robertogreco + interactivity   28

Imaginary Cities: An Interview with Darran Anderson – RhysTranter.com
"When a city is dominated by one vision, it becomes either a sterile corpse, however pretty it looks, or, at worst, an all-out tyranny. I’d go as far to say that the very idea of a city is predicated on it being a plurality. When it is singular, it becomes something else; namely a citadel that benefits the powerful, whoever that may be in a given society. That’s one of the reasons that planned cities very often (though not always) fall flat. We forget to build in accidents and resistances – the dialectics of urbanism where different ideas are colliding and synthesizing and pushing things creatively forward in the process. When cities, and indeed countries, adopt a siege mentality, they stagnate and the inhabitants go slowly mad. We’re about to find out a lot of things about what Britain really is. I suspect, given certain cherished illusions await shattering, it’ll be a huge and very dark wake-up call indeed. Nothing would delight me more than to be wrong on this incidentally but I can see it getting decidedly Children of Men sooner than we think. On a less pessimistic note, it will also be a real test of British cities as international outward-facing metropolises, a challenge that anyone with a progressive atom in their body needs to fight in advance rather than retreat. We are mongrel peoples on these islands. We do well not to begin attempting to dismantle ourselves or anyone else for that matter. The future, if we wish to be part of it, is plural."



"We have a tendency to think of books as ends in themselves, which has always seemed somewhat ludicrous, even a bit arrogant to me; the assumption because you’ve read Isherwood’s Berlin novels, you’ve got the Weimar Republic sussed (I don’t mean that detrimentally to Isherwood, whose work I love, incidentally). It’s like that bucket list approach to experience, when you hear someone say they’ve ‘done’ Europe or Thailand. However great a book is, however ‘definitive’ it is on a subject, it strikes me as only a point of beginning or as temporarily conclusive, as time and perspectives are constantly changing. I’ve always had enough self-doubt to be resistant to definitive narratives so I wanted Imaginary Cities to be full of points of departure, contradictions and questions. That’s one of the things I loved about Calvino’s Invisible Cities, which the title is also a nod to. The sense of poetic incompleteness to it. The feeling that the story is continuing on somewhere beyond its pages."



"I’ve always been interested in the thresholds and crossovers of disciplines. “Architecture begins where engineering ends”, the great Walter Gropius said. I think there’s a sort of shifting hinterland between the two, where often the most exciting things are happening. We limit ourselves when we separate things too much. That works for all disciplines. There’s a lot to learn from peering over the walls we’ve built. And I’d question the motives we have in building most of these walls; very often it’s quite petty obscurantism, which ultimately holds us all back.

The first writer I ever fell in love with was Robert Louis Stevenson and I think he had a lasting influence; by his example, you have the permission to wander, literally and figuratively – you can write adventure stories and fuse them with psychological, geographical and historical observations, you can write memoirs, children’s stories, explorations, you can travel with a donkey in the Cévennes if you want. And you can do it all with a continual voice and purpose that threads through everything, even when it seems like chaos or a cacophony.

The writers I’ve loved since, from Montaigne to Borges to Solnit have that same sense of roaming, of proving “why not?” when stepping over frequently-artificial boundaries. It’s not for everyone but I love literature that contains this tendency to roam. It goes beyond even literature I suppose. There’s a colossal amount of be gained from learning from people in other artforms, cine-essayists like Chris Marker or musicians like Brian Eno. I’m not really interested in literature that just speaks to itself. I’d rather literature be a dense and messy city than an ordered monastery."



"We might think of them as problems but I think they’re essential to keep cities alive. I spoke about this at the Venice Architecture Biennale a few months ago and every day since, post-Brexit, it’s got more and more apparent how vital this is. When a city is dominated by one vision, it becomes either a sterile corpse, however pretty it looks, or, at worst, an all-out tyranny. I’d go as far to say that the very idea of a city is predicated on it being a plurality. When it is singular, it becomes something else; namely a citadel that benefits the powerful, whoever that may be in a given society. That’s one of the reasons that planned cities very often (though not always) fall flat. We forget to build in accidents and resistances – the dialectics of urbanism where different ideas are colliding and synthesizing and pushing things creatively forward in the process. When cities, and indeed countries, adopt a siege mentality, they stagnate and the inhabitants go slowly mad. We’re about to find out a lot of things about what Britain really is. I suspect, given certain cherished illusions await shattering, it’ll be a huge and very dark wake-up call indeed. Nothing would delight me more than to be wrong on this incidentally but I can see it getting decidedly Children of Men sooner than we think. On a less pessimistic note, it will also be a real test of British cities as international outward-facing metropolises, a challenge that anyone with a progressive atom in their body needs to fight in advance rather than retreat. We are mongrel peoples on these islands. We do well not to begin attempting to dismantle ourselves or anyone else for that matter. The future, if we wish to be part of it, is plural."



"If you live in a city, every aspect of your life takes place within urban space. The journeys you make are charted through it. The experiences you undertake have a stage. Space seeps into your memories and, by association, your memories seep into space. There are very obvious examples to this – hospitals, churches, graveyards – but also train stations where you saw someone for the last time or pubs where you met for the first time. Streets that mean nothing to most have profound connotations for others. They are the setting of our own private mythologies."



"Bookish folks like you and I explore this largely with literature as an aid but, though I believe books will always have a place, they seem to be more peripheral than we’d like to admit. As much as culture helps define our perception of cities, it has its limits. For me, the starting point for Dublin is Ulysses, just as Kafka is for Prague, and Dostoevsky or Bely is for St Petersburg and yet when I go to places like those, I find that these presumptions are attractive illusions. So much time has passed since those works were written and it was all subjective to begin with. That’s the beauty: the city is not the same thing to any two people, no matter how it is branded. One of the things I’m interested in is how the urban influences us, and the way we see ourselves, in ways that are often overlooked or come by implication. When we look at the Romantics, Sturm und Drang or American Transcendentalism, we tend to take them at their word and focus on rural arcadias or encounters with the sublime in the wilderness. To me, they are profoundly urban. They are the glorious side-effects brought on by the rise of the Industrial Revolution and the huge drive of urbanisation that followed. So even our ideas of escaping to the sanctuary of the countryside, even our conceptions of what the countryside is and for, are profoundly shaped by the appearance and evolution of cities."



"In the near-future, I see the manner in which our identities merge with our surroundings becoming acutely apparent. In terms of technology, it’s easy to see the cumbersome interfaces that we navigate with, the smartphone for example, disappearing. I see this happening somewhat with the book as well (though I’ve no doubt it will remain as an escape into another type of space). The literary approach to cities will become much more interactive with the environment. This isn’t a new idea. The Situationists, who I’m not uncritical of, hinted at this by shifting the focus away from academic texts to games, maps, graffiti, and the streets themselves. With developments in augmented reality, I can see the city becoming a form of text, not just with buildings annotated but actually offering creative input and manipulation. We already read cities without thinking about it. We may come to write them too."
darrananderson  urbanism  architecture  cities  2016  community  society  siegementality  planning  urban  italocalvino  space  identity  memory  augmentedreality  books  writing  interactivity  interactive  situationist  urbanization  ar 
october 2016 by robertogreco
From AI to IA: How AI and architecture created interactivity - YouTube
"The architecture of digital systems isn't just a metaphor. It developed out of a 50-year collaborative relationship between architects and designers, on one side, and technologists in AI, cybernetics, and computer science, on the other. In this talk at the O'Reilly Design Conference in 2016, Molly Steenson traces that history of interaction, tying it to contemporary lessons aimed at designing for a complex world."
mollysteenson  2016  ai  artificialintelligence  douglasenglebart  symbiosis  augmentation  christopheralexander  nicholasnegroponte  richardsaulwurman  architecture  physical  digital  mitmedialab  history  mitarchitecturemachinegroup  technology  compsci  computerscience  cybernetics  interaction  structures  computing  design  complexity  frederickbrooks  computers  interactivity  activity  metaphor  marvinminsky  heuristics  problemsolving  kent  wardcunningham  gangoffour  objectorientedprogramming  apatternlanguage  wikis  agilesoftwaredevelopment  software  patterns  users  digitalspace  interactiondesign  terrywinograd  xeroxparc  petermccolough  medialab 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Do You Read Differently Online and in Print?
"The Internet may cause our minds to wander off, and yet a quick look at the history of books suggests that we have been wandering off all along. When we read, the eye does not progress steadily along the line of text; it alternates between saccades—little jumps—and brief stops, not unlike the movement of the mouse’s cursor across a screen of hypertext. From the invention of papyrus around 3000 B.C., until about 300 A.D., most written documents were scrolls, which had to be rolled up by one hand as they were unrolled by the other: a truly linear presentation. Since then, though, most reading has involved codices, bound books or pamphlets, a major advantage of which (at least compared to the scroll) is that you can jump around in them, from chapter to chapter (the table of contents had been around since roughly the first century B.C.); from text to marginal gloss, and, later, to footnote."



"Comprehension matters, but so does pleasure. In Proust and the Squid, Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University, observes that the brain’s limbic system, the seat of our emotions, comes into play as we learn to read fluently; our feelings of pleasure, disgust, horror and excitement guide our attention to the stories we can’t put down. Novelists have known this for a long time, and digital writers know it, too. It’s no coincidence that many of the best early digital narratives took the form of games, in which the reader traverses an imaginary world while solving puzzles, sometimes fiendishly difficult ones. Considered in terms of cognitive load, these texts are head-bangingly difficult; considered in terms of pleasure, they’re hard to beat.

A new generation of digital writers is building on video games, incorporating their interactive features—and cognitive sparks—into novelistic narratives that embrace the capabilities of our screens and tablets. Samantha Gorman and Danny Cannizzaro’s 2014 iPad novella, Pry, tells the story of a demolitions expert returned home from the first Gulf War, whose past and present collide, as his vision fails. The story is told in text, photographs, video clips, and audio. It uses an interface that allows you to follow the action and shift between levels of awareness. As you read text on the screen, describing characters and plot, you draw your fingers apart and see a photograph of the protagonist, his eyes opening on the world. Pinch your fingers shut and you visit his troubled unconscious; words and images race by, as if you are inside his memory. Pry is the opposite of a shallow work; its whole play is between the surface and the depths of the human mind. Reading it is exhilarating.

There’s no question when you read (or play) Pry that you’re doing something your brain isn’t quite wired for. The interface creates a feeling of simultaneity, and also of having to make choices in real time, that no book could reproduce. It asks you to use your fingers to do more than just turn the page. It communicates the experience of slipping in and out of a story, in and out of a dream, or nightmare. It uses the affordances of your phone or tablet to do what literature is always trying to do: give you new things to think about, to expand the world behind your eyes. It’s stressful, at first. How are you supposed to know if you’re reading it right? What if you miss something? But if you play (or read) it long enough, you can almost feel your brain begin to adapt.

Most of the Web is not like Pry—not yet, anyway. But the history of reading suggests that what we’re presently experiencing is probably not the end times of human thought. It’s more like an interregnum, or the crouch before a leap. Wolf points out that when it comes to reading, what we get out is largely what we put in. “The reading brain circuit reflects the affordances of what it reads,” she notes: affordances being the built-in opportunities for interaction. The more we skim, the more we’re likely to keep skimming; on the other hand, the more we plunge into a text, the more we’re likely to keep plunging. “We’re in a digital culture,” Wolf says. “It’s not a question of making peace. We have to be discerning, vigilant, developmentally savvy.” And of course we have to be surprised, delighted, puzzled, even disturbed. We have to enjoy ourselves. If we can do that, digital reading will expand the already vast interior space of our humanity."
howweread  readin  albertomanguel  technology  reading  digital  internet  paullafarge  maryannewolf  web  online  staugustine  ambrose  nicholascarr  socrates  brain  agostinoramelli  history  attention  digitalmedia  rolfengelsing  rakefetackerman  morrisgoldsmith  johannesnaumann  dianadestefano  jo-annelefevre  hypertext  michaelwenger  davidpayne  comprehension  engagement  enjoyment  talyarkoni  nicolespeer  jeffreyzacks  psychology  memory  linearity  footnotes  marginalia  bookfuturism  information  wandering  cognitiveload  games  gaming  videogames  samanthagorman  dannycannizzaro  ipad  pry  interiority  affordances  interface  linear  awareness  immersion  skimming  cv  humanity  interregnum  interactivity  interaction 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Christine Jones on the notion of the gift, reciprocity, and how being a parent influences her work — Odyssey Works
"OW: WHY CREATE EXPERIENCES?

CJ: As a parent I am aware of creating a world where Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy exist for my kids. When they die it's our job to make other kinds of magic. I love what Charlie Todd of Improv Everywhere says. He said he wanted to live in a world where anything can happen at any moment. His work makes our world just such a world...I think everyone has a desire to be surprised, delighted, moved, and transported. If we don't do this for each other, no one else will. Our parents will make magic for us when we are young, when we are older, we have to make it for ourselves and each other."

OW: WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO DO WITH YOUR WORK?

CJ: This probably sounds horribly pretentious, but lately I have been thinking of myself as an artist who uses Intimacy the way a painter uses paint. My intention with all of my work is to enhance a feeling of connection and presence that makes people feel seen, and sometimes, especially with Theatre for One, loved. It is always amazing to me how simple acts of kindness and generosity are so deeply appreciated. We very rarely slow down enough to feel truly with other people. I am trying to create fruitful circumstances for a gift exchange between audience and performer. Whether it be a big Broadway show, or an immersive dinner theatre experience, or Theatre for One, I am hoping to create a space and relationships within the space that allow the audience to feel that they are receiving a beautiful experience and in return they are giving the performers or creators the gift of their full presence and attention."
audiencesofone  2015  christinejones  art  performance  theater  reciprocity  presence  care  parenting  interactivity  immersivity  immersive  experiencedesign  magic  intimacy  audience  setdesign  wonder  discovery  visibility  gifts  interviews  odysseyworks  wanderlust  sextantworks  relationships  davidwheeler  generosity  theatreforone 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Instagramming Dinosaurs: Clive Thompson on Museums in the Digital Age (4 of 4) | Moosha Moosha Mooshme
"Q: Clive, we’re sitting here talking about all these ways that digital media can augment our abilities to think, to access our minds, to connect with others, think with others and have deeper understanding and reflection after the event. We’re doing this in a museum that was founded in 1869, looking at dinosaurs that are millions of years old, where the tools that we are talking about that can empower that kind of thinking are like “a blip of a blip” in the timeline.

So if this museum was created today, if you were re-designing this hall, and you were thinking about what it would mean for a Natural History Museum to create a space that could support people to use these tools, what would you do?

A: That’s a really good question. I’ll start off by saying I have an enormous respect and fondness for people that create museum exhibits. They’re the first people to have had to think through the implications of multimedia. When they are communicating this to the public, trying to explain dinosaurs, they use text. There’s pictures. They had to decide what physical items should we have. And then there are these sound guys, the first people to start asking, “Why don’t we have the ability to walk through here and have someone talk on computers?” So in this room there’s four forms of media, being used right now, pioneered by museum people. People in the news media didn’t have to think this way. Teachers didn’t have to think this way. But museum exhibit people have been working in multimedia for like a 150 fifty years, frankly, so this room is already a lot richer than most other places you’d see.

If you wanted to add more to it, there are a couple of low hanging fruits. The dinosaurs are wonderful physical artifacts and it’s often startling to realize how big they are, or what their shape is. Look up there at how serrated that tooth is on that T-Rex. How big is that? Well, what would it be like if I held it in my hand? In fact one thing you can start to do is to make these physical objects shout using 3D printing. These days you have a lot of 3D printers that are becoming cheaper. This is essentially the transmission of physical piece of knowledge across the ether. What if I could go to an online site and download and print a copy of any parts of this dinosaur, because I would love one of those teeth, you know? Imagine: having just one of those just sitting on my desk would be a really cool way to reflect on the size and might of this enormous creature. So the physical sharing of these rich artifacts I think is a fantastic new form of media that’s coming along.

The second thing is you can actually do some really cool things with augmented reality. Augmented reality is the concept of being able to hold up the phone and having it overlay over what you’re seeing – information that helps you look at in a different way or learn things about it. And by and large a lot of our augmented reality has not worked very well in the everyday world, but I think it’s because in the everyday world, we often don’t really want a huge information rich experience as we walk down the street. But I could have a little app that I can load and pull it back and forth and be able to see different parts of that dinosaur, with labels, as I move it back and forth, or see the way that the jaw moved. These are ways that would really help me get new dimensions out of what’s physically in front of me. So there is a couple of things that I think we could start to do.

You could probably think a little bit about integrating public thinking into an environment like this. [re: part two of this interview]

Q: How can I, as a visitor to this hall, know what other people are thinking here?

A: Well, yeah, that’s a fun question: so how can we identify the most interesting things anyone has said about this dinosaur? You know, what are the three most up-voted smartest reflections. It could be someone’s having a thought, or a visitor who had some interesting visceral reaction to this, or it could be someone who has found an amazing quote in one of the newspapers in the 19th century when this thing was first uncorked. Those things are hard to engineer because the signal-to-noise ratio can be really high in public thinking. 90% of what people say online it pretty banal. And so we have that challenge, to find the best stuff people have said about this dinosaur, over and over again.

That’s a hard one to surmount, but pretty cool if you could do it.

Wow, I hadn’t seen that tail before. Holy Moses, that’s long!"

