robertogreco + industry   60

‘With or Without You’: Naturalising Migrants and the Never-Ending Tragedy of Liberalism | Salvage
"To be homeless is to be nameless. He. The existence of a migrant worker.

John Berger

*

The One Day Without Us campaign was launched in the UK in October 2016 ‘in reaction to the rising tide of post-Brexit street- level racism and xenophobia’ and, according to its website, ‘the divisive and stridently anti-migrant rhetoric emanating from too many politicians that has accompanied it.’ It held its target protest day on Monday 20 February 2017. ‘At a time when the political discussion about migration too often depicts a false narrative of “us versus them”, and when migrants are too often excluded from a debate that is supposedly about them, we wanted to provide an opportunity for migrants and British nationals to come together and celebrate the vital role that migrants play within their own communities.’ The campaign thus aimed to showcase a variety of pro-migrant sentiment and action across the UK. At my workplace, students and staff were encouraged to write on Post-its pinned to a map of the world their messages of support and solidarity, and what migrants meant to them. In other workplaces, one particularly striking message passing on social media emerged from a series of pictures of people contrasting what their work cohort looked like with and without migrants.

Emphasising how many migrants constitute our workforce and everyday life is a helpful way to create a contrast between the rhetoric of anti-immigration politics and the reality of migrant integration. Yet numbers are also threatening to some when imagined through The Sun-fuelled metaphors of hordes, swarms, and floods of monsters, coming here, taking our jobs. In its more extreme forms, the vocabulary of anti-immigration rhetoric shifts between the registers of environmental disaster to war and crusade. Against this, the One Day Without Us actions send out a powerful message of solidarity by numerically performing the sudden disappearance of the migrants amongst us to conjure up a bond that feels increasingly unbound."



"Specifically, it seems logical to this ideology that where and to whom one is born should determine what resources and conditions one should survive in – justified legally by the respective principles of ius solis and ius sanguinis for determining nationality rights. The anti-immigrant rhetoric in most European countries today reinforces and restricts these principles. However, in other contexts such as North America, as Jessica Evans reminds us, indigenous peoples are ‘internal outsiders with a prior claim to both jus solis and jus sanguinis’ and yet ‘access to the state and to the right for a state of their own’ remains denied to them. In both contexts, however, xenophobic and exclusionary rhetoric finds refuge in the cataclysmic sense of emergency where everybody is meant to accept that the world is dying, resources are limited and cannot be shared, and, crucially, (European) Christian culture is threatened. Thus, people should stay where they are and deal with the lot they were given, whether this means war, famine, persecution, discrimination, colonial theft and trauma, unemployment, lack of healthcare, and more. What this implies is the erosion of the principle of solidarity. Although this principle, when coupled to Western liberal ideals, has often led to the worst of liberal interventionism’s civilising missions, it remains a cornerstone of basic human decency and co- existence, and of socialist politics. It therefore must be protected from European liberalism’s securitisation, retrenchment and paranoia.

Thus, the ‘with and without us’ message signals the challenge of this tragic yet never-ending liberalism, which, like the narrator character in the U2 song ‘With or Without You’, threatens to die but remains loudly and infuriatingly alive and dominant. Liberalism is currently deemed at risk by the advance of the far right; as critics of liberalism, should we not be rejoicing? No, because what is really at risk is not liberalism, but the principle of solidarity that some liberalism contains. Instead of dying, liberalism is merely becoming more and more securitised and economically ‘rational’. The principle of solidarity is trapped in the farcical tragedy of liberalism’s never-ending schizophrenic dance-off to two different songs; trying to cleave to its ideal of harmonious economic migration and human- rights discourse on one hand, and its need for retaining and cajoling the interests of state and capital through cheap labour and border controls on the other.

In ‘With or Without You’, Bono is wailing, taunting us with despair and the threat of death because the subject of his love brings him both joy and pain. He personifies today’s dominant ideology, asking migrants to stay and save liberalism’s soul, while complaining of how they threaten it, justifying the need to exploit them, detain them or kick them back into the equivalent of outer- space. Economic liberalism maintains and reproduces a moral discourse of righteousness and an institutional façade of human rights. Nevertheless, it must be rejected in toto because it necessarily also furthers a policy agenda of fear and social hierarchy that fills up the pockets of employers and fuels the growing migration security agenda and industry. Sonja Buckel captures this relation well when explaining that ‘managing migration’ means that ‘neoliberal open-border politics has been interwoven with a left- liberal humanitarian and human rights strategy, while also needing to make concessions to the conservative project’. Thus, she writes, ‘what is currently happening with the immigration crisis is not a crisis of neoliberalism. Instead, “managing migration” remains effective’.

The left can of course be co-opted into this management of migration, and this calls for vigilance towards instances when we see these categories and subjectivities being invoked and performed. To teach migration from a more critical perspective is to acknowledge and disturb our role as ‘educators’ or conductors of these categories and subjectivities. This means, firstly, to teach the origins of migration as a process tied to the commodification and value theory of labour, where workers are necessarily ‘moving- workers’ but have been alienated to only identify as national citizens or ‘bordered-workers’; and secondly, to rethink on a basic level how we are all necessarily migrants under capitalism.[2]"



"Specifically, it seems logical to this ideology that where and to whom one is born should determine what resources and conditions one should survive in – justified legally by the respective principles of ius solis and ius sanguinis for determining nationality rights. The anti-immigrant rhetoric in most European countries today reinforces and restricts these principles. However, in other contexts such as North America, as Jessica Evans reminds us, indigenous peoples are ‘internal outsiders with a prior claim to both jus solis and jus sanguinis’ and yet ‘access to the state and to the right for a state of their own’ remains denied to them. In both contexts, however, xenophobic and exclusionary rhetoric finds refuge in the cataclysmic sense of emergency where everybody is meant to accept that the world is dying, resources are limited and cannot be shared, and, crucially, (European) Christian culture is threatened. Thus, people should stay where they are and deal with the lot they were given, whether this means war, famine, persecution, discrimination, colonial theft and trauma, unemployment, lack of healthcare, and more. What this implies is the erosion of the principle of solidarity. Although this principle, when coupled to Western liberal ideals, has often led to the worst of liberal interventionism’s civilising missions, it remains a cornerstone of basic human decency and co- existence, and of socialist politics. It therefore must be protected from European liberalism’s securitisation, retrenchment and paranoia.

Thus, the ‘with and without us’ message signals the challenge of this tragic yet never-ending liberalism, which, like the narrator character in the U2 song ‘With or Without You’, threatens to die but remains loudly and infuriatingly alive and dominant. Liberalism is currently deemed at risk by the advance of the far right; as critics of liberalism, should we not be rejoicing? No, because what is really at risk is not liberalism, but the principle of solidarity that some liberalism contains. Instead of dying, liberalism is merely becoming more and more securitised and economically ‘rational’. The principle of solidarity is trapped in the farcical tragedy of liberalism’s never-ending schizophrenic dance-off to two different songs; trying to cleave to its ideal of harmonious economic migration and human- rights discourse on one hand, and its need for retaining and cajoling the interests of state and capital through cheap labour and border controls on the other.

In ‘With or Without You’, Bono is wailing, taunting us with despair and the threat of death because the subject of his love brings him both joy and pain. He personifies today’s dominant ideology, asking migrants to stay and save liberalism’s soul, while complaining of how they threaten it, justifying the need to exploit them, detain them or kick them back into the equivalent of outer- space. Economic liberalism maintains and reproduces a moral discourse of righteousness and an institutional façade of human rights. Nevertheless, it must be rejected in toto because it necessarily also furthers a policy agenda of fear and social hierarchy that fills up the pockets of employers and fuels the growing migration security agenda and industry. Sonja Buckel captures this relation well when explaining that ‘managing migration’ means that ‘neoliberal open-border politics has been interwoven with a left- liberal humanitarian and human rights strategy, while also needing to make concessions to the … [more]
capitalism  migration  border  borders  citizenship  2017  maïapal  nationalism  race  racism  immigration  canon  liberalism  frédériclordon  johnberger  onedaywithoutus  neoliberalism  sandromezzadra  policy  politics  economics  identity  division  marxism  subjectivity  mobility  containment  society  migrants  immigrants  jessicaevans  indigenous  indigeneity  outsiders  accumulation  materialism  consumerism  jeffreywilliamson  sonjabuckel  security  industry  humanrights  humanitarianism  ideology  labor  work  territory  territorialism  colonization  west  xenophobia  naturalization  sovereignty  globalization  globalism  slavery  servitude  war  environment  climatechange  climate  globalwarming  colinmooers  supremacy  backwardness  davidharvey  jasonmoore  dereksayer  structure  agency  whitesupremacy  criticalpedagogy 
march 2019 by robertogreco
The Next Black - A film about the Future of Clothing - YouTube
"The Next Black' is a documentary film that explores the future of clothing. Watch as we meet with some of the most innovative companies on the planet to get their opinion on clothing and its future, including: heroes of sustainability, Patagonia; tech-clothing giants, Studio XO; sportswear icon, adidas; and Biocouture, a consultancy exploring living organisms to grow clothing and accessories.

Learn more about the project: http://www.aeg-home.com/thenextblack

Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter and on the hashtag #thenextblack

https://www.facebook.com/pages/AEG-Global/586037381449750
https://twitter.com/aeg_global "

[See also:
http://www.studio-xo.com/
http://www.biocouture.co.uk/
http://www.patagonia.com/us/worn-wear
https://www.ifixit.com/Patagonia
http://www.patagonia.com/us/worn-wear-repairs
http://www.patagonia.com/email/11/112811.html
http://www.patagonia.com/us/patagonia.go?assetid=106223
http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/ad-day-patagonia-136745
https://www.patagonia.com/us/patagonia.go?assetid=2388
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2013-11-25/patagonias-confusing-and-effective-campaign-to-grudgingly-sell-stuff ]
design  documentary  fashion  video  clothes  clothing  glvo  reuse  mending  repair  materials  textiles  studioxo  biocouture  adidas  patagonia  recycling  waste  consumerism  consumption  capitalism  biology  wearable  wearables  suzannelee  technology  nancytilbury  suzanne  slow  slowfashion  fastfashion  dyes  dying  industry  manufacturing  globalization  environment  rickridgeway  uniformproject  customization  ifixit  diy  alteration  resuse  repairing 
july 2015 by robertogreco
If you need me, I’ll just be over here staring at... — Casey's Notes and Links
"If you need me, I’ll just be over here staring at the pictures in Limits to Growth (1972), by Donella H. Meadows, Dennis L. Meadows, Jorgen Randers. and William W. Behrens III. Ok?"
2015  1972  caseygollan  donellameadows  growth  limitstogrowth  charts  graphs  slow  space  time  environment  nature  ddt  population  ecosystems  industry  industrialcapital  modeling  worldmodels  economics  policy  resources  timelines  jorgenrandes  williambehrens  dennismeadows 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Why is it so difficult and expensive to make your own clothes (or have them made)? | Chez Skud
"I’ve gone on for a long time already, but you can see that modern home-made clothing has most of the disadvantages of industrial clothing (poor durability, fiddly to make, externalities) and few of its benefits (capital-intensive economies of scale).

Home-made clothing may never be able to compete with industrial clothing based on cost alone, however if you aren’t able to wear industrial clothing, perhaps because you don’t fit their mass-produced sizes, or you want to opt out of the industrial clothing system for whatever reason, there are ways to make your own clothing (or have it made) that are more cost effective than the modern, quasi-industrial methods that are promoted through mainstream craft publications and retailers (Australia: Spotlight and Lincraft; USA: JoAnn’s and similar). Best of all, these are a mix-and-match set of skills, materials, and practices that you can do at whatever scale or level of investment works for you. You don’t actually have to dress like an 18th century peasant to take advantage of them. (Of course, if you want to, I fully support your life choices.)

This is quite enough rambling for one post, though, so I’ll put them in a followup. Stay tuned."
clothes  sewing  fabrics  glvo  2013  via:debcha  materials  cotton  capitalism  cost  economics  environment  industry  industrialization  polyester  slavery  viscose  clothing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Drone as Privacy Catalyst - Stanford Law Review
"Daniel Solove has argued that the proper metaphor for contemporary privacy violations is not the Big Brother of Orwell’s 1984, but the inscrutable courts of Franz Kafka’s The Trial.[11] I agree, and believe that the lack of a coherent mental model of privacy harm helps account for the lag between the advancement of technology and privacy law. There is no story, no vivid and specific instance of a paradigmatic privacy violation in a digital universe, upon which citizens and lawmakers can premise their concern.

Drones and other robots have the potential to restore that mental model. They represent the cold, technological embodiment of observation. Unlike, say, NSA network surveillance or commercial data brokerage, government or industry surveillance of the populace with drones would be visible and highly salient. People would feel observed, regardless of how or whether the information was actually used. The resulting backlash could force us to reexamine not merely the use of drones to observe, but the doctrines that today permit this use."
drones  privacy  law  legal  robots  danielsolove  mryancalo  nsa  technology  surveillance  bigbrother  1984  georgeorwell  government  industry  data 
july 2013 by robertogreco
One Tiny College's Lessons for Higher Education - College, Reinvented - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"[T]he College of the Atlantic—330 students and 43 faculty members ensconced on Maine's remote Mount Desert Island—has resisted growth, seeing smallness as key to providing an unusual education that cuts across disciplines, rejects academic conventions, and takes a highly personalized approach to teaching and learning.

"What I learned is how to do more with less, and as someone who is now an entrepreneur, I find that extremely valuable," Mr. Motzkin says. "It's about really being able to adapt and change and apply knowledge. In the future, that's going to be critically important."

The emphasis on smallness runs counter to the national frenzy for reinvention in higher education, which seems fixated on going online and scaling up in an effort to mass-produce knowledge (or at least degrees). Offbeat and experimental colleges like COA—think of Bennington, Goddard, Hampshire, or Unity—are often overlooked and fragile. But they bring new perspectives and techniques to higher education, in part because they are small and nimble.

These colleges provide "a kind of biodiversity in the whole system of higher education," says L. Jackson Newell, an emeritus professor of educational leadership and policy at the University of Utah and a former president of Deep Springs College, a tiny work college in California. "Keeping these institutions alive and healthy is a way of keeping the ideas behind these institutions alive, which I would say is critically important for the health of higher education as a whole.""



"Certain ideas were baked into the College of the Atlantic at its founding, 43 years ago, and they seem to have found a currency in the discussion today over what to do about higher education. Critics talk about academics in silos, toiling on obscure research. At COA, there are no departments, and with only one degree—human ecology—students and faculty members form a culture that encourages teaching, interdisciplinarity, and pursuing one's intellectual interests."
collegeoftheatlantic  small  slow  education  unschooling  deschooling  progressive  progressiveeducation  size  fragility  hampshirecollege  goddardcollege  benningtoncollege  untycollege  maine  darroncollins  huamnecology  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  incubators  capitalism  industry  sustainability  exploration  learning  barharbor  edkaelber  franconiacollege  blackmountaincollege  antiochcollege  tedsizer  renédubos  elizabethrussell  mollyanderson  wofgangserbser  germany  2012  bmc 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Tim Carmody spells it out. (with tweets) · maxfenton · Storify
"…after WW2, a professional managerial class figured out they could trade benefits tomorrow for real money today across the workforce.

Early on, this didn't cost them much, because the workforce was young, health care was cheap, & most of it was just paper promises.

Then when the economy got a little tougher, these industries laid off workers & stopped kicking in funds for pensions. Profits still high.

Now, every single one of those industries are laying off even more workers, reducing benefits & weaseling out of those old promises.

What we're seeing is much less global industrial disruption than it is a bad check, a ponzi scheme, a bald-faced transfer of wealth.

A transfer of wealth across classes and generations, coupled with a villainization of the very employees who've been defrauded.

This is no accident of history. This is a fully planned and executed heist. This makes Ocean's Eleven look like a botched stickup…

[one more here]

This is how you murder the future."
industry  labor  inequity  wealthdistribution  wealth  ponzischemes  pensions  2012  finance  economics  history  timcarmody  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Marcel Claude en la UC - Resumen on Vimeo
"Aquí les dejo un pequeño resumen de lo que fue la conferencia del economista Marcel Claude el pasado viernes 1 de julio en la Casa Central de la UC. Actividad organizada por la Asamblea de Estudiantes Movilizados."
2011  chile  politics  policy  economics  marcelclaude  protests  education  healthcare  socialism  history  copper  industry  wealth  poverty  inequality  naturalresources  wealthdistribution  wealthdistrubution 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Scotia, Calif.: The Last Company Town - Newsweek
"There was a time when employers provided everything: houses, hospitals, bars. Such a place still exists—but not for long. Welcome to Scotia, Calif., the last wholly owned company town in the country. Founded in 1863 by the Pacific Lumber Co., Scotia became “lumberjack heaven”—a complete community with a school, a church, a post office, family homes, and a power plant that provided electric light years before the White House had it. Now it is about to change forever. Marathon Asset Management, a Manhattan-based hedge fund that reluctantly inherited this industrial Eden in a 2008 bankruptcy case, is planning to put the entire town on the market this year—a move that will give residents the chance to own their own homes, elect their own officials, and generally control their own destiny. But longtime residents say that Scotia already amounts to the American Dream."
scotia  california  companytowns  hedgefunds  via:javierarbona  history  lumber  industry  2011  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Wonder of Creation » Wendell Berry: Nature Theologian
"In the Bible we find none of the industrialist’s contempt or hatred for nature. We find, instead, a poetry of awe and reverence and profound cherishing, as in [the verses above] from Moses’ valedictory blessing of the twelve tribes. If we credit the Bible’s description of the relationship between Creator and Creation, then we cannot deny the spiritual importance of our economic life. Then we see how religious issues lead to issues of economy, and how issues of economy lead to issues of art, of how to make things. If we understand that no artist—no maker—can work except by reworking the works of Creation, then we see that by our work, by the way we practice our arts, we reveal what we think of the works of God. How we take our lives from this world, how we work, what work we do, how well we use the materials we use and what we do with them after we have used them—all these are questions of the highest and gravest religious significance. These questions cannot be answered by thinking, but only by doing. In answering them, we practice, or do not practice, our religion."

[via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/2457678491 ]
wendellberry  creation  glvo  art  making  doing  make  industrialization  industry  nature  bible  religion  work  theology  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - RSA Animate - Crises of Capitalism
"In this RSA Animate, radical sociologist David Harvey asks if it is time to look beyond capitalism towards a new social order that would allow us to live within a system that really could be responsible, just, and humane?"
davidharvey  capitalism  economics  politics  rsaanimate  homeownership  us  culture  germany  greece  policy  banks  finance  banking  canon  housing  worldbank  imf  neoliberalism  liberalism  alangreenspan  marxism  instability  systemicrisk  capitalaccumulation  crisis  labor  capital  1970s  1980s  unions  offshoring  power  wagerepression  wages  credit  creditcards  debt  personaldebt  2010  limits  greed  profits  industry  london  uk  latinamerica  wealth  india  china  inequality  incomeinequality  wealthinequality  hedgefunds 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The Toaster Project
""Left to his own devices he couldn’t build a toaster. He could just about make a sandwich and that was it." Mostly Harmless, Douglas Adams, 1992" ... "I'm Thomas Thwaites and I'm trying to build a toaster, from scratch - beginning by mining the raw materials and ending with a product that Argos sells for only £3.99. A toaster. After some research I have determined that I will need the following materials to make a toaster. Copper, to make the pins of the electric plug, the cord, and internal wires. Iron to make the steel grilling apparatus, and the spring to pop up the toast. Nickel to make the heating element. Mica (a mineral a bit like slate) around which the heating element is wound, and of course plastic for the plug and cord insulation, and for the all important sleek looking casing. The first four of these materials are dug out of the ground, and plastic is derived from oil, which is generally sucked up through a hole."
design  technology  art  culture  economics  humor  diy  hardware  capitalism  manufacturing  consumption  toaster  appliances  industry  artifacts  crafts  toasters 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Healthcare CEOs Shoot Themselves in the Foot | Mother Jones
"Yesterday the House Subcommittee on Oversight & Investigations decided to investigate the practice of recission...when you pay your premiums for years to a healthcare insurer, then get sick, and then have your insurance cancelled... "...Late in the hearing, [Bart] Stupak, the committee chairman, put the executives on the spot...asked each of them whether he would at least commit his company to immediately stop rescissions except where they could show "intentional fraud." The answer from all three executives: "No." Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.) said that a public insurance plan should be a part of any overhaul because it would force private companies to treat consumers fairly or risk losing them. "This is precisely why we need a public option," Dingell said. Even the Republicans on the committee couldn't defend the insurance company position. A few more hearings like this and getting a public option into healthcare reform is suddenly going to look like a real possibility."
health  industry  healthcare  insurance  politics  reform  policy  medicine  change 
june 2009 by robertogreco
edublogs: Seth on why the textbook industry deserves to die
"Seth's assumption is the same as mine, and the underlying pretext of the eduBuzz platform: that teachers are paid to share their knowledge, not just with those students in front of them but with anyone in their learning communities, and sharing with this community will make us all better teachers and learners.
sethgodin  ewanmcintosh  textbooks  books  teaching  education  learning  money  industry  change  reform  elearning  ebooks  blogging  wikis  tcsnmy 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Bridging Differences: Test Results Are Not a Good Stand-In for Achievement
"We forget that American economy lived off ingenuity of “ordinary” people, including many with limited or no formal educations & not just “best & brightest.” They sometimes saw themselves as anti-intellectuals—because we mistakenly created a false divide. Too many so-called intellectuals missed connection between hand & eye & brain—not to mention ear, feet & stomach! Americans turned their “ordinary” fascination w/ world of work into hobbies & finding new ways to do old things & old ways to do new things...They produced actual goods & products—good decently paid work was a source of pride. In less than half a century we have lost it. We produce less & less...I was stunned to read that we put a financier in charge of rethinking the auto industry. We need dreamers & tinkerers to invent a new America, not more fancy financial handlers...connection btwn such schooling & real-life achievement, btwn schools that prepare us for 2lst C rather than schools that expect us to actively invent it."
us  education  schooling  intellectualism  anti-intellectualism  learning  schools  publicschools  arneduncan  barackobama  finance  gm  industry  manual  bluecollar  whitecollar  crisis  gamechanging  reinvention  deschooling  unschooling  tinkering  making  make  tcsnmy  deborahmeier  testing  assessment 
june 2009 by robertogreco
MichaelMoore.com : Goodbye, GM ...by Michael Moore
"But you and I and the rest of America now own a car company! I know, I know -- who on earth wants to run a car company? Who among us wants $50 billion of our tax dollars thrown down the rat hole of still trying to save GM? Let's be clear about this: The only way to save GM is to kill GM. Saving our precious industrial infrastructure, though, is another matter and must be a top priority. If we allow the shutting down and tearing down of our auto plants, we will sorely wish we still had them when we realize that those factories could have built the alternative energy systems we now desperately need. And when we realize that the best way to transport ourselves is on light rail and bullet trains and cleaner buses, how will we do this if we've allowed our industrial capacity and its skilled workforce to disappear?"
gm  michaelmoore  detroit  economics  recession  bankruptcy  cleanenergy  retoolinggm  us  future  energy  oil  generalmotors  environment  transportation  trains  industry  transformation  gamechanging 
june 2009 by robertogreco
GM Car Dealerships Closing - 4 Ways to Use Old Car Dealerships - thedailygreen.com
"From new town centers to public art projects -- there is potential in the demise of 1,100 GM dealerships and nearly 800 Chrysler dealerships."
urban  reuse  future  urbanism  industry  green  food  autoindustry  dealerships  adaptive 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Japan for Sustainability - Kakegawa Declares Itself a "Slow Life City"
"SLOW PACE: We value the culture of walking, to be fit & to reduce traffic accidents. SLOW WEAR: ...beautiful traditional costumes... SLOW FOOD: ...Japanese food culture...dishes & tea ceremony & safe local ingredients. SLOW HOUSE: We respect houses built with wood, bamboo & paper, lasting over 100 or 200 years & are careful to make things durably...to conserve our environment. SLOW INDUSTRY: We take care of our forests, through our agriculture & forestry, conduct sustainable farming with human labor & ultimately spread urban farms & green tourism.
slow  sustainability  slowlife  japan  education  sloweducation  slowlearning  meaning  community  aging  industry  happiness  environment  life  local  simplicity  2002  slowfood  homes  housing  walking 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Sweet Juniper! - Don't let them die
"I do see this economic climate as an opportunity for change. It is a chance for us all to step back and think about where the things we buy are made, and all of what that means. It is a chance to accept that much of what we consider wealth isn't even real. If we're going to spend $700 billion to bail out those greedy firms who successfully used chicanery for years to manufacture an economy built of lies, shouldn't we also spend $25 billion to save one of the few remaining industries that actually design, engineer, and manufacture something real and necessary in this country?"
bigthree  autoindustry  gm  chrysler  ford  bailout  detroit  making  finance  us  economics  industry  2008  crisis  austerity  comments 
november 2008 by robertogreco
MTV Multiplayer » “A Higher Standard” — Game Designer Jonathan Blow Challenges Super Mario’s Gold Coins, “Unethical” MMO Design And Everything Else You May Hold Dear About Video Games
"if people get things out of games different from other media ... those things obviously can't be pure escapism"; "the way people act & think 50 years from now will in significant part be determined by the games we create now"; "happiness comes at a cost"
via:preoccupations  games  braid  gaming  culture  videogames  gamedesign  gamechanging  society  escapism  narrative  play  challenge  creativity  storytelling  design  fiction  film  books  industry  gamedev  reward 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Designer Cities: The Development Of the Superstar Urban Plan - WSJ.com
"We are seeing an emergence of a new industry...It's not real-estate development; it's not architecture; it's not city planning. All I can do is name it 'the city-building industry.'"
cities  design  urban  urbanism  starchitects  architecture  construction  planning  trends  development  industry  capitalism 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Will Hutton: Forget the naysayers - America remains an inspiration to us all | Comment is free | The Observer
"The more I visit the US the more I think the pundits predicting the US's imminent economic and political decline hugely overstate their case. Rather, the next 50 years will be as dominated by the US as the last 50. The US will widen its technological and
economics  innovation  optimism  us  crisis  finance  future  global  technology  industry 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Issues in Science and Technology, Fall 2007, The Post-Scientific Society
"the leading edge of innovation in the post-scientific society, whether for business, industrial, consumer, or public purposes, will move from the workshop, the laboratory, and the office to the studio, the think tank, the atelier, and cyberspace."
us  science  future  society  economics  innovation  technology  globalization  competition  postscientificsociety  business  industry  consumer 
april 2008 by robertogreco
The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard
"The Story of Stuff is a 20-minute, fast-paced, fact-filled look at the underside of our production and consumption patterns. The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to cre
environment  sustainability  consumerism  consumption  activism  materials  materialism  industry  globalization  globalwarming  plannedobsolescence  obsolescence  capitalism  carbon  conservation  consumers  simplicity  society  visualization  waste  pollution  trade  gamechanging  green  economics  global  us  production 
april 2008 by robertogreco
IFTF's Future Now: Peal River Downturn - "China's economic boom often compared to West's industrialization, only running in fast-foward...
"looks like decline...playing out on same accelerated time frame...perfect storm of recent developments - US housing market, soaring commodity prices, new labor regulations - shuttering factories in Peal River Delta at alarming rate"
china  industry  industrialization  economics  development  labor  markets  housingbubble  commodities 
march 2008 by robertogreco
3quarksdaily - The Trouble with Organic Food
"“Organic” is a magic charm, to protect us against the squalor, the chemicals and industrial scale on which most of what we eat is produced. Like any magic charm, it can’t possibly do all we expect of it."
food  organic  industry  health  words  language  truth 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Article on Mass Customization
"Mass Customization is the new paradigm that replaces mass production, which is no longer suitable for today’s turbulent markets, growing product variety, and opportunities for e-commerce."
customization  industry  manufacturing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Click opera - Play = communication = fun = creativity = design = events = blah
"sometimes I wonder what the hell we're all playing at. Is all this waffle about "communication" and "play" just what post-industrial societies do when they've lost all productive sense of purpose? Where, in all this, is the relationship between design an
art  children  creativity  design  engineering  ethics  innovation  science  work  play  gamechanging  glvo  momus  industry  postindustrialism  us  sweden  japan  recycling  sustainability  environment  production  products  sweatshops  manufacturing  culture  consumerism  conferences 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: We accidentally marketed ourselves into a corner
'Every school considers applications, grabs students they'd love to have, puts rest in "good enough" pile...let computer sort em out...At least kids will go into their twenties correctly blaming a computer instead of mistakenly blaming themselves."
careers  colleges  education  universities  marketing  parenting  schools  tuition  learning  industry  gamechanging  happiness  economics  consumerism 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- Artist In Residence
"a list of organizations that offer opportunities for artists to collaborate with scientists, technologists, or professionals in business or industry. Many are experimental laboratories where artists collaborate with scientists. Several are university bas
residencies  art  artists  glvo  crosspollination  creativity  technology  science  culture  innovation  business  industry  reference  kevinkelly 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Nordhaus and Shellenberger: Two Environmentalists Anger Their Brethren
"Nordhaus and Shellenberger argue passionately that the only appropriate response to the climate crisis is a federally funded, $300 billion Manhattan Project to rapidly develop new forms of greentech. Nothing short of that, they argue, can jump-start the
economics  environment  sustainability  future  books  industry  government  politics  policy 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Dream Anatomy: Gallery: Fritz Kahn: Man as Industrial Palace
"Kahn’s modernist visualization of the digestive and respiratory system as "industrial palace," really a chemical plant, was conceived in a period when the German chemical industry was the world’s most advanced."
anatomy  visualization  illustration  infodesign  industry  medicine  design  history  art  body  human  modernism  bodies 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Click opera - The disappearance -- and reappearance -- of the ordinary
"Super normal design means design which, instead of trying to stand out by making a statement or being "stimulating", blends into the background, becoming unobtrusive but indispensable. (It's no surprise that Fukasawa has worked for Muji, whose "no brand
everyday  products  trends  design  simplicity  supernormal  industry 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Ponoko
"Ponoko is the world's first personal manufacturing platform. It's the online space for a community of creators and consumers to use a global network of digital manufacturing hardware to co-create, make and trade individualized product ideas on demand."
design  manufacturing  ponoko  networking  objects  business  internet  personal  printing  shopping  spimes  technology  platform  industry  glvo  fabrication  crowdsourcing  customization  construction  crafts  creation  entrepreneurship  engineering  diy  services  inventions  make  invention  personalization  socialnetworking  prototype  products  global 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Penguin - How Luxury Lost its Lustre
"Once upon a time, luxury was only available to the rarefied/aristocratic world of old money/royalty...wasn't simply a product...was a lifestyle. Today, luxury is different...industry run by corporations that focus on brand-awareness, advertising...profit
luxury  marketing  exclusivity  industry  branding  advertising  brands  walth 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Mobile Opportunity: The war between Nokia and Apple
"The Apple-Nokia war finally got underway on August 29, when Nokia announced an array of new music-capable phones and an online music store."
nokia  apple  mobile  phones  future  iphone  interaction  content  music  media  internet  web  business  entertainment  industry  marketing 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Inventing the Organizations of the 21st Century - Google Book Search
"Technological changes have displaced the hierarchical corporation/organization; corporations are decentralizing and externalizing, creating networks of "industry ecosystems" that will replace the top-down organizations of the past"
organizations  management  administration  society  technology  schools  future  lcproject  work  networks  socialnetworks  ecosystems  industry 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Artichoke: Edubloggers as “Prisoners of the nation state.”
"We have been seduced by our inability to imagine ourselves as superfluous to student learning...If Illich could imagine a good education system [sans schools and classrooms] in 1971, why do we keep pretending we need [them] to learn in 2007?"
ivanillich  homeschool  learning  education  freedom  industry  schools  teaching  serendipity  lcproject  politics  deschooling  social  blogging  self-preservation  artichokeblog  pamhook 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Ode Magazine - The forgotten thinker you need to know - [Ivan Illich]
"He challenges the idea that the primacy of the modern economy is the all-important matter in life... economic globalization - and the underlying supremacy of technology and the free market - seems impossible to challenge. Yet there is another side to thi
ivanillich  profile  economics  life  technology  markets  globalization  global  international  capitalism  philosophy  ideas  religion  catholicism  thinking  education  learning  interviews  development  organizations  institutions  happiness  society  poverty  justice  human  freedom  independence  people  schools  industry  equality  health  medicine  autonomy 
june 2007 by robertogreco
blog.pmarca.com: How to hire the best people you've ever worked with
"make sure drive, curiosity, and ethics accompany smarts and degrees...ask questions until they can't answer...hire the one that admits they don't know the answer, avoid the bullshitter"
advice  hiring  jobs  work  administration  management  people  employment  business  human  tips  industry  curiosity  entrepreneurship  passion  howto  ethics 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Harold Jarche » What is weighing down learning?
"The iceberg metaphor shows how much work there is to do below the surface in order to achieve systemic change...It makes a learner-centric, process-oriented education seem even that much more inaccessible."
education  teaching  learning  reform  projectbasedlearning  change  schools  history  industry  society  administration  pbl 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Tech news blog - The next big growth market: education | CNET News.com
"Education, of course, has been a huge issue in the past several years. Parents are far more obsessed about getting their kids on the right educational track earlier than in the past."
education  industry  markets  economics  children  schools  universities  colleges  international  us  world  global  parenting  fear  curriculum 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Graham Attwell :: Weblog :: De-schooling (or re-schooling) society
"The de-institutionalisation or at least recasting the role and organisation of institutions is the greatest need in terms of reforming education and introducing Personal Learning Environments."
education  ples  learning  future  industry  schools  e-learning  online  internet  networking  networks  society  ivanillich  deschooling  homeschool  alternative  lcproject 
may 2007 by robertogreco
The Wales-Wide Web | De-schooling (or re-schooling) society
"It is not only that the present institutional structures are too inflexible to support PLEs, but that they fail to provide support for the many different contexts in which learning is taking place."
education  ples  learning  future  industry  schools  e-learning  online  internet  networking  networks  society  ivanillich  deschooling  homeschool  alternative  lcproject 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Marginal Revolution: China skepticism
"China in the 20th century had two major revolutions, a civil war, a World War, The Great Leap Forward [sic], mass starvation, the Cultural Revolution, arguably the most tyrannical dictator ever and he didn't even brush his teeth, and now they will go fro
economics  china  asia  us  politics  industry  policy  future  society  history 
march 2007 by robertogreco
Ricardo Semler - Wikipedia
"Ricardo Semler (born 1959 in São Paulo) is the CEO and majority owner of Semco SA, a Brazilian company best known for its radical form of industrial democracy and corporate re-engineering."
business  democracy  freedom  management  productivity  reference  organizations  learning  society  brasil  meetings  work  lcproject  sãopaulo  community  education  organization  people  politics  industry  innovation  ricardosemler  brazil 
october 2006 by robertogreco
DigitAll Magazine
"The transformation of the factory from a vast machine into a creative, knowledge-intensive space is a development few could have seen. Are you ready for the next industrial revolution?"
business  creativity  culture  design  ecology  economics  future  ideas  industry  innovation  music  technology  studio  politics  change  ubicomp  theory  trends  work 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Wired 12.10: The Long Tail
"Forget squeezing millions from a few megahits at the top of the charts. The future of entertainment is in the millions of niche markets at the shallow end of the bitstream"
future  internet  society  economics  essays  amazon  books  business  longtail  marketing  media  money  movies  music  television  copyright  creative  culture  content  consumption  data  entertainment  industry  history  journalism  social  statistics  technology  web  video  trends  theory 
december 2004 by robertogreco

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