robertogreco + katakana   6

Why Do Japanese Still Use Kanji? Complicated Writing System... - YouTube
"Why Do Japanese Use Kanji? Japanese is known for its complicated writing system, but why do we use kanji? Can't we just use hiragana and katakana? Is it possible to abolish kanji?

- Hiragana and Katakana are phonetic characters.
- Kanji (literally meaning Chinese letters) is like a symbol.
- Japanese has a lot of homophones and homographs and kanji helps to distinguish them.
- We have a set of official kanji on the joyo kanji list.
- There has been a number of attempts to abolish kanji in Japanese history.
- Once, John Pelzel from the Allied occupation of Japan tried to completely romanise Japanese after WWII.

[Here's a bit of history of people who tried to abolish kanji]

1866 - Hisoka Maejima, a Japanese statesman, was said to send a proposal to the shogun, insisting on abolishing kanji.
1872 - Yukichi Fukuzawa, Japan's prominent figure featured in the current 10,000 yen bill, wrote about his idea of abolishing kanji.
1881 - A group of people started a movement to promote the use of kana letters in place of kanji.
1946 - Naoya Shiga, a famous Japanese novelist, suggested that Japan should adopt French as the official language.
1946 - The Yomiuri Shimbun, one of the most popular Japanese newspapers, published an editorial arguing that adopting Roman alphabet would be key to democratise the country."
japanese  kanji  hirgana  katakana  srg  2015  history  languages  language 
july 2019 by robertogreco
Hiragana & Katakana: the voice of Japanese typefaces - YouTube
"Osamu Torinoumi, Reiko Hirai
ATypI 2016 • Warsaw, Poland
Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw ASP

The Japanese language is unique in that its written form combines four different scripts concurrently: Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji (Chinese characters) and Latin. The huge character set and the complexity of the composite Japanese script make its explanation challenging, with the result that most explanation are either basic or partial. This presentation digs deeper. A comparison of the frequency of use of Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji and Latin character in a Japanese text shows the dominant role of Kana (Hiragana and Katakana). This means that Kana most influences the tone of a paragraph, and determines the characteristic of a typeface. In spite of this importance, Kana presents challenges to designers, as there are no defined alignments like those in other scripts. Within the singular guideline of a square which encloses the form, there is considerable variation of form. Osamu Torinoumi argues that the key to understanding Kana design rests in the history of the script, from its inception in the 8th century, to current digital forms. The importance in designing Kana is to consider the inherent shape, stroke and rhythm of each Kana letter. Translation and English presentation will be handled by Reiko Hirai from Monotype."
japanese  srg  hiragana  katakana  typography  osamutorinoumi  text  graphicdesign  kana  reikohirai  typefaces  fonts  languages 
july 2019 by robertogreco
Hitotoki — About [Nice touce in the Design Notes—see the quote below. Click through for (small) images.]
"The Hitotoki logo is composed of four hankos, traditional Japanese personal stamps. Each was carved in stone by Eiko Nagase, kissed, inked, and pressed to tissue paper, resulting in what you see above.

The hankos can be seen as city blocks, the space between them the little pockets we carve out for ourselves. Each hanko silloutte is an abstracted katakana character cor­responding with the inlaid roman script. hitoOur 435-page identity style guide allows for creative re-positioning of the blocks to fit the logo into different layout contexts. Sadly, the application of the “Bevel and Emboss” filter is strictly prohibited."

[Update 17 July 2013: Link now redirects to Hi [sahi.co], so here's the Wayback link: http://web.archive.org/web/20130117051029/http://hitotoki.org/about/ ]
humor  storytelling  tokyo  geotagging  cities  hitotoki  narrative  blocks  stamps  hankos  katakana  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about “Design and Making Things” » Archive » Dainippon Type Organization: Fun With Japanese Characters
"the Dainippon Type Organization breaks Japanese Katakana, Hiragana, and the alphabet into pieces to recompose the parts and produce new characters - like turning Katakana in Kanji looking characters and the other way round"
art  design  japan  japanese  media  type  typography  toys  hiragana  katakana  letters  symbols  english  language  writing  play  pingmag 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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