[The full set: http://www.mooshme.org/?s=clive+thompson ]
clivethompson  amnh  2014  barryjoseph  socialmedia  instagram  learning  museum  interactive  interactivity  multimedia  augmentedreality  publicthinking  3dprinting  museums  exhibitions  exhibits  exhibitdesign  design  ar 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Inside The Silent History | Contents Magazine
"Horowitz has created a book-app chimera with the weight and flow of a good novel and the open-ended world-making potential of a collaborative game."

the first element was that I wanted to create a novel that you could somehow explore…system of field reporters…varied voice a strength…settled on the oral history format…

a Monday entry should feel different than a Friday

Semi-rational reverse-necessitation is probably a repeated theme throughout this project, I guess, and maybe also in everything else I do…

…the project is full of semi-comprehensible little resonances like that. I mean, it’s a lengthy book about the failures of language. It’s an oral history about people who can’t talk. It’s a digital book that is dependent upon engagement with the physical world. Etc. …

But the world is messy—these field reports only really exist via a weird combination of text, reader, and physical environment, far beyond anything we can hope to control. But I guess that’s what makes it exciting."
arg  gaming  games  location-based  interactivity  voices  collaboration  contentmagazine  fiction  oralhistory  fieldreporting  reverse-necessitation  messiness  edg  srg  interviews  storytelling  thesilenthistory  2012  elihorowitz  erinkissane  suddenoak  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Robin Rendle · Call Me Interactivity
"We are all tempted by inter­ac­tiv­ity; video & audio snip­pets, data charts that can be flicked and pushed, let­ters that can be popped & pinched. But how many of these fea­tures enhance the rela­tion­ship between reader and writer? Due to the con­straints I men­tioned pre­vi­ously, we most likely won’t recog­nise the dig­i­tal book in a decade. This is because they won’t be built in the same way, they won’t be writ­ten in the same way & they won’t be funded & pub­lished in the same way either. These prob­lems, some eco­nomic, some tech­ni­cal, will force us to con­sider alter­na­tive meth­ods of think­ing about con­tent, space, sto­ry­telling & time.

The line that bor­ders pixel & paper has been crossed, bound­aries have been bro­ken, but the hori­zon swells with oppor­tu­nity. And so these uncharted, dig­i­tal spaces demand not only new types of think­ing, pub­lish­ing and design, but also a new form of sto­ry­telling, new kinds of heroes and mon­sters, new worlds to explore…"
technology  mobydick  leonwiedeltier  oliverreichenstein  craigmod  content  flexibility  control  mandybrown  design  ebooks  digitalpublishing  publishing  interactivity  interactive  2012  future  books  robinrendle  epub3  html  html5  moby-dick  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
PSFK and Russell Davies on making a magazine: - Fresser.
"PSFK: What could we do to keep the paper interactive? For example, do we add QR codes to allow people to ‘see more’ (such as an accompanying video)?

RD: Why make it interactive? The world’s not short of interactive things. Just make it good at what it is.

PSFK: And how can me make it a social experience? What could we do to add a meta-layer above the printed page which allows likeminded readers to connect around content?

RD: As above."
reading  social  socialexperience  cruftavoidance  qrcodes  paper  purpose  interactivity  2012  magazines  russelldavies  from delicious
march 2012 by robertogreco
Simple Genius: Pockit, A Game Console With No Screen And No Graphics | Co. Design
"Is a video game still a video game if there's no... video? Designer Adam Henriksson grabs that question by the horns with Pockit, a game console concept that has no graphics whatsoever. Instead, it's a Wii-like motion-sensing wand that "encourages everyone to be physical and have a reason to break norms," he writes. Rather than waving the wand around in front of a screen -- which is the only way you get to see what your wand is representing--the Pockit moves that aspect of the game experience into your own mind's eye. Whether you've configured the Pockit to be "running" a swordfighting game or something else, the point is that the players are focusing their attention on each other in real life, not virtualized avatars."

[See also: http://adamhenriksson.com/?p=72 AND http://www.tuvie.com/pockit-revolutionary-gaming-console-concept-enhances-social-engagement/ via: http://inspirationfeed.a-small-lab.com/post/13234063326/ ]
gaming  games  play  videogames  pockit  adamhenriksson  2011  ios  iphone  interactivity  realworld  johannsebastianjoust  johansebastianjoust  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Codify – iPad
"Codify for iPad lets you create games and simulations — or just about any visual idea you have. Turn your thoughts into interactive creations that make use of iPad features like Multi-Touch and the accelerometer.

We think Codify is the most beautiful code editor you'll use, and it's easy. Codify is designed to let you touch your code. Want to change a number? Just tap and drag it. How about a color, or an image? Tapping will bring up visual editors that let you choose exactly what you want.

Codify is built on the Lua programming language. A simple, elegant language that doesn't rely too much on symbols — a perfect match for iPad."
ipad  programming  ios  development  gamedev  multitouch  codify  applications  via:kottke  interactivity  accelerometers  touch 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Want a job? Major in liberal arts: Technology firms need more than science and math skills
""This Is Your Brain on the Internet" [class]…strips down fundamentals of learning in order to come up w/ better principles designed to help students think interactively, creatively, cross-culturally & collaboratively.

…read sci fi novels & written hypertext versions of them…spent week working w/ Chinese choreographer to learn to improvise w/out a common language…worked w/ video game designer using scissors & construction paper to prototype game…passed evening w/ science writer who lets them "hear" the world as if thu his own cochlear implants…

How do you test skills this curriculum is meant to sharpen?…midterm exam…students had 24hrs to choose, write & answer a question as a group that best summarized the first half of class. 17 of them, signing off on one coherent, final essay, posted on a public website before midnight—w/ failure for all the potential consequence.

These are the kinds of skills the humanities majors of the future are learning…mix technology & communication…"
cathydavidson  education  classideas  learning  questioning  questions  inquiry  teaching  liberalarts  technology  2011  collaboration  creativity  interactivity  communication  humanities  cv  toshare  stem  curriculum  infosystems  information  informationscience  language  business  stevejobs  problemsolving  perspective  empathy  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero’s Blog - Sorting a Mass
"Right now, chronological ordering is the default way to arrange content online, & I wonder how that blanket presumption affects curation on the web. Does it make sense, because people check in frequently, or is it odd, like sorting a stack of photographs alphabetically by who is in them? There are indeed instances where sorting by time is the correct path, but it will be exciting over the next few months and years to see what happens to the web as we recognize the instances where the newest thing is not necessarily the most important thing. (And, as always, the additional problem on top of this: can this sorting process be automated?)

But can you curate on the web? Most curation comes to a point through narrative, and is narrative possible on the web? Stories require a certain amount of linearity, and we all know how the web disrupts that. Maybe it is the same problem that video games have, where interactivity subverts storytelling…"

[This article is now here: http://frankchimero.com/writing/2011/sorting-a-mass/ ]
web  curation  collecting  curating  sorting  frankchimero  storytelling  scrolling  2011  collections  bookmarks  bookmarking  flickr  interactivity  location  alphabet  hierarchy  categorization  time  chronology  chronoogical  pagination  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Muddying titles and Charlie Chaplin's Speech in "The Great Dictator (1940) - Artichoke's Wunderkammern
Chaplin [unmixed here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLci5DoZqHU ]: "Greed has poisoned men's souls; has barricaded the world with hate; has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge as made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in man; cries out for universal brotherhood; for the unity of us all."

Koolhaas: "Conceptually, each monitor, each TV screen is a substitute for a window; real life is inside, cyberspace has become the great outdoors..."
pamhook  charliechaplin  machines  technology  life  humans  humanity  humanism  human  freedom  independence  levmanovich  remkoolhaas  schools  education  inception  hanszimmer  collaboration  newmedia  2011  democracy  remix  remixing  collage  opensource  interactive  interactivity  authorship  internet  web  online  literacy  kindness  gentleness  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  socialemotionallearning  relationships  artichokeblog  socialemotional  remixculture  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: What Is Democracy In Education [Four Principles]
"Autonomy: …Wherever possible, learners should be guided, and able to guide themselves, according to their own goals, purposes, objectives or values…

Diversity: …The intent and design of such a system should not be to in some way make everybody the same, but rather to foster creativity and diversity among its members, so that each person in a society instantiates, and represents, a unique perspective, based on personal experience and insight, constituting a valuable contribution to the whole.

Openness: …People should be able to freely enter and leave the system, and there ought to be a free flow of ideas and artifacts within the system…

Interactivity: …This is a recognition both that learning results from a process of immersion in a community or society, and second that the knowledge of that community or society, even that resulting from individual insight, is a product of the cumulative interactions of the society as a whole…"
autonomy  diversity  interactivity  openness  stephendownes  education  systems  unschooling  deschooling  learning  democracy  democratic  society  power  freedom  compulsory  relationships  communication  motivation  pedagogy  lcproject  tcsnmy  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
3.05: Gossip is Philosophy
"The right word is "unfinished." Think of cultural products, or art works, or the people who use them even, as being unfinished. Permanently unfinished. We come from a cultural heritage that says things have a "nature," and that this nature is fixed and describable. We find more and more that this idea is insupportable - the "nature" of something is not by any means singular, and depends on where and when you find it, and what you want it for. The functional identity of things is a product of our interaction with them. And our own identities are products of our interaction with everything else. Now a lot of cultures far more "primitive" than ours take this entirely for granted - surely it is the whole basis of animism that the universe is a living, changing, changeable place. Does this make clearer why I welcome that African thing? It's not nostalgia or admiration of the exotic - it's saying, Here is a bundle of ideas that we would do well to learn from."

[via: http://preoccupations.tumblr.com/post/897984340/unfinished ]
1995  kevinkelly  brianeno  art  generative  hypertext  philosophy  unfinished  imperfection  culture  via:preoccupations  africa  technology  wired  society  learning  nostalgia  animism  interactivity  interaction  functionalidentity  ambient  wabi-sabi  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Why Old Spice matters « Snarkmarket
"blogs are actu­ally more related to live the­ater than they are to, say, news­pa­pers. The things that make a blog good are almost exactly the things that make a live per­for­mance good...most impor­tant...is inter­play w/ the audience...

...this cam­paign [also] made me think of 48 Hour Mag­a­zine...same sense of you-gotta-see-this...can-they-really-do-it. It was an event..."But [an event’s] urgency—its live­ness, human vital­ity, &, frankly, its risk & unpredictability—is what makes it more than just another link in the stream"...

one final rea­son to take this for­mat seriously:

...It’s tons of fun. Any­body who’s writ­ten a blog, got­ten deep into Twit­ter, run a Kick­starter project, pulled strings on an ARG will tell you...There’s a spe­cial sat­is­fac­tion to see­ing its impact on the world immediately—and adjust­ing based on what you see. It’s alive, it’s elec­tric, it’s addic­tive. It’s con­nected and communal."
robinsloan  socialmedia  storytelling  advertising  oldspice  2010  theater  analysis  marketing  media  digital  creative  casestudy  video  events  ted  realtime  twitter  blogs  blogging  feedback  interactive  interactivity 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Neography [iPhone, iPad] - "Words separate, pictures unite" /by Thibault Geffroy | CreativeApplications.Net
"“Words separate, pictures unite” (Otto Neurath) is the moto of Neography, a personal project by Thibault Geffroy. By reflection on the evolution of the transmission of news information, the ‘soon to be released’ apps for iPhone and iPad will atempt to enable readers to access the latest news quickly through a system of signs and images (RSS reader?). Neography, Thibault describes, builds on the growing interest in data visualization by allowing the coexistence of pictographic symbols of the alphabet, with photo montages to create a kind of a visual riddle. The project is an experimental response in the form and content, a screen … to regain the power of the image.

Newspapers, rarely read.
Covers, only glanced at.
Websites, always surfed through.
Takeover of the text, submission of the reader.
Passivity is the keyword in our time-urgent world.
Now is the moment to use new visual media to reawaken the basic thirst for information that has been lost.
Experiment in form and content on the front page and on screen where the world —without word—comes directly to the eyes."

[http://notgames.tumblr.com/post/773505943/newspapers-rarely-read-covers-only-glanced-at ]
iphone  ipad  applications  reading  interactivity  passive  books  print  newspapers  games  gaming  videogames  touch  screens  interface  engagement  newmedia  information  2010  experimental  visual  passivity  ios 
july 2010 by robertogreco
From space to time « Snarkmarket
"Bri­dle says read­ers don’t value what pub­lish­ers do because all of the time involved in edit­ing, for­mat­ting, mar­ket­ing, etc., is invis­i­ble to reader when they encounter final prod­uct. Maybe. But mak­ing that time/labor vis­i­ble CAN’T just mean brusquely insist­ing that pub­lish­ers really are impor­tant & that they really do do valu­able work. It needs to mean some­thing like find­ing new ways for read­ers to engage with that work, & mak­ing that time mean­ing­ful as THEIR time.

In short, it means that writ­ers & pro­duc­ers of read­ing mate­r­ial prob­a­bly ought to con­sider tak­ing them­selves a lit­tle less seri­ously & read­ers & read­ing a lit­tle more seri­ously. Let’s actu­ally BUILD that body of knowl­edge about read­ers and their prac­tices — let’s even start by look­ing at TIME as a key deter­mi­nant, espe­cially as we move from print to dig­i­tal read­ing — & try to offer a bet­ter, more tai­lored yet more vari­able range of expe­ri­ences accordingly."
reading  writing  snarkmarket  comments  thebookworks  books  publishing  annotation  quotations  interactivity  experience  time  space  data  amazon  penguin  jamesbridle  robinsloan  respect  ebooks  kindle  ipad  bookfuturism  attention  timcarmody  edting  formatting  value  understanding  commonplacebooks  transparency  visibility  patterns  patternrecognition  friends  lisastefanacci  bookselling  npr  practice 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Seattle Central Library: Civic Architecture in the Age of Media: Places: Design Observer
"not only traditional book & library that has become threatened by new digital & electronic media, but traditional forums of public life itself...current popular culture promotes this belief...suggest that city might no longer be something to escape, but something to which we should remain “connected.” Nevertheless...technology exists between ourselves & city, as if to suggest our bodies cannot be located there w/out it...Though Koolhaas’s initial training as screenwriter has often been noted, his Seattle project suggests connection to media culture in fact now transcends linear narratives & scenographic strategies of film structure alone, involving new references to the potentially more interactive strategies of the digital age. Most importantly, this engagement with contemporary visual culture has occurred not by reducing architecture to mere backdrop for the digital, but by once again employing the spatial & temporal tactics natural to it to engage us more fully in collective life."
design  architecture  remkoolhaas  media  libraries  seattle  creativity  information  collectivity  interactivity  digit  medialculturepublicspace  urban  cities  coexistence  culture  urbanism  publicspace  oma  seattlepubliclibrary 
august 2009 by robertogreco
What do we expect from our games? | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"Which got me thinking about what it is that we want from a game, and how it's different to what we want from a story. Superficially, games have a lot in common with other screen-based media: movies and TV shows. They have the same glossy production values, the same multiple franchises, the same all-action blockbusters. But games aren't movies; the interactivity that makes it possible for me to email a character in Routes and receive an in-game response pulls against traditional storytelling. I write both novels and games, and the crucial difference is this: in a novel I'm telling a story to the reader, but in a game I'm allowing the player to construct the story with me. There's a constant tension between allowing players to feel they can do what they want, and guiding them through a satisfying-feeling experience."
games  videogames  gaming  gamedesign  narrative  storytelling  interactivity  immersive  programming  engagement  play 
march 2009 by robertogreco
TOPP [Tagging of Pacific Predators] - "Follow the adventures of leatherback turtles, white sharks, elephant seals, salmon sharks, albatross, and 18 other species on TOPP"
"began in 2000 as one of 17 projects of the Census of Marine Life, an ambitious 10-year, 80-nation endeavor to assess and explain the diversity and abundance of life in the oceans, and where that life has lived, is living, and will live."
via:tomc  sharks  animals  biology  birds  classideas  data  environment  fish  geography  maps  mapping  reference  research  science  interactivity  locative  location-based  tagging  oceans  wildlife  nature  turtles  realtime  tracking  pacific  marine 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Mixed Reality Lab, Singapore
"The Mixed Reality Lab, at the National University of Singapore, is aiming to push the boundaries of research into interactive new media technologies through the combination of technology, art, and creativity"
research  lab  reality  interactive  mixedreality  immersive  pervasive  arg  games  gamedesign  gaming  haptics  interaction  interactivity  interface  technology  singapore  science  future  design  ubicomp  virtual 
june 2008 by robertogreco
42 ENTERTAINMENT
"We are the storytellers who pioneer new forms of cross-platform narratives and build powerful online communities, to create highly participatory experiences for our audiences."
arg  games  agency  marketing  interactive  design  gamedesign  gamedev  experiencedesign  entertainment  ilovebees  immersive  gaming  pervasive  play  multimedia  interactivity  studio  42entertainment  agencies  branding  media 
june 2008 by robertogreco
LEGO-touch for iPhone and iPod Touch
"What if you could virtually build, imagine, share, and play with LEGOs right on your iPhone or iPod Touch? PlayNYC's LEGO-touch application concept has been dreamed up just in time for Apple's SDK."
interactivity  iphone  lego  play  applications  software  ios 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Purse Lip Square Jaw: In favour of boredom
"When it comes to mobile and pervasive computing, I don't worry about privacy as much as I worry about contributing to the commodification of everyday experience. I don't worry about surveillance as much as I worry that chance encounters and serendipity m
computers  ubicomp  time  attention  slow  society  boredom  emotion  history  language  games  interaction  situationist  culture  class  art  interactive  luxury  interactivity  annegalloway 
april 2006 by robertogreco

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