robertogreco + littoralzone   4

Between Two Languages: An Interview with Yoko Tawada
"Among the finest of Tawada’s works are short stories about adapting to new cultures, both physically and linguistically. The daughter of a nonfiction translator and academic bookseller, Tawada learned to read in over five languages; she speaks English, but doesn’t write it. “I feel in between two languages, and that’s big enough,” she told me. Her stories often turn on feeling outside the culture, as an immigrant, as a citizen witnessing great national change, or even as a tourist."



"I look like a person who cannot think when I wake up, because I’m still quite between the sleep and the dream and the waking, and that’s the best time for business."



"Being multilingual is tricky. I feel more as though I am between two languages, and that feels like enough. To study that in-between space has given me so much poetry. I don’t feel like one of those international people who juggles many tongues."
yokotawada  language  languages  bilingualism  2018  interviews  japan  japanese  howwewrite  dreams  sleep  liminality  betweenness  littoralzone  liminalspaces  multilingualism  dualism  srg 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Victor Hwang at Austin Community College, December 11, 2014 : The Best Commencement Speeches, Ever : NPR
"When you go fishing, the best places to drop your line are at the transition points, where light meets dark, shallow meets deep, fast meets slow. The same is true for human life." —Victor Hwang, Austin Community College, December 11, 2014
seams  scars  2014  liminality  borders  edges  transitions  crosspollination  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  victorhwang  liminalspaces  littoralzone 
july 2015 by robertogreco
HIBINOSEKKEI + youji no shiro display gridded façade on hanazono kindergarten
"keeping to the local architectural styles of the miyakojima region- an island 2000km away from tokyo- this is where the hanazono kindergarten and nursery is located. designed by HIBINOSEKKEI and youji no shiro, the building has been characterized by its subtropical, oceanic climate as well as its surrounding context. immersing the children with the outdoors and encouraging creativity are two main elements underlined throughout the nursery. the ground floor, open, breazy and like a studio, is dedicated to art and simultaneously promotes comfortable ventilation. the kindergarten features courtyards and terraces allowing the children to integrating learning, playing and eating outside whenever it is possible."
hibinosekkei  youjinoshiro  architecture  design  schooldesign  education  kindergarten  japan  children  littoralzone  indooroutdoor  schools  liminalspaces  liminality 
may 2015 by robertogreco
The Littoral Space — Matter — Medium
"The littoral zone is defined as the intertidal segment of a beach, from the splash region above the high-water mark to full submergence of the shore. It’s the part that is constantly shifting and changing. You can certainly measure the high-water mark with a strong degree of accuracy over years, but you can’t predict how the spray will land when the tide is high, and the waves will do as they wish. The ocean has its own agency, and the sand is always shifting under your feet.

I’ve been a full-time freelance writer for something approaching 25 years, now. For most writers, me included, that is a littoral space to live in.

The sand is always shifting under my feet. The tides are broadly predictable on an ordinary day, but there aren’t many ordinary days. There have been days out here where a storm system has been bouncing around the estuary, travelling out of sight towards the far tip of the Kent coast, and then ricocheting off and dragging the river with it to unexpectedly smash up against our walls. Sometimes a weather system will get stuck and wheel over the town for days. Every now and then, some nightmare storm will brew up in a dark and unseen region of the North Sea and then hammer up the river like the Mongol Horde in full stampede."



"You discover, later, that you’re not good enough, or not lucky enough, or not present enough, and you made too many important decisions on the fly because you were too busy or too scattered or too tired, and that you’re never going to be that person who writes one of those inspirational blog posts about success. You’re in your 40s and you’re still standing on the shore, keeping a wary eye on the riptide, because you know that all the small things you’ve built could be swept away overnight."
littoralzone  warrenellis  writing  freelancing  2015  life  economics  impermanence  change  jacobmagraw  liminalspaces  liminality 
may 2015 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: