth magazine features, essays, and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service, BBC Mundo, The World, National Public Radio, Marketplace, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Orion Magazine, The Walrus Magazine, Guernica Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, National Geographic NewsWatch, The New York Times, The Guardian, Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Atlantic, among others. She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

*

Bear Guerra is a photographer whose work explores the human impact of globalization, development, and social and environmental justice issues in communities typically underrepresented in the media.

In addition to editorial assignments, he is consistently working on long-term projects, and collaborates with media, non-profit, and arts organizations, as well as other insititutions. His photo essays and images have been published and exhibited widely, both in the United States and abroad.

He was a Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism for the 2013-2014 academic year at the University of Colorado - Boulder; a 2014 Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative Fellow; as well as a 2014 International Reporting Project Health and Development Reporting Fellow. In 2012, he was chosen as a Blue Earth Alliance project photographer for his ongoing project "La Carretera: Life Along Peru's Interoceanic Highway". Other recognitions have included being selected for publication in American Photography (2005, 2015, 2016) and Latin American Fotografía (2014, 2016, 2017); an honorable mention in the 2012 Photocrati Fund competition for the same project. Bear has also been a finalist for a National Magazine Award in Photojournalism (2010).

A native of San Antonio, TX, Bear is currently based in Los Angeles.

For more information, a CV, or to order exhibition quality prints please contact Bear directly.

Editorial clients/publications (partial list): The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Le Monde, The Atlantic, Orion Magazine, The Boston Globe Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, OnEarth, ProPublica, National Public Radio, BBC's The World, California Watch, High Country News, Quiet Pictures, Texas Monthly, Time.com, Earth Island Journal, O Magazine, Glamour, Ms. Magazine, NACLA Magazine, Yes! Magazine, SEED Magazine, The Sun, The Walrus, Guernica, and others.

Nonprofit/NGO clients & other collaborators: International Rescue Committee, Doctors Without Borders, Lambi Fund of Haiti, Children's Environmental Health Institute, Community Water Center, Environmental Water Caucus, Collective Roots, Other Worlds Are Possible, Immigration Justice Project/American Bar Association, Fundacion Nueva Cultura del Agua (Spain), Chinatown Community for Equitable Development, St. Barnabas Senior Services, Jumpstart, Global Oneness Project, Quiet Pictures."
bearguerra  ruxandraguidi  radio  photography  audio  storytelling  everyday  documentary  humanrights  politics  environment  society  socialissues  print  multimedia  oralhistory  art  installation  gatherings  events  inclusion  inclusivity  diversity  nonfiction  latinamerica  us  media  losangeles  kcrw  fronterasdesk  sandiego  tijuana  kpcc  globalization  sanantonio  fonografiacollective  srg  photojournalism 
september 2018 by robertogreco
These ain't no books […]
"These ain't no books [...]
Realized projects lectures / talks / workshops
[...] But aesthetic investigations
these ain’t no books (…)

(…) But pro­jects in di­gi­tal and hy­brid pu­blis­hing.

*******

MISSION

We work at the in­ter­sec­tion of de­sign and tech­no­logy, crea­ting and de­si­gning in­di­vi­dual di­gi­tal and hy­brid pu­blis­hing work­flows.

Take a set of en­cy­clo­pe­dias and ask, “how do i make this di­gi­tal?” you get a Mi­cro­soft En­carta CD. Take the phi­lo­so­phy of en­cy­clo­pe­dia-ma­king and ask, “how does di­gi­tal ch­ange our en­ga­ge­ment with this?” you get wi­ki­pe­dia.

Post-artifact books and publishing – digital’s effect on how we produce, distribute and consume content.

“Most people are tal­king about a 1:1 Text trans­fer to di­gi­tal. Much more in­te­res­ting is the ques­tion: What lies bey­ond that bor­der? how do new ways of books look like? how can they be dis­played on di­gi­tal de­vices?” —Leander Wattig

*******

DESIGN

The de­ve­lop­ment of an in­di­vi­dual, cha­rac­te­ris­tic vi­sual lan­guage for every pu­blis­hing pro­ject is the main goal in our pro­cess.

By ex­pe­ri­men­ting, using tools dif­fer­ently and con­nec­ting lose ends in a new way, we try to find our own me­thods and work­flows.

*******

TECHNOLOGY

Pro­gramming and de­si­gning at the same time al­lows us to take ad­van­tage of the cur­rent tech­no­lo­gi­cal pos­si­bi­li­ties, thus co­m­ing up with uni­que so­lu­ti­ons.

“I don’t know… pro­gramming and de­si­gning is the same thing…” —Erik van Blokland

“We live in a tech­ni­cal rea­lity.” —Mercedes Bunz

“How ex­actly does the tech­no­logy we use to read ch­ange the way we read?” —Ferris Jabr

*******

ABOUT

“These ain’t no books (…)” is a pro­ject by John­son / Kings­ton, emer­ging from the en­ga­ge­ment with the fu­ture of the book and rea­ding on screens.

Tech­no­lo­gi­cal pro­gress has a big im­pact on so­ciety – it is our duty to take part in sha­ping these ch­an­ges.

*******

These ain't no books [...]
is a project by
Johnson / Kingston
Ivan Weiss / Michael Kryenbühl
Bern / Luzern

Contact us:
info@theseaintnobooks.com
www.johnsonkingston.ch"
books  bookfuturism  digital  screens  print  leanderwattig  publishing  technology  design  programming  erikvanblokland  mercedezbunz  ferrisjabr  ivanweiss  michaelkryenbühl  microsoftencarta  encarta  multimedia  encyclopedias  projectideas  howweread  reading  howwewrite  writing 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Ranu Mukherjee
[via: https://deyoung.famsf.org/exhibitions/ranu-mukherjee-bright-stage ]

[see also:
https://www.instagram.com/ranumukherjee/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BkQWt-SlCnE/
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bkx2wXDln4h/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BlJdETEFHMK/ ]

"“There is cultural time and there is material time. The body connects to both.” from notes on Shadowtime, Ranu Mukherjee 2016-17

Ranu Mukherjee creates video installations, bodies of drawing and painting and collaborative projects that have to date included choreography, pirate radio, procession, exhibition and book making. She works with images as time based phenomena that unfold in the traffic between visionary and mediated perception. In a process of making and unmaking, she uses fragments and layers to pry open a space between performance and representation, and to encourage active ways of seeing and being present.

Mukherjee's work is driven by her mixed heritage, dreams of global citizenship and uncanny sensations and events related to climate shift. In making it she places importance on destabilizing established origin stories, holding space for the unknown, negotiating continuous change, celebrating resilience and connecting with residual forms of animism as a means of imagining alternate futures. Her works embody the experience of colliding time frames marked in cultural, ecological and technological terms and the ongoing construction of culture through the forces of creolization, migration, ecology, speculative fiction and desire.

.

awkwardness and beauty. engaging the visceral through a hybrid and visibly crafted aesthetic

color. the space of color, the life of color, the non white-ness of color. Michael Taussig’s What Color is the Sacred? color as an actor, context or stage. color as an animate force and an embodiment of time

creolization. inventing visual forms of Creole, encouraging broad recognition of the complex legacies making up the urban environment. elements sometimes flow together smoothly, and at others are jammed together awkwardly. this is the construction of culture. the making of work that is at least bi-lingual. migration is the origin story

excess. paying a certain kind of attention. working with the excess produced by instrumentalized narratives, information, bodies, objects, everything. the sheer amount of focus and work it takes to resist the forces of instrumentalization

fragment as a unit of measurement. pictorial wholeness no longer makes sense. the incomplete is familiar. it is imperative to leave an opening for what we don't know

figure-ground a new urgency around figure-ground relationships pervades

landscape as a stage and an energetic body. the compressed spaces of body, stage and picture plane. the specificity of place. the importance of the experiential in the making of meaning. the crossing syntaxes of project based work and picture making

neo-animist. vibrant matter, a distributed body. identification with a wide spectrum of organic matter.deep ecology. expansiveness. see the work of Betti Marenko

neo-futurist. speculative fiction. the narratives we have about the future- literary, journalistic, popular and data driven. the other side of the Modernist dream- a watershed moment for industrial production

nomadic. the condition of contemporary life- the un-static. the contradiction between a desirable philosophical space and a potentially exhausting life style. sometimes through desire, sometimes a condition of work, war and other forms of violence, economics. an uprooting and spreading of visual matter and information. a demand. a demand on artists.

0rphandrift a collective artist/entity that emerged in 1994 through Suzie Karakashian, Ranu Mukherjee, Mer Maggie Roberts and Erle Stenberg, plus several collaborators. www.orphandriftarchive.com

procession a form able to carry individual expressions within collective production. the performance of reassembled mythologies for the purposes of re-alignment and recognition. an honoring.

race and abstraction being visibly mixed in a precarious and divisive historical time and place makes the question of pictorial representation- of bodies in particular- tricky and sticky. (not to mention questions of identity)

shadowtime a word invented with the Bureau for Linguistical Reality in 2015 to convey the feeling of living simultaneously in two distinctly different time scales, or the acute consciousness of the possibility that the near future will be drastically different than the present.

time travel. the expansiveness of the body and the ability to perceive differing temporal scales- some that are epic. The scale by which energy takes affect.

tentacles i am the mother of triplets. i make things in 3’s. i have been 2 boys and a girl. i have grown 3 organs. i was well prepared for motherhood through speculative fiction and cyberpunk. i make work which has at least one easily accessible dimension. i think about what we leave. Octopi have 3 hearts and great shape shifting capacity, some day I will find a way to communicate with one.

unknown, the stranger within myself. the stranger that is half of my DNA. making space for the unknown to guide the work. the resistance to explaining it all away.

unmaking occupying images and forms as an artist, to unmake them. re-mak ing them into artworks that have a performative capacity. teasing out tensions between performance and representation,

xeno-real. pictures from late 19th and early 20th century India which describe the beginning of the post-colonial. the playing out of the post-colonial.seethe work of Christopher Pinney"
ranumukherjee  art  artists  sanfrancisco  choreography  dance  video  multimedia  performance  representation  presence  creolization  globalcitenzenry  citizenship  globalcitizenship 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Lorna Simpson, America’s Most Defiant Conceptual Artist, Makes A Radical Change—To Painting - Vogue
"Lorna graduated early from SVA and was doing graphic-design work for a travel company when she met Carrie Mae Weems, a graduate art student at the University of California, San Diego. Weems suggested she come out to graduate school in California. “It was a rainy, icy New York evening, and that sounded really good to me,” Simpson says. “I had no idea what I was getting myself into.” She knew she’d had enough of documentary street photography. Conceptual art ruled at UCSD, and in her two years there, from 1983 to 1985, Lorna found her signature voice, combining photographs and text to address issues that confront African American women. “I loved writing poetry and stories, but at school, that was a separate activity from photography,” she says. “I thought, Why not merge those two things?”"
lornasimpson  2018  art  artists  adjaye  painting  photography  multimedia  ucsd  conceptualart  davidhammons  jean-michelbasquiat  basquiat  zoracasabere  combinations  breakingform  cross-media  race  gender  sex  identity  video  videoart  form 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Book Review: Love And Other Words I Mispronounced — ONI MAGAZINE
"Instead of layers of irony and distance that, like with the poets referenced above, add up to a superficial, sarcastic, hipster-ish voice what this book offers is a sincere expression, beauty in vulnerability, and self-reflection and a search for truth in the aftermath of an abusive relationship."
jamieberrout  poetry  instagtam  blogs  blogging  socialmedia  multimedia  gumroad  transgender  dictionaryofobscuresorrows  johnkoenig  kierra  loveandotherwords  words  poems  writing  books  vulnerability 
february 2018 by robertogreco
HemiPress –
"HemiPress is the Hemispheric Institute’s digital publications imprint, created to house and centralize our diverse publication initiatives. Using a variety of customized open-source digital humanities platforms, HemiPress includes the Gesture short works series, the Duke U.P./HemiPress digital books, stand-alone essays, and the Institute’s peer-reviewed journal emisférica, alongside interviews, Cuadernos, and other online teaching resources. It also provides state-of-the-art multilingual publication capacities and immersive formats for capturing the “live” of performance, as well as a digital “bookshelf”—the interface that houses all of the Institute’s publications and connects communities of readers across the Americas."

[Digital Books:
https://hemi.press/digital-books/

"The Hemispheric Institute's focus on embodied practice requires both methodological and technological innovation. Through our Digital Books initiative, which utilizes both the Scalar and Tome publication platforms, we seek to create media-rich scholarly publications in order to produce and disseminate knowledge across geographic, linguistic, disciplinary, and mediatic borders. Staging a unique intervention in the field of academic publishing, Digital Books allows authors to utilize not only images and video, but also multilingual subtitles, maps and geotags, audio recordings, slideshows, and photo-essays, alongside other interactive features. Whether solo-authored, collaboratively written, or compiled as an edited volume, this critical initiative invites scholars, artists, activists, and students to explore the expansive possibilities of digital publishing in a hemispheric context."



"Tome [http://tome.press/ ] is an online authoring tool that facilitates long-form publishing in an immersive, media-rich environment. Built on the WordPress framework and in collaboration with the Hemispheric Institute, Tome features a suite of custom plugins that empowers scholars, students, and artists to create innovative born-digital work. Recent Tome publications include El Ciervo Encantado: An Altar in the Mangroves (Lillian Manzor and Jaime Gómez Triana), Art, Migration, and Human Rights: A collaborative dossier by artists, scholars, and activists on the issue of migration in southern Mexico, Villa Grimaldi (Diana Taylor), and six gestures (peter kulchyski)."



"Scalar [https://scalar.me/anvc/ ] is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to write long-form, born-digital scholarship online. Scalar enables users to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways, with minimal technical expertise required. Scalar also gives authors tools to structure essay- and book-length works in ways that take advantage of the unique capabilities of digital writing, including nested, recursive, and non-linear formats. The platform also supports collaborative authoring and reader commentary."]

[See also: emisférica
https://hemi.press/emisferica/

"emisférica is the Hemispheric Institute’s peer-reviewed, online, trilingual scholarly journal. Published biannually, journal issues focus on specific areas of inquiry in the study of performance and politics in the Americas. The journal publishes academic essays, multimedia artist presentations, activist interventions, and translations, as well as book, performance, and film reviews. Its languages are English, Spanish, and Portuguese."



"Dossier: Our dossiers are organized around a given theme and feature short texts, interviews, artworks, poetry, and video."



"Essays: We publish invited essays, essays submitted through our open calls, and translations of significant previously published works."



"Reviews: We review books, films, and performances from throughout the Americas"



"Multimedios: Multimedios are digital modules that feature the work of individual artists, artist collectives, curatorial projects, and activists movements. These video and photography, interviews, catalogue texts, essays, and critical reviews."]
publishing  americas  latinamerica  ebooks  epublishing  opensource  español  spanish  portugués  portuguese  digital  digitalpublishing  books  journals  multimedia  photography  poetry  video  art  wordpress  webdev  onlinetoolkit  scalar  hemipress 
january 2018 by robertogreco
IsumaTV
"About us

IsumaTV is a collaborative multimedia platform for indigenous filmmakers and media organizations. Each user can design their own space, or channel, to reflect their own identity, mandate and audience.

Indigenous media organizations can operate their own state-of-the-art media site, under their own design and URL, and at the same time share IsumaTV’s sophisticated back end infrastructure, without needing to re-invent the digital wheel.

The collective platform currently carries over 6000 videos, and thousands of other images and audio files, in more than 80 different languages, on 800+ user-controlled channels, representing cultures and media organizations from Canada, U.S.A., Greenland, Norway, Sweden, Russia, Australia, New Zealand and all over Latin America.

Users can register and open their own channels, upload videos as well as photos and audio files, share text posts and attach images or PDF files for download, upload multiple videos via FTP or email, embed on other websites, and distribute as downloadable podcasts.

Oral Languages Online

IsumaTV honours oral languages. We use less text for navigating our platform. We use icons and color-coded language to be user-friendly to oral cultures online.

IsumaTV’s main menu options are provided in Inuktitut Roman, Inuktitut Syllabic, English, French and Spanish. Content is in more than 80 languages. Our politics emphasize oral Inuktitut uploads rather than syllabic texts.

Contact us if you want IsumaTV main menu options to be in your language.

IsumaTV in Remote Indigenous Communities

By installing IsumaTV Mediaplayers in remote communities, IsumaTV has created an independent distribution network, allowing isolated communities in the world to interact at high-speed with other people worldwide, by contributing their own media content, and having access to the existing media on IsumaTV.

Indigenous communities worldwide face loss of language and traditional knowledge.

Foreign language media overload is only speeding-up this process.

New media democratization allows new groups of people to have access to media tools that were initially exclusive to them. People can use media to recover language and indigenous traditional strengths, and transform these into contemporary strengths.

IsumaTV is available to anyone with an Internet connection and a computer or mobile device. Unfortunately, most indigenous communities do not have sufficient internet bandwidth access, to view and upload multimedia, at full quality and speed.

The IsumaTV Mediaplayer is designed to allow remote communities to participate equally in a world driven by media, in their own language and in the immediacy of our times.

You can read more about the IsumaTV Mediaplayer technology here.

Our Story

IsumaTV is a project of Isuma Distribution International Inc., Canada's first media distribution company specializing in Inuit and Aboriginal films. IsumaTV was launched in January 2008 with programming from a coalition of independent producers and non-profit partners, including: Igloolik Isuma Productions, (producers of the award-winning Inuit-language Fast Runner Trilogy: Atanarjuat The Fast Runner, The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, and Before Tomorrow); Nunavut Independent TV Network (NITV); Arnait Video Productions; Artcirq; ImagineNATIVE Film+Media Arts Festival; Vtape; Native Communications Society of the NWT (producers of the historic TV series Our Dene Elders); and other non-profit agencies.

For information contact us at info@isuma.tv"
inuit  video  indigenous  media  oral  oralcultures  inuktitut  towatch  television  tv  multimedia 
december 2017 by robertogreco
XINONA
[via: https://twitter.com/flett_julie/status/890000615316742144

"This tale of Indigenous resistance by Kaheró:ton takes place in an alternate universe. Or does it? http://nfb.ca/legacies150/xinona/ #canada150"]

[part of: http://legacies150.nfb.ca/

"A nation is a collection of stories. Where they overlap, they represent a shared experience and an intergenerational legacy. In their uniqueness, they underscore just how varied our individual lives are.

Legacies 150 is a series of interactive photo and illustration essays reflecting on legacy and inheritance a century and a half into Canadian Confederation. These first-person stories explore where we come from, who we are, and what kind of nation we are becoming."]
srg  multimedia  canada  film  newmedia  classideas  storytelling  nfb  nfbc 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Miles of Ice Collapsing Into the Sea - The New York Times
"We went to Antarctica to understand how changes to its vast ice sheet might affect the world. Flowing lines on these maps show how the ice is moving."
2017  antarctic  antarctica  environment  multimedia  visualization  maps  mapping  classideas 
may 2017 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Testify
"Karim Ani, the founder of Mathalicious, hassles me because I design problems about water tanks while Mathalicious tackles issues of greater sociological importance. Traditionalists like Barry Garelick see my 3-Act Math project as superficial multimedia whizbangery and wonder why we don’t just stick with thirty spiraled practice problems every night when that’s worked pretty well for the world so far. Basically everybody I follow on Twitter cast a disapproving eye at posts trying to turn Pokémon Go into the future of education, posts which no one will admit to having written in three months, once Pokémon Go has fallen farther out of the public eye than Angry Birds.

So this 3-Act math task is bound to disappoint everybody above. It’s a trivial question about a piece of pop culture ephemera wrapped up in multimedia whizbangery.

But I had to testify. That’s what this has always been – a testimonial – where by “this” I mean this blog, these tasks, and my career in math education to date.

I don’t care about Pokémon Go. I don’t care about multimedia. I don’t care about the sociological importance of a question.

I care about math’s power to puzzle a person and then help that person unpuzzle herself. I want my work always to testify to that power.

So when I read this article about how people were tricking their smartphones into thinking they were walking (for the sake of achievements in Pokémon Go), I was puzzled. I was curious about other objects that spin, and then about ceiling fans, and then I wondered how long a ceiling fan would have to spin before it had “walked” a necessary number of kilometers. I couldn’t resist the question.

That doesn’t mean you’ll find the question irresistible, or that I think you should. But I feel an enormous burden to testify to my curiosity. That isn’t simple.

“Math is fun,” argues mathematics professor Robert Craigen. “It takes effort to make it otherwise.” But nothing is actually like that – intrinsically interesting or uninteresting. Every last thing – pure math, applied math, your favorite movie, everything – requires humans like ourselves to testify on its behalf.

In one kind of testimonial, I’d stand in front of a class and read the article word-for-word. Then I’d work out all of this math in front of students on the board. I would circle the answer and step back.

But everything I’ve read and experienced has taught me that this would be a lousy testimonial. My curiosity wouldn’t become anybody else’s.

Meanwhile, multimedia allows me to develop a question with students as I experienced it, to postpone helpful tools, information, and resources until they’re necessary, and to show the resolution of that question as it exists in the world itself.

I don’t care about the multimedia. I care about the testimonial. Curiosity is my project. Multimedia lets me testify on its behalf.

So why are you here? What is your project? I care much less about the specifics of your project than I care how you testify on its behalf.

I care about Talking Points much less than Elizabeth Statmore. I care about math mistakes much less than Michael Pershan. I care about elementary math education much less than Tracy Zager and Joe Schwartz. I care about equity much less than Danny Brown and identity much less than Ilana Horn. I care about pure mathematics much less than Sam Shah and Gordi Hamilton. I care about sociological importance much less than Mathalicious. I care about applications of math to art and creativity much less than Anna Weltman.

But I love how each one of them testifies on behalf of their project. When any of them takes the stand to testify, I’m locked in. They make their project my own.

Again:

Why are you here? What is your project? How do you testify on its behalf?"
danmeyer  2016  math  mathematics  teaching  interestedness  pokémongo  curiosity  mathalicious  testament  multimedia  howweteach  interest  wonder  wondering  askingquestions  questionasking  modeling  education  howwelearn  engagement 
august 2016 by robertogreco
NewHive
[See also: “Beautiful disasters: NewHive is making the web weird again”
http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/18/5420246/can-newhive-make-the-web-weird-again-zach-verdin ]

"NewHive is a multimedia publishing platform. We provide a blank space and custom tools to simplify the process of creating rich multimedia experiences on the web.

Get started with our User Guide [http://newhive.com/newhive/user-guide ] and Frequently Asked Questions [http://newhive.com/newhive/faq ].

Say hello. Ask about job opportunities. Get in touch with our press and media team. Inquire about partnership and business development opportunities.

We are committed to supporting creators on the NewHive platform.
We do this in a variety of ways, including:

Commissioned Projects

NewHive regularly commissions multimedia mixtapes, singles, zines, ebooks, curated exhibitions, and solo projects by emerging and established artists engaged with the Internet. Creators receive a stipend and technical support. Proposals are reviewed on a rolling basis. Get in touch: m@newhive.com.

Interview Series

NewHive publishes interviews on a weekly basis. These conversations focus on the creative process, and aim to promote a better understanding and appreciation of the arts. Search #interviews to read about the community on NewHive.

Events / Exhibitions

NewHive partners with institutions to increase the profile of our creators. Most recently we collaborated with the Goethe-Institut San Francisco on Image as Location, an exhibition that showcased artists who are remixing their favorite works of art. Previously we teamed up with Gray Area to co-organize UPLOAD.gif, a weekend-long festival celebrating the animated GIF file format.

ZACH VERDIN
Cofounder / CEO

CARA BUCCIFERRO
Cofounder / Designer

ABRAM CLARK
Cofounder / Engineer

MELISSA BRODER
Director of Media

info@newhive.com "

["What is NewHive?

NewHive is a multimedia publishing platform for the easy creation of webpages called newhives. These pages are artist-controlled, embeddable, and may be simply compiled into collections. We provide an intuitive and easy-to-use, graphical user interface. To put it simply, NewHive allows users to create webpages without having to write code or use a rigid interface.

Do I have to pay to use NewHive?

NewHive is totally and completely free!
How do I create a newhive?

To create a newhive page, click on the create icon in the bottom right-hand corner. For help creating a newhive click on the ? while in the editor."]
newhive  multimedia  webrococo  remixing  web  webpublishing  online  internet  remixculture  gifs  gif  animatedgifs  zachverdin  abramclark  carabucciferro  melissabroder  upload.gif  webdev  ebooks  zines  mixtapes  art  community  onlinetoolkit  classideas  multiliteracies  webdesign 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Life After Death : NPR
“The world is starting to forget about Ebola. The village of Barkedu can’t.”



"At first glance, things were looking up. The weekly market had just reopened.

The health clinic, too.

Hunters were heading back into the forest. This hunter said he still avoids monkeys and bats, animals that are considered reservoirs for Ebola.

Large gatherings were safe again. Life seemed as if it were returning to normal.

