robertogreco + kickstarter   77

The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
january 2019 by robertogreco
11 video game trends that will change the future of the industry | Technology | The Guardian
"1. VR with friends rather than alone

2. Physically collaborative games

Virtual reality and its experimental tech contemporaries are exploring new ways to incorporate the body as more than just an anchor to the physical world. As Ghislaine Boddington, creative director of body>data>space, noted in her talk on virtual reality and the “internet of bodies”, the hope for the future is in recognising and augmenting physical bodies in games and play. She offers technologies like programmable gels used with the body in more intimate ways, such as rubbing “gels on to erogenous zones”, allowing partners to “connect together at a distance”.

Boddington also noted the future of physically collaborative and increasingly social spaces in AR, as seen in the very popular Pokémon Go: “Pokémon Go is definitely a collaborative share space. The Pokémon Go site, along with many others, allow the individual to join with the group into the middle, both in a physical and a virtual way.”

Implications of the physical are vast, as Robin Hunicke, co-founder and creative director of Funomena (Woorld, Luna) and previously of thatgamecompany (Journey), noted on the psychological impact of VR brought about by gestural controls, and recognising the capacity of range of movement from players. What does it mean for a player, psychologically, to encourage them to stand tall and strike a powerful pose? What might it mean to force them into a crouched position, to feel small? The necessity of an embodied experience in VR also brings up new questions, such as what the platform offers by way of accessibility.

3. The future of augmented reality

Pokémon Go came to the UK on the third and last day of the conference, and it felt like everyone in Brighton was catching Magikarp and Shellder and Seel and all the other water Pokémon the seaside town had to offer. Had this international hit been available a little earlier, the conference schedule would surely have contained a few more panels about augmented reality. Whether we can expect to see an AR-heavy Develop 2017 will depend on whether Pokémon Go represents the start of a new trend, or if it’s simply a one-off success carried by an already successful brand.

Ismail thinks the latter. When asked what he would do with Pokémon Go, he said that he would sell it, and that it hasn’t proven anything about AR itself. “We’re seeing a lot of discussion right now about whether AR just beat VR, and I think that would be a very wrong statement. Like, Pokémon beat VR, that’s for sure, but I guess Pokémon beat everything at the moment. Pokémon beat Tinder and Twitter, which is a big deal.”

Hunicke might not be looking to make the next Pokémon Go, but she’s still interested in the potential of augmented-reality games that “make the world more silly and joyful, and less logical”. One of Funomena’s upcoming games, Woorld, is described as “a hand-held Alternative Reality experience”, a “whimsical, exploratory application” that lets you place virtual objects against the backdrop of your physical environment. Created in collaboration with Google, with art from Keita Takahashi (Katamari Damacy, Noby Noby Boy), this colourful augmented-reality game and sandbox will be available on devices that include Google’s new AR-enabling platform Tango, like the upcoming Lenovo Phab2 Pro.

4. Incremental console updates …

5. The next step for mobile: TV …

6. Sayonara, Steam: the rise of specialised stores

The number of games on Steam is on the rise, and with it, the number of games that go unplayed or unnoticed. Nearly 37% of all registered Steam games go unplayed , and it’s no secret that many indie games – even good, critically acclaimed games – get lost amid a sea of other green lit games.

In light of this, smaller more specialised distribution services are becoming more important. Itch.io, an “indie game marketplace and DIY game jam host” is already hugely popular in the indie scene, offering pay-what-you-want and minimum-pricing models. Just last year, Itch’s co-founder Leaf Corcoran revealed in a blog post about the site’s finances that they had paid out $393,000 to developers. Since then, the platform has only grown and it’s likely that we’ll see more specialised distributors following Itch’s model.

7. The rise of indie studios …

8. Rejecting crunch

Crunch, ie mandatory (and often unpaid) overtime in the weeks or months leading to a game’s release, has long been an issue for this industry. More than a decade since Erin Hoffman wrote about her husband’s experiences of unpaid overtime when working for EA, in an originally anonymous blog post known at the time as “EA Spouse”, crunch is still commonplace in studios of all sizes, and people are still fighting it.

At this year’s Develop, Machine Studios (Maia) founder Simon Roth gave a talk called “Killing the Indie Crunch Myth: Shipping Games Alive”, which began tweet:
People who support crunch are going against 100+ years of data and science. They are the flat earthers of software development.

9. Design that puts feelings first

The design practice underlying Hunicke’s studio Funomena, and the focus of her keynote, is one she calls “feel engineering”. As Hunicke describes it: “Feel engineering is the process by which you create a game backwards from the feeling you want to create in a person forward towards the mechanics and the dynamics of the game itself.” She notes that while feel engineering isn’t easy, due to its time commitment, high cost, and level of emotional investment asked from development teams, it’s worth it. Hunicke speaks to the positive studio culture of feeling-focused engineering, and its contrast to the toxicity of crunch is evident. “The process of making it is so delightful,” she adds. “It’s so much better than anything I’ve ever done.”

We’ve already seen aspects of feel engineering in the mobile market, with games looking to reverse-engineer social situations people already find fun. Haslam outlines how the design of “co-operative shouting game” Spaceteam was inspired by the social experience of playing a board game with friends, an experience its lead designer Henry Smith already enjoyed.

10. Trying – and failing …

11. Feeling twitchy about YouTube and Twitch"
games  gaming  videogames  future  2016  vr  virtualreality  ar  augmentedreality  youtube  twitch  funomena  kickstarter  crowdfunding  indiegames  design  gamedesign  spaceteam  social  collaboration  braid  worldofgoo  steam  itch.io  mobile  phones  smartphones  pokemongo  keitatakahashi  robinhunicke  thatgamecompany  ghislaineboddington  body>data>space  bodies  play  physical  oculusrift  ramiismail  jordanericaebber  katbrewster  pokémongo  body 
july 2016 by robertogreco
The Internet of Things You Don’t Really Need - The Atlantic
"We already chose to forego a future of unconnected software. All of your devices talk constantly to servers, and your data lives in the Cloud because there’s increasingly no other choice. Eventually, we won’t have unconnected things, either. We’ve made that choice too, we just don’t know it yet. For the moment, you can still buy toasters and refrigerators and thermostats that don’t talk to the Internet, but try to find a new television that doesn’t do so. All new TVs are smart TVs, asking you to agree to murky terms and conditions in the process of connecting to Netflix or Hulu. Soon enough, everything will be like Nest. If the last decade was one of making software require connectivity, the next will be one of making everything else require it. Why? For Silicon Valley, the answer is clear: to turn every industry into the computer industry. To make things talk to the computers in giant, secured, air-conditioned warehouses owned by (or hoping to be owned by) a handful of big technology companies.

But at what cost? What improvements to our lives do we not get because we focused on “smart” things? Writing in The Baffler last year, David Graeber asked where the flying cars, force fields, teleportation pods, space colonies, and all the other dreams of the recent past’s future have gone. His answer: Technological development was re-focused so that it wouldn’t threaten existing seats of power and authority. The Internet of Things exists to build a market around new data about your toasting and grilling and refrigeration habits, while duping you into thinking smart devices are making your lives better than you could have made them otherwise, with materials other than computers. Innovation and disruption are foils meant to distract you from the fact that the present is remarkably similar to the past, with you working even harder for it.

But it sure feels like it makes things easier, doesn’t it? The automated bike locks and thermostats all doing your bidding so you can finally be free to get things done. But what will you do, exactly, once you can monitor your propane tank level from the comfort of the toilet or the garage or the liquor store? Check your Gmail, probably, or type into a Google Doc on your smartphone, maybe. Or perhaps, if you’re really lucky, tap some ideas into Evernote for your Internet of Things startup’s crowdfunding campaign. “It’s gonna be huge,” you’ll tell your cookout guests as you saw into a freshly grilled steak in the cool comfort of your Nest-controlled dining room. “This is the future.”"
2015  ianbogost  iot  internetofthings  design  davidgraeber  labor  siliconvalley  technology  power  authority  innovation  disruption  work  future  past  present  marketing  propaganda  google  cloud  cloudcomputing  computers  code  googledocs  ubicomp  ubiquitouscomputing  everyware  adamgreenfield  amazon  dropbox  kickstarter 
june 2015 by robertogreco
The Process: Bloom Blanket » The Kickstarter Blog — Kickstarter
"One thing was clear: my friends at the tiny Barcelona factory would never be able to sew so many blankets so quickly. My intention was to make 40 beautifully handmade blankets but after being backed by 947 people the entire production process had to be revisited."
manufacturing  sewing  process  2015  biancachengcostanzo  production  glvo  quilting  bloomblanket  kickstarter  logistics 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Keaton's Epic Adventure to Train a Dragon by Ryan Weimer - "The Dude" — Kickstarter
"The most epic Halloween costume ever will be created by the father of a disabled boy for his magic wheelchair."
constumes  kickstarter  2014  halloween 
january 2015 by robertogreco
School of Doodle by School of Doodle — Kickstarter
"A peer-to-peer, self-directed learning lab, School of Doodle is dedicated to activating girls’ imaginations through entertainment, education and community. With its free online curriculum, School of Doodle is a new kind of digital learning experience where artists, creators and students are the teachers and imagination and creativity are the lessons."



"School of Doodle will create a place, through both its online school and offline experiences, where girls can exercise their imagination without judgment or measure.

A place where they expect and demand. Where imagination is a right and not a privilege. Where girls celebrate, and are celebrated for, Being Loud. Where rather than waiting for the world to recognize their value, they recognize it, themselves."

[See also: http://schoolofdoodle.com/ ]
girls  punk  art  srg  schoolofdoodle  online  internet  empowerment  kickstarter  learning  education  2014 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Rev Dan Catt: Heros
"Each one is trying (I believe) to normalise a way of doing something that's currently outside of the mainstream, until hopefully it becomes the new normal. The things they are doing are things that I believe should and need to exist. I'll also get back to that in a moment.

So where's my interest?

Well, we homeschool (UK) here, Modesty (12), Zachary (8) and Isobel (6) for various reasons, but one of them is this: In the last 10 years the internet and the world because of it has changed so much but the school system hasn't really kept up."



"We're practicing Autonomous (or "child led learning") learning, which in theory is letting your children loose to learn whatever they feel like learning while you support them. Our reality is that it's a bit more like one of those toy pull back wind-up car. You pull them back filling them with energy, point them roughly in the direction you think they aught to be heading and release.

In this case Modesty was playing World of Warcraft as was just at the right age to watch The Guild, which led onto watching Felicia's own videos, I can still remember the cry of delight and "Felicia plays Skyrim too, her favorite bow is the same as mine!", which indirectly led to her cooking Skyrim Sweet Rolls after watching Rosanna Pansino make some on Nerdy Nummies. Really getting into board games, watching Amy Dallen talk about comics, Nika Harper talk about writing and video games and then later making cool weaponry from games.

In turn that leads to thoughts such as "Hey, I could be a blacksmith or weaponsmith, or a leather armorer. Time to hit up the library and YouTube". Which is pretty much not what happens at school. Also the (I think) fairly obvious decision to present the content not as "Women in games/comics/magic/technology", but just normalised as cool people talking about cool stuff is just lovely.

Which brings me back to the behind the camera stuff. Richard with his podcasts, plays and theater performances. Sinking a whole bunch of money into trying to make things work outside of the normal TV/Radio/Theater commisioning process, working towards another way of doing things, because that other way of doing things should be just as valid and possible as the "normal".

Leila, here and here making a magazine, podcasts, conferences and more because they are things that aught to exist. They are things that aught to be able to exist, to be funded, paid for, consumed as though they weren't alternatives to the mainstream but just a different part of the mainstream.

Felicia making full-on half hour (US TV "half-hour") TV programs but on YouTube, as thought that's just how it should be. And I've seen the promise of "TV on the internet" for very long time, and each time I watch someone attempt it I'm like "go on, this time, please let this be the one that finally survives and makes it work"

Because...

Because... I'm betting on "Home Schooling" or rather outside of the mainstream education system as a valid route for our children, and when they "leave" I need things like Richard's independent radio/podcast programs to have worked, Felicia's new company that she's spent so much time on getting set up to succeed, Leila to not burn through all her savings and make her way of publishing a magazine and so on, a perfectly acceptable and doable thing to do.

So that when our children are ready for the "world of work" that world is an interesting place and there are people in it I can point to as an example of how things can be done.

In short, I need heros."
revdancatt  2014  heros  feliciaday  leilajohnston  richardherring  cv  homeschool  unschooling  change  future  heroes  hopes  dreams  learning  howwelearn  parenting  television  youtube  creativity  games  gaming  publishing  education  schools  schooling  schooliness  funding  kickstarter  internet  online  markets  alternative  mainstream  pioneers  passion 
july 2014 by robertogreco
kaka'ako agora by atelier bow wow seeks kickstarter funding
"while the picturesque setting of honolulu features many beautiful outdoor parks, the city lacks sheltered areas of congregation which offer respite from the region’s hot sun. consequently, non-profit organization interisland terminal has commissioned tokyo-based atelier bow wow to design and plan ‘kaka’ako agora’ – an indoor pavilion that creates an accessible public space. currently seeking funding on kickstarter, the community based project will serve as a blank canvas for the region’s population.

facilitating discussion and entrepreneurship, as well as culture and performance, the scheme will transform former a 3,225-square foot warehouse into an event space hosting workshops and seminars. a mezzanine level overlooks the expansive volume, contributing additional floor space.
”kaka’ako’ shows an alternative way of creating public space – as it is based on collaboration’, explained yoshiharu tsukamoto of atelier bow wow.

the project is currently seeking funding on kickstarter, with the campaign ending on march 17th, 2014.

the scheme transforms a former warehouse into an community event space

the indoor pavilion creates an accessible public center"
honolulu  openstudioproject  atelierbow-wow  2014  kickstarter  publicspace  sharedspace  congregation 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Minimum Viable Artwork | Feral Research Coalition
"That established cultural institutions are having a hard time relating to art and culture made with contemporary technology is painfully apparent. That they want to remedy this by turning towards the incubator model only shows how desperately regressive they are."



"It is unlikely that any of the artists featured in the exhibitions I mentioned above will be found writing Python code over a cafe midnight at Ritual (unless it’s their day job) because, for the most part, in the ecosystem of the artists I admire who are chasing the meat of art and tech, there couldn’t be three institutions less relevant than New York’s major museums, startup culture and (since I’m barbecuing sacred cows): hacker spaces.

This is not to say that these institutions are inherently evil or bad at what they do, it’s just to say that they are at best not particularly relevant to art production and at worst unintentionally destructive. In all cases this has mostly to do with their formal positions with regards to the dreaded market.

Major museums may wish to have a broad cultural mission and many even succeed on occasion, but they exist largely to condense, wash, clean, process and present the dirty fucked-up art world for preservation and trade. They are in the packaging business. If an artwork appears in MoMA it has been dipped in preservative and the edges have been filed off. This doesn’t mean it isn’t delicious, but Hostess isn’t your neighborhood bakery (which, in any case, is still a business and nothing at all like your grandmother’s home cooking). Museums, while occasionally flying the flag of the freaky creative class, have more in common with financial institutions than artist studios. (Quick: name one heist film that featured burgling a working artist)."



"In the end I don’t want to specifically criticize the New Museum’s venture because I believe it’s a symptom rather than the disease. We have come to believe that art and technology are somehow the same thing, just as we have internalized the idea that creative success and financial success are equivalent.

Art as I know it is messy, complicated, dirty, scary and sharp. It causes problems and fails to measure up and resists categorization. It generates failure. It wastes time and money. It burns through cash and it doesn’t say why.

Museums are archives and represent the endpoint of work, not the wellspring of creativity. If an artwork has solidified out of this primordial state it is not because it represents the “cutting edge” it is because it is finished. As Dave Hickey says: “Whatever happy contingencies fluttered around it disperse, as it departs society and enters “the culture,” where it must necessarily mean less, but to a lot more people. It’s spectator-food, now, scholar-fodder, so you may safely stick a fork in it, tell yourself you’ve won, and go to your room.”

I am not surprised that a major museum as a cultural actor is going to make a safe bet, in particular with regards to technology-based works which are notoriously risky and problematic as art objects. (“It worked five minutes ago” doesn’t fly well among preservationists or collectors). That most of the highly visible contemporary art and technology works currently being displayed are repeatable (if shallow) spectacles is not a major revelation, but it bears a hard look.

It bothers me that the last time I visited the New Museum I ducked into their auxiliary space to be confronted by Nathalie Djurbeg and Hans Berg’s delightfully weird Bird Parade. This was an artist and musician I had never heard of before, and I stayed until the guards kicked me out. Next time, a visit to the same space will require an NDA and likely revealing nothing more interesting than a bunch of white dudes pounding keyboards and energy drinks.

"It bothers me that the notion of artistic risk has been so de-fanged that it can be expressed only in terms of market risk (Serrano’s 1989 Piss Christ was both far more daring and far more beautiful than wasting series A funding, no matter how hot your photo sharing ap might be).

It bothers me that we even consider business strategy as a replacement for encouraging art production. I don’t anticipate the return of public arts funding for individual artists in the United States, but in a world of crowd funding filled with the likes of Kickstarter and Indiegogo and Bandcamp what the art world, (and in particular the art and tech field) needs are a lot fewer “startup incubators” and a lot more Awesome Foundations."

[via: https://twitter.com/matthewward/status/411041722739597313 ]

[See also: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303670804579236523526323820 ]
andrewsempere  inefficiency  newmuseum  davehickey  startupculture  kickstarter  indiegogo  bandcamp  awesomefoundation  2013  art  process  messiness  artproduction  diy  hackerspaces  incubators  culture  culturecreation  waste  time  money  markets  artmarket  finance  juliakaganskiy  artincubators  culturemaking  culturalproduction  andresserrano 
december 2013 by robertogreco
tim wright: digital writer: Some Thoughts About Innovation and Failure
"The trick, apparently, is to *learn* from failure. Only then is failure worth risking. That way the 'innovation' has a point even if it doesn't deliver immediate value. I'd argue, however, that we don't always have to learn from failure, and that sometimes making the same mistakes over and over again might even be part of the innovation (or rather the *invention*) process.

I've worked on lots of failed projects. I'm quite proud of it (in a way). I worked on a project recently, in fact, that was pretty much a failure. (Such a failure that it recently came *second* in an innovation contest - LOL.)"



"So for my money, this leaves 'innovation' as the poor second-cousin of genuine 'invention'. I'd also like to claim that invention can and does often happen in a bubble, and doesn't have to relate to anything that came before. *And* I'd also want to suggest that failure doesn't necessarily need to have a learning point or any value.

We can just noodle about and experiment and repeat and fail again and again and again without any obvious point. Many great artists have done this. It is allowed - and may even be a more natural way to get to truly great new things than enforcing a programme of 'innovation'.

Two cheers, then, for Tom Uglow for being brave enough to face the consequences of our failure and admit that the benefits and value of the #dream40 experiment are to a large extent 'unknown'. As he writes:
"Artistic projects like this do not fit one-size-fits all metrics; and I’m not sure what those metrics are anyway – though I do know that targets breed strategies to hit targets, so you’ll forgive us for ignoring them. Hitting targets reward organizations not audiences, or artists, or culture. This was a disruptive experiment and a hugely successful one if judged simply on what we learnt and where we now move forward from. We hope you understand why we did this and that you enjoyed and continue to enjoy it."
"

[via: http://proboscis.org.uk/5383/thoughts-on-failure/ ]
tomuglow  timwright  rewards  kickstarter  failure  innovation  strategies  targets  funding  fundraising  art  metrics  audiences  organizations  culture  learning  2013 
november 2013 by robertogreco
thoughts on failure | Proboscis
"As I’m sure others who’ve launched kickstarter projects have experienced, I received a number of messages offering me advice and professional services to enhance the campaign. Essentially all the advice boiled down to a simple nugget, that the only way to succeed was to already have a significant “fanbase” who could be “activated” or motivated to pledge support and then amplify it by sharing the fact they’d supported the project to their friends and social circles. If I’ve learnt anything then its probably that Proboscis doesn’t have a fanbase as such to activate.

The irony, too, was not lost on me of trying to raise funding for a project about free play and improvisation without rules, winners or rewards on a crowdfunding platform entirely structured around rewards and goals – where there are only winners (those who reach or surpass their goal) and losers. Could there be more to this than just irony? Could it be that the conceptual nature of the PlayCubes (indeed of my whole practice) is just so diametrically opposite to the way in which kickstarter and the communities which form around it operate that it was always unlikely to succeed? Tim’s post also quotes Tom Uglow writing about a project they collaborated on, #dream40"

[See also (linked within): http://timwright.typepad.com/main/2013/10/some-thoughts-about-innovation-and-failure.html ]
kickstarter  crowdsourcing  art  2013  gileslane  rewards  goals  funding  fundraising  learning  innovation  metrics  audiences  organizations 
november 2013 by robertogreco
▶ Christina Xu, Breadpig - XOXO Festival (2013) - YouTube
"In many industries, publishers can sometimes hurt unknown artists more than they help. But a new model for publishing is emerging, and Breadpig is paving the way—helping independent artists find a wider audience without losing control over their work. In addition to her work running Breadpig, Christina Xu is co-founder of ROFLCon, the conference on Internet culture, and founding director of the Institute on Higher Awesome Studies, the nonprofit wing of the Awesome Foundation."

[Transcript:
http://breadpig.tumblr.com/post/62171738926/welcome-to-the-new-breadpig-blog-this-is-the ]

See also Frank Chimero:
http://frankchimero.com/blog/2013/09/the-inferno-of-independence/

and Anil Dash:
http://dashes.com/anil/2013/09/xoxo-and-reckoning-with-nice.html ]
christinaxu  breadpig  crowdfunding  xoxo  2013  trailblazing  support  creativity  logistics  supportservices  bootstrapping  independence  interdependence  supportstructures  kickstarter  structure  structurelessness  obsatacles  systemsthinking  darkmatter  norms  communities  meangirls  cliques  meritocracy  gatekeepers  disintermediation 
october 2013 by robertogreco
The tyranny of digital advertising — I.M.H.O. — Medium
"Let's be clear: big businesses have grown up around the availability and theory of mass media and buying attention. Any big client older than15 years old will have grown up with the reassuring ability of tv and print advertising to reach mass audiences. Those were methods of advertising predicated on guaranteed access to peoples’ attention through interruptions in mass media.

And thus the marketing and business plans and briefs for those companies assume that you market your product or service by delivering a message to a stupendously large number of people in a short amount of time.

The Product is the Service is the Marketing

At roughly the same time as my two year anniversary in advertising land, Russell Davies recently wrote up a storm explaining what the UK’s Government Digital Service does and what GOV.UK is for.

Simply, their job is to save money by making the digital provision of government services so good that the public prefers to use them.

One of the points that Russell makes in his post is that, in their case, the product is the service is the marketing: the product (a government service) is the service (the delivery and usage of that service) is the marketing (the clear communication to the target audience of the benefits of that service). The tying together of those three different items - product, service, marketing, and how GDS have achieved that aim, has implications as to why good integrated (and so digital) advertising is so difficult to achieve."



"Anything but display advertising
But then there's the whole other, other side to interactive advertising that isn't confined to formats defined by media agencies and associations. And I might be biased, but they seem way more interesting than display advertising.

Here's some examples:"



"There is a shift at the heart of this. There are new brands out there - Kickstarter, Etsy and Amazon come to mind - that got big and profitable without conventional advertising. They’re also brands built in a world reliant upon the network. They do not need advertising, at least, they don’t need advertising the way your mother’s fast moving consumer goods company needed it. Their products are services, and the way their services behave are their own marketing. Google’s own Dear Sophie and Parisian Love adverts are critically acclaimed examples of advertising letting products and services speak for themselves.

So what does an advertising agency do for them?"
danhon  advertising  digital  2013  experience  russelldavies  marketing  service  product  gov.uk  kickstarter  etsy  amazon  nike  nikefuelband  fuelband  ilovebees  jay-zdecoded  arg  oldspice  attention  chrysler  television  tv  wieden+kennedy 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Touching Strangers: Photographs by Richard Renaldi by Aperture Foundation — Kickstarter
"Since 2007, photographer Richard Renaldi has worked on a series of photographs for which he asks complete strangers to physically interact while posing together for a portrait. Working on the street with a large format 8-by-10 view camera, Renaldi encounters his subjects in towns and cities all over the United States.

Renaldi’s objective was to introduce an unpredictable variable into a traditional photographic formula, and to create spontaneous and fleeting relationships between complete strangers. The portraits are extremely difficult to make, involving complex negotiations with the participants that push them past comfort levels, into a physical intimacy normally reserved for loved ones or friends. Touching Strangers creates intimate and ephemeral relationships that exist only for the moment of the photograph. The images are beautiful and strange, crossing out of the zones of safe physical intimacy with strangers and into deep emotional landscapes never photographed before."
richardrenaldi  photography  kickstarter  strangers  touching  touch  contact  physical  physicalcontact  2013  books  via:kiostark  intimacy 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Young people can't work for free says Intern magazine's Alec Dudson
"Intern magazine aims to showcase work from talented creatives currently interning in the creative industry, and raise debate on the culture of internships. Manchester-based Dudson told Dezeen: "Our intention is to empower interns through the publication.""

Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/819444313/intern-magazine ]
interns  internships  creativity  design  kickstarter  magazines 
july 2013 by robertogreco
To Less Efficient Startups - Anil Dash
"Some of the most interesting startups (the NYC chauvinist in me must point out that these are all New York companies) are not optimizing for raw market efficiency, but instead for opportunity for a broader community. Some examples:

• Kickstarter is explicitly building an economy to support the work of artists and creators, disciplines that are often not favored by the attentions of the tech industry.

• 20×200 has a complete structure of support for promotion and payment for artists, as Jen Bekman outlined at the XOXO festival.

• Etsy perhaps illustrates this best of all; I talked about this a bit when recording Chad Dickerson's talk at XOXO, but his slides from that talk outline their commitment as a B Corporation to many of these principles of helping an entire community, not just preferred shareholders:"



"I'm not saying existing companies necessarily need to radically change; It's great that many have succeeded with the model so far. But I'm hoping that people who are building and funding companies can put some thought into what success can look like for future tech companies if they also value creating lots of middle-class jobs and lots of opportunities to help blue collar or non-technical workers thrive with meaningful long-time work as their companies take off.

We tend not to think it's cool that Microsoft or IBM have hundreds of thousands of employees. But there's something meaningful, and important, and essential to our society for enormously valuable companies to also provide enormous value in the form of lots of jobs for regular folks. I'll be rooting for the next wave of startups to tackle this problem that has, so far, been too difficult for our biggest web companies."
anildash  business  economics  inequality  class  2013  middleclass  etsy  kickstarter  20x200  xoxo  jenbekman  chaddickerson  society  incomedistribution 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Tobias Revell on the future of art and design at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale, 24 May 2013 on Vimeo
"Tobias Revell outlines how the willing acceptance and grasping of uncertainty has led to a new way of thinking in the present and a resurgence of romantic futurism. He gives specific examples of solutions outside of a 'grand plan', new production methods that liberalise and free design and art from larger systems. He shows how science-fiction imagery and fantasy have penetrated the arts.
Opening lecture at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale on 24 May 2013, Enschede, the Netherlands."
tobiasrevell  2013  art  design  designfiction  futurism  systems  towatch  artez  uncertainty  video  debate  reflection  critique  change  futures  kickstarter  bitcoins  makerbot  3dprinting  reprap  globalvillageonstructionset  opensource  opensourceecology  cohenvanbalen  thomasthwaites  manufacturing  control  consumption  economics  systemsthinking  bigdog  robots  technology  normalization  marsone  uncannyvalley  spacetravel  space  film  nasa  hierarchy  music  vincentfournier  prosthetics  evil  googleglass  internetofthings  superflux  dance  computing  data  anabjain  iot 
june 2013 by robertogreco
BackerKit
"Crowdfunding lasts 30 days, but your backers are forever.

BackerKit is the best pledge management software for project creators to handle post-crowdfunding challenges.

We make handling your backers’ information easy and automatic, so you can focus on making and delivering your project on time."
kickstarter  supportservices  projectmanagement  software  backerkit  crowdfunding  via:maxfenton 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Make That Thing | Don't Let That Thing Make You
"Make That Thing is a production agency for crowdfunded projects. We help artists and creators design, print, store, and ship this things they make — so you can focus on the art. We know that once your crowdfunding campaign is over, the real work has just begun. And we want to help make sure that your backers get what they pledged for in a reliable, professional, and timely manner.
To do that, we work with artists and creators who have an idea for a crowdfunded project. We help them conceptualize and figure out their project’s specs, as well as offer advice and a friendly ear to help figure out the best way to present the project to the world, including choosing backer tiers and designing stretch goals.

Once the project launches, we help promote it through our network of internet pals, and if the funding goal is met, we then swing into action, ordering the products needed, receiving them at our Massachusetts warehouse, and shipping them to backers all around the world.
Once that’s done, we place the product in our MADE THAT THING online store so anyone who missed the campaign can still buy it after the fact.

We don’t want artists to be limited in their ambitions by the fear of not having the space to receive product, or the time, workforce, or knowhow to ship it. That’s what we do – that’s all we do.
We’re a spinoff of TopatoCo, which has been producing and shipping merchandise for webcomics and other independent creators in some manner of another since 2003. We have two warehouses full of computers, equipment, and experienced people eager to help get your masterpiece out to the wonderful folks who pledged to your campaign.

We have UPS, Fedex, and USPS shipping capability. We have cardboard boxes and shelves and tape guns with all different kinds of tape. We have certificates and insurance and loading docks. We have a forklift that can do donuts.

Let’s MAKE THIS THING."
kickstarter  marketing  via:maxfenton  supportservices  shipping  crowdfunding  makethatthing 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The RoboRoach: Control a living insect from your smartphone! by Backyard Brains — Kickstarter
"The RoboRoach is the world's first commercially available cyborg! That's right... A real-life Insect Cyborg! Part cockroach and part machine. This is not a gimmick... just good ol' fashion neuroscience, evolution and engineering."

[See also: http://qz.com/92551/worlds-first-commercial-cyborg-scuttles-onto-kickstarter/ ]

[Related: Garnet Hertz: http://www.conceptlab.com/ ]
ios  cockroaches  electronics  biology  cyborgs  neuroscience  engineering  2013  kickstarter 
june 2013 by robertogreco
In Conversation | Perry Chen and Theaster Gates on Community-Driven Creativity - NYTimes.com
"The Kickstarter co-founder Perry Chen understands how communities can fuel creativity. The artist Theaster Gates knows how creativity can invigorate a community. What happens when they put their heads together?"



"Perry Chen: But everything comes from somewhere. I didn’t even know this till later on, but we found out that Mozart and Beethoven and Whitman and a lot of 19th-century authors used pre-Internet models like Kickstarter — you know, not just going to rich patrons or the Medici or the Church to get the big check, but people going to dozens or even hundreds of people to fund a creative work, a book where their names might be inscribed in the first edition or a concerto. And the Internet, as it can do, can scale things up and make this same model accessible to millions and billions of people."



"Gates: Your point about purposeful infrastructure is right, but I’m not the community do-gooder. I rehabbed my building, and the building across the street was jacked up, so I cleaned it up, because I didn’t want to look at it. I was really just being a good neighbor. I wasn’t trying to be like Mr. Community Builder Man."



"Gates: People try to create the box that defines the work that we do. I know a bunch of capitalists who put a spin on their hunger for a particular kind of capitalist end: they call it “social do-gooding.” But in fact, I want to kind of resist that and say, “Look, if there’s anything that ends up looking like an activist notion, it’s secondary to just doing the thing that I wanted to do.” The reality in the neighborhood that I live in is: if I don’t constantly reconcile what I have against what other people don’t, either I need to leave and be around other people who have what I have, or I’m constantly engaged in this kind of dynamic flow of opportunity and sharing. And that just feels like smart living. Like if my mom made too much food, she’d send a plate down the street. She doesn’t know how to cook greens for two people. She knew how to cook a pot."



"Gates: But happiness is funny. There are days that are really heavy and complicated and dark. And I think that if I were to look at the trajectory of life, what has been consistent is that there are highs and lows. I mean at the moment I found out that I was accepted into Documenta, my mom died. In a way I felt like, in late 2010, my mom’s death was the thing that somehow actually activated these other future opportunities. But there was tremendous sadness. So, there was a way in which these valences live next to each other all the time."
perrychen  teastergates  2013  creativity  art  socialpracticeart  purpose  neighbors  community  urbanplanning  janejacobs  urban  urbanism  neighborhoods  platforms  funding  crowdfunding  kickstarter  infrastructure  socialgood 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Continuous City by Brian Foo — Kickstarter
"An illustrated book exploring imagined landscapes and topographies for New York City, told through conversations and paintings"



"It made me think of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities (a persistent inspiration for my recent creative projects). A city can be something very different depending on who you ask, as each person perceives their own version of their city.

Our relationships with the places we live in are as complex as our relationships with ourselves and other people. Continuous City ended up being a composite of those different relationships and feelings towards the places we live in. Some are like love letters, some are like formal complaints, some are like letters of regret to a city in which we live or left behind."
nyc  buildings  art  books  2013  brianfoo  italocalvino  invisiblecities  kickstarter 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Zombie-Based Learning -- "Braaaaaaains!" | Edutopia
"Geography has always been a learning target for social studies teachers, and David Hunter, who teaches at Bellevue, Washington's Big Picture School, decided to create a curriculum using Kickstarter as its funding source. He sought to make geography relevant through engaging scenarios and stories with a zombie theme tying it all together. The whole curriculum is standards-based and includes over 70 lessons where students must "consider how to duck the undead invasion, secure their supplies and, eventually, rebuild society" through a variety of activities, worksheets and discussions.

Mr. Hunter's story was featured on an NPR affiliate if you would like to read more. In addition, he has made available one of the comics he created which serve as the textbook for the curriculum. Mr. Hunter created this work in order to engage students, and I believe we can use the topic of zombies to explore further curriculum areas."
zombies  education  teaching  davidhunter  2013  comics  kickstarter  curriculum  learning  socialstudies  classideas 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Critical Making | materials protocols and culture
"Critical Making will operationalize and critique the practice of “making” through both foundational literature and hands on studio culture. As hybrid practitioners, students will develop fluency in readily collaging and incorporating a variety of physical materials and protocols into their practice. With design research as a lens, students will envision and create future computational experiences that critically explore social and culturally relevant technological themes such as community, privacy, environment, education, economics, energy, food, biology, democracy, activism, healthcare, social justice, etc.

While no previous technical knowledge is required to take this course, class projects will involve basic programing, electronic circuity, and digital fabrication design. While tutorials and instruction will be provided, students will be expected to develop basic skills in each of these areas in order to complete the course projects. The course will result in a final public show of student work.

The course goals are:

• develop a critical understanding of emerging making technologies and their role within the current cultural and social context
• establish proficiency with the fundamental concepts, methods, and practices of physical modeling, sketching, form giving, electronic prototyping, and hands on making across a range of materials
• improve students ability to make expressive, physical, interactive objects that critique and advance computing culture through the production of making and artifact creation
• advance the communication and presentation skill of students through the process of the studio critique

projects

This is a studio class with time devoted to lecture, discussion, practice activities, design worksessions, and critique of student work. This course will consist of two Provocations and a Final Project demonstrating a functional interactive object set within a real life context and scenario. There will also be a series of Field Activities and in class sessions that are incuded as a portion of your particpation grade.

readings

Readings will be assigned throughout the semester. Everyone is expected to read the readings. One or two people will be selected for each reading to prepare a class presentation. Each student is expected to engage in class discussions when readings are assigned. This counts towards your class participation grade.

zip.crit

Most classes will begin with a zip.crit. A zip.crit is a rapid crit of an interface, object, design, etc. We will be rotating through the class roster and choosing one person to do a zip.crit each class. That person will select an interface, object, design, instructable, kickstarter, toy, etc. At the beginning of class that person will briefly introduce the object, interface, design to us. The class will collectively critique the artifact.

evaluation

Work and performance in the course will be evaluated after each Provocation and the Final Project. In addition, the process of exploration is as important as the final product, so it is important that students manage time well and devote time to working on the assignments during the course of a week. If class time is given as a worksession and is not put to good use, students’ grades will be penalized. For assignments done in teams, students will be graded on individual contributions as well as synthesis with the team. Work that is late will be decremented in grade.

rules of engagement

One of the main learning exercises in this course is the critique. We will be building this skill throughout the semester Each of the assignments will be critiqued in class.

Be there!

Critique days mandatory attendance. If you are not in class or late, we will deduct from your attendance grade. There will be no exceptions.

Attendance of all classes is mandatory. You are allowed one absence for the semester without penalty (except critique days); thereafter you will receive zero credit for the missed studio. To receive an additional excused absence, you must ask in advance, and receive an acknowledgment from the instructor.

Excusable absences include family emergencies, job interviews, and presenting at a conference. It does not include wanting to leave early for long weekend or vacation. To receive credit for attendance, you must arrive on time. No late assignments will be accepted

Be active!

During the in class critique everyone is expected to be engaged in the discussion. Assignments, timely attendance, and in-class and team participation are a critical part of the grade. Bringing examples from outside of the class is considered to be an assignment and is also important.

Be attentive!

No laptops, phones, electronics out or used during critique and at other selected parts of class.

grading criteria

participation in assignments
good use of class time: attendance, critiques, (NO multitasking)
problem selection
rigorous design explorations
quality of craftsmanship and level of completion
quality of the team’s reflection and communication about a design solution and process
For projects done in teams, students will be graded on individual contributions as well as synthesis with the team.
Work that is late will be decremented in grade.

PARTICIPATION 20%
PROVOCATION 1 20%
PROVOCATION 2 20%
FINAL PROVOCATION 40%"

[See also: http://www.paulos.net/
http://www.krisfallon.com/
http://www.isopoddesign.com/ ]
education  sustainability  making  classideas  syllabus  2013  ericpaulos  krisfallon  chrismeyers  environment  biology  democracy  activism  healthcare  socialjustice  studioculture  openstudio  openstudioproject  makers  berkeley  bayarea  programming  coding  computing  electronics  digitalfabrication  technology  learning  lcproject  kickstarter  instructables  prototyping  glvo  edg  srg  syllabi 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Constellation Quilt by Emily Fischer — Kickstarter
"Touch the stars and celebrate your place in the universe with a handmade quilt of the constellations by Haptic Lab."

[See also: http://www.hapticlab.com/ ]
quilts  quilting  space  astronomy  sewing  kickstarter  2013  hapticlab  emilyfischer 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Slow Design Knowledge Index by slowLab — Kickstarter
"We’re raising money to create the Slow Design Knowledge Index: a comprehensive platform that collects, connects and helps people share a spectrum of Slow design knowledge.  Building this project will enable broader acceptance and understanding of Slow design, will catalyze new ideas, academic programs, local actions and dialogues, and will amplify the voices of the Slow design community. It's a resource that will be accessible to people around the world, and, importantly, it promises to transform how people think about and practice design into the future."
slowlab  design  slowdesign  slow  kickstarter  slowdesignknowledgeindex  glvo 
april 2013 by robertogreco
A New Kind of Library | Metropolis POV | Metropolis Magazine
"Librii was incubated with seed funding from the World Bank Institute and was awarded Best Innovation Leveraging Technology form the Dell Social Innovation Challenge. The World Bank Institute’s Bob Hawkins, believes that Librii is taking the concept of the library into the modern age. “Librii will provide a hub for Ghanians of all ages to explore, learn and connect,” he says. “Education is at a premium in the knowledge economy and the ability to convert that knowledge into beneficial products and services will determine the vibrancy of a community and a nation. Librii can play an important role in transforming communities by providing access to information, access to people, and access to opportunity.”

This is much more than a design exercise: The Librii team is redefining the definition of “library” as a hub of empowerment."

[On Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/248645035/librii-new-model-library-in-africa ]

"We are building a library the likes of which the world has never seen before. It will be the first that will actively engage users as content creators, the first that will operate on a sustainable business model, and the first designed to maximize the potential of high-speed information exchange in developing markets.

By backing this Kickstarter project YOU will be the first in the world to see these designs go into construction, be the first to receive original works created at the library via digital subscription, and have your name hand-written on the wall of the library to recognize your contribution to inventing the library of the future."
librii  libraries  africa  ghana  kickstarter  architecture  empowerment  contentcreation  2013 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The People's E-Book by Hol Art Books — Kickstarter
"A free, beautifully-simple tool to make e-books better.

UPDATE: The People's E-Book will be built! Now, help us build it even better. The more we raise now, the more features we can offer our users in the future. Details coming soon. In the meantime, please keep pledging and keep passing it on to help us build the best free tool for e-books on the planet.

The People's E-Book seeks to be a lab, an incubator, an e-book creation platform for artists, authors, and alternative presses who want to try new things, publish new books, and push into new territories. The People's E-Book will handle e-books of all sizes and scope, but it will excel in areas that no one else has cared to consider—the very small, the quick and dirty, the simple and the experimental.

The People's E-Book is a tool that doesn't account for what e-books are, but rather lets its users imagine what they can be: A short story or an epic poem, a blog post, a manifesto, a photobook, a book of moving photos, a book with a single word, a book with every word, sixteen-million colors, nine swimming pools, a video diary, an idea ...

Make alternative e-books possible. Join us in building The People's E-Book, a remarkable DIY tool anyone can use for free."
publishing  ebooks  diy  tools  toolkit  onlinetoolkit  people'se-book  kickstarter 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The L.A. That Might Have Been | LA as Subject | SoCal Focus | KCET
"A spiraling, 1,290-foot tower built of magnesium. A rapid-transit system with hundreds of miles of subways and elevated tracks. A comprehensive network of parks, beaches, and open spaces linked by greenbelts and parkways. These are just a few unrealized visions for Los Angeles featured in an upcoming exhibition at the Architecture and Design Museum, "Never Built: Los Angeles."

Curated by Greg Goldin and Sam Lubell, the exhibition draws on plans preserved in the region's archives to present an alternate history -- and an alternate present -- for a place where inspirational solutions to the city's problems have often been downscaled, defeated, or altogether forgotten."

[Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1371435920/never-built-los-angeles ]
losangeles  cities  retofuture  future  history  2013  kickstarter  design  architecture  greggoldin  samlubell  a+dmuseum  exhibits  exhibitions 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Real Estate Deal That Could Change the Future of Everything - Neighborhoods - The Atlantic Cities
"Why can’t you be an investor in one of our deals? You live nearby, you’re young, you get it. Why is it that you don’t have this option? That’s unnatural, almost."

"Most American cities as we know them today weren't built this way. Historically, hotels and restaurants and shops were built by local people investing in their own neighborhoods."

"The history of modern financial investment has been the story of people and their money moving farther apart into abstraction, to the point where most of us don't know where our investments (if we have any) have gone. But shorten the distance between those two points, and things start to change. Put your money into a building you can see in your neighborhood, and suddenly you might care more about the quality of the tenant, or the energy efficiency of the design, or the aesthetics of the architecture. This proposition is like "Broken Windows on steroids," Ben says."
local  benmiller  danmiller  westmillcapital  chrisleinberger  regulation  kickstarter  danielgorfine  realestatedevelopment  community  communities  investment  sec  willsharpe  erikbruner-yang  tokiunderground  maketto  washingtondc  hstreetcommunitydevelopment  crowdinvesting  crowdfunding  ericgarcetti  neighborhoods  cities  development  economics  economy  finance  realestate  dc  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Saturn V Relaunch by Paul Sahre — Kickstarter [Great description, great video]
"Near the the end of the Apollo space missions of the early 1970's, my father…began work on his own Saturn V…1/100 scale…kit had hundreds of separate parts that took my dad months (my mom remembers it as YEARS) to meticulously cut, glue, sand, and paint.

When he finally finished, he brought the whole family out to an open field. We counted down, and my mom had the honor of pushing the button. The rocket shot 500 feet into the sky...but the chutes failed to deploy and we watched in horror as it plummeted—nose first—back to earth. Dad's Saturn V was destroyed and I've never forgotten.

My father passed away a few years ago, and I recently discovered his launch pad in the attic—along with dozens of snapshots of the original launch. I am a father now as well, and it struck me that this was the first time I remember seeing him fail at ANYTHING. It reminded me of a time when our fathers were omnipotent; when any dispute with the kid down the block could be settled with "I'll ask my dad.""
1970s  modelbuilding  timemachines  modelrocketry  rockets  modelrockets  paulsahre  kickstarter  2012  parenting  parents  failure  nostalgia  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Whoa-- Design Renderings Banned on Kickstarter! - Core77
"Well folks, it looks like more than a few Kickstarter backers have been disappointed by their recipients' inability to deliver (which is perhaps why some Core77 readers have been critical of the LIFX, to name one project). Product design is no cakewalk, but it's turning out to be a lot easier to come up with a great idea than it is to have it manufactured and delivered.

To circumvent this, Kickstarter has instituted new rules sure to be a blow to many a would-be designer: Renderings and simulations are banned!"
consumerprotection  productdesign  simulations  renderings  2012  kickstarter  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
San Diego Public Market: It's Time! by Catt White & Dale Steele — Kickstarter
"Seattle has Pike Place Market, London has Borough Market, San Francisco has the Ferry Building and Barcelona has La Boqueria. It’s time San Diego, with its year-round growing season and vibrant food scene, got a public market of its own and you can Kickstart it into being right now!"

"We’re downtown in the Barrio Logan neighborhood, on National Avenue between Beardsley and Sigsbee, near Harbor Drive and the Convention Center, Petco Park, the new library, I-5 and a trolley stop."
food  barriologan  kickstarter  2012  sandiego  markets  farmersmarket  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Kickstarter: Crowdfunding Platform Or Reality Show? | Fast Company
"…Pen Type-A, a slick stainless-steel enclosure for Japanese gel ink pens that I first saw on Kickstarter but pre-ordered shortly after their campaign raised more than 100 times its goal in August of last year… Yet the Pen Type-A is more than a $100 metal pen that never gets used, it's a memento of the excitement I felt after first seeing the product.

