robertogreco + mind + neuroscience   45

The Persistence Of Memory | Wired Science | Wired.com
"The great mystery of memory is how it endures. The typical neural protein only lasts for a few weeks, the cortex in a constant state of reincarnation. How, then, do our memories persist? It’s as if our remembered past can outlast the brain itself.

But wait: the mystery gets even more mysterious. A neuronal memory cannot simply be strong: it must also be specific. While each neuron has only a single nucleus, it has a teeming mass of dendritic branches. These twigs wander off in every direction, connecting to other neurons at dendritic synapses (imagine two trees whose branches touch in a dense forest). It is at these tiny crossings that our memories are made: not in the trunk of the neuronal tree, but in its sprawling canopy.

This means that every memory – represented as an altered connection between cells – cannot simply endure. It must endure in an incredibly precise way, so that the wiring diagram remains intact even as the mind gets remade, those proteins continually recycled."
brainscience  biology  science  kausiksi  2012  jonahlehrer  neuroscience  brain  mind  memory  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
A Sharper Mind, Middle Age and Beyond - NYTimes.com
"To isolate the specific impact of schooling on mental skills, Dr. Lachman & her colleagues tried to control for other likely reasons one person might outshine another—differences in income, parental achievement, gender, physical activity & age. After all, we know that the children of affluent, educated parents have a raft of advantages that could account for greater mental heft down the road. College graduates are able to compound their advantages because they can pour more resources into their minds & bodies.

Still, when Lachman & Dr. Tun reviewed results, they were surprised to discover that into middle age and beyond, people could make up for educational disadvantages encountered earlier in life."

[This doesn't make much sense to me. Is this really the cause & effect? "[A] college degree appears to slow the brain’s aging process." Or are people inclined to go to college wired this way, or the jobs that they're likely to have after college allowing them to keep their minds sharp?]
dementia  margielachman  knowledge  genecohen  brain  intelligence  howardgardner  psychology  patriciacohen  williamosler  neuroscience  mind  minds  aging  education  age  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
TPM: The Philosophers’ Magazine | Hacker’s challenge ["Peter Hacker tells James Garvey that neuroscientists are talking nonsense"]
“Philosophy does not contribute to our knowledge of the world we live in after the manner of any of the natural sciences. You can ask any scientist to show you the achievements of science over the past millennium, and they have much to show: libraries full of well-established facts and well-confirmed theories. If you ask a philosopher to produce a handbook of well-established and unchallengeable philosophical truths, there’s nothing to show. I think that is because philosophy is not a quest for knowledge about the world, but rather a quest for understanding the conceptual scheme in terms of which we conceive of the knowledge we achieve about the world. One of the rewards of doing philosophy is a clearer understanding of the way we think about ourselves and about the world we live in, not fresh facts about reality." [via: http://ayjay.tumblr.com/post/1456008129/philosophy-does-not-contribute-to-our-knowledge-of]
psychology  philosophy  consciousness  cognition  brain  neuroscience  mind  nature  peterhacker  wittgenstein  science  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
You Are What You Touch: How Tool Use Changes the Brain's Representations of the Body: Scientific American
"A common illustration of just how flexible the sense of our body is comes from changes in the brain’s representation of the body due to tool use. Humans, and some other animals, are able to use tools as additions to the body. When we use a long pole to retrieve an object we couldn’t otherwise reach, the pole becomes, in some sense, an extension of our body. Is this merely a poetic way of speaking, or does the brain actually incorporate the tool into its representation of the body? Studies of monkeys learning to use a rake to obtain distant objects show that this may be more than a mere metaphor. Multisensory brain cells respond both to touch on the hand or visual objects appearing near the hand. When the monkeys used the rake, these cells began to respond to objects appearing anywhere along the length of the tool, suggesting the brain represented the rake as actually being part of the hand."
neuroscience  perception  evolution  psychology  mind  brain  body  senses  technology  tools  humans  bodyrepresentation  bodies  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Proprioception - Wikipedia [via: http://twitter.com/bopuc/status/20373983137]
"Proprioception (pronounced /ˌproʊpri.ɵˈsɛpʃən/ PRO-pree-o-SEP-shən), from Latin proprius, meaning "one's own" and perception, is the sense of the relative position of neighbouring parts of the body. Unlike the exteroceptive senses by which we perceive the outside world, and interoceptive senses, by which we perceive the pain and movement of internal organs, proprioception is a third distinct sensory modality that provides feedback solely on the status of the body internally. It is the sense that indicates whether the body is moving with required effort, as well as where the various parts of the body are located in relation to each other."
awareness  biology  body  brain  cartography  consciousness  neuroscience  mind  learning  ideas  human  health  perception  physiology  proprioception  psychology  senses  science  self  bodies  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
How facts backfire - The Boston Globe
"In the end, truth will out. Won’t it?