But the more we talked to people, the more we realized the story wasn’t that simple. Ebola caused trauma and disruption that will stay with Barkedu for a long time to come.

We talked to farmers who can’t feed their families. Students who have missed school. A doctor who was nearly run out of town. And the woman who was left to care for many of the village’s Ebola orphans."
ebola  africa  libera  sierraleon  guinea  2015  death  disease  trauma  aftermath  storytelling  photojournalism  multimedia  barkeu  loss  photography 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Press Play — Press Play: Making and distributing content in the present future we are living through. — Medium
"This thing of ours:

This course, Press Play, aspires to be a place where you make things. Good things. Smart things. Cool things. And then share those things with other people. The idea of Press Play is that after we make things we are happy with, that we push a button and unleash it on the world. Much of it will be text, but if you want to make magic with a camera, your phone, or with a digital recorder, knock yourself out. But it will all be displayed and edited on Medium because there will be a strong emphasis on working with others in this course, and Medium is collaborative.

While writing, shooting, and editing are often solitary activities, great work emerges in the spaces between people. We will be working in groups with peer and teacher edits. There will be a number of smaller assignments, but the goal is that you will leave here with a single piece of work that reflects your capabilities as a maker of media.But remember, evaluations will be based not just on your efforts, but on your ability to bring excellence out of the people around you. Medium has a remarkable “notes” function where the reader/editor can highlight a specific word, phrase or paragraph and comment, suggest a tweak or give an attaboy. This is counter-intuitive, but you will be judged as much by what you put in the margins of others work as you are for your own. (You should sign on to Medium as soon as you can. You can log in with Facebook or Twitter credentials. Pithy instructions on writing and collaborating on Medium: here, here, here, and, yes, here.)To begin with, we will look at the current media ecosystem: how content is conceived, made, made better, distributed, and paid for. We will discuss finding a story, research and reporting, content management systems, voice, multimedia packaging, along with distribution and marketing of work. If that sounds ambitious, keep in mind that in addition to picking this professor and grad assistant, we picked you. We already know you are smart, and we just want you to demonstrate that on the (web) page.

What we‘ll create:

Together, we will make a collection of stories on Medium around a specific organizing principle — it could be a genre, topic, reading time, or event — which we’ll decide on in collaboration as well. And once we get stories up and running, we will work on ways of getting them out there into the bloodstream of the web.

In order to have a chance of making great work, you have to consume remarkable work. Fair warning: There will be a lot of weekly reading assignments. I’m not sliming you with a bunch of textbooks, so please know I am dead serious about these readings. Skip or skim at your peril.

I will be bringing in a number of guest speakers. They will be talented, accomplished people giving their own time. Please respond with your fullest attention.

So, to summarize: We will make things — in class, in groups, by our lonely selves — we will work to make those things better, and, if we are lucky, we will figure out how to beckon the lightning of excellence along the way."
davidcarr  2014  web  online  internet  syllabus  education  journalism  writing  howwewrite  ta-nehisicoates  teaching  mooc  moocs  lesliejamison  clayshirky  alexismadrigal  jessicatesta  nrkleinfield  sarahkoenig  davidfosterwallace  elizabethroyte  zachseward  joshuadavis  shanesnow  brianlam  kevinkelly  luciamoses  storytelling  vincentmorisset  emilygibson  caityeaver  mischaberlinski  triciaromano  hamiltonnolan  camilledodero  erinleecarr  mariakonikkova  tonyhaile  ralphabellino  mashacharnay  santiagostelly  timstelloh  jayrosen  felixsalmon  multimedia  socialmedia  canon  engagement  media  distribution  voice  syllabi 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Obsolete Skill Set: The 3 Rs
"I see then a pattern of intellectual development that I shall oversimplify by casting it in three distinct phases. The first phase is one of universally successful learning. All children show a passion for interactive exploration of their immediate world. The diversity of possible activity is great enough for different individuals to find their own styles. The third phase is seen in intellectually awake adults. Here too we see a great diversity of styles. But not everyone gets there. The second phase is the narrow and dangerous passage in which many factors conspire to undermine the continuation of phase one. School is often blamed for imposing on children a uniformity that suffocates those who have developed markedly different intellectual styles; much as it used to suffocate left-handed people by forcing them to "write properly". Most of the blame is well-founded. But in these practices, schools reflect (and amplify) the poverty of media that has plagued society in the past. As long as writing was the only medium in town, schools did not have many choices.

The early and massive imposition on children of what I call "letteracy" carries risk not only because it suppresses diversity of style, but because it forces an abrupt break with the modes of learning shared by the first and third phases. New media promise the opportunity to offer a smoother transition to what really deserves to be called "literacy." Literacy should not mean the ability to decode strings of alphabetic letters. Consider a child who uses a Knowledge Machine to acquire a broad understanding of poetry (spoken), history (perhaps relived in simulations), and art and science (through computer-based labs), and thus draws on this knowledge to conduct a well-informed, highly persuasive campaign to preserve the environment. All this could happen without being letterate. If it does, should we say that the child is illiterate?

The use of the same word to mean both the mechanical ability to read as well as a rich connection with culture is one more reflection of today's paucity of media. As we enter an age in which diversity of media will allow individuals to choose their own routes to literacy, that dual meaning will pass away. For the next generation or two one must expect literacy to include some letteracy, since our culture's past is so connected with expression through writing. But even if a truly literate person of the future will be expected to know how to read books as well as understand the major trends in art history or philosophy, via whatever other media become available, it will not follow that learning the letters should be the cornerstone of elementary education.

My Knowledge Machine is a metaphor for things close enough in the future to demand serious consideration now. Although the software that can be purchased today gives only an inkling of what is to come, it should be seen in the same light as the first flight of the Wright Brothers' machine. Its importance for the future was not measured by its performance in feet of flight, but its ability to fuel the well-informed imagination. There are very few school environments in which the idea of the illetterate but literate child is plausible. The pundits of the Education Establishment have failed to provide leadership in this area. Perhaps the readers of Wired, who can see farther into the future, have a profoundly important social role in stirring up such debate."

[via: http://bengrey.com/blog/2013/10/the-space-between-where-our-role-as-teachers-changes-lives-and-learning/ ]
seymourpapert  literacy  internet  media  learning  children  curiosity  1993  howwelearn  unschooling  deschooling  culture  letteracy  knowledgemachine  illiteracy  canon  understanding  howweteach  schools  education  imagination  childhood  literacies  multiliteracies  multimedia  orality 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Instagramming Dinosaurs: Clive Thompson on Museums in the Digital Age (4 of 4) | Moosha Moosha Mooshme
"Q: Clive, we’re sitting here talking about all these ways that digital media can augment our abilities to think, to access our minds, to connect with others, think with others and have deeper understanding and reflection after the event. We’re doing this in a museum that was founded in 1869, looking at dinosaurs that are millions of years old, where the tools that we are talking about that can empower that kind of thinking are like “a blip of a blip” in the timeline.

So if this museum was created today, if you were re-designing this hall, and you were thinking about what it would mean for a Natural History Museum to create a space that could support people to use these tools, what would you do?

A: That’s a really good question. I’ll start off by saying I have an enormous respect and fondness for people that create museum exhibits. They’re the first people to have had to think through the implications of multimedia. When they are communicating this to the public, trying to explain dinosaurs, they use text. There’s pictures. They had to decide what physical items should we have. And then there are these sound guys, the first people to start asking, “Why don’t we have the ability to walk through here and have someone talk on computers?” So in this room there’s four forms of media, being used right now, pioneered by museum people. People in the news media didn’t have to think this way. Teachers didn’t have to think this way. But museum exhibit people have been working in multimedia for like a 150 fifty years, frankly, so this room is already a lot richer than most other places you’d see.

If you wanted to add more to it, there are a couple of low hanging fruits. The dinosaurs are wonderful physical artifacts and it’s often startling to realize how big they are, or what their shape is. Look up there at how serrated that tooth is on that T-Rex. How big is that? Well, what would it be like if I held it in my hand? In fact one thing you can start to do is to make these physical objects shout using 3D printing. These days you have a lot of 3D printers that are becoming cheaper. This is essentially the transmission of physical piece of knowledge across the ether. What if I could go to an online site and download and print a copy of any parts of this dinosaur, because I would love one of those teeth, you know? Imagine: having just one of those just sitting on my desk would be a really cool way to reflect on the size and might of this enormous creature. So the physical sharing of these rich artifacts I think is a fantastic new form of media that’s coming along.

The second thing is you can actually do some really cool things with augmented reality. Augmented reality is the concept of being able to hold up the phone and having it overlay over what you’re seeing – information that helps you look at in a different way or learn things about it. And by and large a lot of our augmented reality has not worked very well in the everyday world, but I think it’s because in the everyday world, we often don’t really want a huge information rich experience as we walk down the street. But I could have a little app that I can load and pull it back and forth and be able to see different parts of that dinosaur, with labels, as I move it back and forth, or see the way that the jaw moved. These are ways that would really help me get new dimensions out of what’s physically in front of me. So there is a couple of things that I think we could start to do.

You could probably think a little bit about integrating public thinking into an environment like this. [re: part two of this interview]

Q: How can I, as a visitor to this hall, know what other people are thinking here?

A: Well, yeah, that’s a fun question: so how can we identify the most interesting things anyone has said about this dinosaur? You know, what are the three most up-voted smartest reflections. It could be someone’s having a thought, or a visitor who had some interesting visceral reaction to this, or it could be someone who has found an amazing quote in one of the newspapers in the 19th century when this thing was first uncorked. Those things are hard to engineer because the signal-to-noise ratio can be really high in public thinking. 90% of what people say online it pretty banal. And so we have that challenge, to find the best stuff people have said about this dinosaur, over and over again.

That’s a hard one to surmount, but pretty cool if you could do it.

Wow, I hadn’t seen that tail before. Holy Moses, that’s long!"

[The full set: http://www.mooshme.org/?s=clive+thompson ]
clivethompson  amnh  2014  barryjoseph  socialmedia  instagram  learning  museum  interactive  interactivity  multimedia  augmentedreality  publicthinking  3dprinting  museums  exhibitions  exhibits  exhibitdesign  design  ar 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Wire
"It’s beautiful.
Visually rich, clean, and elegant, Wire delivers a communication experience like no other. Write, talk, share pictures, music and video with people on phones, tablets and desktops — Wire is thoughtfully designed. For your every thought.

It’s pure.
With Wire you can easily move from messages and pictures to HD voice. Wire’s pristine audio quality makes it feel as if the people you are speaking to are right there with you.

It’s happening.
Photos on Wire display beautifully inline, SoundCloud music and YouTube videos blend nicely with text and pictures. So you can share your nicest moments, in the moment.

It’s everywhere.
Phone, desktop or tablet — Wire goes where you go. Wire for browsers will be available soon.

It’s on.
Wire is perfect for staying connected with any group. Create a conversation, name it as you wish, and add people — your groups will be taking off whether they’re about work, family or fun. Oh, and Wire groups are full democracy."

[via: http://techcrunch.com/2014/12/02/skype-co-founder-backs-wire-a-new-communications-app-launching-today-on-ios-android-and-mac/ ]
communication  applications  android  iphone  ios  skype  qik  janusfriis  chat  texting  telephony  conversation  groupchat  2014  multimedia  voice  slack  email  ios8  osx  mac  messaging 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Designing in the Borderlands by Frank Chimero
"We spend a lot of time making arguments over how to choose sides on these splits. But after a lot of reflection, I’ve decided that I’m not particularly interested in choosing sides.

I want to be the line, and I want to mess with that line, because that line is a total fabrication. Why fall on the side of print or digital if what’s usually needed is both? Isn’t that a more interesting design problem? Why make books with only text or images if they get better with both? The questions go on and on.

Luckily, these distinctions were drawn by us, which means that we can redraw them. We can move the line, toe it, and breach it with a transgressive practice that tries to turn opposition into symbiosis. But you can only cross the line and confuse the distinction if you commit to the middle space.

These borderlands are the best place for a designer like me, and maybe like you, because the borderlands are where things connect. If you’re in the borderlands, your different tongues, your scattered thoughts, your lack of identification with a group, and all the things that used to be thought of as drawbacks in a specialist enclave become the hardened armor of a shrewd generalist in the borderlands."



"I learned a lot through the design process of The Shape of Design. First, that there are opportunities to produce projects that elegantly incorporate multiple mediums. One only needs to look for them. And second, that these design problems become easier to handle if one considers the system as a whole, instead of attempting to chop it up into separate pieces and attack it as smaller bits. Division reduces them in the same way that Massage, Electric Information Age Book, or The Shape of Design would be made small if the individual parts were isolated. The individual bits would be have differently, and the designer would miss the most important thing: these projects are important and big because they are multiple, and to temporarily make them not so is to misunderstand and misconstruct them. For these sorts of projects, my mantra has become:

Everything all at once.
Everything all together.



