robertogreco + interface   339

Pulp Nonfiction
"Paper continues to be a versatile and indispensable material in the 21st century. Of course, paper is a passive medium with no inherent interactivity, precluding us from computationally-enhancing a wide variety of paper-based activities. In this work, we present a new technical approach for bringing the digital and paper worlds closer together, by enabling paper to track finger input and also drawn input with writing implements. Importantly, for paper to still be considered paper, our method had to be very low cost. This necessitated research into materials, fabrication methods and sensing techniques. We describe the outcome of our investigations and show that our method can be sufficiently low-cost and accurate to enable new interactive opportunities with this pervasive and venerable material."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1Q0QCPdZys ]
paper  digital  touch  interface  yangzhang  chrisharrison  2018 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Your Camera Wants to Kill the Keyboard | WIRED
"SNAPCHAT KNEW IT from the start, but in recent months Google and Facebook have all but confirmed it: The keyboard, slowly but surely, is fading into obscurity.

Last week at Google’s annual developer conference, the company presented its vision for how it expects its users—more than a billion people—to interact with technology in the coming years. And for the most part, it didn’t involve typing into a search box. Instead, Google’s brass spent its time onstage touting the company’s speech recognition skills and showing off Google Lens, a new computer vision technology that essentially turns your phone’s camera into a search engine.

Technology has once again reached an inflection point. For years, smartphones relied on hardware keyboards, a holdover from the early days of cell phones. Then came multitouch. Spurred by the wonders of the first smartphone screens, people swiped, typed, and pinched. Now, the way we engage with our phones is changing once again thanks to AI. Snapping a photo works as well, if not better, than writing a descriptive sentence in a search box. Casually chatting with Google Assistant, the company’s omnipresent virtual helper, gets results as fast, if not faster, than opening Chrome and navigating from there. The upshot, as Google CEO Sundar Pichai explained, is that we’re increasingly interacting with our computers in more natural and emotive ways, which could mean using your keyboard a lot less.

Ask the people who build your technology, and they’ll tell you: The camera is the new keyboard. The catchy phrase is becoming something of an industry-wide mantra to describe the constant march toward more visual forms of communication. Just look at Snapchat. The company bet its business on the fact that people would rather trade pictures than strings of words. The idea proved so compelling that Facebook and Instagram unabashedly developed their own versions of the feature. “The camera has already become a pervasive form of communication,” says Roman Kalantari, the head creative technologist at the design studio Fjord. “But what’s the next step after that?”

For Facebook and Snapchat, it was fun-house mirror effects and goofy augmented reality overlays—ways of building on top of photos that you simply can’t with text. Meanwhile, Google took a decidedly more utilitarian approach with Lens, turning the camera into an input device much like the keyboard itself. Point your camera at a tree, and it’ll tell you the variety. Snap a pic of the new restaurant on your block, and it’ll pull up the menu and hours, even help you book a reservation. Perhaps the single most effective demonstration of the technology was also its dullest—focus the lens on a router’s SKU and password, and Google’s image recognition will scan the information, pass it along to your Android phone, and automatically log you into the network.

This simplicity is a big deal. No longer does finding information require typing into a search box. Suddenly the world, in all its complexity, can be understood just by aiming your camera at something. Google isn’t the only company buying into this vision of the future. Amazon’s Fire Phone from 2014 enabled image-based search, which meant you could point the camera at a book or a box of cereal and have the item shipped to you instantly via Amazon Prime. Earlier this year, Pinterest launched the beta version of Lens, a tool that allows users to take a photo of an object in the real world and surface related objects on the Pinterest platform. “We’re getting to the point where using your camera to discover new ideas is as fast and easy as typing,” says Albert Pereta, a creative lead at Pinterest, who led the development at Lens.

Translation: Words can be hard, and it often works better to show than to tell. It’s easier to find the mid-century modern chair with a mahogany leather seat you’re looking for when you can share what it looks like, rather than typing a string of precise keywords. “With a camera, you can complete the task by taking a photo or video of the thing,” explains Gierad Laput, who studies human computer interaction at Carnegie Mellon. “Whereas with a keyboard, you complete this task by typing a description of the thing. You have to come up with the right description and type them accordingly.”

The caveat, of course, is that the image recognition needs to be accurate in order to work. You have agency when you type something into a search box—you can delete, revise, retype. But with a camera, the devices decides what you’re looking at and, even more crucially, assumes what information you want to see in return. The good (or potentially creepy) news is that with every photo taken, search query typed, and command spoken, Google learns more about you, which means over time your results grow increasingly accurate. With its deep trove of knowledge in hand, Google seems determined to smooth out the remaining rough edges of technology. It’ll probably still be a while before the keyboard goes extinct, but with every shot you take on your camera, it’s getting one step closer."
interface  ai  google  communication  images  cameras  2017  snapchat  facebook  smartphones  lizstinson  imagerecognition  pinterest  keyboards  input  romankalantari  technology  amazon  sundarpichai  albertpereta  gieradlaput 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Sara Wachter-Boettcher | Talk: Design for Real Life
[video: https://vimeo.com/177313497 ]

"Lots of people have weird backgrounds and diverse backgrounds. And the thing is, all of us could have made those design mistakes. Any one of us could have had a scenario where we didn’t think about it, and we made an assumption, and we built it in. Because we’re so used to thinking about our target audience as some sort of narrow, easy-to-imagine thing, somebody we can picture, right? And to be honest, if you’re white and straight and cis—speaking as somebody who is—it’s really easy to imagine that the world is full of people like you. It’s really easy to imagine that, because, like, you see people like you all the time in your social circle and on TV. And it’s really easy to forget how diverse the world really is.

So we all have these blind spots. And the only way to change that, the only way to get around that, is to do the work. And to admit it, to own up to it and say, yeah—yeah, I have bias. And it’s my job to figure that out and do the best I can to get rid of it.

Because if we don’t, and if we don’t also do the work of making our teams and our industry more diverse, more welcoming to people who are different than us, then what we’ll start to do is we’ll start to build exclusion in. An interface that doesn’t support gay people or doesn’t support people of color leads to data that doesn’t represent gay people or doesn’t represent people of color. And that has a domino effect across an entire system.

And so I think back to that example with Google images, right, with their image recognition, and I think about the machine learning that people are really excited about—and should be, because it’s amazing—and I want to remind us all: machines learn from us. They’re really good at it, actually. So we have to be really careful about what we’re teaching them. Because they’re so good at learning from us, that if we teach them bias, they’ll perform bias exceptionally well. And that’s a job that I think all of us actually play a role in, even if it seems distant at this moment."



"Design for real life

But we can do that. I think we really do our best work when we take a moment and we say, how could this be used to hurt someone? How can we plan for the worst? And that’s what I mean when I talk about designing for real life, because real life is imperfect. Real life is biased. Real life can be harmful to people.

Real life has a hell of a lot of problems.

So what I want to leave you with today is one last story that shows just how much design and content can affect people, can affect what happens in their lives.

It actually takes it back offline to standardized tests. I’m sure many of you have taken tests like this in the past with the little Scantron; you fill in the bubbles. In the United States, we take the SATs—many people take the SATs toward the end of high school as a major part of their college entrance. It plays a huge role in where you might get in.

[40:00]

They have three parts: there’s reading, there’s math and there’s writing. Reading and math are done via this multiple-choice format.

Now, for a very long time, there have been some very big disparities in those scores across race and across gender. White students outscore black students by an average of 100 points on each of those exams. And this is not new. This is about the same margin—it’s been this way for decades. And for boys and girls, you also have this as well. It’s a smaller margin, but you’ve got a little bit of a difference in reading for boys versus girls, and then about a 30-point difference in math.

And what researchers have really started to show is that one of the reasons that this gap is not narrowing—despite all of these other indicators that you would think it might, like the number of women who are going to college and all that, right—it’s not narrowing, because the test is actually biased. Because Education Testing Services, which is the people who write all the questions for the test, what they do is they pretest everything, so potential questions get pretested before they make it to an exam. What that does is it assumes in their testing process that “a ‘good’ question is one that students who score well overall tend to answer correctly, and vice versa.”

So what that means is that if a student who scores well on the current SAT, in the current system with the current disparities, if they tend to do well on this other question, then it’s a good question, and if they don’t, then it’s bad. “So if on a particular math question, girls outscore boys or blacks outscore whites, that question has almost no chance of making the final cut,” because what is happening is that process is perpetuating the disparity that already exists. It’s re-inscribing that disparity over and over again, because it’s making a test perform the same for the people it’s always performed well for, right? The people it was first made for in the ‘20s. People who went to college in the ‘20s, and ‘30s, and ‘40s, and ‘50s. Not the diversity of people who are in college now.

And I tell this story, because this is design, and this is content. What is a test like that, besides content, the questions, and an interface with which a student actually answers it, the test itself? This is what happens when we assume that our work is neutral, when we assume that the way that things have been doesn’t have bias already embedded in it. We allow the problems of the past to re-inscribe themselves over and over again.

And that’s why I think that this is us. This is our work. This is not just the work of, you know, super technical folks, who are involved with AI. This is all of us.

Because ultimately, what we put into interfaces, the way that we design them, what the UI copy says, they affect how people answer questions. They affect what people tell us. They affect how people see themselves. So whether you’re writing a set of questions that a defendant has to fill out that’s going to get them rated as a risk for criminal recidivism, or you’re just explaining how to use a form or establishing default account settings, the interface will affect the input that you get. And the input is going to affect the outcome for users. For people.

The outcomes define norms: what’s perceived as normal and average in our society, the way that we see people. Who counts.

What this means is that design has a lot of power. More power, I think, than we sometimes realize. More power than we sometimes want to believe as we’re sort of like squabbling in our companies about whether we’re being invited to the right meetings. There’s a fundamental truth that design has a lot of power.

And so the question is not whether we have power, but how we’ll use it.

Do we want to design for real people, facing real injustice and real pain? Do we want to make the world a little fairer, a little calmer, and a little safer? Or are we comfortable looking the other way?

I’m not. And so I hope you’ll join me. Thank you."

[via: "Every interface decision encodes culture into the system. So what are we encoding? Video/transcript of my new talk:"
https://twitter.com/sara_ann_marie/status/771736431106678784 ]
bias  diversity  inclusion  inclusivity  sarawachter-boettcher  2016  ui  ux  interface  design  testing  standardization  standardizedtesting  sat 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they’re all over the Web) | Ars Technica
"No, it's not only you—some user interfaces today intentionally want to confuse and enroll."
ui  dishonesty  design  ux  darkpatterns  internet  webdev  interface  webdesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Full Thoughts on Pokemon Go from my interview on The Verge — Medium
[via: "And the ideas of "intentional obtuseness" in Pokemon Go (and Snapchat):"
https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/754162625802534912
along with these:
http://makegames.tumblr.com/post/147367627844/this-is-an-excerpt-from-the-spelunky-book-which
http://tevisthompson.com/saving-zelda/ ]

"Andrew Webster over at The Verge interviewed Rami Ismail, Asher Vollmer, and I about Pokemon Go. It's a great piece and the thoughts from Asher and Rami are very good. You should read the piece.

Pokemon Go has been as divisive as it has been phenomenal, so I wanted to post up the full-text from the interview now that parts are up online.

--- Do you think it's a good game / does it do what it sets out to do successfully?

I think Pokemon Go is a great game.

To really understand why it's important to recognize that some games are made great by their mechanics, and some are made great by their communities. Since games really only exist when they are being played, it's very difficult (or maybe impossible) to meaningfully separate a community from a game itself. I think a lot about something my friend and fellow designer Doug Wilson (JS Joust, B.U.T.T.O.N.) told me once about how he designs games: Unlike most developers I know, Doug makes games not by designing intricate and mentally exciting systems, but by looking for interactions that are just physically or emotionally fun to do. I think recognizing this emotional/physical aspect to games is key to understanding much of what Pokemon Go has done brilliantly.

I've seen twitter folks and reviewers complaining about the experience being good but the game itself being bad, but i'm not sure it's entirely fair to pick it apart like that. "What the game is mechanically" or at least what it appears to be mechanically is a huge part of what's drawing so many people to play it, and the biggest, most magical part of playing Pokemon Go right now is that it's the first real-world sized, real world game. By which I mean, the game not only takes place in the real world, but it has enough players to fill it up.

--- Does it even matter if it's "good"?

I think what people are claiming as "bad" is actually a creeping component of modern viral game design — opaque UI. Theres no indication yet as to if the extremely awkward UI of Pokemon Go was intentional or not, but either way I think the aggressive obfuscation (and lacking tutorialization) of the deeper game mechanics is doing a lot to bring players in. Not only is it hiding the more complicated parts of the game from new players, but it enables a lot of discovery sharing amongst friends, kids and parents, websites and readers, etc. Beyond the confusing gym-battle UI you can see this practice stretches into many clearly intentional design decisions in the game: Battle-use items only show up around level 8, Great Balls at level 12, and the pokedex keeps expanding as you find higher and higher numbered Pokemon. These early-level omissions both simplify the game and add to the excitement of players discovering them. How many pokemon are even in this game? I have no idea, but I sure want to find out!

--- What do you think are the most important design aspects that led to it blowing up like this? (i.e. things other than it being Pokemon)

Obviously Pokemon being a gigantic brand is the single biggest thing contributing to the massive player explosion, but no brand is powerful enough to do something like this on it's own — it had to be paired with the perfect game.

Pokemon Go does a lot of things very right, and some of the easiest to spot pop up pretty quickly when you compare it to older team-based AR games like ConQwest or Niantic's own Ingress. Unlike those prior AR games, Pokemon Go is not initially (or necessarily ever) a competitive game. Additionally, like many of the most successful mobile games, you can grasp the entire initial ruleset from watching someone else play the game.

It seems obvious to say, but I believe one of the most substantial features of Pokemon Go is that just walking around catching Pokemon is fun, even if you do absolutely nothing else. And while it seems simple, there are a lot of clever mechanics supporting this small action. The hilariously jankey but stressful ball tossing minigame is just hard enough to make you feel proud when you catch a pokemon, but still incredibly accessible. The vaguely detective-like tracking interface gives you a good reason to rush outside if theres a new pokemon silhouette, while still making them just hard enough to find to encourage strangers on the street to offer unsolicited advice to other players. Even the AR component is used appropriately sparingly to drive home the collecting game. While the technology is still rough, it works just well enough to cement our belief that pokemon are actually in places, and drives the language that players use to communicate with each other ("Theres a squirtle on that corner!"). AR gives the more visible and obvious side-bennefit of social image sharing, but I think its most successful function in Pokemon Go is it's capacity to feed our imaginations. Despite being an AR game, Pokemon Go is still largely played in our imaginations, just like any other game, and being able to see a Pikachu on a street-corner just for a second fuels our fantasy worlds immensely.

--- As a designer what are the most interesting aspects of the game / phenomenon to you? LIke what are things you would like to pull from it for your own?

One of the most exciting things about the success of Pokemon Go is that it gives us a blueprint for what people want out of augmented reality. As far as I can tell, the biggest thing we want from it is social camaraderie — which, feels like it should be obvious, but clearly was not when you look at just how few prior AR games have been non-competitive. Less excitingly but just as obviously, AR game players want to see and interact with other players around them. While news outlets joke that Pokemon Go is a great excuse to go out into the real world and then ignore it, I'd argue that while Pokemon Go players are potentially less connected to the physical outdoors than non-players, they're more connected to the social fabric of society outside. I've interacted with more strangers in NYC in a few days of playing Pokemon than in the last decade I lived there. In aggressively fractured world of headphones and podcasts and socially-filtered news, it's really exciting to see a piece of tech that makes the social space feel vast and whole again.

Of course, there are developers and thinkers out there who are sad to see AR require such high-levels engagement to take off, lamenting that this kind of feat is only viable to global brands, and while that may be true, I think this kind of game coming out only makes it more accessible to indies. I'm certainly not saying that it is accessible to indies, but that this can only help. Not only does it introduce huge swaths of people to AR games, but it also shows us what we're up against if we want to make something like this, and the first thing that makes solving an impossible problem easier knowing exactly what the problem is."
vi:tealtan  pokemongo  2016  games  gaming  play  interface  ux  learning  howelearn  howweplay  videogames  andrewwebster  ramiismail  ashervollmer  zachgage  ar  design  ui  snapchat  srg  edg  gamedesign  zpd  howwelearn  exploration  pokémongo  augmentedreality 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Microsoft's Radical Bet On A New Type Of Design Thinking | Co.Design | business + design
"De los Reyes wasn’t proposing that Microsoft become a sidewalk company. He was proposing a metaphor. He was hoping to find the digital world’s equivalent of the curb cut, something elegant that let everyone live a little easier. At a meeting of Shum’s top deputies, de los Reyes mooted this idea of making Microsoft’s design accessible to all. On its face, this idea flattered Microsoft’s culture. Remember how Windows famously let you adjust the setting on almost anything you wanted, while Apple didn’t? That wasn’t an accident, but rather the perfect expression of Microsoft’s abiding belief, descended from the great garage-hacker Bill Gates, that users should be able to adjust everything they touched as they saw fit. So for Microsofties, it was only natural to think that users, including the disabled, should have as many settings as they wanted. But de los Reyes was after something more ambitious. Kat Holmes, there at the meeting with Shum, supplied another puzzle piece."



"One of Holmes’ first insights was that she didn’t have to figure out all these problems on her own. Other people already had. After all, real personal assistants think every day about getting their clients to trust them, providing the right information at the right time, being helpful before you’ve been asked. So Holmes sought them out. She found real personal assistants who’d served demanding clients ranging from celebrities to billionaires. By studying how they delicately cultivated trust, Holmes was able to recommend a series of behaviors for Cortana. The best personal assistants have logs about client preferences, but they’re also transparent about why they’re recommending certain things. Thus, Cortana, unlike Siri or Google Now, has a log of all the preference data that it has extrapolated about you, which users can edit. Cortana also behaves like a human would, though she doesn’t quite have a personality: Instead of simply giving you a flippant joke when befuddled by a question, like Siri does, Cortana admits to what she does and doesn’t know. She asks you to teach her, just like a trustworthy personal assistant would.

The point wasn’t simply to copy what those personal assistants did, it was to figure out why they were doing what they did. Instead of tackling a thorny problem head on, Holmes had found an analogue to give structure to what she was doing, to provide a framework for the endeavor.

And then Holmes saw the movie Her, a visionary sci-fi film in which a love-lorn everyman played by Joaquin Phoenix falls in love with a digital assistant voiced by Scarlett Johansson. Holmes wangled her way into a connection with the movie’s production designer, K.K. Barrett, and asked him how he’d come up with such a credible-looking vision of the future—one which, in fact, she’d been working on even as the movie was being shot. Barrett answered with a curveball: He said that to make the technology look futuristic, he’d taken everything out that was technology. His approach was to simply let the director Spike Jonze focus only on what was human. All at once, Holmes saw it: She figured that in trying to understand how computers should interact with humans, the best guide was how humans interacted with humans."



"De los Reyes and Holmes, with the help of design experts including Allen Sayegh at Harvard and Jutta Treviranus at the Ontario College of Art and Design, eventually hit upon a vein of design thinking descended from Pat Moore, and universal design. Dubbed inclusive design, it begins with studying overlooked communities, ranging from dyslexics to the deaf. By learning about how they adapt to their world, the hope is that you can actually build better new products for everyone else.

What’s more, by finding more analogues between tribes of people outside the mainstream and situations that we’ve all found ourselves in, you can come up with all kinds of new products. The big idea is that in order to build machines that adapt to humans better, there needs to be a more robust process for watching how humans adapt to each other, and to their world. "The point isn’t to solve for a problem," such as typing when you’re blind, said Holmes. "We're flipping it." They are finding the expertise and ingenuity that arises naturally, when people are forced to live a life differently from most."



"As promising as these smaller projects might be, Holmes and de los Reyes believe there is a bigger opportunity. Today, we are drowning in interactions with smartphones and devices, such as our cars and homes—all of which suddenly want to talk to our phones as well. We live in a world of countless transitions. Instead of one device, there is actually an infinite number of hands-off between devices. There needs to be a new kind of design process to manage those seams. "The assumptions about computing are that our devices are one-on-one with visual interactions," Holmes points out. "The design discipline is built around those assumptions. They assume that we’re one person all the time."

Holmes believes that inclusive design, by bringing a diverse set of users into a design process that typically strips away differences and abstracts them into what seems user-friendly to the maximum number of people, can actually help with the fact that our capabilities change throughout the day. We don’t simply have a persona, fixed in time and plastered on a storyboard, like most design processes would have it. We have a persona spectrum. When you’re a parent with a sprained wrist, or you’re reaching for your phone while holding your groceries, you share a world, albeit briefly, with someone who has only ever been able to use one hand. "There is no such thing as a normal human," Holmes says. "Our capabilities are always changing."

The hope is that in seeking out new people to include in the design process, we can smooth away the gaps that bedevil our digital lives. Which brings to mind Pellegrino Turri and his typewriter, Alexander Graham Bell with his telephone, and Vint Cerf and email—these were inventors who all started with the disabled in mind but eventually helped everyone else. The difference is that while each of those inventors stumbled upon an analogue that helped them invent something that everyone else could use, Microsoft is starting with the analogues. They're seeking out the disabled and the different, confident that they've already invented exactly the solutions that the rest of us need.

For de los Reyes, the promise of this new design process isn't in just a better Microsoft: "If we're successful, we're going to change the way products are designed across the industry. Period. That's my vision.""
disability  microsoft  design  conversationalui  accessibility  2016  augustdelosreyes  cortana  siri  googlenow  katholmes  ux  ui  interface  juttatreviranus  allensayegh  julielarson-green  albertshum  stayanadella  normal  inclusivedesign  incluive  inclusivity  disabilities 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Chats with Bots | BBH Labs
"AI bots are everywhere. Or at least, chatter about chatbots is everywhere. The slick new Quartz app wants to msg you the news. Forbes launched their own official Telegram newsbot yesterday. Will 2016 be the year of the bot, the year we start chatting and stop worrying about whether the person(a) at the other end of the chat is human or not?

At Labs we like to get stuck in and get our hands dirty. Metaphorically. So we fired up Telegram, added some bots to our contact list, and started chatting. And here’s the resulting chat, screengrabbed for your edification."
bots  api  telegram  quartz  interface  ai  artificialintelligence  2016  jeremyettinghausen 
march 2016 by robertogreco
The Future of Chat Isn’t AI — Medium
"So if not AI, then what? What will bots let you do that was never possible before?

We think the answer is actually quite simple: For the first time ever, bots will let you instantly interact with the world around you. This is best illustrated through something that I experienced recently.

During last year’s baseball playoffs, I went to a Blue Jays game at the Rogers Centre. I was running late, so I went straight to my seat to catch as much of the game as I could. But when I got there, I realized I was the only one of my friends without a beer. So, with no beer guy in sight, I turned back to go get a beer. After 10 minutes of waiting in line, I finally got back to my seat. I had missed two home runs.

But good news! In the future, this will never have to happen again. The stadium is developing an app that will let you order from your seat. So next time, I won’t have to miss a beat — I’ll just order through the app. It will be great. Or will it?

Imagine I had sat down and found that there was a sticker on the back of the chair in front of me that said, “Want a beer? Download our app!” Sounds great! I’d unlock my phone, go to the App Store, search for the app, put in my password, wait for it to download, create an account, enter my credit card details, figure out where in the app I actually order from, figure out how to input how many beers I want and of what type, enter my seat number, and then finally my beer would be on its way.

Actually, I would have been better off just waiting in line.

And yet there are so many of these types of apps: apps to order train tickets at stations; apps to order food at restaurants; and apps to order movie tickets at theatres. Everyone wants you to just “download our app!” And yet, after spending millions of dollars developing them, how many people actually use them? My guess: not a lot.

But imagine the stadium one more time, except now instead of spending millions to develop an app, the stadium had spent thousands to develop a simple, text-based bot. I’d sit down and see a similar sticker: “Want a beer? Chat with us!” with a chat code beside it. I’d unlock my phone, open my chat app, and scan the code. Instantly, I’d be chatting with the stadium bot, and it’d ask me how many beers I wanted: “1, 2, 3, or 4.” It’d ask me what type: “Bud, Coors, or Corona.” And then it’d ask me how I wanted to pay: Credit card already on file (**** 0345), or a new card.

Chat app > Scan > 2 > Bud > **** 0345. Done."



"To be clear, this is just the beginning of the bots era, and there are many developments to come. The leaders in this space — Kik, WeChat, Line, Facebook, Slack, and Telegram — all have their own ideas about how this is all going to play out. But one thing I think we can all agree on is that chat is going to be the world’s next great operating system: a Bot OS (or, as we like to call it, BOS).

These developments open up new and giant opportunities for consumers, developers, and businesses. Chat apps will come to be thought of as the new browsers; bots will be the new websites. This is the beginning of a new internet."
chat  ai  artificialintelligence  2016  tedlivingston  kik  slack  telegram  facebook  ui  ux  interface  api  wechat  bots  qrcodes 
march 2016 by robertogreco
It’s here: Quartz’s first news app for iPhone - Quartz
"We just released our first news app for iPhone, which you can download from the App Store right now. Tap or click here to get it.

The app, exclusive to iPhone, is a whole new way to experience Quartz. We put aside existing notions about news apps and imagined what our journalism would be if it lived natively on your iPhone. It wouldn’t be a facsimile of our website. It would be something entirely different, with original writing, new features, and a fresh interface.

Quartz for iPhone has all of that. It’s an ongoing conversation about the news, sort of like texting: We’ll send you messages, photos, GIFs, and links, and you can tap to respond when you’re interested in learning more about a topic. Each session lasts just a few minutes, so it’s perfect for the train, elevator, grocery store line, or wherever you have a spare moment to catch up on the news.

Some of our messages will also reach you through fun and relevant notifications throughout the day. You can pick what you want: haikus about how the stock market is performing, important developments in the global economy, etc. These are notifications you will actually enjoy receiving. And we won’t buzz you unless it’s really important; most alerts will just quietly light up your phone.

There are other treats to enjoy without even opening the app. On the Today screen, you can view our most compelling Atlas chart of the moment. And if you own an Apple Watch, add our complication to your watch face to see how the US markets are faring — in the form of an emoji. We make it easy to stay up-to-date on investor sentiment without doing any work at all. It’s just there.

This is a new kind of business news app, just as qz.com has strived to be a new kind of business news website. We’re excited to add Quartz for iPhone to the roster of ways in which you can get our reporting, perspective, and voice.

The editorial approach

The app’s interface may resemble an automated assistant, but here’s the secret about our little news bot: It’s actually written by humans! Smart journalists who want to keep you informed and entertained. We’ve assembled a global group of Quartz writers and editors, led by Adam Pasick, to give the app its voice.

Our intent is to take a similar approach to other platforms where this kind of media could live. This is a big and broad endeavor for Quartz as we experiment with new formats. Internally, we refer to the project as Jasper, which is a form of the mineral quartz.

Design and development

We started tinkering with concepts and prototypes for an app about a year ago. Quartz has long focused on the open web, and we were never interested in recreating our website as a native app. We still aren’t. But mobile has developed a lot in the last few years, and we saw some new opportunities worth exploring.

Sam Williams developed the app, and Daniel Lee designed it. We drew influence from all sorts of places, but were particularly inspired by Jonathan Libov’s “Futures of Text” and apps with conversational UIs like Lark and Lifeline. Other trends, like the rise of bots and messaging, gave us confidence in the direction.

This is actually Quartz’s second iPhone app, albeit the first one that’s strictly about the news. Last year we released Flags, a custom keyboard to easily type all of the world’s flags in emoji. We plan to keep experimenting with how a news organization can serve readers on their most personal devices.

MINI is the launch sponsor of Quartz for iPhone. Advertising is integrated with the rest of the app beautifully, unobtrusively, and in parallel with the editorial experience. You can engage with the ads just as you would any other content.

Support and feedback

The app is for iPhones only, and you need to be running iOS 9.0 or higher to install it. Report any bugs you encounter to support@qz.com. And we’re looking forward to your feedback on the app as we work on the next version and also turn our attention to Android. Please send any thoughts to hi@qz.com.

Here, again, is the link to download the app. Thank you!

Advertising

[See also: http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/11/10963794/quartz-app-iphone-ios-the-atlantic-download ]
ui  ux  chat  interface  quartz  applications  ios  news  interaction  via:caseygollan  conversationalui 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Desktop Neo – rethinking the desktop interface for productivity.
"The desktop computer hasn’t changed much in the last 30 years. It’s still built on windows, folders and mouse input. But we have changed. We now use smartphones and tablets most of the time, since they are much easier to use.

The traditional desktop computer is struggling to adapt the simple interfaces of mobile devices while also keeping its focus on productivity. With people switching to mobile devices for mundane tasks, we have the opportunity to rethink the desktop computer with a focus on getting professional work done.

Neo is a conceptual desktop operating system interface that is built for todays people, needs and technologies. Visualized below are ideas that were designed to inspire and provoke discussions about the future of productive computing. I have no intention of taking this beyond the concept stage. However, I am putting my work out there hoping that people build upon it."
design  desktop  interface  mobile  ui  lennartziburski 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Do You Read Differently Online and in Print?
"The Internet may cause our minds to wander off, and yet a quick look at the history of books suggests that we have been wandering off all along. When we read, the eye does not progress steadily along the line of text; it alternates between saccades—little jumps—and brief stops, not unlike the movement of the mouse’s cursor across a screen of hypertext. From the invention of papyrus around 3000 B.C., until about 300 A.D., most written documents were scrolls, which had to be rolled up by one hand as they were unrolled by the other: a truly linear presentation. Since then, though, most reading has involved codices, bound books or pamphlets, a major advantage of which (at least compared to the scroll) is that you can jump around in them, from chapter to chapter (the table of contents had been around since roughly the first century B.C.); from text to marginal gloss, and, later, to footnote."