When faced with the reality of these products, disappointment is inevitable--not just because they're too little too late (if at all) but for even weirder reasons. We don't really want the stuff. We're paying for the sensation of a hypothetical idea, not the experience of a realized product. For the pleasure of desiring it. For the experience of watching it succeed beyond expectations or to fail dramatically. Kickstarter is just another form of entertainment. It's QVC for the Net set. And just like QVC, the products are usually less appealing than the excitement of learning about them for the first time and getting in early on the sale."
sponsorshipasentertainment  sponshorship  consumptionsasentertainment  entertainment  sourishong-porretta  micropatronage  crowdsourcing  ouya  cw&t;  products  qvc  experience  buyer'sremorse  consumerism  excitement  2012  ianbogost  kickstarter 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: to be real
"…a bit more theoretical than many of my talks, but I wanted to make the point that things like trust and authenticity aren’t binary – these are built slowly, and gained in the minds of people by doing the right thing. Also that the best trust is from just doing your job, and letting your employees & customers tell their stories."
hownotto  howto  socialmedia  personalization  depersonalization  twitter  firstdirect  people  vimeo  37signals  iceland  nokia  ebay  newspaperclub  kickstarter  upcoming  del.icio.us  flickr  personality  providence  history  business  branding  storytelling  heritage  moleskine  sweden  curatorsofsweden  bookdepositorylive  tumblr  generalelectric  net-a-porterlive  enoughproject  theyesmen  facebook  spambots  brompton  bromptonbicycles  hiutdenim  historytag  @sweden  douglasrushkoff  google  dopplr  copywriting  webdesign  craft  social  spam  russelldavies  online  web  internet  administration  management  howwework  chrisheathcote  2012  authenticity  trust  nextberlin  nextberlin2012  webdev  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Empires: The Film by Marc Lafia — Kickstarter
"…feature length documentary film and new media project which explores the impact of networks on histories and philosophies of political thought. We have spent the last year interviewing an extraordinary array of leading international thinkers on the ideas, philosophies and technologies including social and capital movements that are shaping our sciences and social structures, in our networked world."

"No formal system of power has lasted forever." —Saskia Sassen

"It's way easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of the current order." — Michael Hardt

"It's not even that we've bought into the notion of our own enslavement by capitalism. We bought into winner-takes-all syndrome. … We don't rebel against the system. It's not even a question as to wealth anymore. It's a question of believing that you can be at the center of the network…winner …losers… We are not individuals any more — we are brands." —Greg Lindsay

[via: http://varnelis.net/blog/empires_a_film_on_networks ]
hacking  selfbranding  branding  communication  facebook  twitter  technology  global  web  internet  scaling  scale  scienceofthenetwork  individualism  corporatism  capitalism  media  film  power  documentary  documentaries  kickstarter  2012  geertlovink  nishantshah  michaelhardt  anthonypagden  manueldelanda  jamesdelbourgo  cathydavidson  alexgalloway  wendyhulkyongchung  floriancramer  nataliejeremijenko  kazysvarnelis  saskiasassen  marclafia  networkculture  networks  unfinished  incomplete  cities  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
XOXO Festival by Andy Baio — Kickstarter
"Hey Kickstarter! We're organizing XOXO, an arts and technology festival in Portland, Oregon this September 13-16th.

XOXO is a celebration of disruptive creativity. We want to take all the independent artists using the Internet to make a living doing what they love — the makers, craftspeople, musicians, filmmakers, comic book artists, game designers, hardware hackers — and bring them together with the technologists building the platforms that make it possible. If you have an audience and a good idea, nothing’s standing in your way.

XOXO is in three parts:

Conference (Saturday – Sunday). Talks from artists and creative technologists around the country that are breaking new ground.
Market (Saturday – Sunday). A large marketplace with a tightly-curated list of the best of Portland's arts and tech scenes, sharing and selling their work, with food supplied by the best of our thriving food cart scene…"
via:caseygollan  togo  oregon  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  technology  arts  collaboration  hackerspaces  hackers  hardware  design  2012  events  andybaio  kickstarter  disruption  disruptive  conferences  portland  xoxo  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
phonebook :: threewalls
"PHONEBOOK 3 is a directory of independent art spaces, programming, and projects throughout the United States and a collection of critical essays and practical information written by the people who run them. PHONEBOOK 3 includes artist-run spaces, public programming, unconventional residencies, alternative schools, and community resources; all of the projects that form and support art ecologies across the nation, as well as historical documents marking their past. Featuring essays and documents from Group Material, Renny Pritikin, Susan Sakash, FEAST Brooklyn, Ox-bow, Faheem Majed, Chances Dances, Paul Durica, Dara Greenwald, Amy Franceschini, Pilot TV, Jon Brumit and Sarah Wagner, PLAND, Andy Sturdevant, Robby Herbst and more."
us  nyc  threewalls  kickstarter  artistresidencies  robbyhebst  andysturdevant  pland  sarahwagner  jonbrumit  pilottv  daragreenwald  pauldurica  chancesdances  faheemmajed  feastbrooklyn  susansakash  rennypritikin  groupmaterial  amyfranceschini  ox-bow  resources  communityresources  education  schools  alternativeeducation  alternative  publicprogramming  artist-run  artspaces  art  glvo  residencies  directories  phonebook3  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
"TCHOUPITOULAS" -- a new film by Bill & Turner Ross by the Ross Brothers & Co. — Kickstarter
"THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT: Our new film is about 3 kids, New Orleans at night, and MUSIC -- but we need to raise money to clear the music in order to release the film! Besides some other work by us, we've chosen rewards that commemorate New Orleans, music, and our personal commitment to you if you help us out (e.g., we'll make a movie for you!). If we don't raise at least $38,000, the music in Tchoupitoulas will remain uncleared, the film unreleaseable, and we'll never be able to show it to everyone. The bottom line: WE WANT TO BE ABLE TO SHOW YOU THIS MOVIE!"
music  children  turnerross  billross  tchoupitoulas  film  kickstarter  2012  neworleans  nola  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
An Introduction to the Crowdfunding Revolution by Don Lehman - Core77
"Now think of side-stepping all of that. You refine your idea on your own. You talk to manufacturers and see what it would take to get it made. You work out the budget. You shoot a video marketing the idea and explaining what you need to get it done.

You launch it.

Maybe it doesn't get funded. But at least then you can say that you tried and failed on your own terms, without going tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into debt. At the very least, you have an interesting portfolio piece to talk about and maybe if you're feeling frisky, you refine it further and try launching it again."
doing  making  startups  leanstartups  business  kickstarter  core77  crowdfunding  donlehman  2012  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Portals by Jayne Vidheecharoen — Kickstarter
"More specifically, my Portals will consist of a pair of boxes. Each box has a screen on the front and a gateway on the side where you can reach in with your hand. Through the magic of green screen your hand instantly appears to be in the virtual real-world of Google Streetview. And since you and your objects are now in this parallel world, real-world rules can be broken. For instance, a regular object from the real world could appear animated in this virtual one. These boxes are also connected to the internet which means you could share the space with other people. Here's some videos of where the current prototype is at right now (you can check out my thesis blog for more information too)."

[See also: http://nearfuturelaboratory.com/2011/11/27/introducing-jayne-idheecharoen/ ]
realvirtual  virtualreal  2012  2011  interactive  portals  kickstarter  jaynevidheecharoen  nearfuturelaboratory  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Playtime (Spielzeit) by Lucas Mireles — Kickstarter
"Inspired by Billy Wilder’s People On Sunday (1930), Playtime is a seamless journey through the lives of German youth on a Sunday afternoon. Jan (Jan Müller) awaits his date with the sexy Matilda (Marylu Poolman). But when Matilda shows up with Andy (Markus Klauk), Jan realizes she has more in mind for their afternoon together. Not interested in this ménage à trois, Jan leaves Matilda and Andy to their own fun. But their rendezvous is quickly interrupted by a group of children at play. The boys poke fun at Andy’s shortcomings, until he finally chases them away to a mysterious graveyard. There, one of the boys (Tim Lingens) gets lost in his imagination as the sun sets on this ordinary Sunday experienced through extraordinary lives."

[See also http://www.playtimemovie.com ]
ryanslattery  uclafilm  ucla  cologne  germany  2012  innocence  youth  playtime  1930  billywilder  filmmaking  lucasmireles  play  children  film  kickstarter 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Les Petites Échos, The Kids Are All Right// The Meaning is the...
"In the end, the film worked for the same reasons any piece of art works: it was very well made. The handheld shots and playful editing seamlessly accompanied the whimsical pop navigations of Girl Talk’s music; the movie built up a slow, compelling love triangle between Marsen and the two nameless male dancers as they drifted through the urban landscape, meeting and parting, meeting and parting. This gave me hope: craft still matters. Despite the evening’s hispterish veneer, despite all of its Web 2.0 trappings, a piece of art must still stand on its own. An audience will still respond to quality and shun mediocrity."
reiflarsen  kickstarter  film  art  glvo  making  generations  socialnetworking  mashups  meaning  facebook  millennials  communication  sharing  inbetweeness  girltalk  girlwalk  annemarsen  2011  audience  craft  quality  mediocrity  happiness  from delicious
december 2011 by robertogreco
Crowdfunding the commons
"Goteo is a social network for crowdfunding and distributed collaboration (services, infrastructures, microtasks and other resources) for encouraging the independent development of creative and innovative initiatives that contribute to the common good, free knowledge, and open code.

A platform for investing in "feeder capital" that supports projects with social, cultural, scientific, educational, technological, or ecological objectives that generate new opportunities for the improvement of society and the enrichment of community goods and resources."
crowdfunding  opensource  goteo  kickstarter  glvo  open  fundraising  socialnetworks  collaboration  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
OMG! Cameras Everywhere! Music Video Summer Camp - Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg - Video - The Atlantic
"What happens when established music video directors and producers team up with 12 kids for a free, weeklong summer camp about making music videos? Check out their "trailer" to find out ..."

[For now, just noting that number — 12 — in the group size sweet spot.]
kasiacieplak-mayrvonbaldegg  omgeverywhere  teaching  video  education  openstudios  toshare  learning  glvo  losangeles  musicvideo  kickstarter  cv  nextsteps  summerprojects  projectideas  lcproject 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Teagueduino: Learn to Make by Teague — Kickstarter
"Teagueduino is an open source electronic board and interface that allows you to realize creative ideas without soldering or knowing how to code, while teaching you the ropes of programming and embedded development (like arduino). Teagueduino is designed to help you discover your inner techno-geek and embrace the awesomeness of making things in realtime — even if you’ve only ever programmed your VCR."
arduino  microprocessors  2011  electronics  kickstarter  hardware  diy  hacking  learning  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Don't Go Back to School: A handbook for learning anything by Kio Stark — Kickstarter
"Don’t Go Back to School  is a handbook for independent learning that shows you how to learn almost anything without school. If you’re thinking about going back to school or about the possibility of self-taught learning, read this book first! Don’t Go Back to School will help you figure out if you can do it on your own—and it’ll show you how. It might just save you a gazillion dollars in tuition fees, and spare you the yoke of student loans for years to come."
kiostark  unschooling  deschooling  learning  books  kickstarter  2011  danielsinker  corydoctorow  quinnnorton  selfeducated  self-directedlearning  autodidactism  autodidacts  brepettis  skillshare  dropouts  education  cv  autodidacticism  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Especially Mysterious Letters by Lenka & Michael — Kickstarter
"We need help!

We're sending letters to everyone in the world, one town at a time. The letters all arrive on the same day, just like a huge dollop of fresh cream blobbed on the whole town. These cheerful handwritten letters prompt chats around neighborhoods and whip up all sorts of community curiosity and giggling confusion."

[via: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/646138685/especially-mysterious-letters/posts/125549?ref=base ]
letters  letterwriting  art  conceptualart  mystery  mysteriousletters  lenkaclayton  michaelcrowe  2011  classideas  kickstarter  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
United States Artists - Great Art Forms Here - Artist Fundraising & Advocacy
"United States Artists (USA's) mission is to invest in America's finest artists and illuminate the value of artists to society.<br />
Supporting outstanding artistic talent has been realized by the USA Fellows program over the past 5 years. By the end of 2009, 213 artists had been named USA Fellows, each receiving a grant of $50,000, for a total of direct investment in artists equalling $10,000,000. USA's investment funded new dances, poetry, films, theatrical productions, musical compositions, paintings, sculpture, and more. Worldwide audiences of all ages have encountered these stimulating new works in galleries, on stages, in print, and online."<br />
<br />
[via: http://www.unitedstatesartists.org/project/yucca_crater via Regine (wmmna)]
design  art  culture  networking  kickstarter  glvo  fundraising  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
a reGeneration (a unique documentary from leave it better) by Graham Meriwether — Kickstarter
"All across the world, youth are beginning to take action.

Kids are building gardens, sharing stories, inspiring friends and family to change the way we relate to our food, to our community and ultimately, to our planet.

Our unique documentary project provides children with gardening supplies and cameras, and allows them to share the story as they learn to compost, plant seeds and ultimately harvest food they've grown themselves.

Throughout the project, footage will be shared on Leave It Better, so you can follow the incredibly inspiring youth who are the stars and co-directors of our documentary.

Starting in New York City, we will see the story grow organically as kids share stories with other youth gardeners in other states, countries, and continents.

In the 2010-2011 school year, our pilot/research year, we've given gardens and cameras to 10 schools in New York…"
film  activism  food  green  documentary  via:alexpappas  children  kickstarter  gardening  gardens  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Declaration and Validation » The Kickstarter Blog — Kickstarter
"A successful Kickstarter project has, I think, two parts. First, there’s declaration, the part where you’re forced to say, out in public—there’s no such thing as a private Kickstarter project!—you’re forced to say very clearly: This is what I am, and this is what I want to do. Then, there’s validation, the part where it flips around and your posse replies, in unison, and again out in public: Yep, sounds about right.<br />
<br />
And that’s when you feel like a writer.<br />
<br />
So for me, it’s declaration and validation that constitute the connection between Kickstarter pages and bookstore shelves. Without them, I would at this moment still not feel like a writer"
kickstarter  declaration  validation  robinsloan  writing  posses  support  2011  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Animated GIFs Triumphant - Anil Dash
"The facts about animated GIFs are stark. They only support a palette of 256 colors. No current browser lists support for animated GIF as a codec for the HTML5 <video> tag. That omission is understandable, as GIF compression of animation isn't particularly efficient. They even lived under an unfashionable cloud of patent uncertainty during the web's formative years. And those are just some of the traits I love about the format…

But to my eye, GIF is the most popular animation and short film format that's ever existed. It works on smartphones in millions of people's pockets, on giant displays in museums, in web browsers on a newspaper website. It finds liberation in constraints, in the same way that fewer characters in our tweets and texts freed us to communicate more liberally with one another. And it invites participation, in a medium that's both fun and accessible, as the pop music of moving images, giving us animations that are totally disposable and completely timeless."
culture  history  web  animation  anildash  animatedgifs  gifs  2011  kickstarter  constraints  technology  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Penumbra has a posse > Robin Sloan
"…another char­ac­ter in this story…Sean McDonald.

…an edi­tor at Far­rar, Straus & Giroux. He’s worked with writ­ers as diverse as Junot Díaz (n.b.), John Hodg­man, and the RZA…also a Snark­mar­ket reader (!) & he’s been an impor­tant vec­tor of enthu­si­asm & encour­age­ment…because his mes­sages have always been two-​​fold. First: this is so cool. Then: it can be even better.

& that gets exactly to the heart of why I’m work­ing with Sarah & Sean to pub­lish Penum­bra. You know me: I am a cham­pion of new modes & meth­ods. I love Kick­starter projects & remix con­tests…not going to stop doing any of that stuff.

…when…shop­ping the Penum­bra man­u­script around…I told [publishers] all the same thing: I’m look­ing for a posse…a smart, cre­ative crew who will help me make this book bet­ter than I could make it on my own.

…isn’t just text on a scree…It’s the design, the phys­i­cal arti­fact…press…events we’ll dream up…real books in real book­stores…"
robinsloan  mrpenumbra  publishing  2011  farrarstraus&giroux  seanmcdonald  sarahburnes  posses  books  events  kickstarter  kindle  gernertcompany  remixing  teamwork  snarkmarket  creativity  collaboration  tcsnmy  classideas  remixculture 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Periscope Project: Urban Education Initiative by The Periscope Project — Kickstarter
"Designed by resident contemporary artists, architects, and educators, the first annual Periscope Urban Laboratory will teach high school students drawing, photography, video-making, construction, hydroponic gardening, and critical thinking skills as potent tools for urban analysis, public art, and environmental sustainability.

Each lab in the series will guide high school students in producing an analytically engaging artistic response to a contemporary regional urban issue and will culminate in a gallery show at the end of the summer. More importantly, we hope to equip students with valuable technical, visual, and aesthetic communication tools necessary to understand, interpret, and critically respond to the urgent urban challenges they face.

We already have the space, skilled instructors, and community support. With your help, the next step is equipment and supplies."
sandiego  kickstarter  education  fundraising  urbanlaboratory  highschool  drawing  photography  learning  lcproject  2011  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
cloudhead - The Anti-Manifesto Manifesto
"Manifestos are from an era when information moved slowly, but at the speed of light, there’s no time to declare your intentions … everything is made public as it happens.

Today a traditional manifesto arrives as a footnote to reality, just in time to make sense of a motion that’s already transpired.

Our actions and the reactions they excite are now the only meaningful declaration possible. The manifesto can no longer be separated from the reality it hopes to manifest.

New crowd funding platforms like Kickstarter point to a new kind of manifesto - one that merges declaration, action, and response into a single connective motion.

The new manifesto turns goals into roles for both actors and audience alike … before the environment or the goals have a chance to change."
shiftctrlesc  headmine  cloudhead  crowdfunding  kickstarter  manifestos  action  change  declaration  response  connectivism  connectivity  connectedness  audience  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Red Pop: The big red button for your iPhone camera.
"Red Pop adds a big red button to your iPhone camera so you never miss the moment and that perfect shot."
iphone  camera  accessories  kickstarter  redpop  brendandawes  cameras  ios  photography  buttons  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Shape of Design, a new book by Frank Chimero
"It’s a field guide for makers, a book for the people who believe that the world is not yet done. It’s a handbook for the emerging skillset: improvisation, storytelling, embracing paradox, honoring craft, and delighting audiences.<br />
<br />
More than anything, it’s a book of suggestions to how we can make things that help us to live better."
theshapeofdesign  books  frankchimero  design  improvisation  storytelling  paradox  craft  delight  kickstarter  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Notice of an Advisory Relationship (Ftrain.com)
"I'm 36 now, and I've been writing for the web since I was 21. I've written for other media, but this right here is my medium of choice and I love it the most, even if I've been pretty lousy at updating Ftrain over the last few years.

In those 15 years I've learned that the web has countless ways to say “no,” or to say “meh.” It has fewer ways to say “yes.” Readability looks like a way to say “yes” to people doing hard work—whether they're journalists, essay and fiction writers, publishers, editors, fact-checkers, illustrators, photographers, proofreaders, circulation specialists—or the people who write the checks. The web needs more “yes.” That is why I've thrown my hat into the ring."

[via: http://blog.frankchimero.com/post/3526362273/in-those-15-years-ive-learned-that-the-web-has ]
paulford  readability  kickstarter  postive  meh  yes  support  writing  creativity  instapaper  funding  micropayments  moneyforcontent  money  publishing  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Shape of Design by Frank Chimero — Kickstarter
"The Shape of Design isn't going to be a text book. The project will be focused on Why instead of How. We have enough How; it's time for a thoughtful analysis of our practice and its characteristics so we can better practice our craft. After reading the book, I want you to look at what you do in a whole new light. Design is more than working for clients.

But really, this book aims to look at the mindset and worldview that designing develops in order to answer one big, important question: How can we make things that help all of us live better?"
frankchimero  books  kickstarter  design  why  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Daniel Johnston's "Infinite Comic Book of Musical Greatness" by Daniel Johnston — Kickstarter
"We're bringing the long awaited first full-length comic book by legendary musician and artist Daniel Johnston to his loyal fans. Donations will fund the creation, production, and manufacture of "Daniel Johnston's Infinite Comic Book of Musical Greatness."

The project will be much more than just a standard comic book…although a standard comic book by Daniel Johnston would be anything but standard and certainly worth funding. The "Infinite Comic Book of Musical Greatness" will combine the unique and brilliant characters, images and words of Daniel Johnston along with Daniel's amazing music, and the musical and artistic contributions of fans, to create a one-of-a-kind interactive comic book experience…"
danieljohnston  music  comics  kickstarter  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
So Long 2010, and Thanks for All the Pageviews — Satellite — Craig Mod
"Make no mistake, there is nothing easy about writing. It requires a tremendous amount of time &, often, blind belief in the output. The larger essays can take upwards of 50-100 hours to complete — write, edit, design, rewrite, whiskey, redesign, self-doubt, layout, cry, publish, promote, correct embarrassing invariable spelling mistakes.

But the act of writing each of these essays has led to a deeper insight into the subject…this is something many creatives simply choose not to engage. & it's a shame. Reflection through writing can illuminate the next step in a creative process which all too often feels like flailing aimlessly in the dark.

…I'd go so far as to say an unarticulated experience or creative process is one left unresolved. By writing about your experience you close the loop…When you publish, both the output of the experience (book, software, photographs, etc) & now the ability to replicate that experience is in the hands of your audience. That's a powerful thing…"
craigmod  writing  internet  web  photography  kickstarter  speaking  freelancing  creativity  2010  relection  reflection  execution  articulation  doing  making  make  glvo  balance  understanding  learning  tcsnmy  publishing  blogs  blogging  ipad  experience  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Rise of the Micro-Medici: Change Observer: Design Observer
"Why does crowdfunding work where crowdsourcing fails? Because ideas are cheap and subjective, and money is expensive and objective. As Clay Shirky puts it in Cognitive Surplus, "People don't actively want bad design — it's just that most people aren't good designers.” Asking crowd members to put their money behind someone else's creativity does two things: It forces contributors to be more deliberate in their assessment of what constitutes a good idea, and it generates an absolute measure of merit based on the cumulative contributions of individuals."
design  thinking  crowdsourcing  crowdfunding  2010  mariapopova  clayshirky  kickstarter  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Kickstarter Blog - Disperse/Displace Comes to Life
"When conceptual artist Shannon Rankin came to Kickstarter, she was looking to put on her first ever international exhibition; a site specific installation to be premiered at Galerie Voss in Düsseldorf, Germany. Called “Disperse/Displace”, it would consist of meticulously deconstructed and rearranged maps, inviting reinterpretation of our commonly accepted geographies and engaging the possibility of a broader, more diverse landscape. One successful project and a few months later, we’re watching the final show come to life! Super exciting. <br />
<br />
Her recently posted shots had us a little jealous as we watched her building the exhibit, hanging out with really cute dogs, and having impromptu dance parties. Wish we had been there!"
shannonrankin  kickstarter  art  glvo  2010  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Glif - iPhone 4 Tripod Mount & Stand by Dan Provost — Kickstarter
"Hello there! Thanks for visiting our Kickstarter page. With your help, we'd love to release a product into the world that we think is pretty swell.<br />
<br />
Glif is a simple iPhone 4 accessory with two primary functions: mounting your iPhone to a standard tripod, and acting as a kickstand to prop your iPhone up at an angle. From these two functions emerge numerous uses: hands-free FaceTiming, watching videos, making movies, using your iPhone as an alarm clock, and many others.<br />
<br />
So why do we need YOUR help? Simply put, manufacturing is expensive. We want to use a process called 'injection molding' to create the Glif at a level of quality we deem acceptable, but unfortunately this requires a hefty set up cost. By pledging at least twenty dollars, you will be essentially pre-ordering a Glif, and helping turn our little project into a reality."
tripod  accessories  iphone4  kickstarter  invention  iphone  manufacturing  2010  photography  videography  glif  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Punk Mathematics by Tom Henderson — Kickstarter
"Punk Mathematics will be a series of mathematical stories. It is written for readers who are interested in having their minds expanded by the strange metaphors and implications of mathematics, even if they're not always on friendly terms with equations. Better living through probability; the fractal dimension of cities and cancers; using orders of magnitude to detect bullshit; free will and quantum economics; and the mathematics of cooperation in a networked world on the brink of a No Future collapse."
math  mathematics  philosophy  learning  funding  kickstarter  books  tomhenderson  punk  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Kickstartup — Successful fundraising with Kickstarter & the (re)making of Art Space Tokyo — Craig Mod
"I want to share with you a story about books, publishing, fundraising and seed capital. It's a story that I hope will change how you think about all of these topics. And it's a story that I hope will serve as a template. In April 2010, Ashley Rawlings and I used community fundraising to raise nearly $24,000[1] to breathe new life into our book, Art Space Tokyo. My goal here is to outline what we did and why we did it, with the hope of inspiring anyone with an itch, gumption and a good narrative, to do the same. To bring beautiful, well-considered things into the world."
books  kickstarter  crowdfunding  entrepreneurship  publishing  craigmod  marketing  print  self-publishing  tokyo  fundraising  funding  design  printing  typography  selfpublishing 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Unschooling : The Movie by Lee Stranahan — Kickstarter
"Unschooling : The Movie is a fun and informative documentary about a radical idea - that the best education for kids can come without any formal education at all. The film features extensive interviews with unschooling parents and children with a special emphasis on the groundbreaking work and ideas of unschooling advocate Sandra Dodd.

The film is a great way to deepen your understanding of unschooling and homeschooling, whether you're brand new to the ideas or an experienced unschooler. It can also serve as a great introduction to the topic for friends or family who can't wrap their heads around why the kids aren't in school. Unschooling : The Movie talks about the problems and conflicts that unschoolers can face and practical, simple ways to solve them."
unschooling  homeschool  children  education  parenting  kickstarter  documentary 
july 2010 by robertogreco
velo-city blog | NYC | Programs
"Velo City’s mission is to introduce youth from diverse under served communities to urban planning and design concepts, community involvement opportunities, and career options in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning and design through the medium of cycling."

[See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/991833446/cycling-exploring-the-city-bikesplorations ]
via:adamgreenfield  nyc  bikes  biking  kickstarter  landscape  activism  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  architecture  community  civics  youth  design  velocity  transportation  transit  bikesplorations  classideas  tcsnmy 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Why Robin Sloan is the Future of Publishing (and Science Fiction) | Wet Asphalt [Gets right to the heart of (a) why I love Robin's brand of science fiction; and (b) how the content is also related to the process of its creation.]
"While Bruce Sterling & Cory Doctorow & Vernor Vinge fantasize about Singularity or augmented reality or 3D printers that can reproduce themselves (which, incidentally, all appeal heavily to juvenile power fantasies), Sloan is writing a fiction that speaks to a world in which we find ourselves not exactly emancipated by technology but simply hyper-connected by it, our identities as people redefined by the media we share, media which we embrace & deeply care about even when it leaves us bewildered, co-opted, & reduced in a thousand ways to algorithms. It isn't "hard" Science Fiction, not by a long shot, but most "hard" SF long ago stopped being able to figure out how to be relevant to most readers (as can be seen by their sales figures), with its greatest practitioners, William Gibson & Neal Stephenson, turning instead to the present day, on the one hand, & history & alternate history, on the other. Sloan, however, has found an entirely different & exciting avenue of attack."
robinsloan  sciencefiction  scifi  writing  publishing  social  socialmedia  kickstarter  via:robinsloan  future  present  quantumcomputing  corydoctorow  singularity  williamgibson  brucesterling  vernorvinge 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Robin writes a book (and you get a copy) » Naming characters with Google AdWords — Kickstarter
"But okay, I'll be honest. This was mostly just an excuse to try a new tool. Any nerd will tell you that tools can provide their own intrinsic rewards. There's an aspect of exploration to it, too: you're pressing out into new tool-territory, learning about what you can and can't do."
google  adwords  research  writing  crowdsourcing  names  naming  kickstarter  marketing  process 
october 2009 by robertogreco
MakerBeam: An Open Source Building Kit — Kickstarter
"MakerBeam is a project to build a toy and tool for the open source imagination. Based on Mini-T, a new open source standard, MakerBeam will develop a construction toy for our times: open source precision hardware equally at home doing desktop fabrication or serving as a drawbridged castle for action figures."
kickstarter  fabrication  engineering  opensource  hardware  makerbeam  diy  make 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Kickstarter
"Kickstarter is a funding platform for artists, designers, filmmakers, musicians, journalists, inventors, bloggers, explorers..."
glvo  funding  fundraising  art  creativity  design  entrepreneurship  crowdsourcing  vc  socialsoftware  money  networking  community  music  projects  kickstarter 
june 2009 by robertogreco

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