Maybe not. Recently, a few political scientists have begun to discover a human tendency deeply discouraging to anyone with faith in the power of information. It’s this: Facts don’t necessarily have the power to change our minds. In fact, quite the opposite. In a series of studies in 2005 and 2006, researchers at the University of Michigan found that when misinformed people, particularly political partisans, were exposed to corrected facts in news stories, they rarely changed their minds. In fact, they often became even more strongly set in their beliefs. Facts, they found, were not curing misinformation. Like an underpowered antibiotic, facts could actually make misinformation even stronger."
truth  facts  psychology  politics  democracy  culture  philosophy  politicalscience  neuroscience  biology  brain  cognition  bias  belief  behavior  faith  information  media  mind  science  research 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Alcoholism : The Frontal Cortex
"Now here's some blatant speculation. I think one reason AA is successful, at least for many of those who commit to the program, is that it's designed to force people to confront their prediction errors. Just look at the twelve steps, many of which are all about the admission of mistakes, from step number 1 ("We admitted we were powerless over alcohol--that our lives had become unmanageable") to step number 8 ("Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all") to step number 10 ("Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it"). I'd suggest that the presence of these steps helps people break through the neuromodulatory problem of addiction, as the prefrontal cortex is forced to grapple with its massive failings and flaws. Because unless we accept our mistakes we will keep on making them."
2010  addiction  alcoholism  brain  neuroscience  psychology  jonahlehrer  prediction  decisions  mind  research 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Memory is Fiction : The Frontal Cortex
"Although our memories always feel true, they’re extremely vulnerable to errant suggestions, clever manipulations and the old fashioned needs of storytelling. (The mind, it turns out, cares more about crafting a good narrative than staying close to the truth.)
brain  neuroscience  jonahlehrer  storytelling  psychology  remembering  fiction  memory  mind  science 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The Anosognosic’s Dilemma: Something’s Wrong but You’ll Never Know What It Is (Part 1) - Opinionator Blog - NYTimes.com
"Dunning & Kruger argued...“When people are incompetent in strategies they adopt to achieve success & satisfaction, they suffer a dual burden: Not only do they reach erroneous conclusions & make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of ability to realize it. Instead...they are left w/ erroneous impression they are doing just fine.”
decisionmaking  culture  education  intelligence  incompetence  ignorance  psychology  errolmorris  epistemology  neuroscience  behavior  brain  confidence  mind  competency  tcsnmy  awareness  self-awareness  dunning-krugereffect  possibility 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The Amazonian tribe that can only count up to five | Science | The Guardian
"Does a group of indigenous South Americans hold the key to our relationship with maths? Here, an extract from an enlightening new book explains why it just might"
amazon  mathematics  psychology  intelligence  language  math  teaching  science  anthropology  brain  cognition  counting  culture  education  ethnography  numbers  neuroscience  mind 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Depression’s Upside - NYTimes.com
"doesn’t matter if we’re working on mathematical equation or through broken heart: anatomy of focus is inseparable from anatomy of melancholy...suggests depressive disorder is extreme form of ordinary thought process, part of dismal machinery that draws us toward our problems, like magnet to metal. is that closeness effective? Does despondency help us solve anything?...significant correlation btwn depressed affect & individual performance on intelligence test...once subjects were distracted from pain: lower moods were associated w/ higher scores. “results were clear. Depressed affect made people think better.” challenge is persuading people to accept misery, embrace tonic of despair. To say that depression has purpose or sadness makes us smarter says nothing about its awfulness. A fever, after all, might have benefits, but we still take pills to make it go away. This is paradox of evolution: even if our pain is useful, urge to escape from pain remains most powerful instinct"
jonahlehrer  psychology  creativity  writing  health  brain  depression  evolution  mind  thinking  thought  happiness  mood  darwin  relationships  evolutionarypsychology  neuroscience  culture  hope  charlesdarwin 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Brain: Stop Paying Attention: Zoning Out Is a Crucial Mental State | Memory, Emotions, & Decisions | DISCOVER Magazine
"The fact that both of these important brain networks become active together suggests that mind wandering is not useless mental static. Instead, Schooler proposes, mind wandering allows us to work through some important thinking. Our brains process information to reach goals, but some of those goals are immediate while others are distant. Somehow we have evolved a way to switch between handling the here and now and contemplating long-term objectives. It may be no coincidence that most of the thoughts that people have during mind wandering have to do with the future."