I had two goals today.

First, I wanted to articulate the biggest opportunity I see in design today: designer as translator, designer as integrator, designer as a merchant of ideas. We’ve built up so much knowledge that is tucked away in books and websites, and often all that’s needed to get that knowledge the attention it deserves is a gentle massage of tone and a switch of format. We can introduce physical materials to the web to reap the benefits of the network, but we can also translate the web’s content to the physical realm to stabilize it so it can be held and appreciated.

The second goal was to cast an additional mold for a designer, and to provide an explanation about why a person would want to go make weird little books and sit and write essays instead of working at an ad agency or startup for six figures. It’s worth documenting the different ways one can go about pursuing a design practice. There are many stories and paths, and I hope all of this is a reminder that the lines we draw to create the contours of our expectations can be disrupted. And that this disruption can, somehow, be soothing to those of us who identify as something different than the standard.

I’d like to finish by revisiting that Calvino quote:
Whenever humanity seems condemned to heaviness, I think I should fly like Perseus into a different space. I don’t mean escaping into dreams or the irrational. I mean that I have to change my approach, look at the world from a different perspective, with a different logic and with fresh methods of cognition and verification.

I hope you get the opportunity to do this at some point in your career, and that my conclusions will help those of you who identify as generalists. If you do not, perhaps I have convinced you that our conception of work is more flexible than we typically believe. The field is wide open; that is why it’s called a field."
generalists  frankchimero  creativity  design  borders  seams  interstitial  cv  trickster  departmentalization  interdisciplinary  dualism  transdisciplinary  print  digital  books  ebooks  bookfuturism  marshallmcluhan  quentinfiore  buckminsterfuller  multimedia  jeffreyschnapp  adammichaels  allsorts  italocalvino  translation 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Sensate Journal Front Page » Sensate Journal
"A Journal for Experiments in Critical Media Practice"



"Welcome to Sensate, a peer-reviewed, open-access, media-based journal for the creation, presentation, and critique of innovative projects in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Our mission is to provide a scholarly and artistic forum for experiments in critical media practices that expand academic discourse by taking us beyond the margins of the printed page. Fundamental to this expansion is a re-imagining of what constitutes a work of scholarship or art. To that end, Sensate accepts and encourages non-traditional submissions such as audiovisual ethnographic research, multimedia mash-ups, experiments in media archaeology, time-based media, participatory media projects, or digitized collections of archival media, artifacts, or maps. Sensate accepts submissions of finished projects, proposals, and reviews of works (monographs, films, exhibitions, etc).

As an issueless journal, Sensate avoids the rigid structures of chronology and provides readers with the opportunity to explore the content in networked and associative ways, offering a rich, intuitive experience. Users can sort the content by clicking on the media icons, selecting one of our Special Collections (curated by Guest Editors), or through advanced search queries.

Sensate uses Zeega, an interactive storytelling platform, to provide a unique tool for non-linear, open-source, multi-media publishing. Zeega allows contributors to seamlessly integrate audio, video, text, and maps from across the Internet, and will be made available to the public in August, 2012. Sign up here for updates and to receive a Zeega account. Projects, proposals, and reviews that do not use Zeega are also welcome and encouraged.

All works featured in Sensate are published under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license. For more information on licensing and copyright, please see our Terms of Use.

The staff of Sensate would like to express our sincere appreciation for the support and guidance provided to us by our colleagues at the Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, The Film Study Center, metaLAB@Harvard, the Sensory Ethnography Lab, as well as our associates at Zeega. Thank You!"

[via: http://designculturelab.org/2014/03/07/on-dogs-and-design-ethnography/
Example: http://sensatejournal.com/2011/12/malavika-reddy-and-taylor-lowe-story-of-story-of-tongdaeng/ ]
sensoryethnographylab  newmedia  anthropology  glvo  classideas  metalab  zeega  sensate  berkmancenter  criticalmedia  multimedia  digitalhumanities  storytelling  arts  humanities  sciences  associative  howwethink  thinking  communication 
march 2014 by robertogreco
STET | Attention, rhythm & weight
"For better or worse, we live in a world of media invention. Instead of reusing a stable of forms over and over, it’s not much harder for us to create new ones. Our inventions make it possible to explore the secret shape of our subject material, to coax it into saying more.

These new forms won’t follow the rules of the scroll, the codex, or anything else that came before, but we can certainly learn from them. We can ask questions from a wide range of influences — film, animation, video games, and more. We can harvest what’s still ripe today, and break new ground when necessary.

Let’s begin."

[See also: http://publishingperspectives.com/2013/10/books-in-browsers-iv-why-we-should-not-imitate-snowfall/ and video of Allen's talk at Books in Browsers 2013 (Day 2 Session 1) http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40164570 ]
allentan  publishing  writing  internet  web  timcarmody  2013  papermodernism  literacy  fluency  intuitiveness  legibility  metaphor  interaction  howweread  howwewrite  communication  multiliteracies  skills  touch  scrolling  snowfall  immersive  focus  distraction  attention  cinema  cinematic  film  flickr  usability  information  historiasextraordinarias  narrative  storytelling  jose-luismoctezuma  text  reading  multimedia  rhythm  pacing  purpose  weight  animation  gamedesign  design  games  gaming  mediainvention  media 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Life Online: An Interview with Folkert Gorter and Jon-Kyle Mohr - Venue
"The scroll bar is a great device—I have always been most excited about it as my main user interface device. Way back, I started experimenting, along with a whole bunch of other people, with making scrolling interfaces. I would put up a ton of content, but you couldn’t see all of it. It was as if the browser was the viewfinder of a camera, and, instead of moving the viewfinder, you could just scroll the page."



"Gorter: I think the way we get around this is that we try to not make a specific interface. Instead, we always use the content as the interface. This is how we always design. In Cargo, there’s no design, there’s just content. You click on a thumbnail, but the thumbnail is just a smaller representation of the project.

Essentially the browser is the canvas—it is the design—whereas, with a lot of web design, you see people making designs inside the browser, like a box inside a box, and then shading here, adding a bar there.

But we don’t do that. We try to disappear.

Twilley: You’ve described Cargo as not social but rather collaborative. That difference between closed and open, complete and unfinished, is really interesting. There are actually not a lot of middle spaces on the Internet that manage to straddle that division, whereas Cargo is populated by user content but still feels aesthetically coherent.

Gorter: I think, again, that’s because the design is the way the interface works, rather than being some kind of overlay.

Even if you completely disassociate your personal site from the platform, the brand is the interface. We care so much about the feel and the behavior of the interface—when you click something, something happens to bridge the waiting time between the click and the response, and the typography is always properly in proportion—that it still feels like Cargo, at the end of the day, no matter what it looks like.

You’re in a structure, but the only things you see are content. "



"Manaugh: Our final question, just to bring it full circle, is about the process of working on the Venue website, and whether that allowed you to explore any new territory. Perhaps it did, perhaps it didn’t.

Mohr: The integration with Google Maps for Venue was really fun. I had never used their API. We’re actually starting to work on an API for Cargo, and working with Google Maps’ API for Venue really influenced how I’m approaching that.

It was also really fun to play with spatiality. Google Maps is already interesting in terms of its Z-space functionality—the way that you can zoom in and out in satellite view—and we spent a long time playing around to find a comfortable zoom level for Venue, and so on.

Gorter: It was a great project for us, I think, because we’re always looking for excuses to extend Cargo’s functionality. The only reason we make new stuff for Cargo is in response to a specific request. We never say, “Hypothetically, people would love such-and-such new feature—let’s make it!”

And, because we don’t design websites—we don’t make layouts, we just put content in—the Google Maps integration is not simply decoration. It’s actually integral to how the site works. What I really love about what we accomplished was that we put the Google Maps in there, but we imposed the Venue aesthetic over top of it.

We’ve done projects with Flash before where we work the same way. The problem with Flash is that it’s like an aquarium—all the content sits behind a thick layer of glass. You can’t touch it; you can only look at it. It’s imprisoned. What we've done is use Flash in a new kind of way, as a background environment, and then put a flat HTML layer over top of it so that you can interact with as if you were interacting with any website."

[See also: http://www.laimyours.com/7398/thinking-in-the-future-tense-an-interview-with-folkert-gorter/ ]
folkertgorter  jon-kylemohr  2013  design  cargo  butdoesitfloat  spacecollective  venue  geoffmanaugh  nicolatwilley  scrollbars  web  internet  online  multimedia  ux  ix  interface  browsers  content  browser 
october 2013 by robertogreco
New Degrees of Freedom
"Did cyberspace mix up your circadian rhythm? Have you lost your mind to the global brain? Do you energetically perpetuate an economy of boundaryless social and working life? Experiencing an “investiture crisis”? The physical world looks different against the landscape of the Internet. Immeasurable digital choices mark our bodies; frustrates them. Can we live our online projections? Have you ever considered “power dressing” by means of a real-life avatar?

--

Throughout time, from wheel to book to clothing, humans have created mediating technologies to extend their physical or mental faculties.

Early Internet mediums reached out for autonomous space and flexible identity. In these virtual confines, one could present oneself as one imagined oneself to be; projection and representation became flattened. One could be many things and in many places at the same time.

Such affordances, or cyber-body freedom, have gradually disappeared as cyberspace has shifted away from a text-based environment dominated by user-generated role-playing and chat environments where anonymity and invented identities prevailed. The space has now become a visual arena where we are subject to constant imaging, surveillance, and the workings of information economy.

In effect, every new link between one’s online and offline identities removes a “degree of freedom”—each connection subsequently severs a limb from one’s Internet avatar. Multiple simultaneous lives, accelerated to Internet speed, incrementally meet their deaths; minds, metamorphosed into a global brain, are disconnected.

In the computer room, one finds oneself with a single body whose functional capacity exists in one point in space and time. And while humans are typically seen as psychophysical entities, limited by the frame of the body, this condition no longer seizes us in our self-understanding.

If the body cannot be emancipated online—indeed the Internet has proved to be not virtual enough—let us imagine new modes of existence in the physical world. Perhaps we should stretch out from the confines of what has become a normative space and start a process of self-actualization (again) inside human bodies. For this, we need a series of aberrant identifications beyond social essences—ones connected to us by way of names, titles, and degrees. We need to use bodily production and exchange beyond our structural limits, determining new zones within known space.

It is time to assume physical formlessness.

--

Like amoebas or acrobats, real-life avatars strive for autonomy in time and space by means of shape shifting. They demonstrate new ways of living in bodies—such as lending one’s body to another, being nebulously anywhere, or constantly reassembling—thus augmenting the presence of those that they represent.

The project of the real-life avatars operates twofold. On the one hand, they represent a precarious social and working life made of flesh—a critical illustration, exaggerating existing power relations through to their logical end point. On the other hand, they reappropriate the means of immaterial production, connecting bodies and minds in subversive ways—a means to self-actualize, or take time off, offline, off time.

--

New Degrees of Freedom is a media project by Jenna Sutela, with graphic designer Johanna Lundberg and collaborators."

[See also: http://www.twinfactory.co.uk/index.php/jenna-sutela-space-time-and-the-body/ ]
jennasutela  johannalundberg  internet  identity  freedom  art  avatars  movement  dance  newmedia  multimedia  offline  online  2013  form  formlessness  circadianrythms  cyberspace  immaterialproduction 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Art Teaching for a New Age - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
[NB: Tagging this one Black Mountain College and BMC, not because it is references in the text, but that it reminds me of BMC.]

[Also related, in my mind: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/15046238819/our-middle-school-is-an-art-school and http://www.graphpaper.com/2007/10-17_what-i-learned-in-art-school-is-it-design-thinking ]

"The technological changes we are witnessing will not threaten conceptual rigor or craft, nor will the ease of expression and communication make art obsolete. But these shifts are changing what we mean by art making and what counts as meaningful, crafted expression. To say so is not to judge the quality of that expression or to lament the rise of vulgarity or the lowering of standards. It is simply to observe that this democratization of expression will alter fundamentally how students—aspiring artists—think about art, its meaning and purpose, and the ways in which it is made.

These shifts will also change the professions for which educational institutions like mine prepare students. After all, if technology becomes smart enough to make design decisions, then designers could increasingly become technicians, operators of machines instead of creative professionals. But the more profound—and less visible—impact will be on how students think about their creative pursuits.

