robertogreco + mind + happiness   6

The power to be who we want to be
"The actor & impresario Joseph Gordon-Levitt is really frighteningly omni-talented &, on top of everything else, rather wise:

"On some level, we as human beings can be who we want to be. Our identity & our nature can be in our control. I don’t just mean the presentation of our identity. Look at Gary Oldman—look at his characters in ‘True Romance’ or the Harry Potter films or in the Batman movies—you can’t be as good as he is by doing it just on the surface. We have the power to be who we want to be, whoever that is."

That’s from an interview w/ Geoff Boucher. It’s true, & it’s scary that it’s true, because it means if we aren’t who we want to be, we have no one to blame… but ourselves.

It reminds me of something I heard a long time ago. I’m paraphrasing from musty memory here… it went something like this:

"I have good news & bad news. Bad news first: if you’re not happy right now, at this moment in your life, you will never be happy. Now, the good news: you can be happy right now."
geoffboucher  being  psychology  mind  garyoldman  acting  josephgordon-levitt  positivepsychology  willpower  power  human  identity  happiness  2012  robinsloan  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Half the Time Everyone's Thinking About Something Else | Smart Journalism. Real Solutions. Miller-McCune.
"New research finds our minds wander much more frequently than we realize, and our inability to stay focused in the present leads to unhappiness."
happiness  attention  psychology  mind  productivity  work  brain  add  wanderingmind  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Depression’s Upside - NYTimes.com
"doesn’t matter if we’re working on mathematical equation or through broken heart: anatomy of focus is inseparable from anatomy of melancholy...suggests depressive disorder is extreme form of ordinary thought process, part of dismal machinery that draws us toward our problems, like magnet to metal. is that closeness effective? Does despondency help us solve anything?...significant correlation btwn depressed affect & individual performance on intelligence test...once subjects were distracted from pain: lower moods were associated w/ higher scores. “results were clear. Depressed affect made people think better.” challenge is persuading people to accept misery, embrace tonic of despair. To say that depression has purpose or sadness makes us smarter says nothing about its awfulness. A fever, after all, might have benefits, but we still take pills to make it go away. This is paradox of evolution: even if our pain is useful, urge to escape from pain remains most powerful instinct"
jonahlehrer  psychology  creativity  writing  health  brain  depression  evolution  mind  thinking  thought  happiness  mood  darwin  relationships  evolutionarypsychology  neuroscience  culture  hope  charlesdarwin 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Relevant History: Quote of the day: Timothy Ferris
""What is the opposite of happiness? Sadness? No. Just as love and hate are two sides of the same coin, so are happiness and sadness. Crying out of happiness is a perfect illustration of this. The opposite of love is indifference, and the opposite of happiness is - here's the clincher - boredom... The question you should be asking isn't 'What do I want?' or 'What are my goals?' but 'What would excite me?' Remember - boredom is the enemy, not some abstract 'failure.'" I recently realized that for me, the opposite of being depressed isn't being happy, but rather being active. So perhaps happiness and boredom are opposites."
boredom  happiness  sadness  depression  mind  psychology  love  hate 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Emory Magazine: Winter 2008: Why is This Man Smiling?
"The study of happiness—and its causes—has Buddhists and scientists talking"
happiness  religion  mind  body  depression  busshism  research  health  via:behemoney  bodies 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Can a Lack of Sleep Set Back Your Child's Cognitive Abilities? -- New York Magazine
"Overstimulated, overscheduled kids are getting at least an hour’s less sleep than they need, a deficiency that, new research reveals, has the power to set their cognitive abilities back years."
children  cognition  learning  sleep  teens  emotions  attitude  overscheduling  education  health  mind  psychology  research  lifehacks  happiness  creativity  youth  brain  science  kids  parenting  lifestyle  society  homeschool  cognitive  obesity  depression  moods  memory  dreams 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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