psychology  via:kottke  learning  science  brain  attention  neuroscience  thinking  memory  creativity  concentration  boredom  flow  daydreaming  cognition  mind 
july 2009 by robertogreco
How the city hurts your brain - Boston.com
"Recent research by scientists at the Santa Fe Institute used a set of complex mathematical algorithms to demonstrate that the very same urban features that trigger lapses in attention and memory -- the crowded streets, the crushing density of people -- also correlate with measures of innovation, as strangers interact with one another in unpredictable ways. It is the "concentration of social interactions" that is largely responsible for urban creativity, according to the scientists. The density of 18th-century London may have triggered outbreaks of disease, but it also led to intellectual breakthroughs, just as the density of Cambridge -- one of the densest cities in America -- contributes to its success as a creative center. One corollary of this research is that less dense urban areas, like Phoenix, may, over time, generate less innovation."
landscape  fredericklawolmstead  cities  urban  urbanism  brain  via:adamgreenfield  psychology  urbanplanning  design  architecture  culture  environment  housing  health  nature  cognition  attention  intelligence  neuroscience  mind  boston  biodiversity  behavior 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The Science of Memory: An Infinite Loop in the Brain - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International
"Wouldn't it be great to be able to remember everything? To see all our most important moments, all the priceless encounters, adventures and triumphs? What if memory never faded, but instead could be retrieved at any time, as reliably as films in a video store?" ... "She's constantly bombarded with fragments of memories, exposed to an automatic and uncontrollable process that behaves like an infinite loop in a computer. Sometimes there are external triggers, like a certain smell, song or word. But often her memories return by themselves. Beautiful, horrific, important or banal scenes rush across her wildly chaotic "internal monitor," sometimes displacing the present. "All of this is incredibly exhausting," says Price."
memory  neuroscience  mind  cognition  borges  intelligence  information  research  psychology  brain  philosophy  science  episodicmemory 
december 2008 by robertogreco
What Makes the Human Mind?  (November-December 2008)
"Hauser summarizes the distinguishing characteristics of human thought under four broad capacities. These include: the ability to combine and recombine different types of knowledge and information in order to gain new understanding; the ability to apply the solution for one problem to a new and different situation; the ability to create and easily understand symbolic representation of computation and sensory input; and the ability to detach modes of thought from raw sensory and perceptual input.
science  evolution  human  nature  animals  neuroscience  mind  anthropology  thought  creativity  language  knowledge 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Important work can be done while daydreaming - The Boston Globe
"Although there are many anecdotal stories of breakthroughs resulting from daydreams...Children in school are encouraged to stop daydreaming and "focus," and wandering minds are often cited as a leading cause of traffic accidents...In recent years, however, scientists have begun to see the act of daydreaming very differently. They've demonstrated that daydreaming is a fundamental feature of the human mind - so fundamental, in fact, that it's often referred to as our "default" mode of thought. Many scientists argue that daydreaming is a crucial tool for creativity, a thought process that allows the brain to make new associations and connections. Instead of focusing on our immediate surroundings - such as the message of a church sermon - the daydreaming mind is free to engage in abstract thought and imaginative ramblings. As a result, we're able to imagine things that don't actually exist, like sticky yellow bookmarks."
dreams  daydreaming  serendipity  imagination  messiness  creativity  brain  neuroscience  dreaming  intelligence  psychology  research  innovation  education  learning  children  behavior  mind  science 
september 2008 by robertogreco
In search of a beautiful mind - The Boston Globe
"He was long a jewel of the MIT faculty. Now, after a devastating brain injury, mathematician Seymour Papert is struggling bravely to learn again how to think like, speak like, be like the man of genius he was."