"Comprehension matters, but so does pleasure. In Proust and the Squid, Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University, observes that the brain’s limbic system, the seat of our emotions, comes into play as we learn to read fluently; our feelings of pleasure, disgust, horror and excitement guide our attention to the stories we can’t put down. Novelists have known this for a long time, and digital writers know it, too. It’s no coincidence that many of the best early digital narratives took the form of games, in which the reader traverses an imaginary world while solving puzzles, sometimes fiendishly difficult ones. Considered in terms of cognitive load, these texts are head-bangingly difficult; considered in terms of pleasure, they’re hard to beat.

A new generation of digital writers is building on video games, incorporating their interactive features—and cognitive sparks—into novelistic narratives that embrace the capabilities of our screens and tablets. Samantha Gorman and Danny Cannizzaro’s 2014 iPad novella, Pry, tells the story of a demolitions expert returned home from the first Gulf War, whose past and present collide, as his vision fails. The story is told in text, photographs, video clips, and audio. It uses an interface that allows you to follow the action and shift between levels of awareness. As you read text on the screen, describing characters and plot, you draw your fingers apart and see a photograph of the protagonist, his eyes opening on the world. Pinch your fingers shut and you visit his troubled unconscious; words and images race by, as if you are inside his memory. Pry is the opposite of a shallow work; its whole play is between the surface and the depths of the human mind. Reading it is exhilarating.

There’s no question when you read (or play) Pry that you’re doing something your brain isn’t quite wired for. The interface creates a feeling of simultaneity, and also of having to make choices in real time, that no book could reproduce. It asks you to use your fingers to do more than just turn the page. It communicates the experience of slipping in and out of a story, in and out of a dream, or nightmare. It uses the affordances of your phone or tablet to do what literature is always trying to do: give you new things to think about, to expand the world behind your eyes. It’s stressful, at first. How are you supposed to know if you’re reading it right? What if you miss something? But if you play (or read) it long enough, you can almost feel your brain begin to adapt.

Most of the Web is not like Pry—not yet, anyway. But the history of reading suggests that what we’re presently experiencing is probably not the end times of human thought. It’s more like an interregnum, or the crouch before a leap. Wolf points out that when it comes to reading, what we get out is largely what we put in. “The reading brain circuit reflects the affordances of what it reads,” she notes: affordances being the built-in opportunities for interaction. The more we skim, the more we’re likely to keep skimming; on the other hand, the more we plunge into a text, the more we’re likely to keep plunging. “We’re in a digital culture,” Wolf says. “It’s not a question of making peace. We have to be discerning, vigilant, developmentally savvy.” And of course we have to be surprised, delighted, puzzled, even disturbed. We have to enjoy ourselves. If we can do that, digital reading will expand the already vast interior space of our humanity."
howweread  readin  albertomanguel  technology  reading  digital  internet  paullafarge  maryannewolf  web  online  staugustine  ambrose  nicholascarr  socrates  brain  agostinoramelli  history  attention  digitalmedia  rolfengelsing  rakefetackerman  morrisgoldsmith  johannesnaumann  dianadestefano  jo-annelefevre  hypertext  michaelwenger  davidpayne  comprehension  engagement  enjoyment  talyarkoni  nicolespeer  jeffreyzacks  psychology  memory  linearity  footnotes  marginalia  bookfuturism  information  wandering  cognitiveload  games  gaming  videogames  samanthagorman  dannycannizzaro  ipad  pry  interiority  affordances  interface  linear  awareness  immersion  skimming  cv  humanity  interregnum  interactivity  interaction 
january 2016 by robertogreco
The Museum Interface - Magazine - Art in America
"It's no longer a question of whether art institutions should have a virtual presence. Rather, the onus is being placed on designers to facilitate meaningful interactions with art that might occur in the gallery, via Web-based applications or in new hybrid spaces that merge the real and the virtual. Any attempt to augment an encounter with artwork using technological means invariably raises questions about the values we assign to certain modes of viewing. After all, isn't visiting a museum inherently tied to a very deep, very primary real-life experience? The promises and pitfalls of new technologies are forcing museums to rebalance their traditional mandates to care for a collection of physical objects while enabling scholarship and providing the wider public an opportunity to engage with works of art. —R.G. and S.H."



"HROMACK The Walker's model is very interesting to me and has been for years. Reading from afar, I often wonder about the relationship between the museum and its local community and whether the same model would work in New York, the city where I live and work. Museums consider the notion of public engagement very carefully, and the social web provides an ideal space for the institution to project its own feelings about how openly or generously or successfully it interacts with people-whether those notions are functionally true or not.

I am not entirely convinced that museum-run publications-as-social-spaces-the Whitney Stories publication and video series that we run out of my department, for instance, or MoMA's Post project-can unilaterally engender genuine, self-selected digital communities, regardless of how much we hope and believe otherwise, on an institutional level. At this point in the history of the Internet, the major social media platforms command a sheer level of user engagement that individual, organization-specific platforms simply cannot, unfortunately; it's our job to figure out how to harness that monopoly, both socially and technically, through smart social integration and interface design.

Researchers such as Sherry Turkle (MIT) have worked for decades to both understand and caution against the complex psychological relationships people develop with their devices.

Yet, the future of museum visitor engagement will continue to mimic current technology trends: smartphones, "wearables" and proximity-based technologies such as the iBeacon. MoMA's most recent mobile application, Audio +, is a strong example of an institution recognizing a now—natural human behavior—in this case, the propensity of in—gallery photography—and designing for that behavior rather than sanctioning against it. Likewise, the soon-to-reopen Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum will proffer an interactive pen, co-designed with Hewlett-Packard, to each visitor who will in turn be permitted to "collect" objects throughout the institution by scanning museum labels, thereby "capturing" their visit to the museum for later access on a web address printed on their admission ticket. These digital experiments don't always work, and they certainly challenge still-held ideas about how people should and shouldn't behave in museums. But art institutions aren't churches, and the enthusiasm we see among visitors for bringing digital technology into the gallery suggests that we're witnessing a transformation in how the museum relates to its public. The assumptions and biases that will be overturned in that process remains another question entirely."
museums  sarahhromack  robgiampietro  art  interface  technology  web  online  galleries  design  interfacedesign  walkerartcenter  2014  via:ablerism  via:caseygollan 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Apple invents natural tap-based gesture input for nudging onscreen objects, selecting text
"A patent granted to Apple on Tuesday reveals a novel mode of mobile device gesture input that turns taps detected on non-touchscreen surfaces, like the side of an iPhone, into granular on-screen controls.

As published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple's patent No. 9,086,738 for "Fine-tuning an operation based on tapping" describes a solution to a problem many iPhone and iPad owners face when attempting to conduct highly granular user interface manipulations on multitouch displays.

As Apple notes, touchscreens excel in operations requiring only coarse granularity, such as swipes and taps, but are often times unsuitable for performing fine adjustments. For example, picking out a specific character in a line of text is difficult on a touch interface because the mechanism relies on an input object with a relatively large contact area (a user's finger).

Apple's iOS features a virtual magnification loupe as a workaround for accurate UI asset selection, but the method is not as precise as a traditional computer mouse. Instead of looking for an answer in multitouch screen technology, Apple's patent makes use of motion sensors available throughout its iOS device lineup.

In one embodiment, a user is able to move an onscreen object left or right with extreme precision, perhaps nudged a pixel at a time, by lightly tapping on the side of an iPhone. Tap gestures on non-touchscreen portions of a device are picked up by an accelerometer or gyroscope and processed naturally, meaning inputs are represented onscreen in an equal and opposite direction. For example, a light tap on the right side of an iPhone would move an object to the left, while a tap on the left would send the object to the right.

The patent also accounts for varying input magnitudes. Stronger taps move objects greater distances, for example.

Another embodiment detailing text selection notes users can easily extend or contract an active boundary through suitable tapping procedures. Lighter taps would move the cursor one character at a time, while more prominent taps jump entire words or lines. The idea can be extended to any number of selection or virtual object manipulation operations, as seen in the above illustration relating to a spreadsheet application.

Apple also covers taps in other directions, for example from the top and bottom of a device, as well as input involving more than one finger and other UI variations.

It is unclear if Apple intends to incorporate the tap-based fine tuning mechanism into its iOS platform anytime soon. However, the company is slowly extending device usability beyond the years-old multitouch interface by augmenting its devices with new forms of input like Force Touch, which is rumored to make the jump from Apple Watch to iPhone this year.

Apple's patent for fine UI manipulation through tap gestures was first filed for in January 2013 and credits Maxim Tsudik as its inventor."
2015  via:tealtan  interaction  apple  patents  technology  nudging  interface  gestures  touch  motion  ios  accelerometers  gyroscopes 
july 2015 by robertogreco
more than 95 theses - Things I Hate about Tumblr
"A partial list:

1. Tumblr Radar on the Dashboard

2. Recommended Blogs on the Dashboard

3. Occasional promoted content on the website

4. Constant promoted content on the iOS app

5. When I try to post something using the Tumblr bookmarklet on Chrome, I can’t resize the posting window: when I drag it to the size I want, it instantly resizes itself

6. Once I get something posted, instead of a simple confirmation message I get an outrageously, violently animated image of celebration, complete with falling confetti and a leaping avatar, as though I’ve just won the lottery

7. Significantly inconsistent posting behavior among (a) the website, (b) the iOS app, © the share-sheet in iOS — for instance, the iOS app doesn’t recognize Markdown

I just don’t know whether I can put up with this crap any more. There’s so much of it."

[And a response from Naum Trifanoff https://twitter.com/naum/status/617076055547883520 +
http://azspot.net/post/123143841390/things-i-hate-about-tumblr :

"Permit me to add:

1. Total bookmarklet failure for an increasing number of sites – when you click on the bookmarklet bar tab and the resultant dialog panel containing url info and highlighted text never returns. Then, I must close that tab, open up a browser tab, and manually fill in a post with all the details. Sort of defeats the raison d'être for Tumblr.

2. The act of reblogging is a far more complex one than simply posting a link or quote – often, your post type is restricted, and then there is addendum content added that grows ever more tricky to format or suppress. I dare say that Tumblr reblogging is more laborious than creating a simple blog post.

3. Default dashboard view doesn’t show my Tumblr blogs. Yes, they’re accessible from a menu pulldown, so this probably falls into the category of minor nitpicking.

4. Search, though it has improved in recent months. [Yes, it has improved. Very much so!]

5. “Activity” dashboard panel is nice, but it could be a lot more useful. Also, when you have ~100K followers, the “Latest Notes” scroll is not very useful – a simple filter where I could just see where somebody added text (or content) instead of just all the likes and reblogs would be awesome.

I suppose we all should be thankful and celebrate that since moving to the online place where things go to die, nevertheless, Tumblr is still chugging along." ]

[My responses to Alan:

"@ayjay I've got #8 (related to #7) for you, right from your post. Tumblr thinking it’s smarter than it is. pic.twitter.com/lI7MTSYzto "
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/617063344000733184

"Also noting that the markdown editor struggles with > for blockquotes. It works, but open again to edit & they revert to ASCII codes."
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/617063915353079808

Additional notes:

- I'm nowhere near quitting, but Alan's #7 (and the wonkiness of the Markdown editor, which I have abandoned for the rich text editor and its own problems) really wastes a lot of my time.

- My version of the iOS app (an old one since I'm stuck in iOS6) is nowhere near as bad as the version Alan is running, doesn't even show promoted content.

- I haven't used the bookmarklet but for a handful of times in the last few years precisely because of the problems mentioned above. I guess that's why my complaints are fewer — through my workflow, I've abandoned parts of Tumblr slowly over times and that leaves me with a narrower view of features that mostly work.

- Of what he notes, Naum's #2 is the one that gets me the most. I think this is related to the broken editors (Markdown, rich text, and even HTML). ]
tumblr  interface  markdown  alanjacobs  2015  yahoo  bookmarklets  naumtrifanoff 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Jamie Zigelbaum: Excerpt From My Master's Thesis
"One of the most interesting concepts arising from my research and development of tangible interfaces is the idea of external legibility. While the HCI literature is full of examples of studies of interface legibility or how well an individual user or a group of users can interact with or understand an interface or interaction techniques that they are directly involved with using (what could be called internal legibility), there are hardly any examples of studies to examine the impact of interface design on non-participating observers. I define this property of interface design as external legibility.

External Legibility: a property of user interfaces that affects the ability of non-participating observers to understand the context of a user’s actions.

One reason why external legibility is important in interface design has to do with its relationship to semantics. Although it may never be possible to truly understand another’s mind, communication is based on shared understanding. Without a context in which to base understanding, inferring meaning or semantics becomes difficult.

Think of watching a master craftsperson working on a cabinet. You can see her hammering a nail to join two two-by-fours, you can see how she makes precise cuts along the edge of a piece of plywood. The context that the craftsperson works within is highly legible to an observer—the feeling of the wood, the knowledge of why a hammer is used, the memory of experiences of doing things like what the craftsperson are doing are available to many of us, but unless you too are a master craftsperson you may not know why she is doing the things that she does. The specific content of her actions are private, her thoughts and strategies, but the context of her actions are public. Without the ability to move from observation to inference accurately, it is hard to create shared understanding. External legibility is a measure of the reliability of the connection between observation and inference in interface design, but not in the traditional framing of one person and one machine—what could be called legibility. External legibility is a property of the space between one person observing another person using a machine.

Publications
Zigelbaum, J. Mending Fractured Spaces: External Legibility and Seamlessness in Interface Design. Master’s Thesis, MIT Media Lab (2008)."
jamiezigelbaum  legibility  workinginpublic  modeling  2015  via:litherland  lcproject  openstudioproject  interface  interfacedesign  design  observation  inference  craft  craftsmanship  communication  understanding  process  context  visibility 
may 2015 by robertogreco
The End Of Apps As We Know Them - Inside Intercom
"The experience of our primary mobile screen being a bank of app icons that lead to independent destinations is dying. And that changes what we need to design and build.

How we experience content via connected devices – laptops, phones, tablets, wearables – is undergoing a dramatic change. The idea of an app as an independent destination is becoming less important, and the idea of an app as a publishing tool, with related notifications that contain content and actions, is becoming more important. This will change what we design, and change our product strategy.

NO MORE SCREENS FULL OF APP ICONS

This is such a paradigm shift it requires plenty of explaining. Whilst it may not transpire exactly as I’m about to describe, there is no doubt what we have today — screens of apps — is going to dramatically change. Bear with me as I run through the context.

The idea of having a screen full of icons, representing independent apps, that need to be opened to experience them, is making less and less sense. The idea that these apps sit in the background, pushing content into a central experience, is making more and more sense. That central experience may be something that looks like a notification centre today, or something similar to Google Now, or something entirely new.

The primary design pattern here is cards. Critically it’s not cards as a simple interaction design pattern for an apps content, but as containers for content that can come from any app. This distinction may appear subtle at first glance, but it’s far from it. To understand it, and chart the trajectory, we need to quickly run through two things.

1. Designing systems not destinations

I covered this topic in detail in a previous post, so I’ll quickly summarise here. Most of us building software are no longer designing destinations to drive people to. That was the dominant pattern for a version of the Internet that is disappearing fast. In a world of many different screens and devices, content needs to be broken down into atomic units so that it can work agnostic of the screen size or technology platform. For example, Facebook is not a website or an app. It is an eco-system of objects (people, photos, videos, comments, businesses, brands, etc.) that are aggregated in many different ways through people’s newsfeeds, timelines and pages, and delivered to a range of devices, some of which haven’t even been invented yet. So Facebook is not a set of webpages, or screens in an app. It’s a system of objects, and relationships between them.

2. Recent changes to iOS and Android notifications

Things changed with iOS 8 and Android KitKat. Notifications used to be signposts to go to other places. A notification to tell you to open an app. To open a destination.

But that is changing fast. For a while now, you can take action directly in Android notifications. Sometimes that takes you to that action in the app itself, but sometimes you can do the action directly, meaning that you don’t need to open the app at all.



We’ve moved pretty quickly from notifications as signposts, to containers (cards) that include content, and actions on that content."

[Follow-up post: “It's not the end of apps”
http://blog.intercom.io/its-not-the-end-of-apps/ ]
applications  design  ux  mobile  phones  smarthphones  interface  2015  pauladams  content  interaction  ios  android  services  software  notification  cards 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Futures of text ["A survey of all the current innovation in text as a medium"] | Whoops by Jonathan Libov
"Text is the most socially useful communication technology. It works well in 1:1, 1:N, and M:N modes. It can be indexed and searched efficiently, even by hand. It can be translated. It can be produced and consumed at variable speeds. It is asynchronous. It can be compared, diffed, clustered, corrected, summarized and filtered algorithmically. It permits multiparty editing. It permits branching conversations, lurking, annotation, quoting, reviewing, summarizing, structured responses, exegesis, even fan fic. The breadth, scale and depth of ways people use text is unmatched by anything."



"Messaging is the only interface in which the machine communicates with you much the same as the way you communicate with it. If some of the trends outlined in this post pervade, it would mark a qualitative shift in how we interact with computers. Whereas computer interaction to date has largely been about discrete, deliberate events — typing in the command line, clicking on files, clicking on hyperlinks, tapping on icons — a shift to messaging- or conversational-based UI's and implicit hyperlinks would make computer interaction far more fluid and natural.

What's more, messaging AI benefits from an obvious feedback loop: The more we interact with bots and messaging UI's, the better it'll get. That's perhaps true for GUI as well, but to a far lesser degree. Messaging AI may get better at a rate we've never seen in the GUI world. Hold on tight."

[via: https://twitter.com/equartey/status/570340911227367424
https://twitter.com/hautepop/status/570895976296087552
https://twitter.com/bruces/status/572384468230676480
https://twitter.com/TheRealFuture/status/572502116490747905 ]
text  texting  chat  sms  messaging  ui  communication  interface  design  gui  lark  quicktype  sinaweibo  alipay  qq  wechat  qqhousekeeper  weidan  koudai  facebook  facebookmessenger  talkto  applications  mobile  luka  chatgrape  slack  commandline  bustime  jonathanlibov 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Sara Wachter-Boettcher | Personal Histories
"1. Ask only for what I need.
There are lots of reasons companies want data about their customers or users, but a good many of them come down to marketing: How can I gather information that helps me more effectively sell you things?

There’s a difference between nice-to-have and mission-critical information. And too often, we force users to provide things we really don’t need—things they might not even have, or don’t want to tell us.

We talk a lot about being user-centered in the way we design and write. But how often do we assess—truly assess—how much we need from a person for them to use our products or services? How often do we prioritize our dreams of better user data, more accurate profiles, more “personalization”?

2. Work on their clock, not mine.
It wasn’t a problem that the German government asked about my family members—I’m proving my nationality, after all. But it came as a surprise; it threw me somewhere I hadn’t intended to go right then, and it took me a couple minutes to regain my bearings and move on.

Paper doesn’t mind the wait, but websites often do: they make it impossible to start a form and then save it for later. They time out. They’re impatient as all hell.

I suspect it’s because our industry has long prioritized speed: the one-click purchase. The real-time update. The instant download. And speed is helpful quite often—who doesn’t want a page to load as fast as possible?

But speed doesn’t mean the same thing as ease.

Margot Bloomstein has spoken recently about slowing our content roll—about slowing down the pace of our content to help users have a more memorable and successful experience.

What if we looked at ways to optimize interactions not just for speed, but also for flexibility—for a user to be able to complete steps on their own terms? When might it help someone to be able to pause, to save their progress, to skip a question and come back to it at the end?

What would a more forgiving interface look like?

3. Allow for complexity.
I didn’t need to explain my might-have-been older brother’s backstory to the German government. But in my doctor’s form, that complexity mattered to me—and a simple binary wasn’t nearly enough space for me to feel comfortable.

As interface-makers, what might seem simple to us could be anything but to our users. What can we do to allow for that complexity? Which what-ifs have we considered? What spaces do they create?

Take gender. I have qualms about many of Facebook’s practices, but they’ve done this well. Rather than a binary answer, you can now customize your gender however you’d like.

[image]

Facebook's gender selector showing Male, Female, and Custom options
You can also choose how you want to be addressed—as he, she, or they.

[image]

Facebook's pronoun selector showing they as the selected pronoun
We could call users who identify as something other than “male” or “female” an edge case—Why muck up our tidy little form fields and slow down the process to make space for them?

Or we could call them human.

4. Communicate what happens next.
One of my favorite details in Facebook’s gender settings is that little alert message that pops up before you confirm a setting change:
Your preferred pronoun is Public and can be seen by anyone.

I don’t care who knows what my preferred pronoun is. But I’m not a trans teen trying to negotiate the complex public-private spaces of the internet. I’m not afraid of my parents’ or peers’ reactions. I’m lucky.

Whether it’s an immediate announcement to a user’s social circle that they’ve changed their status or a note in their file about sexual assault that every doctor will ask about forever, users deserve to know what happens when they enter information—where it goes, who will see it, and how it will be used.

5. Above all, be kind.
When you approach your site design with a crisis-driven persona, you WILL see things differently.

Eric Meyer

Most of us aren’t living the worst-case scenario most of the time. But everyone is living. And that’s often hard enough.

How would our words change if we were writing for someone in crisis? Would our language soften? Would we ask for less? Would we find simpler words to use, cut those fluffy paragraphs, get to the point sooner? Would we make it easier to contact a human?

Who else might that help?

Humility. Intention. Empathy. Clarity. These concepts are easy enough to understand, but they take work to get right. As writers and strategists and designers, that’s our job. It’s up to us to think through those what-ifs and recognize that, at every single moment—both by what we say and what we do not say—we are making communication choices that affect the way our users feel, the tenor of the conversation we’re having, the answers we’ll get back, and the ways we can use that information.

Most of the choices aren’t inherently wrong or right. The problem is when our intentions are fuzzy, our choices unacknowledged, their implications never examined."
design  interface  inclusion  accessibility  humility  difference  intention  empathy  clarity  communication  purpose  kindness  ux  contentstrategy  gender  content  2015  sarawachter-boettcher  privacy  complexity  binary  inlcusivity  inclusivity 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Filtered for top-notch long reads ( 5 Dec., 2014, at Interconnected)
"1.

This well-illustrated piece on Chinese Mobile UI trends [http://dangrover.com/blog/2014/12/01/chinese-mobile-app-ui-trends.html ] is full of great nuggets.

My favourite is that companies have adopted automated "chat" as their official public face. Each brand is a bot that runs inside one of the several apps that users in China have instead of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, etc. How it works:
You can send any kind of message (text, image, voice, etc), and [the bot will] reply, either in an automated fashion or by routing it to a human somewhere. The interface is exactly the same as for chatting with your friends, save for one difference: it has menus at the bottom with shortcuts to the main features of the account.

A couple more features:
Other than that, every feature you can use in a normal chat is available here. WeChat even auto-transcribes the voice messages (mentioned before) into text before passing them to the third-party server running the account. Official accounts can also push news updates to their subscribers. Every media outlet operates one ...

I'm into this, I'm into this. Our western way for interacting with companies (assuming the shitty voice menu things are wildly out-dated) is websites, which we browse. But instead of browsing, a conversation?

So... cultural difference between China and the west, or just one of those forks in the road? Or a glimpse of the future?

2.

Hooked on Labs [http://thelongandshort.org/issues/season-two/hooked-on-labs.html ] (thanks Iain) draws a line between the practice of Robert Hooke in the 1660s and the modern trend for companies to have "labs."
Labs are places where people conduct experiments to test out theories. The new labs proliferating outside the hard sciences are a symptom of the spread of experimentalism as an ideology for how we should shape the future. Curiosity is at the core of experimentalist culture: it holds that knowledge should develop by being testable and therefore provisional ...

I like that the answer to "how should we invent?" can be not a process but a location. Other answers might be "a studio," and "the field," both of which suggest a variety of processes and practices without being pinned down.

I guess my recent preoccupation with coffee mornings is about the same thing. Can the "coffee morning" as a place, with all its informality (which I am desperate to preserve), be a way to dowse the scenius, to allow invention to occur without process?

Also coffee.

And this bit:
One vital source of this conversational approach to science was Copenhagen and the culture that Niels Bohr created around his institute for theoretical physics and his nearby home.

...which reminds me of this terrific story about the development of the theory of electron spin and how it came together as Bohr travelled across Europe by train.

At the beginning of the trip:
Bohr's train to Leiden made a stop in Hamburg, where he was met by Pauli and Stern who had come to the station to ask him what he thought about spin. Bohr must have said that it was very very interesting (his favorite way of expressing that something was wrong), but he could not see how an electron moving in the electric field of the nucleus could experience the magnetic field necessary for producing fine structure.

And as Bohr travels from town to town, he meets scientists, hears arguments, develops his view, and carries information. Great story.

I think of the interactions between scientists as the hidden particles that don't show up in the traces of a cloud chamber. They're there, busy - multiple - far denser and richer and messier than the clean interactions of the citations in scientific papers or at conferences - the invisible trillions of forks that are left out of Feynman diagrams. Those interactions are what really matter, and their stories are the most interesting of all."
mattwebb  2014  china  chinese  interface  input  chat  communication  internet  web  online  browsing  conversation  wechat  labs  openstudioproject  charlesleadbeater  nielsbohr  experiments  experimentation  experimentalism  curiosity  classideas  invention  place  studios  lcproject  informal  informallearning  informality  scenius  process  howwelearn  messiness  interaction  culture  difference  frontiers  us 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Selling on the slider — The Message — Medium
"The slider is a hot piece of technology that will play a central role in the future of prices.

The slider need not be cold, and it need not be rational.

It’s not economic efficiency that moves the slider, but emotion.

And for my money, this is the most interesting checkout screen on the whole internet.

[image]

That’s what you see when you’re about to buy a Humble Bundle. There’s a lot going on there, so let me just break it down quickly. The Humble Bundle is a popular product with roots in indie video games that’s expanded into music, movies, books, and more. The deal goes like this:

You, the potential customer, are presented with a bundle of merchandise. Maybe it’s a dozen video games; maybe a truckload of digital comics.
You decide what price you’d like to pay for all of it together. It can be as little as one penny! (This is section 1 in the screenshot above.)
You also decide how that price should be apportioned, splitting it between the content makers, a set of related charities, and the company Humble Bundle, Inc. (This is section 2 above.)

There are some nuances. Most bundles include extra content that you only receive if you meet a certain minimum payment — $10, perhaps. More interestingly, bundles almost always offer extra content that you receive only if you exceed the current average payment — an incentive that, of course, has the effect of slowly raising that average over time.

Honestly, it feels less like a checkout screen and more like a video game.

Humble Bundle’s sliders are the most elaborate you’ll find anywhere, but the basic element is all over the place."



"The slider is a natural fit when you’re buying something from a specific individual, possibly someone known to you or whose work you’ve long admired. It acts as an affinity-meter through which you can convert surplus units of love and gratitude into cold, hard dollars.

But there’s more to the slider, particularly in Humble Bundle’s implementation. It has to do with communication.

The information content of most payments is one bit: either you agree to the asking price and make the purchase, or you don’t. When a payment goes through a slider, that information content increases. When it goes through an interface like Humble Bundle’s… well, I mean, look at this!"
robinsloan  ixd  interactiondesign  pricing  2014  sliders  money  economics  humblebunndle  payment  internet  interface  web  online 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Why Getting It Wrong Is the Future of Design | WIRED
"Degas was engaged in a strategy that has shown up periodically for centuries across every artistic and creative field. Think of it as one step in a cycle: In the early stages, practitioners dedicate themselves to inventing and improving the rules—how to craft the most pleasing chord progression, the perfectly proportioned building, the most precisely rendered amalgamation of rhyme and meter. Over time, those rules become laws, and artists and designers dedicate themselves to excelling within these agreed-upon parameters, creating work of unparalleled refinement and sophistication—the Pantheon, the Sistine Chapel, the Goldberg Variations. But once a certain maturity has been reached, someone comes along who decides to take a different route. Instead of trying to create an ever more polished and perfect artifact, this rebel actively seeks out imperfection—sticking a pole in the middle of his painting, intentionally adding grungy feedback to a guitar solo, deliberately photographing unpleasant subjects. Eventually some of these creative breakthroughs end up becoming the foundation of a new set of aesthetic rules, and the cycle begins again."
design  art  rules  2014  scottdadich  unlearning  graphicdesign  technology  interfacedesign  interface  ux 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Interface Writing: Code for Humans | Nicole Fenton
"What actions can people take? What are you asking them to do?
What are you allowing them to do? What are the rules and dead-ends?
What sort of language do you use to guide people?"

Whatever you’re building, you need to think about the content in the database and the instructions around it. I call those things interface writing. Some people call them microcopy since they’re usually short."



"With clear instructions and a warm tone, you can help them find what they need quickly, without having to ask someone for help."



"When you’re writing for the web, you’re having the same sort of conversation with your readers. You’re telling them to do something or asking them a question. Above all, you want it to make sense and feel natural to them.

Our strings have to be useful—not funny—so we need to do the extra work of figuring out what our readers need. That makes it easier to show people around, ask for more of their time, or get them to take a particular action."



"From a high level, these are my goals when I’m writing strings:

• Be clear.
• Be kind.
• Be careful.
• Be honest.

Focus on the reader’s needs. Think about the implications of what you’re asking for. Be honest about what you’re doing with the data. That’s extremely important."



"Talk to them, not at them. Use positive language and avoid yammering on about your company or your interface. The system isn’t the point."



"Don’t assume you’re the core audience. Most of the time, we’re not designing for ourselves. Think about the universe of people out there. Word choice is extremely important when you’re trying to grow.

Avoid jargon and catchphrases. Cut the bullshit. You don’t have to be hip or clever, but you do have to be nice.

Don’t assume dichotomies or binaries will do the trick. Not everything will fit into a boolean. Real life is complicated. As an example, some people are neither male nor female. They’re still people and they deserve our consideration.

Don’t interrupt. Keep things focused and make sure this is the best time to deliver this message."

[video here: https://vimeo.com/103526258 ]
interface  writing  nicolefenton  2014  tone  instruction  conversation  listening  howweteach  teaching  howto  tutorials  microcopy  interfacewriting  writingfortheweb 
august 2014 by robertogreco
SuperShoes - tickling shoes that facilitate urban rediscovery on Vimeo
"Today we immerse in our digital lives through smartphones - we use google maps to navigate to the right location, yelp to find the right restaurant and so on. We don't get lost anymore, we don't wander, wonder and discover. Acts of random serendipity through walking brings us back to our innate nature as explorers, walking is meditating.

SuperShoes are a pair of flexible inner soles that you can flex, twist and put in any of your shoes to make them a supershoe. Each of these soles have three vibrotactile motors that tickle your toes, a capacitive pad that recognizes your touch and serves as an input modality. Onboard micro controller, low-power bluetooth and battery supplement the interface. The soles talk to the smartphone to use its location and data services. Users register onto ShoeCentral - once - where they populate their likes and dislikes (food, people, shopping, weather, places, hobbies, activities, interests etc) and social preferences. The ShoeCentral keeps learning about user preferences as you use the SuperShoes to go around.

The shoes are based on a tickling interface - left toe tickles - turn left, right toe tickles - turn right, no tickle - keep going, both tickle repeatedly - reached destination, both tickle once - recommendation, both tickle twice - reminder.

The shoes perform varying functions -

Map - The shoes take you to your destination by tickling. You input your destination once on the accompanying smartphone app. No more staring at the screen, rather immerse in your surroundings.

Tour guide - Since the shoes know your likes and dislikes, they recommend places of interest nearby. You could look at the smartphone app to know the suggestion, but ideally - the user follows the tickle to reach the suggested place as a surprise. Say you like Sushi and the shoes know this, the shoes know that you are on 33rd St and 7th Avenue, the shoes tickle you to take you to the Sushi place nearby which is highly recommended online. You can pause the suggestion by tapping on the toes to ignore it.

Reminders - Most of our to-do lists are on the smartphone or on the computer, we don't constantly monitor these lists throughout the day. The shoes know your tasks, and they tickle you twice to remind you when you are close to the place. Say you had to pick up wine before reaching home, as you approach close to the wine store, the shoes tickle you - and as you look around - you see the wine store and you remember your task.

Break time - We don't take breaks, we run from one place to the other. The shoes have access to your calendar and know if you have a free slot in the day, they plan a short route for you that starts and ends at your current location. So you can go out and take a break - walk without worrying where you are going - while being assured that you'd reach back at your origin in time.

Getting lost - Given the design of cities and the cross streets, there are infinite number of ways to go from one place to the other. However, we always take the same route from our work to home and vice versa. Depending on how much time you have at hand, the shoes suggest a new route for you everyday so that you can discover, explore more and not worry about getting lost."

[Also posted here: http://dhairyadand.com/sec/?page=projects&id=supershoes ]

[Reminds me of: http://dominicwilcox.com/portfolio/gpsshoe/ ]
via:lukeneff  shoes  walking  supershoes  discovery  meandering  wonder  wandering  haptic  interface  maps  mapping  directions  reminders  gettinglost  exploration  2014  dhairyadand  design 
april 2014 by robertogreco
ClintLalonde.net | The pedagogical features of a textbook
"This is pretty exciting stuff. Theoretically, if we create a button in the user interface to insert a case study into the textbook, it could also insert metadata that identifies that block of content as a case study. Once you have content identified, you could then build API’s that could extract the textbook specific content chunks. From a reuse and remixability perspective, this makes a textbook modular. Build an API that can, for example, extract just the practice questions in a book and you can create a separate practice question handbook with nothing but the practice questions from the book. In essence, we can make the book modular and with that modularity comes flexibility to potentially mix and match content in interesting and unique ways.

But before we get to the point where we could have modular & remixable content, we need to focus and determine what are the really useful pedagogical features of a textbook that improves student learning. Once we can answer that, then we have some footing to proceed to the next step & build the technology to enable that."
education  2014  textbooks  clintlalonde  interface  pedagogy  via:audreywatters 
march 2014 by robertogreco
CHUPAN CHUPAI on Vimeo
"In a near future heavily influenced by the imminent boom of the Indian subcontinent, an emerging technology and economic superpower a new digital city has developed. The film follows a group of young children as they play a game of hide and seek (Chupan Chupai) in the bustling streets of this smart city. Through their play the children discover how to hack the city, opening up a cavernous network of hidden and forgotten spaces, behind the scenes of everyday streets.

The narrative of piece focuses on how the children interact with their built environment, we explore the smart city through the device of the classic children's game. The design of the future city fuses technology and built matter as one programmable environment. Using gestures and signs as a language, the project takes the concept of gesture based control to the level where we can interact and control all elements of the built environment, creating a symbiosis between technology and the city. The film splits the physical architecture of the city into two categories; the synthesised lived in city, and its organic wild undergrowth.

The project was shot on location in India and uses a mixture of animation and visual effects to embellish the design of the city and locations that are pictured.

Based on a short story by Tim Maly
Directed by FACTORY FIFTEEN
Produced by Liam Young"

[See also: http://www.factoryfifteen.com/ ]
[Interview: http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/17980/1/factory-fifteens-futureworlds-dazed-visionaries ]
timmaly  sciencefiction  scifi  2014  film  video  jodhpur  india  hideandseek  children  interface  design  technology  play  gestures  cities  cityasclassroom  thecityishereforyoutouse  architecture  ux  smartcity  smartcities  urban  urbanism  streets  streetgames  games  builtenvironment  liamyoung  factoryfifteen  speculativefiction  jaipur  cherrapunjee 
february 2014 by robertogreco
The Future of UI and the Dream of the ‘90s — UX/UI human interfaces — Medium
"In other words, we’re expected to translate our emotions through emotionless interfaces."



"While application interfaces probably don’t need to make use of immersive soundtracks, the addition of sound effects can add to a user’s experience (provided they have the option to opt-out.) Apps like Clear and Duolingo added cheery and triumphant sound effects to their completion actions. These sounds are a recognition of the user’s success and reinforces the visual mark of a, typically green, success state."



"What can we learn from the masters of animation and how can we apply that to our work in UI? Replicating what we see in everyday life reminds us of our personal experiences. In Disney animators Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas’ book, The Illusion of Life: Disney Animation, they outline 12 basic principles to creating more realistic animations.

While not the key point of an interface, we can apply these principles on a micro-level. Excellent examples of delightful animation can be seen in Tweetbot, Apple Maps and Vine."



"While seemingly a very obvious way to communicate—copy and how we deal with inputs is often overlooked. In our rush to replace popular actions with iconography, designers often forget that sometimes copy can be just as powerful.

We can make use of copy to speak to users conversationally, eliminate the chore of form input or provide discoverable and fun easter eggs. All three ways give the illusion of a person behind the product or device."
ux  helentran  ui  interface  2014  design  minorityreport  animation  emotions  sound  frankchimero  journey  clear  duolingo  vine  tweetbot  pixar  maps  mapping  copy  content  writing  gestures 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Interface Critique | Words in Space
[Updated version [22 Jan 2014]: http://www.wordsinspace.net/wordpress/2014/01/22/interface-critique-revisited-thinking-about-archival-interfaces/ ]

"how do we critique an interface?"

… "We should attend to variables of basic composition (e.g. the size, shape, position, etc., of elements on the screen), as well as how they work together across time and space: how we read across panels and scenes, how we follow action sequences and narrative and thematic threads through the graphic interface."

… "Reading “beneath” those graphic frames provides insight into the data models structuring our interaction with the technology. ... The design of an interface thus isn’t simply about efficiently arranging elements and structuring users’ behavior; interface design also models – perhaps unwittingly – an epistemology and a method of interpretation."

… "In our interface critique, then, we might also consider what acts of interpretive translation or allegorization are taking place at those nodes or hinges between layers of interfaces."

… "We might consider how the interface enunciates – what language it uses to “frame” its content into fundamental categories, to whom it speaks and how, what point(s) of view are tacitly or explicitly adopted. ... How the interface addresses, or fails to address us – and how its underlying database categorizes us into what Galloway calls “cybertypes” – has the potential to shape how we understand our social roles and what behavior is expected of us."

… "We also, finally, must consider what is not made visible or otherwise perceptible. What is simply not representable through a graphic or gestural user interface, on a zoomable map, via data visualization?"

… "Yet we should also consider the possibility that some aspects of our cities are simply not, and will never be, machine-readable. In our interface critique, then, we might imagine what dimensions of human experience and the world we inhabit simply cannot be translated or interfaced."
toread  shannonmattern  interface  ubicomp  design  2014  johannadrucker  stevenjohnson  criticism  scottmccloud  cities  alexandergalloway  adamgreenfield  materiality  scale  location  urban  urbanism  time  space  orientation  frameanalysis  minorityreport 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Christian Ervin
"I am an interaction designer, design researcher, and architectural designer in Cambridge, MA. I work in the Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, as the project manager for the Adaptive Living Environments (ALivE) project, a unique research collaboration with the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering on intelligent material systems.

I recently completed my master's degree in Technology in the Advanced Studies Program at the GSD. I make interactive objects, immersive digital environments, and develop custom software solutions for particularly challenging design problems. I am most excited by scenarios that bridge the material and digital realms, linking our lived experience with those that are mediated by the web. In addition to my research, I study the history of human-machine interfaces and teach the theory and practice of digital design."

[See also: "The Digitally Mediated Body": http://chrerv.com/TEDxSitka-The-Digitally-Mediated-Body and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uozNzbN3vxw
"Computer Vision Helm": http://www.chrerv.com/Computer-Vision-Helm
"Alberto Mendoza Day Care Center" http://www.chrerv.com/Alberto-Mendoza-Day-Care-Center and others]
christianervin  design  via:ablerism  body  interface  architecture  mediation  digitalmediation  human-machineinterfaces  web  internet  bodies 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Windows Phone Doomsaying is Making Me Surprisingly Sad | Hazlitt | Random House of Canada
"In part, my affinity for it is a matter of aesthetics. Windows Phone eschews the rows of icons and multiple pages of iPhones and Androids for one main screen composed of squares and rectangles of different sizes, with a list of all your other apps in a single list off to the right. Rather than pictures or treatments meant to resemble physical objects, Microsoft’s approach follows the principles of flat design—since aped by Apple—in which clear shapes, fonts and bright colours work together to produce a purely digital look. The overall effect is vastly cleaner and more organized, particularly for attention-addled brains like my own—even an iPad feels visually cacophonic in comparison.

As any iPhone owner will tell you, it’s easy to become attached to objects because of how they look. Becoming attached to software, however, is a bit more strange. And with Windows Phone, the affection you begin to feel isn’t so much toward aesthetics or one particular function but, rather, processes—of movements on a screen, or patterns of motion inscribed into muscle memory. It is the flow of the thing that compels, the way the interface asks for a back and forth between quick, short swipes and taps that leaves one feeling that a smartphone operating system isn’t only a tool, but more akin to an interactive language.

Software is an intermediary between people and the world. As such, screens aren’t a sphere unto themselves as much as a sort of lens onto reality, and the confluence of aesthetics and interaction—even on my clunky old Nokia—shapes that perception in subtle, important ways. It structures a relationship to information.

“But!” the analysts say, “Microsoft-Nokia’s products are doomed!” I’m not convinced that’s entirely true. Assuming it is, though, and Windows Phone heads the way of Palm, WordPerfect, or, probably soon, BlackBerry, what then? If software isn’t just a tool but a window onto life, and picking one is almost like choosing a language or a style, what are we supposed to do when our chosen way of mediating a connection to the world of information disappears?

I don’t have an answer to that—beyond “learn programming,” I guess. But as it stands now, the aesthetic and processual cleanliness of Microsoft’s recent approach helps me to deal with information overload and media glut. Market forces and consumer desire mean that, save learning how to create my own, I might be forced to use a system less suited to my needs. It’s as if I’m presented with this malleable, highly adaptable mechanism for constructing my relation to media, news and the world… and it could, at almost any moment, be taken from me by rigid, entrenched forces far beyond my control."
windowsphone  windowsphonemetro  nokia  2013  software  interface  aesthetics  navneetalang 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Annotator - Annotating the Web
"The Annotator is an open-source JavaScript library and tool that can be added to any webpage to make it annotatable.

Annotations can have comments, tags, users and more. Morever, the Annotator is designed for easy extensibility so its a cinch to add a new feature or behaviour.

Check out the live demonstration or install it now."
via:litherland  javascript  webdev  annotation  jquery  tools  interface  webdesign 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Life Online: An Interview with Folkert Gorter and Jon-Kyle Mohr - Venue
"The scroll bar is a great device—I have always been most excited about it as my main user interface device. Way back, I started experimenting, along with a whole bunch of other people, with making scrolling interfaces. I would put up a ton of content, but you couldn’t see all of it. It was as if the browser was the viewfinder of a camera, and, instead of moving the viewfinder, you could just scroll the page."



"Gorter: I think the way we get around this is that we try to not make a specific interface. Instead, we always use the content as the interface. This is how we always design. In Cargo, there’s no design, there’s just content. You click on a thumbnail, but the thumbnail is just a smaller representation of the project.

Essentially the browser is the canvas—it is the design—whereas, with a lot of web design, you see people making designs inside the browser, like a box inside a box, and then shading here, adding a bar there.

But we don’t do that. We try to disappear.

Twilley: You’ve described Cargo as not social but rather collaborative. That difference between closed and open, complete and unfinished, is really interesting. There are actually not a lot of middle spaces on the Internet that manage to straddle that division, whereas Cargo is populated by user content but still feels aesthetically coherent.

Gorter: I think, again, that’s because the design is the way the interface works, rather than being some kind of overlay.

Even if you completely disassociate your personal site from the platform, the brand is the interface. We care so much about the feel and the behavior of the interface—when you click something, something happens to bridge the waiting time between the click and the response, and the typography is always properly in proportion—that it still feels like Cargo, at the end of the day, no matter what it looks like.

You’re in a structure, but the only things you see are content. "



"Manaugh: Our final question, just to bring it full circle, is about the process of working on the Venue website, and whether that allowed you to explore any new territory. Perhaps it did, perhaps it didn’t.

Mohr: The integration with Google Maps for Venue was really fun. I had never used their API. We’re actually starting to work on an API for Cargo, and working with Google Maps’ API for Venue really influenced how I’m approaching that.

It was also really fun to play with spatiality. Google Maps is already interesting in terms of its Z-space functionality—the way that you can zoom in and out in satellite view—and we spent a long time playing around to find a comfortable zoom level for Venue, and so on.

Gorter: It was a great project for us, I think, because we’re always looking for excuses to extend Cargo’s functionality. The only reason we make new stuff for Cargo is in response to a specific request. We never say, “Hypothetically, people would love such-and-such new feature—let’s make it!”

And, because we don’t design websites—we don’t make layouts, we just put content in—the Google Maps integration is not simply decoration. It’s actually integral to how the site works. What I really love about what we accomplished was that we put the Google Maps in there, but we imposed the Venue aesthetic over top of it.

We’ve done projects with Flash before where we work the same way. The problem with Flash is that it’s like an aquarium—all the content sits behind a thick layer of glass. You can’t touch it; you can only look at it. It’s imprisoned. What we've done is use Flash in a new kind of way, as a background environment, and then put a flat HTML layer over top of it so that you can interact with as if you were interacting with any website."

[See also: http://www.laimyours.com/7398/thinking-in-the-future-tense-an-interview-with-folkert-gorter/ ]
folkertgorter  jon-kylemohr  2013  design  cargo  butdoesitfloat  spacecollective  venue  geoffmanaugh  nicolatwilley  scrollbars  web  internet  online  multimedia  ux  ix  interface  browsers  content  browser 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Progressive Reduction — LayerVault Blog
"I’m very excited to talk about a technique that we’ve started using at LayerVault. We call it Progressive Reduction.

Culture of Reduction
The principles mentioned in our Flat Design Era post are the consequence of a culture of reduction—an important place to start. Without the right product culture, implementing the ideas in this post won’t help you much.

The idea behind Progressive Reduction is simple: Usability is a moving target. A user’s understanding of your application improves over time and your application’s interface should adapt to your user."

[Follow-up post: "Implementing Progressive Reduction" http://layervault.tumblr.com/post/42442865260/implementing-progressive-reduction ]
design  minimalism  ui  ux  2013  reduction  progressivereduction  layervault  interface 
august 2013 by robertogreco
DIRTI for iPad, World's first tapioca interface | USER STUDIO
"a 570cm3 dish that contains about 8.600 seeds of dry tapioca grains

Our research led us to wonder if and how we could change the relationship that humans have with tangible controllers: at the time (2011) we were working on trying to control thousands of particles on the screen in the most natural, intuitive fashion possible. We figured there was no better way than by actually controlling real world particles! So when creating this new "DIRTInterface", we set our minds on making something a little less accurate, while a lot more subtle, constantly adapting, almost alive. Tackling the cold, abrupt interaction that traditional controllers impose on us... It was all about interaction design politics ;)

Ok, so what's DIRTI in the first place?

It's the World's first tapioca interface! No really, it enables you to control your computer or your iPad with tapioca or anything else that's semi-transparent and that you can mold, like vanilla ice cream for example. Any non-opaque material that's either granular or liquid will do just fine. It's kind of a real-world interface. And the acronym stands for Dirty Tangible Interface. Tacky? Yeaaaah, we love tacky!

You, the user, interact with your machine by moving the material around in a sand-blasted dish. Anything that you're going to produce from within the Dirty Tangible Interface can not be 100% accurate, but it's infinitely refined, expressive and subtle. And you can't cancel any action or go back to a previous, default position, but you can control any graphics or sounds coming out of your machine with amazing expressivity, just like with real world instruments. Say, a violin. Not even kidding. And who wouldn't like plunging their hands in ice cream?!"
dirti  interface  tactile  touch  ncmideas  particles  texture  software  programming  installation  tangiblecontrollers  controllers  input  via:markllobrera  userstudio  glvo  maisondepetits  centquatre  rolandcahen  diemoschwarz  ircam  raspeberrypi  ios  ipad  destronics  topophonie 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Magic Ink: Information Software and the Graphical Interface
"The ubiquity of frustrating, unhelpful software interfaces has motivated decades of research into “Human-Computer Interaction.” In this paper, I suggest that the long-standing focus on “interaction” may be misguided. For a majority subset of software, called “information software,” I argue that interactivity is actually a curse for users and a crutch for designers, and users’ goals can be better satisfied through other means.

#Information software design can be seen as the design of context-sensitive information graphics. I demonstrate the crucial role of information graphic design, and present three approaches to context-sensitivity, of which interactivity is the last resort. After discussing the cultural changes necessary for these design ideas to take root, I address their implementation. I outline a tool which may allow designers to create data-dependent graphics with no engineering assistance, and also outline a platform which may allow an unprecedented level of implicit context-sharing between independent programs. I conclude by asserting that the principles of information software design will become critical as technology improves.

#Although this paper presents a number of concrete design and engineering ideas, the larger intent is to introduce a “unified theory” of information software design, and provide inspiration and direction for progressive designers who suspect that the world of software isn’t as flat as they’ve been told."

[Via: http://www.technologyreview.com/view/514306/yahoos-weather-app-has-no-cool-interactions-and-thats-amazing/ ]

[See also: http://www.theonion.com/articles/internet-users-demand-less-interactivity,30920/ ]
design  interface  software  ui  usability  ux  interaction  interactiondesign  humans  bretvictor  via:johnpavlus  information  technology  infromationsoftware 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Lamps: a design research collaboration with Google Creative Labs, 2011 – Blog – BERG
"As a technical challenge it’s been one that academics and engineers in industry have failed to make compelling to the general populace. The Google team’s achievement in realising this vision is undoubtedly impressive. I can’t wait to try them! (hint, hint!)

It’s also a vision that is personal and, one might argue, introverted – where the Big Brain is looking at the same things as you and trying to understand them, but the results are personal, never shared with the people you are with. The result could be an incredibly powerful, but subjective overlay on the world.

In other words, the mirrorworld has a population of 1. You.

Lamps uses similar techniques of computer vision, context-sensing and machine learning but its display is in the world, the cloud is painted on the world. In the words of William Gibson, the mirrorworld is becoming part of our world – everted into the spaces we live in.

The mirrorworld is shared with you, and those you are with."
projection  projectors  imagerecognition  robotreadableworld  microworld  spoookcountry  williamgibson  googleglass  light  interface  google  2012  2011  berglondon  berg  lamps  mattjones  basaap  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
Soulver | Acqualia
"Soulver helps you work things out.

It's quicker to use than a spreadsheet, and smarter and clearer than a traditional calculator.

Use Soulver to play around with numbers, do "back of the envelope" quick calculations, and solve day-to-day problems."
via:clivethompson  applications  math  iphone  software  calculator  osx  interfacedesign  interface  calculators  ios  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
MaKey MaKey: An Invention Kit for Everyone (Official Site)
"MaKey MaKey is an invention kit for the 21st century. Turn everyday objects into touchpads and combine them with the internet. It's a simple Invention Kit for Beginners and Experts doing art, engineering, and everything inbetween:

The kit will include everything you see above: MaKey MaKey, Alligator Clips, USB Cable."
interface  mit  invention  programming  children  interaction  hardware  diy  arduino  makeymakey  coding  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Codename: Svbtle by Dustin Curtis
"…I decided to build my own solution to power dcurt.is. It is codenamed Svbtle. The first interface I built just contained a simple list of articles with a “new post” form, like almost every other blogging management system ever created, but it has slowly evolved into something that has hugely improved the quality of my thinking and writing."

"This interface doesn't force me into thinking about ideas as posts, like every other blogging system does. I don't have to sit down and think about a title and content, and I'm not expected to publish immediately. The disconnection between draft ideas and published posts makes a big subconscious difference. It allows ideas to start abstractly, to ruminate for a while, and then, as I work on them, to become more and more concrete until they're ready to be published as articles. The side effect of this is that ideas I would never have written down before now become fully developed posts. It has hugely surprised me."
ideas  bloggingplatform  onlinetoolkit  interface  platform  svbtle  dustincurtis  thinking  writing  blogging  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
TOC 2012: Tim Carmody, "Changing Times, Changing Readers: Let's Start With Experience" - YouTube
Notes here by @tealtan:

"unusual contexts in writing / reading text

“In a hyperliterate society, the vast majority of reading is not consciously recognized as reading.”

“What readers expect is more important than what readers want.”

Bill Buxton: “every tool is the best at something and the worst at something else”

skills, path-dependency, learning effects

“…we actually like constraints once we're in them.”"

And notes from @litherland:

"11:40: “I do things like … just obsess about weird little details. So, for instance … like, how do you do text entry in a Netflix app on the Wii? You know? I think about this a lot.” Your many other talents notwithstanding, Tim, you may have missed your calling as a designer. /

18:30: “I think it’s a tragedy that we have not been able to figure out a good interface for pen and ink on reading devices.” Holy grail. My dream for years. I would give anything. I would give anything to be smart enough to figure this out."
design  reading  writing  journalism  history  timcarmody  toc2012  via:tealtan  constraints  billbuxton  bookfuturism  ebooks  stéphanemallarmé  paper  2012  media  mediarevolutions  sentencediagramming  advertising  photography  change  books  publishing  printing  modernism  context  interface  expectations  conventions  skills  skeuomorph 
february 2012 by robertogreco
discontents - It’s all about the stuff: collections, interfaces, power and people
"‘What changes’, Hitchcock asks, ‘when we examine the world through the collected fragments of knowledge that we can recover about a single person, reorganised as a biographical narrative, rather than as part of an archival system?’ ... People with passions, people with dreams, people who are just annoyed and impatient, don’t have to wait for cultural institutions to create exactly what they need. They can take what’s on offer and change it."
museum  archives  communitiesofauthority  timhitchcock  narrative  biographicalnarrative  passion  collections  interface  via:straup 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Edward Tufte forum: Touchscreens have no hand
"So instead let us give more time for doing physical things in the real world and less time for staring at (and touching) the glowing flat rectangle.

Plant a plant, walk the dogs, read a real book, go to the opera. Or hammer glowing hot metal in a blacksmith shop."
edwardtufte  making  doing  tangible  touch  touchscreen  2011  bretvictor  hands  living  screens  interface  interactiondesign  glowingrectangles  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Neighborland
"Neighborland is a fun and easy way for residents to suggest new businesses and services that they want in their neighborhood. It's a great tool for residents to voice new ideas for vacant commercial real estate, existing public space, and development projects in the works. As our community grows, entrepreneurs, property owners, and developers will be able to hear the collective needs and wants of a neighborhood, and build relationships with their future customer base. Neighborland is supported by the Tulane City Center, part of Tulane's School of Architecture, with the generous support of Tulane's Social Entrepreneurship Program and the Rockefeller Foundation."
twitter  interface  neighborhoods  candychang  teeparham  danparham  neworleans  nola  jamesreeves  chrispalmatier  alanwilliams  civiccenter  cities  neighborland  obvious  obviouscorp  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
MoMA | Talk to Me BETA
"New branches of design practice have emerged in the past decades that combine design’s old-fashioned preoccupations—with form, function, and meaning—with a focus on the exchange of information and even emotion. Communication design deals with the delivery of messages, encompassing graphic design, wayfinding, and communicative objects of all kinds, from printed materials to three-dimensional and digital projects. Interface and interaction design delineate the behavior of products and systems as well as the experiences that people will have with them. Information and visualization design deal with the maps, diagrams, and tools that filter and make sense of information. In critical design, conceptual scenarios are built around hypothetical objects to comment on the social, political, and cultural consequences of new technologies and behaviors."
cities  interaction  interface  augmentedreality  2011  talktome  moma  design  media  objects  dialogue  socialnetworks  information  technology  dialog  ar  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Mule Design Studio’s Blog: Density and Difference
Putting screenshots of Google+ and Twitter next to each other you’ll notice two things.…One…more density on the Twitter side…

Secondly, take a look at how each service shows you the difference between things. In twitter’s ordered world there’s a basic unit of measurement: a tweet. Highly restrictive by nature. The differences are easy to spot. Some have links, some are retweets, faves, etc. But because the basic unit itself is so uniform, the stream is incredibly easy to scan, even read. The differences between each unit are things you catch out of the corner of your eye.

Google+, on the other hand, wants you to know that these objects are different types. It’s all about leading with the differences, rather than creating a scannable, understandable whole. It’s function over form. Cognitively, I have to figure out what type of object it is before I can read it."
design  social  twitter  google  facebook  google+  2011  density  scanning  interface  interfacedesign  reading  difference  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Infovore » Waving at the Machines
"It sounds strange when you first read it: behavioural change to accommodate the invisible gaze of the machines, just in case there’s an invisible depth-camera you’re obstructing. And at the same time: the literacy to understand that there when a screen is in front of a person, there might also be an optical relationship connecting the two – and to break it would be rude.

The Sensor-Vernacular isn’t, I don’t think, just about the aesthetic of the “robot-readable world“; it’s also about the behaviours it inspires and leads to.

How does a robot-readable world change human behaviour?…

Look at all the other gestures and outwards statements that the sensor-vernacular has already lead to: [examples]…

Where next for such behavioural shifts? How long before, rather than waving, or shaking hands, we greet each other with a calibration pose:

Which may sound absurd, but consider a business meeting of the future… [described]"
gestures  machines  tomarmitage  2011  kinect  waving  behavior  technology  sensors  interface  robots  sensor-vernacular  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
How Print Design is the Future of Interaction - Mike Kruzeniski
"Products like Flipboard are attractive because they are consciously and carefully designed to highlight the content, instead of crowding the experience with UI tools. The design of these experiences is being driven by new thinking in interaction design, where visual design is central to the experience, rather than painted on at the end. Once the traditional elements of UI are torn away, designers can concentrate their efforts on working iwth the content that remains. And it ends up looking a lot like Print. If we pull Visual Design to the front of the product creation process, we can break free of the bad design habits that surround us. As Interaction Designers we can stop polishing our icons, and focus on communicating the content inside, clearly and with style. The rewards are simple: more beautiful products that are easier to use, and beautifully branded experiences with more room for self-expression."

[Now here: http://kruzeniski.com/2011/how-print-design-is-the-future-of-interaction/ ]
2011  mikekruzeniski  technology  digital  print  design  content  undesign  overdesign  history  interaction  interface  experience  ui  flipboard  printdesign  adamgreenfield  typography  pacing  instapaper  iconography  imagery  objectivity  markboulton  berg  berglondon  vannevarbush  paulrand  andreiherasimchuk  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Kicker Studio: Why You Want (But Won’t Like) a Minority Report-style Interface
"Instead of looking to Minority Report for inspiration, might I suggest we look to a humbler source for the future of gestural interfaces: public bathrooms. The toilet flushes as you walk away; the sink turns on as you put your hands under it; a paper towel dispenses with a wave of a hand. This is everyday magic, so natural we seldom even think about it. These are the kind of gestural interfaces I want to have in my living room, my kitchen, my hobbies, my workplace. Interactive gestures that blend into our activities, enhancing them in ways that aren’t gimmicky or tiring, and yet are beautiful, fluid, expressive. That’s the future I want to live in."
interface  minorityreport  dansaffer  design  ux  ui  gestures  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Kodu Offers Pop-Up Computer Programming for Children - NYTimes.com
"Kodu, built by a team at Microsoft’s main campus outside Seattle, is a programming environment that runs on an Xbox 360, using the game console’s controller rather than a keyboard. Instead of typing if/then statements in a syntax that must be memorized — as adult programmers do — the student uses the Xbox controller to pop up menus that contain options from which to choose. Kodu itself resembles a video game, with a point-and-click interface instead of the thousand-lines-of-text coding tools used by grown-ups."
microsoft  xbox  xbox360  programming  scratch  education  learning  children  games  gaming  gamedesign  criticalthinking  edg  srg  tcsnmy  kodu  interface  iteration  computing  classideas  coding  teaching  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
iHelp for Autism - - News - San Francisco - SF Weekly
"Since the iPad's unveiling in April, autism experts and parents have brought it into countless homes and classrooms around the world. Developers have begun pumping out applications specifically designed for users with special needs, and initial studies are already measuring the effectiveness of the iPod Touch and the iPad as learning tools for children with autism. Through the devices, some of these children have been able to communicate their thoughts to adults for the first time. Others have learned life skills that had eluded them for years.<br />
<br />
Though there are other computers designed for children with autism, a growing number of experts say that the iPad is better. It's cheaper, faster, more versatile, more user-friendly, more portable, more engaging, and infinitely cooler for young people. "I just couldn't imagine not introducing this to a parent of a child who has autism," says Tammy Mastropietro…"
autism  ipad  interface  education  communication  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Swype | Text Input for Screens
"Swype provides a faster and easier way to input text on any screen. With one continuous finger or stylus motion across the screen keyboard, the patented technology enables users to input words faster and easier than other data input methods—at over 40 words per minute. The application is designed to work across a variety of devices such as phones, tablets, game consoles, kiosks, televisions, virtual screens and more."
android  keyboard  mobile  input  swype  applications  writing  touchscreen  usability  ui  typing  interface  iphone  ios  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Keynotopia - Keynote themes for interactive prototyping of iPad, iphone and web apps [more at: http://www.adaptivepath.com/blog/2010/07/15/your-rapid-prototyping-tool-for-ipad-keynote/]
"Put together user interfaces in minutes<br />
Add interactivity and animations without writing code<br />
Export and test your prototypes on the iPhone and the iPad<br />
Capture your audience with click-thru product presentations<br />
Annotate and share your interactive prototypes instead of long requirement documents"
keynote  layout  templates  wireframes  ipad  iphone  prototyping  ux  webdesign  development  design  interface  webdev  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Features/Spiral Home View - Sugar Labs
"This is an enhancement to the Home View to enable the display of more icons. The idea is that after the circle becomes too large, rather than shrinking the icons, it morphs into a spiral. Only after the spiral no longer fits on the screen do the icons shrink."
olpc  interface  homeview  sugar  sugarlabs  ui  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Craighton Berman: Where is my digital version of the desk blotter, the back of a receipt, or painter’s palette?
"The digital world lacks these kind of informal places for scribbling things to remember in the short term. There are probably thousands of note-taking applications out there, meant to capture small bits of information—but I have yet to encounter any that match the spontaneity of the tangible world’s solutions, or the casual ability to place bits of info in a visual manner. Where is my digital version of the desk blotter, the back of a receipt, or painter’s palette?"

[Sent him an email pointing to a few examples that approach the "digital version of the desk blotter, the back of a receipt, or painter’s palette."

Desktastic for Mac OS X
http://www.panic.com/desktastic/

Edgies for Mac OS X
http://www.oneriver.jp/Edgies/index_e.html

The Sugar UI (on the OLPC) shows clipboard items (from copy-paste) on the side.
http://www.sugarlabs.org/index.php?template=gallery&page=media_02
http://www.sugarlabs.org/index.php?template=gallery&page=galler y]
digital  craightonberman  informal  software  computing  interface  ui  ux  mac  macosx  sugar  olpc  destastic  edgies  osx  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Neography [iPhone, iPad] - "Words separate, pictures unite" /by Thibault Geffroy | CreativeApplications.Net
"“Words separate, pictures unite” (Otto Neurath) is the moto of Neography, a personal project by Thibault Geffroy. By reflection on the evolution of the transmission of news information, the ‘soon to be released’ apps for iPhone and iPad will atempt to enable readers to access the latest news quickly through a system of signs and images (RSS reader?). Neography, Thibault describes, builds on the growing interest in data visualization by allowing the coexistence of pictographic symbols of the alphabet, with photo montages to create a kind of a visual riddle. The project is an experimental response in the form and content, a screen … to regain the power of the image.

Newspapers, rarely read.
Covers, only glanced at.
Websites, always surfed through.
Takeover of the text, submission of the reader.
Passivity is the keyword in our time-urgent world.
Now is the moment to use new visual media to reawaken the basic thirst for information that has been lost.
Experiment in form and content on the front page and on screen where the world —without word—comes directly to the eyes."

[http://notgames.tumblr.com/post/773505943/newspapers-rarely-read-covers-only-glanced-at ]
iphone  ipad  applications  reading  interactivity  passive  books  print  newspapers  games  gaming  videogames  touch  screens  interface  engagement  newmedia  information  2010  experimental  visual  passivity  ios 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Prologue: Iron Man 2 | Motionographer | Motion graphics, design, animation, filmmaking and visual effects
"Not since the Minority Report have interfaces played such a major role in a Hollywood blockbuster. For Iron Man 2, Prologue lifted screen design elements off of flat surfaces and into the three dimensional world surrounding Tony Stark. As he struts through his secret lab, a virtual world of swirling data and wireframe plans pops forth from the genius playboy’s fingertips, creating a seamless dance between man and machine that elegantly echoes the symbiosis between Stark and his exoskeleton."
via:timo  motiongraphics  interface  ui  ux  ironman  ironman2  design  film 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Art Wants to be Ninety-Nine Cents | Scott Sona Snibbe Blog
"Over the past few days my first three apps became available on the iTunes store: Gravilux, Bubble Harp, and Antograph. I’ve been dreaming of this day for twenty years: a day when, for the first time, we can enjoy interactive art as a media commodity no different from books, music, and movies. But is there a market for this new medium?...From 1988 to 1997 I refined my aesthetic for screen-based interaction, noting that the cursor is the only thing on the screen with true personality, since through the mouse it’s the connection from your body to the computer. For years I created gestural interactive programs inspired by the abstract masters like Lye and Oskar Fischinger, but I couldn’t find an audience...then Apple announced the iPad...the perfect medium for interactive art. The iPhone...is still mostly a tool for your working life...the iPad is an object of leisure: a portable screen for our precious free time. So what do you do with a recreational screen?"
ipad  iphone  experimental  interaction  installation  art  cinema  exhibition  interface  innovation  music  sound  scottsnibbe 
july 2010 by robertogreco
What Apple needs to do now « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"Oh, but that interface. Or more particularly, the design of applications and utilities. The worrisome signs that first cropped up in the iPhone 3G Compass app, and clouded the otherwise lovely iPad interaction experience, are here in spades. What’s going on here is an unusual, unusually false and timid choice that, in the aggregate, amounts to nothing less than a renunciation of what these devices are for, how we think of them, and the ways in which they might be used.
apple  design  osx  ux  iphone  ipad  adamgreenfield  skeuomorph  userinterface  applications  ui  interaction  metaphor  affordance  interface  usability  2010  ios 
june 2010 by robertogreco
ignore the code: Gestures
"In a way, gestural user interfaces are a step back, a throwback to the command line. Gestures are often not obvious and hard to discover; the user interface doesn’t tell you what you can do with an object. Instead, you have to remember which gestures you can use, the same way you had to remember the commands you could use in a command line interface.
via:daringfireball  ipad  iphone  touch  touchscreen  experiencedesign  design  gestures  interaction  interface  hci  gui  ux  ui  apple  2010  commandline 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Nokia’s designs on Apple | Tech Blog | FT.com
"“I still think the whole industry is missing a trick,” said Mr Ahtisaari during a meet-the-press session in London yesterday. “All the touchscreen interfaces are very immersive. You have to put your head down. What Nokia is very good at is designing for mobile use: one-handed, in the pocket. Giving people the ability to have their head up again is critical to how we evolve user interfaces.”
markoahtisaari  nokia  iphone  ipad  mobile  mobility  smartphones  immersive  hardware  future  design  apple  phones  screens  2010  socialmedia  ux  interface  interfacedesign  glowingrectangles 
may 2010 by robertogreco
How the Tablet Will Change the World | Magazine
"The fact is, the way we use computers is outmoded. The graphical user interface that’s still part of our daily existence was forged in the 1960s and ’70s, even before IBM got into the PC business. Most of the software we use today has its origins in the pre-Internet era, when storage was at a premium, machines ran thousands of times slower, and applications were sold in shrink-wrapped boxes for hundreds of dollars. With the iPad, Apple is making its play to become the center of a post-PC era. But to succeed, it will have to beat out the other familiar powerhouses that are working to define and dominate the future."

[Guest essays here: http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/03/ff_tablet_essays/all/1 ]
apple  computers  computing  ebooks  edtech  future  gadgets  tablet  tablets  gui  innovation  interface  internet  ipad  media  mobile  technology  trends  stevenjohnson  kevinkelly  nicholasnegroponte  olpc  chrisanderson  marthastewart  bobstein  jamesfallows 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The Wired Tablet App: A Video Demonstration | Epicenter | Wired.com
"Last week Jeremy Clark from Adobe and I unveiled the first glimpse of the Wired Reader at TED. Above, you’ll see a video, narrated by Jeremy and Wired Creative Director Scott Dadich, who led our tablet team, that shows more. It explains why the tablet is such a groundbreaking opportunity for magazines such as ours."
wired  magazines  ipad  ereaders  ebooks  technology  journalism  webdesign  adobe  tablet  mobile  video  interface  interactive  media  publishing  design  air  flash  ui  webdev 
february 2010 by robertogreco
A Whole Lotta Nothing: Broken feedback loops
"when there are 1/2 dozen places someone can hit like button, mark favorite or leave a comment I have no knowledge of, the feedback loop is broken.

When I think about the years I've learned to become a more concise writer & better photographer by throwing shit online & gathering feedback, then repeating the cycle again, I'm dismayed to see all these new tools that lack appropriate feedback mechanisms that can relay information back to the original authors.

So to future application creators I ask that you simply respect the creators of content & help them improve by offering notification, search, &/or backlink capabilities so it's possible for someone to see where their creations end up. I know it's a lot easier to just consider it all "output" within your application, but the internet is a great communication medium not just for relaying information from anyone to anywhere on earth, but for also making it a dialogue between reader & writer.

Don't break the feedback loop."
internet  twitter  blogging  socialmedia  facebook  remix  socialnetworking  feedback  communication  trends  software  blogs  social  interface  buzz  matthaughey 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: 'The Gadget Disappears'
"Love this line from the New York Times’s David Carr on the Charlie Rose show, regarding the iPad:
One thing you have to understand about this gadget is that the gadget disappears pretty quickly. You’re looking into pure software.

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that Carr is a business reporter, not a tech reporter. He sees the forest, not the trees. But this is really astute. I’ve been using a Nexus One Android phone for the last few weeks, and Carr’s quote summarizes the fundamental difference between Android and iPhone OS. On the iPhone, once you’re in an app, everything happens on-screen, with touch. Everything. You go outside the screen to the home button to leave the app or the sleep button to turn off the device. On Android, many things happens on screen with touch, but many other things don’t, and you’re often leaving the screen for the hardware Back, Menu, and Home buttons, and text selection and editing requires the use of the fiddly trackball. An Android gadget never disappears."
daringfireball  johngruber  ipad  invisibletechnology  iphone  interface  ui  touchscreen  buttons  apple  android  davidcarr  design 
february 2010 by robertogreco
cityofsound: For the life between buildings - some notes on the iPad
"If it’s technically possible to develop a Processing environment, a sawn-off Photoshop or Illustrator, Sketchup, Omnigraffle for iPad, then I see no reason why Apple wouldn’t move those apps to the front of the shop, & thus the iPad becomes productive...in a traditional sense.
design  technology  urban  urbanism  apple  cityofsound  interface  ipad  computing  danhill  interaction  architecture  cities  environment  interactiondesign  postarchitectural  digitalmedia  trends  culture  context  ui  ux 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Mule Design Studio's Blog: The Failure of Empathy
"The iPad isn’t the future of computing; it’s a replacement for computing.
ipad  apple  computing  usability  empathy  ict  iphone  trends  computers  interface  disruption  technology  2010  future  culture  simplicity  design 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Fraser Speirs - Blog - Future Shock: "What you're seeing in the industry's reaction to the iPad is nothing less than future shock."
"I'm often saddened by the infantilising effect of high technology on adults. From being in control of their world, they're thrust back to a childish, mediaeval world in which gremlins appear to torment them & disappear at will & against which magic, spells & the local witch doctor are their only refuges.
design  technology  culture  future  software  iphone  ipad  computers  interaction  futureshock  interface  usability  apple  computing  ux  ui  ipod  2010  operatingsystems  fraserspeirs  edtech  teaching  learning  intuition  simplicity  complexity 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Pen v keyboard v Newton v Graffiti v Treo v iPhone (Phil Gyford’s website)
"I’m surprised by some of this. I thought that typing on a full-size keyboard would be a lot quicker than the iPhone and Treo than it is, although a real touch-typist could have beaten my 68 words per minute.
ui  newton  design  interface  usability  iphone  keyboard  typing  philgyford 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Why Tumblr is kicking Posterous’s ass « PEG on Tech
"Posterous has everything to win:...Y Combinator company...top-tier investors...founders experienced software engineers w/ compsci degrees from Stanford. How come it’s eating dust from small startup by high school dropout?...Tumblr is a NY company & Posterous is a SV company... Posterous...engineered product... Tumblr...designed product. Posterous is extremely well engineered...nothing wrong with it...well thought out. But it’s not just that it’s less pretty (though it is). It’s just not designed as well as Tumblr is...Posterous is typical of the SV engineering mindset where everything is measured, ranked, weighted. It’s like Google. & having terrible design like Google is great if you have a technology edge. But if you’re in a market where what matters is design edge, that’s not enough. There needs to be great design...how it works for end user. Meanwhile, Tumblr is typical of new NY startups, that have great engineering talent, but care about design, UI & UX."
blogging  siliconvalley  usability  technology  webdesign  startups  posterous  design  business  ux  webdev  strategy  newyork  comparison  interface  interaction  blogs  engineering  web  tumblr  ui  nyc  bayarea 
january 2010 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

$100  1:1  1to1  3d  abundance  accelerometers  accessibility  activism  ad  adamgreenfield  adaptation  adaptivepath  adblocking  adobe  advertising  advice  aesthetics  affordance  affordances  africa  age  agencies  agency  agostinoramelli  ai  aiga  air  alancole  alanjacobs  alankay  alanwilliams  albertomanguel  albertpereta  albertshum  alexandergalloway  algedonicmeters  algorithms  alinear  alipay  allensayegh  alphabethistoriography  alternative  amazon  ambient  ambientawareness  ambrose  aminalhazwani  analysis  analytics  anatomy  andreiherasimchuk  andrewwebster  android  animaition  animals  animation  annotation  anthologies  anthropology  api  apple  applications  ar  architecture  archives  arduino  areae  arg  art  artificialintelligence  artist  artists  ashervollmer  attention  attribution  audio  audiovisual  augmentedreality  augustdelosreyes  aurora  authenticity  authoringtools  autism  automation  avatars  averaging  aware  awareness  azaraskin  balloons  basaap  bayarea  bbc  beautifulseams  behavior  benjaminbratton  berg  berglondon  bias  billbuxton  binary  biofeedback  biographicalnarrative  biology  biosignals  blackberry  bldgblog  blogging  bloggingplatform  blogjects  blogs  bluetooth  bobstein  bodies  body  bookfuturism  bookmarklets  bookmarks  books  bots  boys  brain  branching  branding  bretvictor  brooklynbeta  browser  browsers  browsing  brucemau  brucesterling  brunolatour  builtenvironment  business  bustime  butdoesitfloat  buttons  buzz  C64  cabinetsofcuriosity  calculator  calculators  california  callandresponse  cameras  candychang  canon  capitalism  cards  cargo  cars  casestudy  cativaucelle  censorship  centquatre  cgi  change  characters  charlesleadbeater  charts  chat  chatgrape  cherrapunjee  chi2008  children  chile  china  chinese  chistopherfahey  chrisanderson  chrisharrison  chrispalmatier  christianervin  cinema  cities  cityasclassroom  cityofsound  civiccenter  civilization  clarity  classideas  classification  clear  clintlalonde  closed  clothing  cloud  cocreation  code  coding  cognition  cognitive  cognitiveload  collaboration  collaborativeproduction  collaborativewriting  collections  collective  color  comedy  comics  commandline  commands  commentary  commenting  comments  communication  communitiesofauthority  community  comparison  complexity  comprehension  computation  computer  computers  computing  concentration  concept  concepts  conferencing  connections  consciousness  constraints  content  contentstrategy  context  continuity  continuouspartialattention  control  controllers  conventions  conversation  conversationalui  copy  copying  copyright  cortana  courneydanforth  craft  craftsmanship  craightonberman  creative  creativecommons  creativity  credit  crime  criticalthinking  criticism  crowdsourcing  css  culture  curiosity  curriculum  cursor*10  customization  cv  cyberspace  cybersyn  dangrover  danhill  dannycannizzaro  danparham  dansaffer  daringfireball  darkpatterns  data  database  databases  datamining  datavisualization  davidcarr  davidmerrill  davidpayne  davidthornburg  death  del.icio.us  democracy  demographics  density  deschooling  design  designandtheelasticmind  desktop  destastic  destronics  development  devices  dhairyadand  diagrams  dialog  dialogue  dianadestefano  diegogoldberg  diemoschwarz  difference  digital  digitalhumanities  digitalmedia  digitalmediation  digitalnatives  directions  directory  dirti  disabilities  disability  discovery  dishonesty  display  displays  disruption  diversity  diy  documentation  documents  doing  dopplr  downloads  drawing  drawings  ds  duolingo  dustincurtis  dynabook  dynamic  e-learning  eames  earth  ebooks  ecologyoftools  economics  economy  edenmedina  edg  edgies  editing  edtech  education  edwardtufte  effects  efficiency  ekg  electricity  electronics  electroplankton  elementary  email  emotion  emotions  empathy  emulators  energy  engagement  engineering  enjoyment  enterprise  entertainment  environment  ereaders  ethnography  etiquette  everyware  evolution  ewingmachines  excel  exhibition  exhibits  expectations  experience  experiencedesign  experimental  experimentalism  experimentation  experiments  exploration  explore  extensibility  extension  extensions  eyecandy  fabiengirardin  fabric  facebook  facebookmessenger  factoryfifteen  families  features  feedback  feeds  ffffound  fiction  fidgeting  files  film  filtering  finance  findability  fireeagle  firefly  firefox  firstlife  flash  flashmobs  flcikr  flickr  flipboard  flow  flowchart  focus  folkertgorter  folksonomy  fonts  footnotes  form  format  frameanalysis  frankchimero  fraserspeirs  free  freedom  freeware  frontiers  fun  functionality  furniture  future  futureshock  futurism  futurology  gadgets  galleries  gallery  gamechanging  gamedesign  gamedev  games  gaming  gardening  gear  gender  generator  geoffmanaugh  geography  geolocation  geotagging  gestures  gettinglost  gieradlaput  gis  global  globalization  glowingrectangles  glvo  gmail  gne  google  google+  googleglass  googlenow  government  gps  graffiti  granularity  graphic  graphicdesign  graphics  green  gui  gyroscopes  habits  hacking  hacks  handhelds  hands  handwriting  happiness  haptic  haptics  hardware  hci  headphones  heidegger  helentran  hideandseek  historiography  history  homebrew  homes  homeschool  homeview  howelearn  howto  howwelearn  howweplay  howweread  howweteach  html  hud  human  human-machineinterfaces  humanity  humans  humblebunndle  humility  humor  hybrids  hyperstudio  hypertext  iconography  icons  ict  ideas  identity  ideo  illustration  im  imagerecognition  imagery  images  imagination  imaging  immersion  immersive  immigration  imovie  incluive  inclusion  inclusivedesign  inclusivity  india  industrial  inference  inflatable  inflatables  infodesign  infographics  informal  informality  informallearning  information  informationdesign  infrastructure  infromationsoftware  inkwell  inlcusivity  innovation  input  insfrastructure  inspiration  instagram  installation  instapaper  instruction  instruments  intelligence  intention  interaction  interactiondesign  interactive  interactivity  interdisciplinary  interface  interfacedesign  interfaces  interfacewriting  interiority  international  internet  interregnum  interviews  intimacy  intuition  invention  inventions  invisibletechnology  ios  ip  ipad  iphone  ipod  ircam  ironman  ironman2  it  italy  iteration  ix  ixd  jackschulze  jaipur  jamaiscascio  jameseo  jamesfallows  jamesreeves  jamiezigelbaum  janchipchase  janmcgonigal  japan  japanese  javascript  jeffhan  jeffreyzacks  jeremyettinghausen  jkkeller  jo-annelefevre  jodhpur  johannadrucker  johannesnaumann  johngruber  johnnychunglee  johnstone  jon-kylemohr  jonathanharris  jonathanlibov  josswhedon  journalism  journey  joystick  jquery  julianbleecker  julielarson-green  juttatreviranus  katholmes  kevinkelly  keyboard  keyboards  keynote  khoivinh  kids  kik  kindle  kindness  kinect  kodu  korea  kottke  koudai  kyte  lab  labs  lamps  landscape  language  laptops  lark  layers  layervault  layout  lcproject  learning  led  legibility  lego  lennartziburski  liamyoung  life  lifeasgame  light  linear  linearity  links  linux  lisastrausfeld  listening  literacy  literature  live  living  lizstinson  local  location  location-aware  location-based  locative  london  love  low-tech  lowtech  luddism  ludicorp  ludology  luka  mac  machineart  machines  machinima  macosx  magazines  maisondepetits  make  makeymakey  making  management  manifestos  mapping  maps  marginalia  mario  marioworld  markboulton  markdown  marketing  markoahtisaari  marthastewart  maryannewolf  mashup  materiality  materials  math  matthaughey  mattjones  mattwebb  maxfenton  meandering  media  medialab  mediarevolutions  mediation  megacities  memory  messaging  messiness  metaphor  metaplace  metaverse  mfa  michaelwenger  microcontrollers  microcopy  microsoft  microworld  migration  mikekruzeniski  mikemonteiro  mind  mindmap  minimalism  minorityreport  mit  mitmedialab  mixedreality  mmog  mmorpg  mobile  mobility  mobs  modeling  models  modernism  moma  money  monitoring  morrisgoldsmith  moshimonsters  motion  motiongraphics  motofone  motorola  movement  movies  mozilla  mp3  multimedia  multiplayer  multitasking  multitouch  murielcooper  museum  museums  music  n95  nanotechnology  narration  narrative  natal  nature  naumtrifanoff  navigation  navneetalang  ncmideas  nearfield  nearfuture  neighborhoods  neighborland  netlab  networking  networks  neuroscience  newmedia  neworleans  news  newspapers  newton  newyork  nfc  nicholascarr  nicholasnegroponte  nicholasnixon  nicolasnova  nicolatwilley  nicolefenton  nicolespeer  nielsbohr  nike+  nintendo  nintendods  noahkalina  noise  nokia  nola  non-linear  nonlinear  nonprofit  nonprofits  normal  norms  nostalgia  notebooks  notes  notices  notification  notifications  novels  nudging  nyc  nytimes  objectivity  objects  observation  obvious  obviouscorp  olpc  online  onlinetoolkit  open  opensource  openstudioproject  operatingsystems  oreilly  organizations  orientation  origins  os  osx  outdoors  overdesign  overload  ownership  pace  pachube  pacing  packaging  painting  pandas  pantographia  paolaantonelli  paper  papervision  papervision3d  paralleluniverses  pareidolia  parenting  parkour  particles  passion  passive  passivity  patents  patterns  pauladams  paullafarge  paulrand  payment  pc  pedagogy  pentagram  people  performance  personalinformatics  personalization  pervasive  pervasivecomputing  phantomcity  philgyford  philosophy  phones  photography  photoshop  physical  physicalcomputing  physics  pinboard  pingmag  pinterest  pixar  pixelart  place  planning  plants  platform  play  plush  podcasts  pokemongo  pokémongo  policy  politics  popculture  portability  portable  portal  portfolio  postarchitectural  posterous  power  powerusers  predictions  predictive  presentations  pricing  print  printdesign  printing  privacy  process  processing  procrastineering  product  productdesign  productivity  products  programming  progressivereduction  projection  projectnatal  projectors  projects  promotion  prototype  prototyping  pry  psychogeography  psychology  public  publishing  puppets  purpose  python  qq  qqhousekeeper  qrcodes  quantummechanics  quartz  quicktype  quotes  radio  rakefetackerman  ramiismail  raphkoster  raspeberrypi  reactable  readability  readin  reading  reading.am  reality  realitymining  realtime  record  records  reduction  reference  reminders  remix  reputation  research  resources  rfid  risk  rjdj  robgiampietro  robinsloan  robotics  robotreadableworld  robots  rolandcahen  rolfengelsing  romankalantari  rss  rules  runlolarun  safari  samanthagorman  sampling  sandiego  sarahhromack  sarawachter-boettcher  sat  scalability  scale  scaling  scanning  scenius  schooldesign  schools  schulzeandwebb  sciarc  science  sciencefiction  scifi  scottdadich  scottmccloud  scottsnibbe  scratch  screen  screens  screensavers  scrollbars  sculpture  search  secondlife  security  self  semanticweb  semiotics  senses  sensing  sensor-vernacular  sensors  sensory  sentencediagramming  serendipity  services  sewing  shannonmattern  share  sharing  shell  sherryturkle  shifd  shoes  shopping  siftables  signs  siliconvalley  simplicity  simulations  sinaweibo  singapore  siri  skateboarding  skateboards  skating  skeuomorph  skills  skimming  sl  slack  sleep  sliders  slow  smartcities  smartcity  smarthphones  smartmobs  smartphones  smell  sms  snapchat  social  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialobjects  socialsoftware  society  sociology  socrates  software  songs  sony  sound  sounds  soundscapes  space  spacecollective  spacial  spam  speculativefiction  speech  speed  spimes  spoookcountry  srg  staffordbeer  stamendesign  standardization  standardizedtesting  standards  startups  stateofmind  statistics  staugustine  stayanadella  stevemambert  stevenjohnson  stories  storytelling  strategy  streaming  street  streetart  streetgames  streets  structure  students  studio  studios  stéphanemallarmé  sugar  sugarlabs  sugralabs  sundarpichai  supershoes  surfing  surfoboards  surveillance  sustainability  svbtle  swype  systems  systemsthinking  tablet  tablets  tactile  tagging  tags  talkto  talktome  talyarkoni  tangible  tangiblecontrollers  tcsnmy  teaching  technology  techsupport  tedlivingston  teens  teeparham  telegram  templates  temporality  tennis  tenori-on  territory  testing  text  textbooks  textiles  texting  texture  thecityishereforyoutouse  theft  theory  thesaurus  thesis  thinking  thinkmap  thought  thoughts  tics  timcarmody  time  timelapse  timelines  timemerge  timemergemedia  timetravel  timhitchcock  timmaly  timoarnall  tobiasbernard  toc2012  tokyo  tomarmitage  tone  tools  topophonie  toread  toshioiwai  touch  touchscreen  toys  tracking  traffic  training  transportation  travel  trends  trust  tumblr  tumblrs  tutorial  tutorials  tv  tweetbot  twitter  type  typing  typography  ubicomp  ubiquitous  ucsd  ui  uk  unboxing  understanding  undesign  unix  unlearning  unschooling  urban  urbancomputing  urbanism  us  usability  user  userexperience  usergenerated  userinterface  users  userstudio  usmanhaque  utilities  ux  value  vannevarbush  venue  verbs  vi:tealtan  via:ablerism  via:adamgreenfield  via:audreywatters  via:blackbeltjones  via:caseygollan  via:clivethompson  via:daringfireball  via:johnpavlus  via:kottke  via:litherland  via:lukeneff  via:markllobrera  via:migurski  via:preoccupations  via:smbro  via:straup  via:tealtan  via:timo  video  videogames  vine  virtual  virtuality  virtualreality  virtualworlds  visibility  vision  visual  visualization  visualtheory  voice  vorhanden  vr  walkerartcenter  walking  wandering  watchmen  wattson  waving  wayfinding  wearable  wearables  weather  web  web2.0  webapp  webapps  webcam  webcams  webdesign  webdev  website  wechat  weidan  whiteboards  whiteglovetracking  wifi  wii  wiimote  wiiwiiwiiwii  williamgibson  wind  windows  windowsphone  windowsphonemetro  wired  wireframes  wireless  wmmna  women  wonder  wordprocessing  words  work  workflow  workinginpublic  workshops  world  writing  writingfortheweb  xbox  xbox360  yahoo  yangzhang  youth  youtube  yugonakamura  zachgage  zooming  zpd  zuhanden  édouardurcades 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: