robertogreco + krisfallon   3

Rashomon Project
"Recent protests, political unrest, and news events have been well documented with digital video and photos posted online on sites like YouTube. As smartphones grow in popularity, this trend will accelerate. Yet it remains difficult to obtain a comprehensive view of contested events from the many individual photos and video accounts. The result is that viewers often draw contradictory conclusions by seeing only parts of the available material. The Rashomon Project is developing an online toolkit that will facilitate rapidly assembly and public review of "Multi-Perspective Chronologies" where many videos are time-aligned and displayed simultaneously. Initial experiments with vanilla iPhone and Android video show that temporal metadata embedded in the digital files can be used to do a very close alignment. Once they are closely aligned, audio signals from video can be processed to further refine the alignment. Such a toolkit will benefit the public, citizen journalists, and ideally courts or commissions charged with investigating disputed incidents. Our goal is to allow the public (potentially hundreds of thousands of viewers) to gain a much better understanding of contested events from user-generated photos and video than is currently possible."

[via: http://www.krisfallon.com/projects/ ]

[Update 27 April 2014: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/04/hey-youtube-we-need-a-multi-video-syncing-function/361236/ ]
srg  rashomon  audio  journalism  perception  perspective  documentary  video  film  onlinetoolkit  multi-perspectivechronologies  citizenjournalism  time  chronology  iphone  android  storytelling  usergenerated  krisfallon  darkmatterproject 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Critical Making | materials protocols and culture
"Critical Making will operationalize and critique the practice of “making” through both foundational literature and hands on studio culture. As hybrid practitioners, students will develop fluency in readily collaging and incorporating a variety of physical materials and protocols into their practice. With design research as a lens, students will envision and create future computational experiences that critically explore social and culturally relevant technological themes such as community, privacy, environment, education, economics, energy, food, biology, democracy, activism, healthcare, social justice, etc.

While no previous technical knowledge is required to take this course, class projects will involve basic programing, electronic circuity, and digital fabrication design. While tutorials and instruction will be provided, students will be expected to develop basic skills in each of these areas in order to complete the course projects. The course will result in a final public show of student work.

The course goals are:

• develop a critical understanding of emerging making technologies and their role within the current cultural and social context
• establish proficiency with the fundamental concepts, methods, and practices of physical modeling, sketching, form giving, electronic prototyping, and hands on making across a range of materials
• improve students ability to make expressive, physical, interactive objects that critique and advance computing culture through the production of making and artifact creation
• advance the communication and presentation skill of students through the process of the studio critique

projects

This is a studio class with time devoted to lecture, discussion, practice activities, design worksessions, and critique of student work. This course will consist of two Provocations and a Final Project demonstrating a functional interactive object set within a real life context and scenario. There will also be a series of Field Activities and in class sessions that are incuded as a portion of your particpation grade.

readings

Readings will be assigned throughout the semester. Everyone is expected to read the readings. One or two people will be selected for each reading to prepare a class presentation. Each student is expected to engage in class discussions when readings are assigned. This counts towards your class participation grade.

zip.crit

Most classes will begin with a zip.crit. A zip.crit is a rapid crit of an interface, object, design, etc. We will be rotating through the class roster and choosing one person to do a zip.crit each class. That person will select an interface, object, design, instructable, kickstarter, toy, etc. At the beginning of class that person will briefly introduce the object, interface, design to us. The class will collectively critique the artifact.

evaluation

Work and performance in the course will be evaluated after each Provocation and the Final Project. In addition, the process of exploration is as important as the final product, so it is important that students manage time well and devote time to working on the assignments during the course of a week. If class time is given as a worksession and is not put to good use, students’ grades will be penalized. For assignments done in teams, students will be graded on individual contributions as well as synthesis with the team. Work that is late will be decremented in grade.

rules of engagement

One of the main learning exercises in this course is the critique. We will be building this skill throughout the semester Each of the assignments will be critiqued in class.

Be there!

Critique days mandatory attendance. If you are not in class or late, we will deduct from your attendance grade. There will be no exceptions.

Attendance of all classes is mandatory. You are allowed one absence for the semester without penalty (except critique days); thereafter you will receive zero credit for the missed studio. To receive an additional excused absence, you must ask in advance, and receive an acknowledgment from the instructor.

Excusable absences include family emergencies, job interviews, and presenting at a conference. It does not include wanting to leave early for long weekend or vacation. To receive credit for attendance, you must arrive on time. No late assignments will be accepted

Be active!

During the in class critique everyone is expected to be engaged in the discussion. Assignments, timely attendance, and in-class and team participation are a critical part of the grade. Bringing examples from outside of the class is considered to be an assignment and is also important.

Be attentive!

No laptops, phones, electronics out or used during critique and at other selected parts of class.

grading criteria

participation in assignments
good use of class time: attendance, critiques, (NO multitasking)
problem selection
rigorous design explorations
quality of craftsmanship and level of completion
quality of the team’s reflection and communication about a design solution and process
For projects done in teams, students will be graded on individual contributions as well as synthesis with the team.
Work that is late will be decremented in grade.

PARTICIPATION 20%
PROVOCATION 1 20%
PROVOCATION 2 20%
FINAL PROVOCATION 40%"

[See also: http://www.paulos.net/
http://www.krisfallon.com/
http://www.isopoddesign.com/ ]
education  sustainability  making  classideas  syllabus  2013  ericpaulos  krisfallon  chrismeyers  environment  biology  democracy  activism  healthcare  socialjustice  studioculture  openstudio  openstudioproject  makers  berkeley  bayarea  programming  coding  computing  electronics  digitalfabrication  technology  learning  lcproject  kickstarter  instructables  prototyping  glvo  edg  srg  syllabi 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Kris Fallon
"I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Film & Media at UC Berkeley with a Designated Emphasis in New Media through the Berkeley Center for New Media.  Beyond my two ‘homes’ here on campus I also work with the Townsend Center for the Humanities on their film series and as a Graduate Student Researcher at the CITRIS Data & Democracy Initiative.

Research

My research looks at documentary practices across a range of media, from photography and film to data visualization and other digital forms.  I’m interested in the different ways we represent the world to ourselves and try to persuade others to share this same view.  My dissertation looks specifically at the collision of documentary film and digital media in the United States post 9/11.  I demonstrate that the political conflict of the Bush Era pushed activists and artists to experiment with a range of tools that blended image making with other technologies social networks, games, virtual environments and data analytics."

[via: http://make.berkeley.edu/ ]
krisfallon  bayarea  film  documentary  filmmaking  socialnetworks  games  gaming  images  dataanalytics  berkeley  photography  newmedia  glvo  edg  srg 
may 2013 by robertogreco

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