genius  learning  neuroscience  mit  seymourpapert  biography  brain  health  science  autodidacts  autodidactism  lego  olpc  education  children  mind  mindstorms  constructivism  unschooling  deschooling  recovery  rehabilitation  autodidacticism 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Neurophilosophy : The left brain/ right brain myth
"So the notion that someone is "left-brained" or "right-brained" is absolute nonsense. All complex behaviours and cognitive functions require the integrated actions of multiple brain regions in both hemispheres of the brain."
psychology  illusion  neuroscience  mind  learning  thinking  brain  myths 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Neurophilosophy : 6 iconoclastic discoveries about the brain
"Below are 6 long-held dogmas about the brain. Each one is followed by a brief description of research which shows that it is either untrue, or is an oversimplification."
via:preoccupations  biology  brain  neuroscience  science  psychology  mind  cognition  research 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Key to All Optical Illusions Discovered | LiveScience
"one-tenth of a second goes by before the brain translates signal into visual perception of the world..our visual system has evolved to compensate for neural delays, generating images of what will occur one-tenth of a second into future."
science  brain  psychology  perception  neuroscience  illusions  cognition  mind  cognitive  biology  senses  sight  visualization 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School [blog: http://brainrules.blogspot.com/]
"How do we learn? What exactly do sleep & stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking myth? Why is it so easy to forget—& so important to repeat new knowledge? Is it true that men & women have different brains?" + http://www.brainrules.net/the-rules
learning  brain  research  education  lifehacks  neuroscience  johnmedina  books  psychology  science  sleep  stress  teaching  brainresearch  information  efficiency  health  exercise  curiosity  memory  mind 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Get Smarter: 12 Hacks That Will Amp Up Your Brainpower
"1. Distract Yourself 2. Caffeinate With Care 3. Choose Impressive Information 4. Think Positive 5. Do the Right Drugs 6. Juice Your IQ Score 7. Know Your Brain 8. Don't Panic 9. Embrace Chaos 10. Get Visual 11. Exercise Wisely 12. Slow Down"
brain  productivity  memory  neuroscience  comprehension  memorization  education  efficiency  learning  lifehacks  knowledge  mind  tips  gtd  science  psychology  sleep  drugs  health  medicine  howto 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Clive Thompson on Why the Next Civil Rights Battle Will Be Over the Mind
"We think of our brains as the ultimate private sanctuary...but...boundaries are gradually eroding...host of emerging technologies aimed at tapping into our heads...raise a fascinating, & queasy, new ethical question: Do we have a right to "mental privacy
brain  ethics  neuroscience  surveillance  advertising  privacy  science  society  personalinformatics  technology  mind  intelligence  research  rights  future  psychology  politics  philosophy  clivethompson 
april 2008 by robertogreco
PsyBlog: 7 Sins of Memory: Complete Guide
"# How quickly do we forget? # When and how are memories warped? # What biases act on our memory? # Why is it sometimes impossible to forget?"
memory  mind  neuroscience  psychology  science  brain 
march 2008 by robertogreco
How we judge the thoughts of others : Nature News
"Brain division could help explain stereotyping, religious conflict and racism."
brain  science  psychology  mind  philosophy  neuroscience  relationships  society  racism 
march 2008 by robertogreco
TED | Talks | Jill Bolte Taylor: My stroke of insight (video)
"Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor had an opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: One morning, she realized she was having a massive stroke. As it happened -- as she felt her brain functions slip away one by one, speech, movement, understanding --
brain  science  ted  psychology  Philosophy  stroke  physiology  presentations  consciousness  buddhism  neuroscience  nirvana  lectures  mind  meaning  religion  life  biology 
march 2008 by robertogreco
The Autumn of the Multitaskers
"Neuroscience is confirming what we all suspect: Multitasking is dumbing us down and driving us crazy. One man’s odyssey through the nightmare of infinite connectivity"
multitasking  continuouspartialattention  attention  psychology  neuroscience  behavior  brain  cognition  cognitive  concentration  memory  connectivity  culture  society  stress  productivity  education  learning  lifehacks  slow  mind  organization  theatlantic  technology  recession  trends  bubbles  mobile  phones  distraction  etiquette  economics  freedom  simplicity  digitalnatives 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Snorting a Brain Chemical Could Replace Sleep
"In what sounds like a dream for millions of tired coffee drinkers, Darpa-funded scientists might have found a drug that will eliminate sleepiness."