We cannot say with certainty what that impact will be. The first generation of so-called digital natives is reaching college only now; the environment they grew up in—which seemed so radical and new to many of us just a decade and a half ago—is already a punchline. Soon it will be an antiquated joke that doesn't even make sense anymore. Remember AOL? Remember plugging in to access the Net? Today's students don't.

They arrive at college having shot and edited video, manipulated photographs, recorded music—or at least sampled and remixed someone else's—designed or assembled animated characters and even virtual environments, and "painted" digital images—all using technologies readily available at home or even in their pocket. The next generation of students will have designed and printed three-dimensional images, customized consumer products, perhaps "rapid-prototyped" new products—I can't imagine what else.

Students today are not simply bombarded by images, consuming them in great gulps, as previous generations did; they are making the environments they inhabit, and making meaningful connections among images, stories, mythologies, and value systems. They are creative and creating.

But their notion of what it means to create is different from ours. It's something one does to communicate with others, to participate in social networks, to entertain oneself. Making things—images, objects, stories—is mundane for these students, not sacred. It's a component of everyday experience, woven tightly into the fabric of daily life.

So what is the task of arts educators? Is it to disabuse these young people of what we think are their misconceptions? Is it to inculcate in them an understanding of the "proper" way to create, to make art or entertainment? Is it to sort out the truly artistic from the great mass of creative chatterers—and to initiate them into some sacred tradition?

Maybe. Maybe not.

Or maybe the task of the educator is to help them develop judgment, to help them to see that creating, which they do instinctively, almost unconsciously, is a way of learning, of knowing, of making arguments and observations, of affecting and transforming their environment. And perhaps that's not so very different from what we do now.

We do it now, though, in the context of a curriculum and institutional histories oriented toward specific professional training and preparation. We seek to develop in students the critical faculties needed to thrive in clearly defined professions. But in the future, we may have to rethink our purpose and objectives. We may have to reimagine our curricula, recast the bachelor-of-fine-arts degree as a generalist—not professional—degree.

In a media-saturated culture in which everyone is both maker and consumer of images, products, sounds, and immersive experiences like games, and in which professional opportunities are more likely to be invented or discovered than pursued, maybe the B.F.A. is the most appropriate general-education experience, not just for aspiring artists and designers but for everyone.

That poses challenges for arts educators. We are good at equipping students who are already interested in careers in art and design with the skills and judgment necessary to succeed in artistic fields and creative professions that are still reasonably well defined. We are less good at educating them broadly, at equipping them to use their visual acuity, design sensibility, and experience as makers to solve the problems—alone or in collaboration with others—that the next generation of creative professionals may be called on to solve. These will be complex problems that cross the boundaries of traditional disciplines, methodologies, and skill sets—ranging from new fields like data visualization, which draws on graphic design, statistical analysis, and interaction design, to traditional challenges like brand development, which increasingly reaches beyond logos on letterhead to products and environments.

To do that, arts colleges would have to reorganize their curricula and their pedagogy. Teaching might come to look a lot more like what we now call mentorship or advising. Rather than assume that young people know what they want to do and that we know how to prepare them to do it, we would have to help them to explore their interests and aspirations and work with them to create an educational experience that meets their needs.

Curricula would not be configured as linear, progressive pathways of traditional semester-long courses, but would consist of components, such as short workshops, online courses, intensive tutorials, and so forth. Students would pick and choose among components, arranging and rearranging them according to what they need at a particular moment. Have a problem that requires that you use a particular software program? Go learn it, to solve that problem or complete that project. Want to pursue a traditional illustration-training program? Take multiple drawing and painting studios.

Linking all of this together would not be a traditional liberal-arts curriculum but what one faculty member at the University of the Arts has called a liberal art curriculum—one focused on design as problem solving, on artistic expression as the articulation and interrogation of ideas. Instead of an arts-and-sciences core curriculum separate and disconnected from studio instruction, we would build a new core that integrates the studio and the seminar room, that envisions making and thinking not as distinct approaches but as a dynamic conversation.

This fantasy of an alternative arts education—which resembles experiments that other educators have attempted in the past—begins to veer into utopianism, though, and a vague utopianism at that. It would be impossible to administer and to offer to students cost-effectively. And most students would probably find it more perplexing than liberating.

But I see an urgent need for new models that respond to the changing conditions affecting higher education—models that can adapt to conditions that are in constant flux and to an emerging sensibility among young people that is more entrepreneurial, flexible, and alert to change than our curricula are designed to accommodate.

We need an educational structure that takes instability and unpredictability as its starting point, its fundamental assumption. If a university is not made up of stable, enduring structures arranged linearly or hierarchically—schools, departments, majors, minors—but rather is made up of components that can be used or deployed according to demand and need, then invention instead of convention becomes the governing institutional dynamic."
arteducation  art  education  expression  artisticexpression  internet  web  making  unpredictability  uncertainty  liberalarts  generalists  specialists  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  multimedia  lcproject  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  ncmideas  openstudioproject  2013  seanbuffington  teaching  learning  criticalthinking  problemsolving  communication  bfa  mfa  highered  highereducation  generaleducation  curriculum  altgdp  design  craft  internetage  medialiteracy  media  newmedia  rapidprototyping  projectbasedlearning  bmc  blackmountaincollege  pbl 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Zeega
"Zeega is revolutionizing interactive storytelling for a future beyond blogs. Zeegas are a new form of interactive media, enabling anyone to easily combine animated GIFs, audio, images, text and video from across the web.

We’re living in a unique moment. More media than ever is recorded and shared. But the web today is dominated by a few platforms - all stories start to feel the same, trapped in rigid boxes and long lists. Zeega is ushering in an era when the web truly becomes an interactive, audiovisual medium made by everyone.

Interactive Storytelling
Everyone wants to tell stories that allow viewers to interact, but to remain captivated. A great example is how this blog post about urban explorer Steve Duncan is transformed into this Zeega [http://zeega.com/51818 ] that allows you to travel with him beneath New York, Paris and other cities. Or this recent report by NewsHour on the current debates of gun control.

Creating Memories
Anyone can use Zeega to create lasting artifacts of their favorite experiences. A scrolling list of photos on Tumblr, a stream of Instagrams or a photo set on Facebook simply doesn’t fill the same need for narrative memories like the old treasured scrapbook.

One our recent favorites is How I Got To Boston, a personal story of the post-college years.

Playing with the Web
Zeega is also a great platform for playing with the web. A large part of the community is starting to really get into making “audioGIFs,” simple combinations of animations and audio."

[via: https://vimeo.com/66603842 ]
zeega  storytelling  onlinetoolkit  blogging  interactive  media  multimedia  gifs  audio  images  text  video  audiovisual 
may 2013 by robertogreco
PLANETARY COLLECTIVE
"Planetary Collective is a group of filmmakers, visual media creatives and thinkers who work with cosmologists, ecologists, and philosophers to explore some of the big questions facing our planet at this time.

Embracing a multidisciplinary, multi-media approach, we brings scientists, philosophers, and researchers together with designers, coders, and creatives to bring new perspectives to audiences around the world in fresh and innovative ways."

"Planetary was founded in 2011 as a direct answer to the big questions our civilization and species are currently facing. We believe that the root of the environmental and social crises facing humanity is the misperception that we are separate – from each other, the planet, and the cosmos as a whole.

As young people today, we seek to reclaim our voices in the face of these misperceptions, which cloud the communication surrounding issues such as the ecological crisis, the economic crisis, and our collective crisis of identity.

Our aim is to captivate and inspire people to LOOK DEEPER, and question the way we see ourselves, the world around us, and our relationship to the wider cosmos.

Embracing a multidisciplinary, multi-media approach, we bring scientists, philosophers and researchers together with designers, coders, and creatives to bring new perspectives to audiences around the world in fresh and innovative ways."
collective  earth  film  video  planetraycollective  multimedia  multidisciplinary  cosmology  astronomy  ecology  philosophy  guyreid  christophferstad  stevekennedy 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Speak City Heights
"Speak City Heights is a media collaborative aimed at amplifying the voices of residents in one of San Diego’s most diverse neighborhoods, City Heights.Through reporting and multimedia projects from our partners—KPBS, voiceofsandiego.org, The AjA Project and Media Arts Center San Diego—the collaborative will help residents and policymakers frame a discussion about what constitutes a healthy community, its barriers and how they’ll overcome them in City Heights.

Why City Heights? Its transformation from a sleepy San Diego suburb to the city’s dense, urban core has given way to a diverse community of immigrants and refugees. This vibrant state of flux both inspires and challenges the neighborhood. It is among San Diego’s poorest, lacking quality housing, updated infrastructure or easy access to healthcare and nutritious food."
sandiego  education  learning  speakcityheights  cityheights  voiceofsandiego  kpbs  mediaartscenter  macsd  aja  ellatino  youth  media  multimedia  communities  community  activism  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
Watch a creepy guy smell someone: The New York Times builds contextual multimedia into the flow of a story » Nieman Journalism Lab
"The Times calls them “quick links,” and they’re intended to add a new way for Times reporters to add depth to online storytelling. And at a time when mainstream news organizations are criticized for barely linking at all, it’s an attempt to embrace a reading process that isn’t completely linear, one that allows for optional digressions. While the idea, and the technology, for the pop-up link is not new, quick links show the Times wants to openly experiment with its storytelling."

“What we’re really looking for are moments where we can add highly contextual multimedia that doesn’t distract you and doesn’t take you away from a story.”
via:litherland  2012  inlinefootnoting  footnoting  footnotes  reading  embedding  storytelling  links  niemanlab  amyoleary  joshwilliams  quicklinks  journalism  multimedia  nytimes  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Moment Factory | HOME
"Moment Factory is a new media and entertainment studio specialized in the conception and production of multimedia environments combining video, lighting, architecture, sound and special effects to create remarkable experiences.

Since its beginnings in 2001, Moment Factory achieved more than 300 events, shows and installations in Canada, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East for such clients as the Cirque du Soleil, Disney, Céline Dion, Microsoft, the National Capital Commission in Ottawa and the City of Lyon.

Our team of 60 talented individuals occupies a dynamic, multifunctional 20 000 square-foot space in Montreal, Canada. In our industrial studios we develop, design and produce the groundbreaking—often interactive—new media installations for which we have earned our reputation as industry leader, building mockups and testing prototypes prior to executing our vision."
multimedia  video  sound  experiencedesign  architecture  events  montreal  installation  design  interactive  momentfactory  from delicious
march 2012 by robertogreco
Story Maps | Use ArcGIS and Web maps to tell your story.
"Story maps use the concepts and tools of geography to tell stories about the world. They combine intelligent Web maps with text, multimedia content, and intuitive user experiences to inform, educate, entertain, and inspire people about a wide variety of topics. Most story maps are designed for non-technical audiences.

Story maps are at the focal point of the rapid evolution of GIS from a technology available primarily to highly-trained specialists to an array of services and resources that can benefit everyone.

Learn how to create your own story maps in our Workflows and Best Practices summary. Read about characteristics and types of storytelling maps in our Telling Stories with Maps white paper."
infographics  multimedia  mapping  data  via:joguldi  geography  gis  maps  storytelling  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Klynt
"Edit Rich Narratives
*Mixed Media Editing: Texts, images, audios, videos and hyperlinks
*Multiple Interactive Layers: Manage unlimited story nodes
*Visual Storyboard: Edit your storyboard like a mind map

Connect Your Story To The Web
*Mash-up Ready: Mix YouTube videos and FlickR images
*Facebook & Twitter Friendly: Share your favorite sequences on social networks
*Custom Maps: Geolocalize your content

Publish Anywhere
*Quick Publishing: Automatically export your final edit
*Embedable Anywhere: Show your program on any webpage
*Tablet and Mobile Device Compatible: iOS player available this Spring"

[See this project example "Journey to the End of Coal": http://www.honkytonk.fr/index.php/webdoc/ ]
[Related: http://nofilmschool.com/2012/02/advice-creating-transmedia-documentary/ ]
[See also Bear 71: http://bear71.nfb.ca ]
klynt  remixing  dailymotion  youtube  flickr  onlinetoolkit  twitter  facebook  geolocation  mapping  maps  storyboards  hypertext  audio  text  vimeo  cyoa  interactivedocumentary  webdoc  media  software  journalism  video  interactive  tools  multimedia  fiction  if  interactivefiction  filmmaking  remixculture  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
The New Value of Text | booktwo.org
"Text lasts. It’s not platform-dependant, you don’t just get it from one source, read it in one place, understand it in one way. It is not dependent on technology: it is what we make technology out of. Code is text, it is the fundamental nature of technology. We’ve been trying for decades, since the advent of hypertext fiction, of media-rich CD-ROMs, to enhance the experience of literature with multimedia. And it has failed, every time.

Yet we are terrified that in the digital age, people are constantly distracted. That they’re shallower, lazier, more dazzled. If they are, then the text is not speaking clearly enough. We are not speaking clearly enough. Like over-stuffed attendees at a dull banquet, the mind wanders. We are terrified that people are dumbing down, and so we provide them with ever dumber entertainment. We sell them ever greater distractions, hoping to dazzle them further."
reading  writing  distraction  text  books  jamesbridle  publishing  content  technology  2011  bookfuturism  multimedia  fear  efficiency  storytelling  complexity  simplicity  digitaltext  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
The Never-Ending Story | design mind
Harris: "I think that’s something stories can do—prepare their way of finding meaning in this madness and bringing some order to the chaos.

…creating a space that’s more about slowing down and contemplating and being introspective is a prerequisite for getting people to tell stories that have impact.

…Cow Bird is basically a storytelling platform that people can use to tell stories online using photos, sound maps, timelines, videos, and casts of characters. It’s geared towards long-form narrative…when many different people tell stories, the system automatically finds connections between them and weaves them together into a kind of meta-story…The platform automatically analyzes all the text in your memory, figures out your cast of characters, and connects it to previous stories.

…one of the pieces of this system I’ve been building is that to tell the story you have to dedicate it to somebody, which creates a gift economy of stories."

[via http://twitter.com/frogdesign/status/105785778331852800 via @bobulate]
design  art  writing  storytelling  jonathanharris  cowbird  slow  slowness  multimedia  thisishuge  gamechanging  2011  interviews  classideas  curating  curation  twitter  facebook  longform  meaning  meaningmaking  meaningfulness  self-expression  internet  web  stories  social  socialsoftware  metastory  relationships  connectivism  narrative  memory  memories  soundscapes  soundmaps  timelines  video  gifteconomy  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Visual novel - Wikipedia
"A visual novel (ビジュアルノベル bijuaru noberu?) is an interactive fiction game featuring mostly static graphics, usually with anime-style art, or occasionally live-action stills or video footage.[1] As the name might suggest, they resemble mixed-media novels or tableau vivant stage plays.

In Japanese terminology, a distinction is often made between visual novels proper (abbreviated NVL), which are predominantly narrative and have very little interactive elements, and adventure games (abbreviated AVG or ADV), which typically incorporate problem-solving and other gameplay elements. This distinction is normally lost in the West, where both NVLs and ADVs are commonly referred to as "visual novels" by Western fans. Visual novels and ADVs are especially prevalent in Japan, where they made up nearly 70% of the PC game titles released in 2006."
games  writing  japan  classideas  multimedia  media  nvl  avg  adv  visualnovels  interactive  interactivefiction  fiction  gaming  videogames  if  cyoa  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Andrew Sliwinski | Thisandagain
"Hi. My name is Andrew.<br />
I help solve problems and make things using design, technology, science and fabrication."
andrewsliwinski  engineering  making  makers  doing  make  hackers  building  electronics  multimedia  via:javierarbona  technology  science  design  problemsolving  thisandagain  makerfaire  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Bricolage - Wikipedia
"Bricolage (pronounced /ˌbriːkɵˈlɑːʒ/ or /ˌbrɪkɵˈlɑːʒ/) is a term used in several disciplines, among them the visual arts, to refer to the construction or creation of a work from a diverse range of things that happen to be available, or a work created by such a process. The term is borrowed from the French word bricolage, from the verb bricoler, the core meaning in French being, "fiddle, tinker" and, by extension, "to make creative and resourceful use of whatever materials are at hand (regardless of their original purpose)". In contemporary French the word is the equivalent of the English do it yourself, and is seen on large shed retail outlets throughout France. A person who engages in bricolage is a bricoleur."

[Bricoleur!]
bricolage  bricoleur  creativity  language  postmodernism  art  tinkering  diy  glvo  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  multimedia  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  learning  education  borrowing  french  fiddling  culture  punk  edupunk  claudelevi-strauss  guattari  constructionism  seymourpapert  sherryturkle  ianbogost  kludge  deleuze  thesavagemind  polystylism  jacquesderrida  gillesdeleuze  félixguattari  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Maine Media Workshops | Maine Media
"Over the last 35 years, the Workshops has influenced thousands of people — many of them in life-changing ways. When asked what was the most important part of their experience, some talk about the spectacular beauty of the environment, others praise the excellence of the programs, the world-renowned faculty or state-of-the-art equipment. Many respond by acknowledging the staff and their dedication to creating exceptional experiences. The comment received most often, however, reflects what is created when all these essential elements coexist: an appreciation for the ability to completely immerse oneself in one's art and become part of a community passionate about creativity."
maine  photography  writing  video  music  youth  classes  rockport  camden  schools  multimedia  education  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Bezoar — War Resistance films and videos at Other Cinema
"Javier Arbona, Nick Sowers & Kate Chandler present an experimental live slide-, sound- and video-show on the emergence of drones as America’s killing machine of choice. PLUS Steev Hise’s American Business Adventures and Code Pink’s confrontation with the Blackwater mercenaries. Free bread and roses!"
javierarbona  nicksowers  katechandler  drones  sanfrancisco  events  film  multimedia  todo  military  war  warresistance  video  blackwater  militaryindustrialcomplex  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Mimi Ito: When Youth Own the Public Education Agenda
"YouMedia supports learning that begins with youth agency and voice, is socially connected, tailored to individual interests, and highly engaged -- properties that are absent from many young people's classroom experiences. The energy level and buzz in the space is similar to what I see when young people are with their same-aged peer group, immersed in online gaming, gossiping, or sharing YouTube videos, but this is an intergenerational space framed by educational goals--an open public space, an institution of public education, where learning and literacy are seamless with youth-driven activity.

If we think of the mission of public education as providing learning opportunities to all young people and not only about supporting public schools, YouMedia represents some of the best of what public education has to offer in the 21st Century."
mimiito  youmedia  chicago  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  teens  youth  education  learning  informallearning  libraries  library2.0  control  media  multimedia  thirdplaces  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Neal Stephenson and Greg Bear launch first digital 'social book' - News - Digital Arts
"Best-selling authors Neal Stephenson and Greg Bear have launched The Mongoliad, the first digital novel on a so-called social book platform that will allow them to add new elements such as music, video and reader-generated content to the book."

[More at: http://venturebeat.com/2010/08/31/writer-neal-stephenson-unveils-his-digital-novel-the-mongoliad/ ]
via:preoccupations  nealstephenson  gregbear  books  multimedia  ebooks  social  socialbooks  digital  novels  digitalnovels  music  video  readers  reader-generatedcontent  usergenerated  usergeneratedcontent  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Exchange, edit and publish intelligent stories: Storyplanet
"What if some tool would let you drag and drop you way to an awesome interactive story without touching a single line of code? And what if you could share photos, video and audio with the worlds best storytellers to get the pieces missing for your project? And in the end you should be able to spread the story all over the internet, and make money from advertising and licensing.<br />
<br />
And so they build Storyplanet."
webtools  online  multimedia  slideshow  journalism  audio  video  powerpoint  interactive  collaboration  collaborative  content  photos  storytelling  storyplanet  classideas  onlinetoolkit  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Everynone
"Everynone is a production company located in New York & Los Angeles.

We are:
Will Hoffman, Daniel Mercadante, Julius Metoyer III

Take a look at more of our work by visiting:
Flowship (Daniel Mercadante)
MJR (Julius Metoyer III)
Anyone Everything (Will Hoffman)"
filmmaking  film  photography  multimedia  storytelling  production  agency  everynone  willhoffman  juliusmetoyeriii  danielmercadante  losangeles  nyc  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
designfiction :: NuVu studio
"In “Design Fiction Studio,” we will focus on experimental ways to combine science fiction story telling w/ new forms of media production. The students will be asked to write a short science-fiction story & expected to illustrate it in an experimental book. We will explore ways to combine alternative materials–such as very basic electronic elements, conductive inks, phase-&color-changing materials– w/ new kinds of fabrication & production techniques to learn both about materials & way they can be used in different kinds of fictional products.

Topics to be covered:

—Basic scifi writing skills to develop a short story or concept that will address a problem we may have in the near future.

—Experiment w/ new kinds of smart materials, design & interaction techniques to build an interactive book to illustrate the story.

—Discuss how writing fiction & building fictional objects can contribute to our thinking & allow us to bring into attention problems before they may even emerge."

[via: http://www.nearfuturelaboratory.com/2010/07/30/design-fiction-studio-for-young-minds/ ]
designfiction  education  future  learning  design  julianbleecker  mit  writing  classideas  nearfuture  brucesterling  scifi  sciencefiction  science  newmedia  multimedia  objects  fiction  designfictionstudio  nuvustudio  nuvu 
august 2010 by robertogreco
NBC Learn
"NBC Learn is the education arm of NBC News. We are making the global resources of NBC News and the historic film and video archive available to teachers, students, schools and universities.
nbclearn  nbc  education  video  videos  reference  socialstudies  science  history  news  body  brain  multimedia  tcsnmy  physics  olympics  technology  sports  bodies 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Spokes - Two-Wheeled Tribes - Interactive Feature - NYTimes.com
"Cyclists in New York are hardly a monolithic subculture — more like a collection of finely divided sub-subcultures with their own uniform, lingo and attitude toward the bicycle’s place in the urban landscape. Here’s a look at members of five different cycling tribes."
bikes  biking  culture  nyc  multimedia  sound 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Knotebooks - Anyone can contribute. Everyone can learn.
"Knotebooks is a supplementary education platform that enables students, teachers and self-learners to effortlessly create and collaborate on customized multimedia physics lessons."
collaboration  physics  science  education  free  learning  multimedia  math  opensource  pedagogy  tcsnmy 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Editor and the Curator (Or the Context Analyst and the Media Synesthete) | Tomorrow Museum
"Also implied by the word curator is an intuitive sense of pattern recognition and glyphs. More visual than a mere editor, the Internet requires a sense of the relationships between words, images, space, and shapes. The reason we call web content “content” is because every kind of it — be it text or game or photograph — communicates differently on the net. Online, art is no longer just an image, it becomes a collage that you made. I used to know someone who worked as a sound designer and I was constantly fascinated when he would do something like rub his hand across his collar and say “that’s a character moving in a space suit.” The media application of this is writing text and knowing exactly how to visually represent it. This is more than just photo editing, it is multi-platform mediamaking... Like remix culture, having a collage mind is essential in making something standout on the web."
medialiteracy  curating  curation  culture  art  criticism  journalism  media  editing  editors  internet  technology  mediamaking  mediainvention  remixculture  multimedia  tcsnmy  generalists  collageminfd  cv  patternrecognition  sensemaking  glyphs  relationships  content  remixing 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Builders Association
"Founded in 1994 and directed by Marianne Weems, The Builders Association is a New York-based performance and media company that creates original productions based on stories drawn from contemporary life. The company uses the richness of new and old tools to extend the boundaries of theater. Based on innovative collaborations, Builders' productions blend stage performance, text, video, sound, and architecture to tell stories about human experience in the 21st century. From BAM to Bogata, Singapore to Melbourne, Minneapolis and Los Angeles to Budapest, The Builders Association's OBIE award-winning shows have toured to major venues the world over."

[see also: http://www.continuouscity.org/ ]
artists  art  business  borders  culture  newmedia  multimedia  technology  interactive  media  theater  nyc  performance  globalization  installation  sound  film  design 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Interactive - ITVS
"Television is just one way to tell a compelling story. For more than a decade, ITVS Interactive has developed, produced, and collaborated on new media projects for multiple platforms. From extensive program companion websites to online film festivals, Web-originals and mapping projects to social issue games, ITVS Interactive focuses on innovation, participation, and engagement bringing new audiences to public media 2.0."
multimedia  storytelling  narrative  classideas  tcsnmy  interactive  mapping  web  online  internet  participatory 
june 2010 by robertogreco
California is a place.
"California is loaded. From Disneyland to farmland, we’ve got Scientology and superstars, Silicon and silicone, crips and bloods. The border. Krunkin’ Clownin’ Jerkin’. The surf and the turf. The boom and the bust. California is humanity run amuck and then packaged, branded and sold. California Cuisine, California Love, California Casual, California Gold, California Girls, and of course, California Dreams. If it exists in the world, it exists here and it does so with pizzaz.

Obviously, we love this stuff. That’s why we’re doing this project. Simply put, California is sensational. And the closer we look the better it gets: words and images, stories and songs, opinions and ideas. This project is ongoing. We hope you like what you see and say so. We plan to post often. So until that day, when we finally float off into the Pacific, California is a place. Stay tuned."
california  immigration  skateboarding  multimedia  video  documentary  sandiego  losangeles  sanfrancisco  borders  mexico  us  tcsnmy  skating  skateboards 
may 2010 by robertogreco
A new class of content for a new class of device « Snarkmarket
"the web kinda hates bounded, holis­tic work...likes bits & pieces, cross-references & rec­om­men­da­tions, frag­ments & tabs...loves the fact that you’re read­ing this post in Google Reader...iPad looks to me like a focus machine...such an oppor­tu­nity for sto­ry­telling, & for inno­va­tion around sto­ry­telling...oppor­tu­nity to make the Myst of 2010...con­nect the dots. For all its power & flex­i­bil­ity, the web is really bad at pre­sent­ing bounded, holis­tic work in a focused, immer­sive way. This is why web shows never worked. The web is bad at con­tain­ers...bad at frames... the young Hayao Miyaza­kis & Mark Z. Danielewskis & Edward Goreys of this world ought to be learn­ing Objective-C—or at least mak­ing some new friends. Because this new device gives us the power and flex­i­bil­ity to real­ize a whole new class of crazy vision—and it puts that vision in a frame. ... In five years, the coolest stuff on the iPad should be… jeez, you know, I think it should be art."
design  culture  storytelling  snarkmarket  blogging  journalism  robinsloan  immersion  epub  content  ipad  marketing  attention  future  books  change  multimedia  apple  media  innovation  2010  focus  singletasking  multitasking  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs  monotasking 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Alabama's Homeboys - Los Angeles Times
"For three years, L.A.'s Homeboy Industries...has sent a few of its members on an extraordinary pilgrimage to work with impoverished kids in Alabama Village, Prichard, Ala. Tucked away in the southwest corner of the state, the small community is rural, largely segregated, oppressed by violence and ignored by the surrounding community. Its young people have come to know their enclave as "Death Valley." The povery of the children of Alabama Village is shocking --- even to the Homeboys, who come from the tough inner-city streets of Los Angeles. But there is also much the Homeboys recognize: drug dealers, shootings, dead-end choices and the desperate situation of youth facing no way out. It is in these children 2,000 miles away that the visitors from L.A. find their calling."
homeboyindustries  activism  alabama  urban  latimes  abandonment  atlanta  gangs  journalism  documentary  multimedia  photography  video  poverty 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Towards A Theory of Secondary Literacy « Snarkmarket
"This is where most of the futur­ists got it wrong — the impact of radio, tele­vi­sion, and the tele­phone weren’t going to be solely or even pri­mar­ily on more and more speech, but, for tech­ni­cal or cul­tural or who-knows-exactly-what rea­sons, on writ­ing! We didn’t give up writ­ing — we put it in our pock­ets, took it out­side, blended it with sound, pic­tures, and video, and sent it over radio waves so we could “talk” to our friends in real-time. And we used those same radio waves to down­load books and news­pa­pers and every­thing else to our screens so we would have some­thing to talk about."
timcarmody  literacy  reading  writing  secondaryliteracy  snarkmarket  books  radio  multimedia  marshallmcluhan  walterong  jacquesderrida  secondaryorality 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Orhan Pamuk's 'Museum' Of Obsession, Innocence : NPR
"Pamuk began collecting the objects that his protagonist Kemal would save before he even began writing the novel. And, in an unusual instance of literature melding into real life, he plans to display those objects in an actual "Museum of Innocence," which he hopes to open in Istanbul in July 2010. The idea for the museum came, in part, from the author's visits to small collections around the world. Pamuk says he's always been attracted to small museums and the "melancholy" that seems to permeate them."
orhanpamuk  literature  museums  melancholy  multimedia  novels 
october 2009 by robertogreco
vook
"A vook is a new innovation in reading that blends a well-written book, high-quality video and the power of the Internet into a single, complete story.
books  vook  application  iphone  multimedia  publishing  storytelling  reading  writing  utilities  kindle  video  mobile  ebooks 
october 2009 by robertogreco
vook
"vook is a new type of digital book which combines digital text with rich interactive media like video and
vook  books  iphone  applications  video  multimedia  interactive  socialnetworking  ios 
october 2009 by robertogreco
SOPHIE:
"Sophie 2.0 is open source software for writing, reading and visualizing rich media documents in an interactive, networked environment. The program emerged from the desire to create an easy-to-use application that would allow authors to combine text, images, video, and sound quickly and simply, but with precision and sophistication. Sophie's users are interested in creating robust, elegant, networked, texts and multimedia works without having programming knowledge or training in the use of more complex and costly tools. such as Flash."
education  opensource  squeak  smalltalk  application  publishing  authoring  media  multimedia  writing  tools  collaboration  free  software  books  ebooks 
september 2009 by robertogreco
SOPHIE 2.0 IN DEVELOPMENT! | Sophie [also: http://www.sophieproject.org/]
"Sophie is software for writing and reading rich media documents in a networked environment. Initially designed and developed under the auspices of the Institute for the Future of the Book, Sophie is currently being significantly revised and improved, thanks to a generous grant from the Mellon Foundation in the fall of 2008. Sophie 2.0, with added features and improved stability, will debut October 15, 2009."
education  books  media  writing  squeak  smalltalk  opensource  multimedia  ebooks  sophie  richmedia  authoring  freeware  software 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Online Audio Editor - Aviary.com's Myna [an online GarageBand]
"Use Myna to remix music tracks and audio clips. Apply sound effects and record your own voice or instruments!"

[via: http://mashable.com/2009/09/16/aviary-myna/ ]
onlinetoolkit  music  garageband  recording  podcasting  freeware  aviary  multimedia  mp3  webapps  software  sequencer  audacity  myna 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Archival Sound Recordings
"Explore 44,500 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments: accents and dialects; arts, literature and performance; classical music; environment and nature; jazz and popular music; oral history; sound recording history; world and traditional music"
art  history  music  uk  britishlibrary  library  sounds  recordings  samples  ethnography  multimedia  database  free  audio  sound  online  world  jazz  classical  environment  nature  arts  literature  poetry  accents  spokenword  media  archives  repository  tcsnmy  libraries 
september 2009 by robertogreco
ScrollMotion - Iceberg
"Iceberg is our revolutionary new electronic reader. Iceberg brings the timeless experience of reading books to the mobile space, wedding the functionality of the iPhone to the feel and familiarity of books.
iceberg  iphone  ebooks  kindle  applications  books  multimedia  entertainment  csiap  ios 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Revealing the Link
"Ida is the most complete early primate fossil ever found, and scientists believe that she could be one of our earliest
science  evolution  ida  multimedia  archaeology  paleontology  prehistoric  missinglink 
may 2009 by robertogreco
SAMPLE REALITY · What’s Wrong With Writing Essays
"The student essay is a twitch in a void. A compressed outpouring of energy (if we’re lucky) that means nothing to no one. My friend and occasional collaborator Randy Bass has said that nowhere but school would we ask somebody to write something that nobody will ever read.

This is the primary reason I’ve integrated more and more public writing into my classes. I strive to instill in my students the sense that what they think and what they say and what they write matters — to me, to them, to their classmates, and through open access blogs and wikis, to the world.

In addition to making student writing public, I’ve also begun taking the words out of writing. Why must writing, especially writing that captures critical thinking, be composed of words? Why not images? Why not sound? Why not objects? The word text, after all, derives from the Latin textus, meaning that which is woven, strands of different material intertwined together. Let the warp be words and the weft be something else entirely.

With this in mind, I am moving away from asking students to write toward asking them to weave. To build, to fabricate, to design. I don’t want my students to become miniature scholars. I want them to be aspiring Rauschenbergs, assembling mixed media combines, all the while through their engagement with seemingly incongruous materials, developing a critical thinking practice about the process and the product."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/blog/snarkives/books_writing_such/teaching_as_antiteaching_writing_as_antiwriting/ ]
teaching  learning  multimedia  tcsnmy  classideas  expression  criticalthinking  robertrauschenberg  process  mixedmedia  blogs  wikis  publicwriting  writing  education  marksample  2009  workinginpublic  teachingwriting  canon  cv  uncreativewriting 
march 2009 by robertogreco
This Is How We Dream, Parts 1 & 2 | Welcome to NCS-Tech!
"It is fitting because as you will see in this video, Dr. Miller’s message is about something new as well, what he calls the “new humanities,” the technology-fueled convergence of visual, audible, textual and informatical literacies that represent, in his view, the future of human communication. A future, indeed, for which we are not prepared, largely because no pedagogies exist to teach it."
via:hrheingold  teaching  pedagogy  universities  colleges  books  humanities  change  future  literacy  research  libraries  reading  writing  communication  multimedia  reform  information  visual  audio  technology 
january 2009 by robertogreco
boxee: the open, connected, social media center for mac os x and linux
"on a laptop or connected to an HDTV, boxee gives you a true entertainment experience to enjoy your movies, TV shows, music and photos, as well as streaming content from websites like Hulu, Netflix, CBS, Comedy Central, Last.fm, and flickr." via: http://blog.wired.com/geekdad/2008/12/boxee-saves-the.html
mac  windows  linux  osx  opensource  appletv  video  tv  television  streaming  multimedia  freeware  onlinetoolkit  software  entertainment  media 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Zattoo | TV meets PC
"Zattoo has developed a software program that allows you to watch TV on your computer. All you need is a broadband connection and a current operating system (Windows XP or Vista, Mac OS X, or Linux). The service is legal and free of charge"
television  tv  online  internet  web  streaming  windows  mac  osx  applications  multimedia  entertainment  zattoo 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Prada's Plans - ARTINFO.com - "The new facility, scheduled for completion in three years, will house multimedia laboratories in addition to hosting a vast range of events, from concerts and cinema festivals to symposia on architecture and fashion"
"The foundation’s goal, says Germano Celant, the director since 1995, is “to create a force field in which all artistic languages might converge and radiate energies that reach beyond the walls containing them into the urban context.”"
remkoolhaas  prada  italy  lcproject  multimedia  art  creativity  urban  design  glvo 
july 2008 by robertogreco
University of Manitoba: Information Services and Technology - Michael Wesch and the Future of Education
"During his presentation, the Kansas State University professor breaks down his attempts to integrate Facebook, Netvibes, Diigo, Google Apps, Jott, Twitter, and other emerging technologies to create an education portal of the future."

[video on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4yApagnr0s ]
michaelwesch  education  learning  schools  change  reform  technology  e-learning  ethnography  gamechanging  classideas  twitter  jott  diigo  del.icio.us  googleapps  netvibes  facebook  portals  collaboration  socialnetworking  medialiteracy  socialmedia  literacy  newmedia  universities  colleges  teaching  multimedia 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Apture • Apture.com
"Apture provides the first rich communication platform allowing publishers and bloggers to easily turn flat pages of text into multimedia experiences."
blogging  blogs  onlinetoolkit  multimedia  javascript  technology  portfolio  online  tools  webdesign  apture  via:cburell  webdev 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Chilirec - Your Free Internet Recorder!
"Get your free personal radio channel recorder on the Internet with the possibility to record from hundreds of radio channels. Your personal radio recordings are stored on the Internet, and won't require any disk space on your computer."
via:preoccupations  onlinetoolkit  audio  recording  radio  broadband  dvr  discovery  multimedia  media  listening  recorder  mp3  streaming  music  internet  online  web 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: From Serious Games to Serious Gaming
"Learning as a Process, Not a Product...spaces for exploration, experimentation, & problem solving...Games as Interdisciplinary Spaces...Serious Games and Participatory Culture...Reality -- Augmented, Alternate, & Otherwise"
henryjenkins  willwright  seriousgames  interdisciplinary  gaming  games  gamedesign  learning  education  schools  schooling  unschooling  play  problemsolving  multidisciplinary  deschooling  janmcgonigal  arg  participatory  contentcreation  literacy  media  pervasive  cocreation  collaboration  modding  machinama  mobile  multimedia  phones  online  internet  web  computers  technology  puzzles 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Peter Gabriel's The Filter - scrobbling your life | PDA: The Digital Content Blog | guardian.co.uk
"Gabriel explains this principle of recommendation is the most effective way to navigate the huge amount of content around us, because those recommendations combine human and automated processes."
arg  multimedia  recommendations  media  petergabriel  thefilter  film  music  video  youtube  mp3 
june 2008 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

3d  3dprinting  42entertainment  abandonment  abramclark  academia  accents  activism  adammichaels  adhd  adjaye  adv  advertising  advice  africa  aftermath  agencies  agency  aggregator  aja  alabama  alexismadrigal  algebra  alice  allentan  allsorts  altgdp  ambient  america  american  americas  amnh  amyoleary  ancientcivilization  ancienthistory  andrewsliwinski  android  animals  animatedgifs  animation  anime  annotation  antarctic  antarctica  anthropology  anti-teaching  apple  appletv  application  applications  apture  ar  archaeology  architecture  archives  arg  argentina  aristideantonas  arizona  art  arteducation  artisticexpression  artists  arts  askingquestions  associative  astronomy  atlanta  attention  audacity  audio  audiovisual  augmented  augmentedreality  authoring  authors  autodidacts  avatars  avg  aviary  aware  awareness  barkeu  barryjoseph  basquiat  bearguerra  berkmancenter  bfa  bikes  biking  biographies  biography  biology  birthdays  blackmountaincollege  blackwater  blogging  blogjects  blogs  blos  bmc  bodies  body  bookfuturism  books  border  borders  borrowing  brain  branding  brands  breakingform  brianlam  bricolage  bricoleur  britishlibrary  broadband  broadcast  browser  browsers  brucesterling  buckminsterfuller  building  business  butdoesitfloat  buttons  caityeaver  calculus  california  camden  cameras  camilledodero  canada  canon  carabucciferro  cardboard  cargo  cars  cartography  cgi  change  characterdesign  charlesdarwin  chat  chemistry  chicago  childhood  children  china  choreography  christophferstad  cinema  cinematic  circadianrythms  cities  citizenjournalism  citizenship  cityheights  civicengagement  civics  clarity  classes  classical  classideas  classroom  classrooms  claudelevi-strauss  clayshirky  climate  clivethompson  closedcaptioning  closedcaptions  coal  cocreation  codecs  coding  collaboration  collaborative  collageminfd  collections  collective  collectiveintelligence  colleges  combinations  comics  communication  communities  community  complexity  computer  computers  computing  conceptualart  conferenceplanning  conferences  connectivism  connectivity  constructionism  content  contentcreation  control  conversation  conversion  convert  converter  cosmology  courses  cowbird  craft  create  creative  creativecommons  creativity  creolization  crime  criticalmedia  criticalthinking  criticism  cross-media  crossdisciplinary  crossmedia  crosspollination  crowdsourcing  csiap  culture  curating  curation  curiosity  curriculum  cv  cyberspace  cyoa  césarreyesnájera  dailymotion  dance  danielmercadante  danmeyer  darwin  data  database  datavisualization  davidcarr  davidfosterwallace  davidhammons  death  del.icio.us  deleuze  democracy  departmentalization  deschooling  design  designfiction  designfictionstudio  desktop  development  diagrams  dialogue  dictionaryofobscuresorrows  digital  digitalhumanities  digitalnovels  digitalpublishing  digitalstorytelling  digitaltext  diigo  discovery  disease  distraction  distractions  distribution  diversity  diy  documentary  documents  doing  download  downloads  dpr-barcelona  drawing  drones  dualism  dvd  dvr  dynamic  e-learning  earth  ebola  ebooks  ecology  economics  editing  editors  education  edupunk  edutainment  edutopia  effects  efficiency  elearning  electronics  elementary  elizabethroyte  ellatino  email  embedding  emilygibson  encarta  encounters  encyclopedia  encyclopedias  engagement  engineering  english  entertainment  environment  epub  epublishing  epubs  erikvanblokland  erinleecarr  español  ethelbaraonapohl  ethics  ethnography  eventplanning  events  everyday  everynone  everyware  evolution  exhibitdesign  exhibitions  exhibits  experience  experiencedesign  expression  extension  eyecandy  facebook  fanfic  fanfilms  fear  felixsalmon  ferrisjabr  fiction  fiddling  files  film  filmmaking  firefox  flash  flickr  fluency  focus  folkertgorter  folksonomy  fonografiacollective  food  footnotes  footnoting  form  format  formlessness  frankchimero  free  freedom  freeware  french  fronterasdesk  future  félixguattari  gadgets  gamechanging  gamedesign  gamedev  games  gaming  gangs  garageband  garrisonkeillor  gatherings  geekingout  gender  generaleducation  generalists  generationz  generator  genz  geoffmanaugh  geography  geolocation  geotagging  gif  gifs  gifteconomy  gillesdeleuze  girls  gis  global  globalcitenzenry  globalcitizenship  globalization  glvo  glyphs  goldenrecord  google  googleapps  googleearth  googlemaps  government  gps  graffiti  graphic  graphics  grassroots  green  gregbear  groupchat  guattari  gui  guides  guinea  gumroad  guyreid  hackers  hamiltonnolan  handhelds  hangingoutmessingaroundgeekingout  harrypotteralliance  headphones  hearing  hemipress  henryjenkins  heroes  highered  highereducation  historiasextraordinarias  history  homago  homeboyindustries  homeschool  homework  howardrheingold  howto  howwelearn  howweread  howweteach  howwethink  howwewrite  hp  html  humanities  humanrights  humor  hyperlocal  hypertext  ianbogost  iceberg  ida  identity  if  illiteracy  illustration  ilovebees  imagery  images  imagination  imaging  immaterialproduction  immersion  immersive  immigration  inclusion  inclusivity  indigenous  individual  infographics  informal  informallearning  information  inlinefootnoting  innovation  instagram  instagtam  installation  institutions  instruction  integration  interaction  interactiondesign  interactive  interactivedocumentary  interactivefiction  interactivity  interdisciplinary  interest  interestdriven  interestedness  interet  interface  interfaces  international  internet  internetage  interstitial  interviews  intimacy  intuitiveness  inuit  inuktitut  ios  ios8  ipad  iphone  ipod  iraq  italocalvino  italy  ivanillich  ivanweiss  ix  jacquesderrida  jadensmith  jamesbridle  jamieberrout  jamielidell  janmcgonigal  janusfriis  japan  japanese  javascript  javierarbona  jayrosen  jazz  jean-michelbasquiat  jeffreyschnapp  jennasutela  jessicatesta  johannalundberg  johnkoenig  jon-kylemohr  jonathanharris  jose-luismoctezuma  joshuadavis  joshwilliams  jott  journalism  journals  julianbleecker  juliusmetoyeriii  katechandler  kcrw  kevinkelly  kevinsystrom  kids  kierra  kindergarten  kindle  kludge  klynt  knowledgemachine  kpbs  kpcc  kyte  lajolla  language  languagelearning  languages  latimes  latinamerica  lcproject  leadership  leanderwattig  learning  legibility  lego  lesliejamison  letteracy  libera  liberalarts  libraries  library  library2.0  licensing  life  links  linux  listening  lists  literacies  literacy  literature  live  local  location  location-based  locative  longform  lornasimpson  losangeles  loss  lost  loveandotherwords  luciamoses  lukaswinklerprins  mac  machinama  macsd  maine  make  makerfaire  makers  making  management  manga  mapping  maps  marcelduchamp  mariakonikkova  marine  marketing  marksample  marshallmcluhan  mashacharnay  mashup  math  mathalicious  mathematics  meaning  meaningfulness  meaningmaking  media  mediaartscenter  mediainvention  medialab  medialiteracy  mediamaking  mediascape  melancholy  melissabroder  memories  memorization  memory  mercedezbunz  messaging  messingaround  metalab  metaphor  metastory  methods  mexico  mfa  michaelkryenbühl  michaelparaskos  michaelwesch  microblogging  microsoftencarta  middleeast  migration  military  militaryindustrialcomplex  mimiito  mirrors  mischaberlinski  missinglink  mit  mitmedialab  mixedmedia  mixtapes  mobile  moby  moby-dick  mobydick  modding  modeling  modern  modernism  momentfactory  monitoring  monotasking  montreal  mooc  moocs  motion  movement  movies  mp3  mscape  multidisciplinary  multiliteracies  multimedia  multitasking  museum  museums  music  myna  n95  n800  narrative  nasa  national  nature  nbc  nbclearn  ncmideas  nealstephenson  nearfuture  neighborhoods  netvibes  networkedactivism  networkedlearning  networking  newhive  newmedia  newmexico  newness  news  nfb  nfbc  nicksowers  nicolatwilley  niemanlab  noise  nokia  nonfiction  nonprofit  nonprofits  novels  npr  nrkleinfield  nuvu  nuvustudio  nvl  nyc  nytimes  objects  ocd  ocean  oceans  offline  olympics  online  onlinecommunities  onlinetoolkit  open  opencontent  opencourseware  opensource  openstudioproject  oral  oralcultures  oralhistory  orality  orhanpamuk  osx  outside.in  pacing  painting  paleontology  panorama  papermodernism  parenting  participatory  participatoryculture  patternrecognition  pbl  pechakucha  pedagogy  performance  personal  personalization  pervasive  petergabriel  philosophy  phone  phones  photography  photojournalism  photos  photoshop  physics  place  planetraycollective  planets  planning  play  podcasting  podcasts  poems  poetry  pokémongo  policy  politics  polystylism  population  portable  portal  portals  portfolio  portuguese  portugués  postmodernism  poverty  powerpoint  prada  prehistoric  presence  presentations  print  problemsolving  process  processing  production  productivity  professionaldevelopment  programming  projectbasedlearning  projectideas  projectors  projects  psychogeography  psychology  public  publications  publicthinking  publicwriting  publishing  punk  purpose  puzzles  qik  qrcodes  quentinfiore  questionasking  quicklinks  race  radio  ralphabellino  ranumukherjee  rapidprototyping  raumlabor  rauschenberg  reader-generatedcontent  readers  reading  reality  recommendations  record  recorder  recording  recordings  reference  reform  relationships  religion  remix  remixculture  remixing  remkoolhaas  repository  representation  research  resizing  resources  reuters  rhythm  richmedia  robertrauschenberg  robinsloan  rockport  rss  ruxandraguidi  samples  sanantonio  sandiego  sanfrancisco  santiagostelly  sarahkoenig  scalar  scholarship  school2.0  schooling  schools  science  sciencefiction  sciences  scifi  scratch  screen  screencapture  screens  screenshot  scrollbars  scrolling  seams  seanbuffington  sebastiangreger  secondaryliteracy  secondaryorality  self-expression  sensate  sensemaking  sensoryethnographylab  sequencer  seriousgames  services  seti  sex  seymourpapert  shanesnow  share  sharing  sherryturkle  sierraleon  simplicity  simulations  singletasking  skateboarding  skateboards  skating  skills  skype  slack  slideshow  slow  slowness  smalltalk  smartphones  snapchat  snarkmarket  snowfall  social  socialactivism  socialbooks  socialissues  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  socialstudies  society  software  solar  songs  sophie  sound  soundmaps  sounds  soundscapes  soundtracks  space  spacecollective  spanish  speakcityheights  specialists  speech  spokenword  sports  squeak  srg  states  statistics  stevekennedy  stop-motion  stories  storyboards  storyplanet  storytelling  streaming  streetart  students  studies  studio  subtitles  sustainability  syllabi  syllabus  ta-nehisicoates  tagging  tags  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  teaching  teachingwriting  technology  ted  teens  telephony  television  tennis  testament  texas  text  textbooks  texting  texttospeech  thanoszartaloudis  theater  thefilter  thesavagemind  thinking  thirdplaces  thisandagain  thisishuge  tijuana  timcarmody  time  timelines  timstelloh  tinkering  tips  todo  tonyhaile  tools  touch  towatch  tracking  training  transdisciplinary  transgender  translation  transmedia  trauma  travel  trends  triciaromano  trickster  tutorials  tv  twitter  ubicomp  ubiquitous  ubuntu  ucsd  ui  uk  uncertainty  uncreativewriting  understanding  universities  unpredictability  unschooling  upload.gif  urban  urbanism  us  usability  usc  user  usergenerated  usergeneratedcontent  utilities  ux  venue  via:britta  via:cburell  via:hrheingold  via:javierarbona  via:joguldi  via:litherland  via:preoccupations  via:tomc  video  videoart  videoblog  videoblogging  videogames  videos  vimeo  vincentmorisset  virtual  virtualreality  vision  visual  visualization  visualnovels  vlog  voice  voiceofsandiego  vook  voyager  vr  vulnerability  walking  walterong  war  warresistance  water  wearable  wearables  web  web2.0  webapps  webcams  webdesign  webdev  webdoc  webpublishing  webrococo  webtools  weight  whiteboards  wifi  wiki  wikipedia  wikis  willhoffman  willwright  windows  wireless  women  wonder  wondering  wordpress  words  workinginpublic  world  writing  youmedia  youth  youtube  zachseward  zachverdin  zattoo  zeega  zines  zoracasabere  édouardurcades 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: