robertogreco + michaelchabon   13

My Son, The Prince Of Fashion | GQ
"You are born into a family and those are your people, and they know you and they love you and if you are lucky they even, on occasion, manage to understand you. And that ought to be enough. But it is never enough. Abe had not been dressing up, styling himself, for all these years because he was trying to prove how different he was from everyone else. He did it in the hope of attracting the attention of somebody else—somewhere, someday—who was the same. He was not flying his freak flag; he was sending up a flare, hoping for rescue, for company in the solitude of his passion.

“You were with your people. You found them,” I said.

He nodded.

“That's good,” I said. “You're early.”"
michaelchabon  identity  parenting  fashion  children  2016  passion  tribes  attention  signaling  presentationofself 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Venture Ethnography 1: a bi(bli)ography « Justin Pickard
"Project Cascadia is the test-case for a cluster of ideas I’ve been playing with for the best part of five years. A chance to break out my signature obsessions …

Hauntings, world expos, gonzo journalism, science fiction, systems, geopolitics, utopianism, virtuality, globalisation, the sublime, resilience, collapsonomics, aesthetics, architecture, environmentalism, infrastructure, design, futures studies, sovereignty, atemporality, risk, the nation-state, the uncanny, Americana, technoscience, cyberpunk, multispecies ethnography, fiction, capitalism, the human senses, counterfactual history, media and cyborgs (and media cyborgs)

… and nail them to the mast of a weird and interstitial sort of boat; a soupy, hybrid writing practice that would combine the best of ethnography, journalism and science fiction.

In lieu of a biography, then, I’m offering a bibliography. Five years of my brain, in books, articles, essays, and blog posts…"
urbanism  jgballard  richardbarbrook  marcaugé  warrenellis  jenniferegan  bradleygarrett  donnaharaway  naomiklein  brunolatour  ursulaleguin  ianmacdonald  suketumehta  chinamieville  jimrossignol  michaeltaussig  huntersthompson  adamgreenfield  brucesterling  thomaspynchon  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  cityofsound  danhill  davidgraeber  matthewgandy  williamgibson  corydoctorow  douglascoupland  michaelchabon  jamaiscascio  laurenbeukes  journalism  mediacyborgs  cyborgs  geopolitics  aesthetics  utopianism  risk  atemporality  sovereignty  sciencefiction  cyberpunk  technoscience  ethnography  capitalism  globalization  collapsonomics  resilience  writing  projectcascadia  bibliographies  2011  justinpickard  bibliography  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Manhood for Amateurs: The Wilderness of Childhood by Michael Chabon | The New York Review of Books
"Art is a form of exploration, of sailing off into the unknown alone, heading for those unmarked places on the map. If children are not permitted—not taught—to be adventurers and explorers as children, what will become of the world of adventure, of stories, of literature itself?"
2009  learning  literature  deschooling  unschooling  storytelling  adventure  michaelchabon  cv  children  exploration  art  manhood  masculinity  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Maps of our lives « SB129
"as your child gets older, you become aware that they should be exploring & pushing boundaries. That their spatial freedom in some way equals mental freedom – the unseen, unsupervised allows for growth & development.

As Chabon wonderfully describes, in adolesence it is the ‘wilderness’, those part of the landscape – either rural, suburban or urban – that are derelict, abandoned & free from adult management, that allow for a space of the imagination. A landscape of performance and play, where scenes of adventure and misbehavior are acted out, where new worlds are constructed and occupied, where rules are made by kids and the adults are the enemy. It is in these spaces where we grow and foster our creative imaginations.

As we enter young adulthood our spatial boundaries dramatically increase, we move away from home, travel on our own & explore the places of our future lives. In fact, I would go as far as saying you’re identity becomes defined by the scope of your spatial experiences."
cartography  personalcartographies  blankways  location  locativemedia  spatialpractice  discovery  tomloois  identity  spatialexistence  thresholds  boundaries  exploration  parenting  adolescence  adolescents  childhood  manhoodforamateurs  michaelchabon  2012  spatialexperience  experience  mapping  maps  mattward  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
MAPS OF FICTIONAL WORLDS
“When I first decided I wanted to be a writer, when I was 10, 11 years old, the books that I loved…came with maps and glossaries and timelines—books like Lord Of The Rings, Dune, The Chronicles Of Narnia. I imagined that’s what being a writer was: You invented a world, and you did it in a very detailed way, and you told stories that were set in that world.”
—Michael Chabon…

My undergrad thesis argued that world-building wasn’t just for fantasy & sci-fi writers—every tale has a setting, every tale creates a world in the reader’s mind—& it explored ways that drawing that world (visual thinking!) can lead to better fiction.

Some of my favorite “lit’ry” books are accompanied by maps.

[examples]

Some writers use previously-made maps to help create their fiction: Melville used whaling charts, Joyce used Ordnance surveys of Dublin, & Pynchon used aerial maps.

Poking around the ‘net I found maps for Faulkner’s books, Treasure Island, and of course, Tolkien…"

[See also the comments.]
fictionalmaps  fictionalworlds  books  literature  literarymaps  storytelling  reference  graphics  writing  michaelchabon  2008  visualthinking  worldbuilding  cartography  mapping  visualization  fiction  maps  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
List of fictional books - Wikipedia
"A fictional book is a non-existent book created specifically for (i.e. within) a work of fiction. This is not a list of works of fiction (i.e., actual novels, mysteries, etc), but rather imaginary books that do not actually exist.

Uses: Such a book may (1) provide the basis of the novel's plot, (2) add verisimilitude by supplying plausible background, or (3) act as a common thread in a series of books or the works of a particular writer or canon of work. A fictional book may also (4) be used as a conceit to illustrate a story within a story, or (5) be essentially a joke title, thus helping to establish the humorous or satirical tone of the work. (Fictional books used as hoaxes or as purported support for actual research are usually referred to as false documents.)"
borges  umbertoeco  michaelchabon  italocalvino  neilgaiman  philipkdick  aldoushuxley  johnirving  kafka  georgeorwell  orhanpamuk  thomaspynchon  vonnegut  wikipedia  writing  fiction  lists  literature  books  meta  invention  verisimilitude  kurtvonnegut  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Ask the Author Live: Dana Goodyear with Neil Gaiman: Ask the Author : The New Yorker
"Authors like Michael Chabon have been cru­sad­ing for awhile to break down the bar­ri­ers between so-called ‘lit­er­ary fic­tion’ and ‘genre fic­tion’. Do you have any idea why lit­er­a­ture remains so com­part­men­tal­ized? Is there any end in sight?
neilgaiman  writing  interviews  michaelchabon  confluence  comics  lowbrow  glvo  cv  literature  fiction  barriers  compartmentalization  art  culture 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Sam Anderson on When the Meganovel Shrank - The 00's Issue -- New York Magazine
"What new species of books, then, have proved themselves fit to survive in the attentional ecosystem of the aughts? What kind of novel, if any, can appeal to readers who read with 34 nested browser tabs open simultaneously on their frontal lobes? And, for that matter, what kind of novel gets written by novelists who spend increasing chunks of their own time reading words off screens?"
2000s  bestof  literature  writing  media  books  culture  fiction  newmedia  reading  attention  technology  robertobolaño  googlebooks  samanderson  davidmitchell  michaelchabon  davidfosterwallace  infinitejest  postmodernism  daveeggers  junotdíaz  toread  00s 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Faking It as a Productivity Tip - ProfHacker.com
"Faking it is a crucial way to get anything accomplished. Many abstracts for conferences or proposals for books or sabbaticals or anything else are written before the project described therein is finished, or sometimes even started. You build a constituency for a new course in part by positing its existence, and then trusting that a successful iteration of it will lead to even more interested students. Al Filreis gave an excellent example of this on Twitter the other day: “In the late 90s univ’s had big plans for ‘distance learning’ but it all fell through (not enough $). Now it simply happens.” It happens through getting out there and doing the work–even if, or perhaps especially when, you’re not 100% sure of what you’re doing."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/3698 ]

[now at: http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/faking-it-as-a-productivity-tip/22762 ]
productivity  cv  doing  do  sabbaticals  diggingin  tcsnmy  iteration  making  thinking  process  academia  learning  learningbydoing  gtd  autodidacts  unschooling  faking  fakingit  michaelchabon  kiostark  brepettis  nobodyknowswhatthey'redoing 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Manhood for Amateurs: The Wilderness of Childhood - The New York Review of Books
"Childhood is a branch of cartography... Most great stories of adventure ... come furnished with a map... traveler soon learns that the only way to come to know a city ... is to visit it alone, preferably on foot, ... become as lost as one possibly can. ... our children have become cult objects to us, too precious to be risked. At the same time they have become fetishes, the objects of an unhealthy and diseased fixation. And once something is fetishized, capitalism steps in and finds a way to sell it. What is the impact of the closing down of the Wilderness on the development of children's imaginations? ... Should I send my children out to play? ... Even if I do send them out, will there be anyone to play with? Art is a form of exploration, of sailing off into the unknown alone, heading for those unmarked places on the map. If children are not permitted—not taught—to be adventurers and explorers as children, what will become of the world of adventure, of stories, of literature itself?"
children  childhood  parenting  society  freedom  fear  safety  maps  mapping  michaelchabon  literature  cartography  creativity  narrative  education  learning  exploration  unschooling  deschooling  travel  risk  survival  independence  adventure  stories  storytelling  danger  mattgroening  writing  culture  books  youth  kids  manhood  masculinity 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Michael Chabon on why real-life superhero costumes don't work. This... (kottke.org)
"A constructed superhero costume is a replica with no original, a model built on a scale of x:1. However accurate and detailed, such a work has the tidy airlessness of a model-train layout but none of the gravitas that such little railyards and townscapes
superheroes  glvo  costumes  michaelchabon  comics  illustration  sewing  fabric  fashion 
march 2008 by robertogreco
rodcorp: Various art and books
Michael Chabon on Solitude and the Fortresses of Youth: "It is in the nature of a teenager to want to destroy. The destructive impulse is universal among children of all ages, rises to a peak of vividness, ingenuity and fascination in adolescence, and the
children  youth  destruction  violence  umbertoeco  michaelchabon  play  learning  boys  rodcorp  guns 
december 2007 by robertogreco

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