sleep  drugs  health  future  performance  productivity  psychology  medicine  military  neuroscience  transhumanism  cognition  cognitive  brain  science  mind 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Erowid
"Erowid is a member-supported organization providing access to reliable, non-judgmental information about psychoactive plants and chemicals and related issues. We work with academic, medical, and experiential experts to develop and publish new resources,
drugs  experience  medicine  mind  neuroscience  health  psychology  subculture  substance  science  database 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Seed: The Listener
"As Oliver Sacks observes the mind through music, his belief in a science of empathy takes on new dimension."
oliversacks  neuroscience  music  mind  brain 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Mind Hacks: The neurology of Alice in Wonderland
"It was first reported by psychiatrist John Todd in a 1955 article that noted its connection with epilepsy and migraine. There are a variety of other possible syndromes that appear in the story, however. Dr Andrew Larner, author of the recent article, not
biology  books  neuroscience  literature  brain  mind 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Our Lives, Controlled From Some Guy’s Couch - New York Times
"if you accept a pretty reasonable assumption of Dr. Bostrom’s, it is almost a mathematical certainty that we are living in someone else’s computer simulation"
computers  future  life  mind  philosophy  religion  singularity  technology  simulations  science  matrix  artificial  virtual  virtuality  theory  evolution  neuroscience  visualization  existence  perception 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Are You Living in a Computer Simulation?
"... at least one of the propositions is true: 1 human species is likely to go extinct before reaching a “posthuman” stage; 2 any posthuman civilization is unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of their evolutionary history 3 we are liv
academia  mind  artificial  simulations  computer  computing  consciousness  theory  technology  philosophy  science  matrix  evolution  neuroscience  visualization  virtuality  singularity  scifi  futurism  existence  religion  perception  debate 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Scientists find drug to banish bad memories | Science | Earth | Telegraph
"Researchers have found they can use drugs to wipe away single, specific memories while leaving other memories intact."
brain  forgetting  medication  medicine  memory  mind  neuroscience  psychology  research  science 
july 2007 by robertogreco
ABC News: Borat, Colbert and Our Loopy Selves
"I just read of a panel discussion...whose subject was the number of levels of reality present if Stephen Colbert, anchor of the faux news "Colbert Report," were to interview Sacha Baron Cohen, creator of the characters Borat and Ali G."
books  reviews  reality  self  identity  perception  mind  brain  consciousness  science  neuroscience 
june 2007 by robertogreco
List of cognitive biases - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Cognitive bias is distortion in the way humans perceive reality (see also cognitive distortion). See also the list of thinking-related topic lists. Some of these have been verified empirically in the field of psychology, others are considered general cat
advertising  brain  bias  branding  cognition  criticalthinking  decisionmaking  decisions  definitions  design  development  economics  fallacies  human  intelligence  knowledge  learning  logic  mind  research  neuroscience  sociology  perception  reasoning  reason  philosophy  perspective  thought  thinking  writing  words  language 
may 2007 by robertogreco
26 Reasons What You Think is Right is Wrong
"A cognitive bias is something that our minds commonly do to distort our own view of reality. Here are the 26 most studied and widely accepted cognitive biases."
advertising  brain  bias  branding  cognition  criticalthinking  decisionmaking  decisions  definitions  design  development  economics  fallacies  human  intelligence  knowledge  learning  logic  mind  research  neuroscience  sociology  perception  reasoning  reason  philosophy  perspective  thought  thinking  writing  words  language 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Cognitive Daily: Artists look different
"These two pictures represent the eye motions of two viewers as they scan a work of art with the goal of remembering it later. One of them is a trained artist, and the other is a trained psychologist. Can you tell which is which?"
art  artists  attention  brain  science  cognition  visualization  vision  psychology  perception  neuroscience  mind  images  human  noticing  memory  eyetracking  education  research 
march 2007 by robertogreco
YouTube - In My Language
"This is not a look-at-the-autie gawking freakshow as much as it is a statement about what gets considered thought, intelligence, personhood, language, and communication, and what does not."
autism  brain  cognitive  communication  human  intelligence  neuroscience  psychology  linguistics  language  mind  video 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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