robertogreco + howto   820

Eve Tuck on Twitter: "I was just asked by a colleague how I facilitate Q & A sessions—I guess the word is out that I am very deliberate about how an academic Q & A should go after a talk or panel. I think of this as an Indigenous feminist approach to fa
"I was just asked by a colleague how I facilitate Q & A sessions—I guess the word is out that I am very deliberate about how an academic Q & A should go after a talk or panel. I think of this as an Indigenous feminist approach to facilitating academic Q & A. 1/

Ever since I was in graduate school, I thought I hated giving public talks. But I soon realized it’s not the presentation, but the Q & A that can feel so awful. Academic audiences can be arrogant, hostile, and self-absorbed. 2/

People don’t always bring their best selves to the Q & A—people can act out their own discomfort about the approach or the topic of the talk. We need to do better. I believe in heavily mediated Q & A sessions. 3/

Before I give a talk, I ask my host to please find someone to facilitate the Q & A. It is better for someone who knows the people in the audience to choose who gets to ask questions in public, because they know who is a bully, who to avoid, who will derail a conversation. 4/

The tips in this thread are both what I do after my own talks, and what I do when I am chairing a session. I especially do this for graduate students and early career scholars. 5/

I make it clear that it is the audience’s responsibility to help craft a positive public speaking experience for graduate students and early career scholars. I tell the audience to help keep the good experience going and tell them not to ask violent questions. 6/

Right after I am finished talking or all the panelists have shared their papers, I invite the audience to take 5-10 minutes to talk to each other. After 45-70 minutes of listening, people are bursting to talk, 7/

and taking the time to turn to talk to a neighbor keeps the first question from being from a person who just felt the urgency to talk. Also, I often need a breather and a moment to drink water or even step out to use the washroom. 8/

So, I give the audience 5-10 minutes to talk to a neighbor. I suggest that they use the time to peer review their questions. 9/

I say that this is a time for them to share a question they are considering posing in the q and a, and that they should

a) make sure it is really a question;

b) make sure they aren’t actually trying to say that THEY should have given the paper; 10/

c) figure out if the question needs to be posed and answered in front of everyone;

d) I remind the audience that the speaker has just done a lot of work, so they should figure out if their question is asking the speaker to do work that really the question-asker should do. 11/

Then, after 5-10 mins, I will sometimes ask for the first question to come from particular people in the room— Indigenous graduate students, etc.

Or, if opening it up for anyone to begin, I will ask, “did you peer review your question?” before the person takes the mic. 12/

People kind of laugh it off, but once they realize that I am serious--that the expectation is that they are thoughtful about the quality of their question and whether it really needs to be asked--it often helps to make the conversation much more satisfying. 13/

We often treat Q & A as something that is to be endured, and are willing to gamble on it not going well by having very passive facilitation. We can shift how we interact with one another and make it better. Thanks to Daniel Heath Justice @justicedanielh for asking about this! 14/"
conferences  howto  q&a  academia  facilitation  evetuck 
26 days ago by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: How to make a website for your creative work
"A guide to getting your work on the internet so you can share it with others, written by Jason Huff and illustrated by Sean Suchara."



"If you’re a creative person living in the world today, people will expect to be able to find some examples of your work online. How you choose to put it there, though, is completely up to you.

I got started on the web in the early aughts when I created a gallery for my creative work. I call it a gallery because it was just that: a blank space with images in a row that linked to some projects I wanted to share with friends. Since then my site has evolved, disappeared, come back, and spawned other sites that express my ideas and identity online. Each evolution was a chance to share new work in a way that reflected how I wanted people to experience it.

I work on the web everyday. I help designers, artists, and galleries discover and create their online presence. And for seven years, I designed and led teams at Etsy, a platform that helps millions of creative humans around the world use the web to make an income from their craft. In all of my work, I’ve learned that every person brings their own body of knowledge and point of view when they create their own space online. The unique approaches that each individual brings to the experience are what make the internet an interesting place to explore.

Before digging into this guide, I recommend reading Laurel Schwulst’s essay, My website is a shifting house next to a river of knowledge. What could yours be? It’s a great sister piece to this more practical guide, and provides many poetic explorations of the website format. Like Laurel mentions in her essay, “Artists excel at creating worlds.” I hope this guide will help you start creating yours.

— Jason Huff"
webdesign  webdev  howto  websites  seansuchara  jasonhuff  art  glvo  projectideas  laurelschwulst  morehshinallahyari  petracortright  americanartist  ingridburrington  damonzucconi  jennyodell  seokhoonchoi  tomjennings  carlyayres 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: How to make a zine
"A guide to ideating, publishing, and distributing a DIY zine, written by Rona Akbari and illustrated by Somnath Bhatt."
zines  howto  classideas  tutorials  somnathbhatt  ronaakbari  publishing  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
november 2018 by robertogreco
David Adams on Twitter: "The more power the left gains, the more vociferously will entrenched interests fight back. We better have a lot more in our arsenal than sarcasm and call-outs. Twitter is exactly the wrong place to prepare."
"The more power the left gains, the more vociferously will entrenched interests fight back. We better have a lot more in our arsenal than sarcasm and call-outs. Twitter is exactly the wrong place to prepare.

A few accounts miraculously navigate this poisoned discursive terrain adroitly. @BlackSocialists comes immediately to mind. They do Twitter "wrong" and it's wonderful to see.

That sort of patient, clear, drama- and hyperbole-free presentation is something to learn from. Stick to the principles, stick to the material analysis, dodge around the feints and discursive traps of the opposition.

These are skills we have to put real effort into learning, but then, they don't call it a fight or a struggle because it comes automatically, right? These rhetorical skills are part of our basic training.

Going for the sick own, the oh-snap fireworks, is about your own personal brand, your lil ego, & that, folks, is commodification in action. Socialism isn't about you-as-atomized-individual. It's about us, building understanding, seeing above the spectacle, gaining power together."
davidadams  twitter  socialism  activism  education  ego  personalbranding  solidarity  collectivism  bsa  blacksocialistsofamerica  socialmedia  individualism  howto  organizing  resistance  struggle  sarcasm  callouts  training  opposition 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Wikipedia:The Wikipedia Adventure - Wikipedia
"Learn to edit Wikipedia in under an hour! Come on a journey full of real skills, tips, helpers, rewards, and support."



"Mission 1
Say Hello to the World

Mission 2
An Invitation to Earth

Mission 3
Small Changes, Big Impact

Mission 4
The Neutral Point of View

Mission 5
The Veil of Verifiability

Mission 6
The Civility Code

Mission 7
Looking Good Together

Get Help
Hang out in the Interstellar Lounge"
wikipedia  howto  tutorials  onlinetoolkit  classideas 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Clayton Cubitt on Twitter: "Three step guide to photography: 01: be interesting. 02: find interesting people. 03: find interesting places. Nothing about cameras."
"Three step guide to photography: 01: be interesting. 02: find interesting people. 03: find interesting places. Nothing about cameras."
claytoncubitt  photography  edg  srg  glvo  classideas  howto  cameras  2013 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Engaging Children in the Park Planning Process | Health and Wellness | Parks and Recreation Magazine | NRPA
"In planning and designing new facilities, park and recreation agencies typically seek public input through a meeting or a series of meetings. Having hosted and participated in many such meetings as a park planner, I believe they may not be the most effective way to obtain input that reflects all segments of communities and their diverse viewpoints. Children (under 18 years of age), for example, are often underrepresented or not represented at all. This is certainly alarming but not entirely surprising, considering that the formal or rigid nature of most public meetings can intimidate and discourage kids of all ages from openly sharing their ideas and thoughts.

Given that children are key park users and parks contribute significantly to their development and quality of life, we must be intentional and creative in how we engage them in the planning and design of parks. An important lesson I have learned over the years is that children have much to say about parks and have valuable insights to contribute. The challenge then is for us to engage them in ways that encourage and empower them to share their ideas and to actively participate in existing and future planning and design processes.

Voting for Park Features and Activities
Many kids today are tech savvy and most have their own smartphones. One way to effectively engage them is to have an activity during a community meeting that allows them to vote for their favorite park features (like a basketball court) and recreational activities (like skateboarding). This may be done using special mobile devices or smartphones, with participants being shown images of various park features and activities, and then being able to select the ones that appeal to them the most.

This approach was part of the process used to develop the Puente Hills Landfill Park Master Plan, which involves the conversion of the nation’s second-largest landfill into a regional park. Voting using sticker dots was also done on a large scale for the Los Angeles Countywide Parks and Recreation Needs Assessment as children and adults voted for their top 10 park projects in communities across the county. Although this method might be more old school, it was still a good way to determine a community’s park priorities.

Drawing and Building Dream Parks
The traditional public meeting tends to be dominated by a few loud voices, eager to share their opinions with everyone. To truly engage kids, meetings need to be more fun and interactive. Providing art supplies and allowing younger children to draw their favorite dream or ideal park is one way to do this. This type of activity not only encourages them to be creative and share their ideas visually, but it also helps parents to more freely participate in the meeting without having to worry about their children. For the Master Plan for Sustainable Parks and Recreation planning process, time was set aside toward the end of meetings for children to present their drawings. This helped to create an overall hopeful and positive feeling for all participants. Yet another way to engage kids is to provide them with toy blocks and other random materials they can use to build model parks. For example, planner and artist James Rojas’ interactive planning approach through the use of model building has proven successful in engaging the public, especially kids, and encouraging innovative city-making. Having had first-hand experience in a
Rojas-led exercise, I know this approach empowers participants by allowing them to shape and share visions in a supportive environment without the fear of providing a wrong answer.

Touring Parks
Sociologist Frederik Polak once said, “The future may well be decided by the images of the future with the greatest power to capture our imaginations and draw us to them, becoming self-fulfilling prophecies.” To enable children to see what is possible, they need to be exposed to a wide variety of park and recreation destinations. This is especially true for kids growing up in underserved communities with very few parks and lacking the means to travel to places outside of their immediate neighborhoods. As part of our various planning efforts, we organized tours for children to visit and experience parks in other areas. For example, during the Belvedere Skate Park’s design process, our department took young East Los Angeles skateboarders on a tour of various skateparks to see which design features they would like at their own skatepark. Also, for the Puente Hills Landfill Park Master Plan, many youths participated in an organized hike to the top of the landfill so they could experience what it would be like to have a regional park there in the future.

Visiting Schools
In addition to hosting meetings with activities that engage children and offering tours of parks, it is also important to visit children where they are and where they spend most of their time — at their schools. This requires coordination with and the cooperation of local school districts and/or principals, but it is well worth the effort. As part of the Florence-Firestone Community Parks and Recreation Plan, a middle school allowed us time to conduct a survey of its students to better understand their needs and preferences with respect to park and recreation programs. We also asked the students to illustrate their ideal park and came away with some wonderful pieces of art that were incorporated into the plan.

To meet the growing and diverse needs of communities, park and recreation agencies must effectively reach out to and collaborate with existing and future park users in the planning and design of recreational facilities. We must plan and design parks with, rather than for, children."
children  parks  planning  urbanplanning  urban  urbanism  clementlau  2018  howto 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Resistance School – Practical Skills to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Reimagine America
[See also: https://www.resistanceschool.com/courses/ ]

"Turn your online outrage into offline action

The first free digital training platform for civic engagement and community organizing.

Learn
Access video lessons from leading academics and practitioners to gain the skills you need to organize and mobilize effectively.

Engage
Dive in with supporting resources — readings, quizzes, and tools — and join discussions with other learners in an online forum.

Act
Connect to local, state, and national organizations that are leading the charge for progressive change."
resistance  politics  organizing  howto  tutorials 
july 2018 by robertogreco
joão do lago 🌱 on Twitter: "PSA: If you pause a youtube video, you can use the , and . keys to scroll through it frame by frame. Very helpful for animation study and reference."
"PSA: If you pause a youtube video, you can use the , and . keys to scroll through it frame by frame. Very helpful for animation study and reference."
youtube  howto  tips  animation  2018 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Ten guidelines for nurturing a thriving democracy by Bertrand Russell
"In December 1951, British philosopher Bertrand Russell wrote a piece for the NY Times Magazine titled The Best Answer to Fanaticism — Liberalism with a subhead that says “Its calm search for truth, viewed as dangerous in many places, remains the hope of humanity.” At the end of the article, he offers a list of ten commandments for living in the spirit of liberalism:

1. Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.

2. Do not think it worthwhile to produce belief by concealing evidence, for the evidence is sure to come to light.

3. Never try to discourage thinking, for you are sure to succeed.

4. When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory.

5. Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.

6. Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you.

7. Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.

8. Find more pleasure in intelligent dissent than in passive agreement, for, if you value intelligence as you should, the former implies a deeper agreement than the latter.

9. Be scrupulously truthful, even when truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it.

10. Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool’s paradise, for only a fool will think that it is happiness.

Over the past few years, I’ve found it increasingly difficult to keep an open mind about many issues, particularly on those related to politics. Remaining curious and generous about new & different ideas, especially in public, is perhaps more challenging than it was in Russell’s time. We are bombarded on all sides by propaganda, conspiracy theories, and broadly discredited theories from the past pushed upon us by entertainment news outlets and social media algorithms — we’re under a constant denial-of-service attack on our ability to think and reason.

We can’t reasonably be expected to give serious consideration to ideas like “the Holocaust didn’t happen”, “the Earth is flat”, “the Newtown massacre was faked”, “let’s try slavery again”, “vaccines cause autism”, and “anthropogenic climate change is a myth” — the evidence just doesn’t support any of it — but playing constant defense against all this crap makes it difficult to have good & important discussions with those we might disagree with about things like education, the role of national borders in a extremely mobile world, how to address our changing climate, systemic racism & discrimination, gun violence, healthcare, and dozens of other important issues. Perhaps with Russell’s guidelines in mind, we can make some progress on that front."
bertrandrussell  rules  guidelines  howto  democracy  politics  fanaticism  liberalism  truth  thinking  criticalthinking  evidence  authority  opposition  opinions  happiness  curiosity 
june 2018 by robertogreco
How to make a book
"Anyone who has ever attempted to write a book knows that the job requires a lot of you—for instance, a cat, Diet Coke, an onion, an emotional crisis, avoiding all socialization for at least four weeks, or, better yet, disappearing into the Mariana Trench until further notice. Of course, you must know when to stop. Also, it’s best if you “don’t try.”

There is a lot of writing advice out there, but I don’t find much of it especially helpful. I do not mean that it’s “inaccurate”; I only want to note that a lot of it suggests that there are only a few “correct” methods, and that can endanger the process, or at least make it a lot less fruitful. Writing a book is an individual endeavor, an expression of a writer’s unique and thoughtful approach to inspiration, process, and refinement. The way a book is written is part of what makes it so singular. This guide points to a few approaches that have worked for some writers.

Like writing a book, there are many ways to publish one. For the sake of this guide, I’ll be referring to books sold through the trade marketplace—that is, books that are edited, designed, and printed by a publishing house like MCD x FSG, where I work, and distributed to bookstores and online retailers. This guide provides some practical advice from writers on how to find an agent, working with an editor, and engaging with your audience—crucial parts of trade publishing.

To demystify the process of writing and publishing books, I sought advice from some of the authors of MCD x FSG—Jace Clayton, Araminta Hall, Bruce Holbert, Liska Jacobs, Catherine Lacey, A.G. Lombardo, Tamara Shopsin, Robin Sloan, Héctor Tobar, Jeff VanderMeer, and Joshua Wheeler—to compile this guide. It’s honest, self-deprecating, contradictory, and a bit long-winded. We call it “How to make a book.”

— Naomi Huffman"
naomihuffman  nakim  2018  books  classideas  bookmaking  writing  howto  tutorials  publishing 
april 2018 by robertogreco
How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch | Poetry Foundation
"Curious about poetry, but don't know where or how to begin? We've reprinted the first chapter from the book How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch. Its 16 sections provide strategies for reading poems, and each section has plenty of links to examples of poems in our archive to illustrate the points.

Heartland
Poems are like messages in a bottle sent out with little hope of finding a recipient. Those of us who find and read poems become their unknown addresses.

To the Reader Setting Out
The reader of poetry is a kind of pilgrim setting out. To read a poem is to depart from the familiar, to leave all expectations behind.

In the Beginning is the Relation
A lyric poem is a special communiqué between an I and a You. It speaks out of a solitude to a solitude; it begins and ends in silence.

Stored Magic
The lyric poem seeks to mesmerize time. It crosses frontiers and outwits the temporal. It can bridge the gulf between people otherwise unknown to each other.

The Immense Intimacy, the Intimate Immensity
The experience of reading poetry and the kind of knowledge it provides cannot be duplicated elsewhere.

Mere Air, These Words, but Delicious to Hear
From syllable to word to phrase to sentence, the sound of poetry is the source of its primitive pleasures.

In Plain American Which Cats and Dogs Can Read!
A lyric poem walks the line between speaking and singing. Poetry is not speech exactly and yet it is always in relationship to speech, to the spoken word.

Give a Common Word the Spell
The medium of poetry is language, our common property. It belongs to no one and to everyone. The precision of poetry restores language. It also defamiliarizes words by wrenching them from familiar or habitual contexts.

Metaphor: A Poet is a Nightingale
Metaphor drives the engine of poetry. Figurative language—figures of speech and thought—guides the interaction between poet and reader.

Epic, Drama, Lyric: Be Plentiful Like the Universe
Poems may be epic, lyric, dramatic, or a mixture of the three. Most poems find a way to defy these conventional categories.

Harmonious Sisters, Voice, and Vers
The lyric poem began as a work to be performed, to be sung or read aloud. Over time, the lyric transformed into a work for the page, for the reader to imagine in visual terms.

Winged Type
The poem appeals to the eye. It has a shapely dimension and thus relates to the plastic arts, especially painting. The poem is something to look at as well as to recite.

Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking
Rhythm is a form cut into time, as Ezra Pound said in ABC of Reading. It is the combination in English of stressed and unstressed syllables that creates a feeling of fixity and flux, of surprise and inevitability.

The Wave Always Returns
The poem is a muscular and composed thing. It moves like a wave, dissolving the literal. We participate in its flow as it moves from the eye to the ear, to the inner ear, the inner eye.

Help Me, O Heavenly Muse
Where does a poem come from? The sources of inspiration are many, from reason to a touch of madness.

It Is Something of an Accident That You Are the Reader and I the Writer
Reading poetry calls for an active reader. The reader must imaginatively collaborate with a poem to give voice to it."
edwardhirsch  poems  poetry  classideas  tutorials  howto  literature  words  meaning  meaningmaking  language 
april 2018 by robertogreco
BBC Blogs - Academy - How to improve your mojo skills by sacrificing a latte
"A journalist using only the pre-installed apps on their smartphone is like someone driving a Ferrari in first gear. At the risk of stretching the metaphor to breaking point, you can get your phone purring along in fifth with the addition of just a few well-chosen apps. But you’ll have to buy them – yes, by spending actual money.

Before I highlight some of my personal favourites and explain how they could improve your mojo (mobile journalism) output, here’s a quick question: how often do you buy a coffee during the day? Perhaps once on the way to work to get yourself going and again later to counter that mid-afternoon slump? Anecdotally from my face-to-face training for the BBC Academy, many people don't think twice about spending £3 for a triple decaf caramel dry latte (extra nutmeg) once or twice a day.

Yet ask those same people when they last spent a comparable sum on an app to soup up their smartphones and I find that it’s rarely within the last month. More often it is "never".

But if the money on just one coffee a week went instead towards an app, within a few months that smartphone would have acquired new powers (and you might even have lost a few pounds from your waistline).

The apps I’m writing about here are established favourites within the growing global mojo community - that is, producers and reporters who cover news stories and create related content using just their smartphones plus a few gadgets and gizmos like a tripod, a lens, a microphone and a spare battery.

You can also find an entire level of high end apps which stray more into cinematography than video for news and journalism, but I won't be dealing with those here."
smartphones  phones  mobile  journalism  reporting  applications  ios  iphone  video  audio  howto  tutorials  cinematography  editing  onlinetoolkit 
february 2018 by robertogreco
The Challenge of a Straight Line - YouTube
"Explore key methods Concrete Artists in Brazil and Argentina used to create perfectly straight edges in paint. This video is one of three that accompanied the “Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros” (September 16, 2017 – February 11, 2018) at the Getty Museum. For more information visit https://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/cisneros/ "
art  drawing  technique  lines  classideas  arthistory  brasil  brazil  argentina  patriciaphelpsdecisneros  hermelindofiaminghi  raúllozza  juanmelé  rhodrothfuss  willysdecastro  craft  howto  tutorials  research  tape  2017 
february 2018 by robertogreco
On Seeking Unschooling Advice | A Muddy Life
"I love to write about and share how my children learn without school here on the blog. And I feel it’s important to share not just the abundance of good stuff and the leaps and bounds of learning, but also to show the underbelly: the doubts, insecurities and fears around taking risks or being judged.

But if I could give one piece of advice to parents just setting out on their own unschooling journey with their children it would be this:

Don’t seek too much advice.

I know that sounds paradoxical, but here’s the thing: you are unique. Your children are unique. Your life together is unique. And because of all that individuality and rich diversity, the what, when, why, where and how you and your children live and learn will be innately different. If you trust yourself as a parent to offer gentle guidance and support without interference (and that’s a tall order in and of itself) and if you then extend that trust to your children to be curious and inquisitive, you’re half way there. The other half of the journey will unfold in glorious and magical layers and sometimes very ordinary ways, if we just let it happen naturally.

Insecurities and doubts about how our children will learn without someone teaching them are normal. We’ve been conditioned to believe it’s neither possible nor socially acceptable. We fear giving our children freedom because most of us have been well trained ourselves to stay within the confines of societal rules and regulations. We are led to believe that offering our children autonomy means giving up any sense of structure, or that we may even be putting them in harm’s way. Society tells us that following, obeying, and perpetuating rules and paradigms we don’t necessarily believe in are all part of being a good citizen, and dare I say, A Good Parent.

Those same parameters and restrictions are sometimes seen in online unschooling communities. Many believe if we follow certain rules and can check off certain criteria, we are being “good” unschoolers. Stray from those norms, and you’ve wandered off into a sub strait or separate faction that needs yet another label. These likenesses form out of a need to belong, to do things the “right” way, to fit in and yes, even to comform to expectations about how we parent, guide our children in their learning, and help them explore their world. It’s human nature to want to learn from others, to seek support when we feel uncertain, even to rely on those with more experience to guide us. There is often great comfort in knowing that we are not alone in our doubts, that others have trudged through the obstacles and survived. It’s affirming to be inspired by real examples of unschooled children who have conquered criticism and surmounted physical or developmental obstacles, to be bolstered by stories of children who come to reading and writing later in life, children who don’t seem interested in anything or anyone, until one day, when everyone seems to have given up on them, they are moved by interest or curiosity or some great unknown force within themselves and cannot, for any reason, be torn away from the object of their intent. There is always relief when we recognize our children or ourselves in these stories and we let out a sigh of relief. Phew! I feel so much better.

But there is a difference between asking for comfort, support, suggestions and reassurance and receiving it in a non-judgemental and constructive way, and taking too much advice from those we deem experts. Particularly if that advice goes against our instincts and better judgement. Many in the unschooling world would argue with me, but I am a firm believer that there is no such thing as an unschooling “how to.” Of course, we need to offer examples about what unschooling is and what it isn’t as a way to explain it. It needs to be called something so that we can refer to it, talk about it, write about it. But can we really assign it a global definition? And do we need to?

If we boil it down to it’s essence, unschooling is really just living, fully and freely. If the institution of school had never existed, society would not have collapsed. Learning would not have died off. And certainly, we would be more intriquitely woven together–as families, communities, as a society, and probably as a world filled with different and unique individuals, each contributing, each respected.

It’s wonderful to ask for and receive loving support. Ask for suggestions, but don’t follow anyone else’s path. Seek advice, but know that it’s okay to sift through it and toss out what doesn’t work. Look to those with more experience, but don’t try to replicate. Try things. Weigh them. Discard. Be inspired. Let in what resonates. Fail. Succeed. Try again. Follow your children, follow your instincts. And listen to yourself. Trust. And never let anyone tell you you’re doing it wrong. Your unschooling is not my unschooling. Or anybody else’s. And that’s exactly how it should be."
unschooling  advice  education  learning  individuality  parenting  deschooling  multitudes  2018  ellenrowland  homeschool  howto 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Machine Project
"Download
Machine Project Guide to Curating and Planning Events
This tool kit covers the basic ideas, philosophies, and techniques for event-based programming. It's for anyone interested in producing events as a form of cultural programming. It's for anyone who wants to make something exciting happen with other people but isn't sure where to start.

Download
Machine Project Guide to Workshops
This tool kit covers the basic ideas, philosophies, and techniques for workshop-based programming.

Download
Machine Project Guide to Starting Your Own Art Space
This tool kit is for anyone who is considering starting an arts or cultural organization. We will guide you through the ins and outs of conceptualizing, setting up, and running your organization."

[via: "Oh nice—Machine Project has published free downloadable toolkit’s for starting your own art space, curating events, etc. nice way to end their terrific 15-year run:"
https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/956683123730808834 ]
machineproject  via:ablerism  curation  lcproject  openstudioproject  workshops  howto  tutorials  events 
january 2018 by robertogreco
The Beginner's Guide to Community Building
"A roundup of links and guides for thinking about and building communities online."
community  communitybuilding  howto  online  web  internet  tomcritchlow 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Erase All Kittens - A game that inspires girls to code by Erase All Kittens — Kickstarter
"An epic adventure game that inspires girls to code and teaches them professional coding languages."



"Girls need to learn digital skills!

The vast majority of girls say that learning digital skills is ‘too difficult’, 'boring' or ‘more for boys’.

Since 65% of school children will be in jobs that have yet to be created - most likely involving tech skills - this is a massive, and growing issue for the economies of the future...

We need to do more to inspire girls to code, if don't want them to get left behind.

A new way to learn

We want to take on this problem, so we decided to create an epic Mario-style adventure game to make learning to code easy and fun.

Erase All Kittens teaches professional languages via quirky characters and an original storyline, centred around saving kittens in a fantasy internet universe."



"How it works

We carried out eighteen months of research, interviewing hundreds of students aged 8-13 and immersing ourselves in their culture, to discover the best ways to teach young children - especially girls - digital skills.

As a result, we spent over two years developing a code education tool which is first and foremost a game - where the educational elements are woven into the core fabric of high quality gameplay, rather than a few gaming features or characters being bolted on at the end.

In Erase All Kittens, players build and fix real levels using practical coding skills to save the Earth's kittens (displayed as kitten gifs) which have been captured in the internet universe.

Our prototype teaches basic HTML and how to create links, through Mario-style gameplay and interactive dialogue with strange and fantastical creatures - such as Tarquin Glitterquiff, a half-unicorn, half-mermaid serial entrepreneur, and Boris J. Buttstacks, the self-appointed mayor of PonyHead Bay."
girls  coding  games  gaming  videogames  programming  howto  education 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Zoom H1 Tutorial - YouTube
"Audio settings:
- WAV
- 48/16
- Auto level OFF
- Lo cut OFF"
zoomh1  howto  audio  recording  2013 
september 2017 by robertogreco
How a (nearly) zero-carbon conference can be a better conference | University of California
"A conference wrapped up recently at UC Santa Barbara, but this was not a typical academic conference. There was no mess to clean up at the end: no coffee-stained tablecloths and muffin crumbs. The attendees were from campuses all across California, but no one had to rush to catch a flight home. The cost of the conference: essentially free. The carbon footprint of the conference: nearly zero.

John Foran, professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies at UC Santa Barbara, was part of the team that put on the recent UC-CSU Knowledge Action Network Conference as part of UC’s Carbon Neutrality Initiative.

Given the topic of the conference — developing resources for teaching sustainability, climate change, climate justice and climate neutrality to all California students from kindergarten through college — the idea of having people fly in, and contribute greenhouse gases in the process, seemed sadly ironic, if not "morally bankrupt," in Foran's words.

In fact, air travel to conferences, talks and meetings accounts for about a third of the carbon footprint for a typical university. For many professors who travel to multiple conferences and meetings per year, air travel can easily make up over half of their annual carbon footprint.

“Knowing what we know now, it’s just not responsible to fly to conferences all over the world,” said Foran.

For universities concerned about trying to reduce — or even eliminate — their carbon footprints, the problem of air travel is especially acute. Both the carbon footprint and the cost of air travel and honoraria have pushed many institutions to support virtual meetings, but traditional teleconferencing has proved a largely unsatisfying alternative. Dropped connections, inadequate bandwidth and other technological issues have made live video conferences a poor substitute for in-person attendance."

[See also: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2016/016796/more-conference-less-carbon ]

[See also: http://ehc.english.ucsb.edu/?page_id=16797/

"UC-CSU KAN Conference
a nearly carbon-neutral conference

Interested in staging a nearly carbon-neutral (NCN) conference? For the rationale behind this approach & details on how to coordinate such events, see our White Paper / Practical Guide.
[http://hiltner.english.ucsb.edu/index.php/ncnc-guide/ ]

“Building a UC/CSU Climate Knowledge Action Network”
Spring 2017 Nearly Carbon-Neutral Conference

The UC-CSU Knowledge Action Network
for
Transformative Climate and Sustainability Education and Action



Welcome!

We are delighted to host this virtual space and welcome you to our community – We’re all in for an adventure, if this goes as we hope! This conference opened on Monday, June 12, 2017, and we now invite all participants to please view and comment on the talks for the next three weeks! On Monday, July 3, the conference and the Q&A will close. After that, the website will remain open to the public and continue to invite participation in the building of this Knowledge Action Network.

Guiding Principles

We affirm the essential roles social scientists, humanists, educators, and arts and culture play in advancing transformative climate action. We affirm the roles of California faculty in supporting younger generations to act on climate and in reaching beyond the campus to engage various publics to accelerate the shifts. We affirm the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goal 4.7: “To ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.”

Purpose

Over the course of the 2016-17 academic year, a network of 32 University of California and California State University teachers has been building a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) around issues of teaching sustainability, climate change, climate justice, and climate neutrality to all California students, from kindergarten to the graduate university level.

The purpose of this knowledge action network is to begin to take the steps necessary to provide California educators a collaborative framework to facilitate highly integrative sustainability and climate education and action. The KAN will accelerate California educators’ abilities to offer climate neutrality, climate change, climate justice,[1] and sustainability education to all Californian students in ways that are culturally contextualized, responsive and sustaining, as well as actionable and relevant to their futures. The network will also enable California educators to engage across and beyond our educational institutions for transformative climate action over time.
Process

In the spring of 2017, we came together in four regional workshops, and spent one and a half days together at each site getting to know each other, identifying the current state of climate change and climate justice education in California, envisioning what we hope to see in the future, and then beginning to identify ways to get there. In doing so, we explored the facilitation process of “emergent strategy,” based on the book by Adrienne Maree Brown, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds.

The present “nearly carbon-neutral conference” is the next step in that process. Each participant was asked to make a video of approximately fifteen minutes on one of the following themes:

Option 1:

What is one of your best practices in teaching climate change, climate justice, carbon neutrality/greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and/or sustainability in a culturally responsive and sustaining way?

What makes it work?

How does/can it scale?

[If appropriate] What obstacles and barriers have you encountered? Where are you stuck? What would you need to go forward?

Option 2:

What vision, proposal, or idea do you have for achieving the goals of the KAN in teaching climate change, climate justice, carbon neutrality/greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and/or sustainability in a culturally responsive and sustaining way?

What is exciting about it?

How does/can it scale?

[If appropriate] What obstacles and barriers have you already or might you encounter? Where are you stuck? What would you need or what would need to happen to make it a reality?

Format

This conference was unusual because of its format, as we took a digital approach. Because the conference talks and Q&A sessions reside on this website (the talks are prerecorded; the Q&As interactive), travel was unnecessary. By 2050, the aviation sector could consume as much as 27% of the global carbon budget (more). We need to immediately take steps to keep this from happening. This conference approach, which completely eschews flying, is one such effort (more).

Website

UCSB’s Environmental Humanities Initiative (EHI) is hosting this conference on the EHI website. While here, please feel free to explore the EHI site, perhaps starting with our Intro and Home pages."]
conferences  carbonneutrality  events  planning  2017  johnforan  virtual  environment  sustainability  teaching  pedagogy  sfsh  airtravel  climatechange  climate  climatejustice  climateneutrality  carbonfootprint  kenhiltner  internet  web  online  access  accesibility  community  howto  ucsb  highered  education  highereducation  academia 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Stephanie Hurlburt on Twitter: "A bunch of people are asking what resources I recommend to start learning graphics programming. So you get a thread on it!"
"A bunch of people are asking what resources I recommend to start learning graphics programming. So you get a thread on it!

I really enjoy giving beginner-level workshops. Here are two that focus on graphics:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1yJSQy4QtcQxcMjr9Wj6kjMd2R1BLNA1mUebDtnaXDL8/edit
https://www.slideshare.net/StephanieHurlburt/graphics-programming-workshop

If you're a graphics coder reading this wondering how you can host a workshop too, I've written about that:
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/11/1/guide-to-running-technology-workshops

I also wrote my own little writeup on graphics, notes from when Rich & I were helping Sophia learn graphics.
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/10/28/casual-introduction-to-low-level-graphics-programming

One more graphics workshop-- this one includes a raytracing and particle demo for you to play with.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1d0StEQMEdz4JUEHXfTPbwKIGYex2p5Mko1Rj66e5M80/edit

I love @baldurk 's blog series, "Graphics in Plain Language" https://renderdoc.org/blog/Graphics-in-Plain-Language/

For those ready to wade into advanced waters, "A trip through the graphics pipeline" by @rygorous is great
https://fgiesen.wordpress.com/2011/07/09/a-trip-through-the-graphics-pipeline-2011-index/

This online book is just an amazing introduction to shaders, by @patriciogv and @_jenlowe_ https://thebookofshaders.com/

Prepare yourself for a monster list of graphics resources on this site! My favorite is the SIGGRAPH papers. http://kesen.realtimerendering.com/

I'm a big fan of Cinder and OpenFramworks, both C++/graphics. They are what I started from.
https://libcinder.org/docs/guides/opengl/index.html
http://openframeworks.cc/learning/

BGFX is also great!
https://github.com/bkaradzic/bgfx

For a more beginner friendly library, Processing is simply lovely. https://processing.org/tutorials/

Shaders! GLSLSandbox is more beginner-friendly, Shadertoy if you want to see some crazy shit
http://glslsandbox.com/
https://www.shadertoy.com/

Can't go without mentioning @CasualEffects 's Graphics Codex-- excellent and comprehensive graphics resource. http://graphicscodex.com/

I stand by this advice on how to approach learning graphics programming.
[image with screenshot of chat]

Since we're now on the topic of getting jobs, do mock interviews and get mentors and talk to people. https://twitter.com/sehurlburt/status/872919452718727168 ["Attn coders who struggle w these, or jr coders:

It is your homework to set up a mock interview w one of these folks"]

My mentor list is FULL of graphics programmers. They all love helping you. I do need to update it with more.
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/11/14/list-of-engineers-willing-to-mentor-you

People ask me about learning math and I point them to @EricLengyel 's book
https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Game-Engine-Development-Mathematics/dp/0985811749/

GPU Performance for Game Artists by @keithoconor
http://fragmentbuffer.com/gpu-performance-for-game-artists/

There are more resources I didn't mention. Check out the last two slides of this https://www.slideshare.net/StephanieHurlburt/graphics-programming-workshop , and http://www.realtimerendering.com

This is a good little collection of resources on advanced GPU optimization and documentation.
https://github.com/g-truc/sdk/tree/master/documentation/hardware/amd/Southern%20Islands

Destiny's Multithreaded Rendering Architecture by @mirror2mask
http://www.gdcvault.com/play/1021926/Destiny-s-Multithreaded-Rendering

An important point: The vast majority of graphics coders I know don't know math very well. Don't be scared away if you aren't a math person.

I say this as someone who adores math, was expecting to use it all the time, & only ever needed basic linear algebra for my graphics work.

Someone made a Slack chat for graphics programming learning/development! Both experienced folks + newbies welcome. https://twitter.com/iFeliLM/status/884801828696805377 ["Great idea. We have a Slack group here:

Invite link here: https://join.slack.com/gfxprogramming/shared_invite/MjExMTIxOTc4NjkwLTE0OTk3ODgxNDYtYTRkNzQ2OGIxOQ "]"
graphics  programming  howto  tutorials  stephaniehurlburt  via:datatelling  math  mathematics  coding 
july 2017 by robertogreco
10 ways to have a better conversation
"Celeste Headlee is an expert in talking to people. As part of her job as a public radio host and interviewer, she talks to hundreds of people each year, teasing from her guests what makes them interesting. At a TEDx conference two years ago, Headlee shared 10 tips for having a better conversations that work for anyone:

1. Don’t multitask.
2. Don’t pontificate.
3. Use open-ended questions.
4. Go with the flow.
5. If you don’t know, say that you don’t know.
6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs.
7. Try not to repeat yourself.
8. Stay out of the weeds.
9. Listen.
10. Be brief.

Watch the video for the explanations of each point. I’m pretty good on 1, 5, & 7 while I struggle with 3, 4, and sometimes 6. 9 is a constant struggle and depends on how much I’ve talked with other people recently."
conversation  classideas  listening  howto  tutorials  celesteheadlee  multitasking  pontification  questionasking  questioning  flow  notknowing  uncertainty  experience  repetition  brevity 
june 2017 by robertogreco
5 Instagram Lessons from Magnum Photographers • Magnum Photos
"As part of an ongoing pursuit of delving into the practices of Magnum photographers, Magnum has asked David Alan Harvey, Christopher Anderson and Matt Stuart to share their views on using Instagram, the ubiquitous social media app that has far reaching implications for photographers. Here, we present five things to consider for emerging and professional photographers who use the app."
instagram  photography  howto  tips  2017  davidalanharvey  christopheranderson  mattstuart  magnumphotos 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Cheap Bots, Done Quick!
"This site will help you make a Twitterbot! They're easy to make and free to run.

To use it, create a Twitter account for your bot to run under and then sign in below. The bots are written in Tracery, a tool for writing generative grammars developed by Kate Compton. This site is run by George Buckenham - he can be contacted at vtwentyone@gmail.com. "
twitter  bots  twitterbots  howto  tutorials  georgebuckenham 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Listening to Jupiter on a DIY Radio | Hackaday
"By Jove, he built a radio!

If you want to get started with radio astronomy, Jupiter is one of the easiest celestial objects to hear from Earth. [Vasily Ivanenko] wanted to listen, and decided to build a modular radio receiver for the task. So far he’s written up six of the eight planned blog posts.

The system uses an LNA, a direct conversion receiver block, and provides audio output to a speaker, output to a PC soundcard, and a processed connection for an analog to digital converter. The modules are well-documented and would be moderately challenging to reproduce.

NASA maintains a list of receivers suitable for Jovian listening, although you can use basically any receiver that covers the right frequency band. If you want to hear what the giant planet sounds like, check out the video, below.

If you are interested in a cheap way to listen to some of our other cosmic neighbors, you might think about converting a satellite dish. Or, you can try something smaller."
audio  jupiter  planets  space  radio  howto  classideas  astronomy 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Surveillance Self-Defense | Tips, Tools and How-tos for Safer Online Communications
"Modern technology has given those in power new abilities to eavesdrop and collect data on innocent people. Surveillance Self-Defense is EFF's guide to defending yourself and your friends from surveillance by using secure technology and developing careful practices.

Select an article from our index to learn about a tool or issue, or check out one of our playlists to take a guided tour through a new set of skills."

[See also:

"Worried about the NSA under Trump? Here's how to protect yourself: We don’t yet know Trump’s surveillance plans, but follow these guidelines if you think it’s better to be safe than sorry"
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/nov/10/nsa-trump-protect-yourself

"Surveillance Self-Defense Against the Trump Administration"
https://theintercept.com/2016/11/12/surveillance-self-defense-against-the-trump-administration/

"A 70-Day Web Security Action Plan for Artists and Activists Under Siege"
https://medium.com/@TeacherC/90dayactionplan-ff86b1de6acb

"Surveillance and inaction"
https://phiffer.org/writing/surveillance-and-inaction/

CryptoParty
https://www.cryptoparty.in/

"Digital Security and Source Protection for Journalists – A Handbook"
http://susanemcgregor.com/digital-security/

"Don’t panic! Download “A First Look at Digital Security”"
https://www.accessnow.org/a-first-look-at-digital-security/

"Protecting Your Digital Life in 7 Easy Steps"
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/17/technology/personaltech/encryption-privacy.html

"The Source Guide to Defending Accounts Against Common Attacks"
https://source.opennews.org/en-US/guides/defending-accounts/ ]
eff  privacy  security  surveillance  howto  tutorials  technology  2016  nsa  onlinetoolkit  digital  internet  web  online 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Speak Up: Responding to Everyday Bigotry | Southern Poverty Law Center
"In this article

Responding to Everyday Bigotry
What Can I Do Among Family?
What Can I Do About Sibling Slurs?
What Can I Do About Joking In-Laws?
What Can I Do About Impressionable Children?
What Can I Do About Parental Attitudes?
What Can I Do About Stubborn Relatives?
What can I do about my own bias?
What Can I Do Among Friends And Neighbors?
What Can I Do About Sour Social Events?
What Can I Do About Casual Comments?
What Can I Do About Offended Guests?
What Can I Do About Real Estate Racism?
What Can I Do About Unwanted Email?
What Can I Do About My Own Bias?
What Can I Do At Work?
What Can I Do About Casual Comments
What Can I Do About Workplace Humor?
What Can I Do About Sexist Remarks?
What Can I Do About Meeting Missteps?
What Can I Do About Boss Bias?
What Can I Do About My Own Bias?
What Can I Do At School?
What Can I Do About Negative Remarks?
What Can I Do About Familial Exclusion?
What Can I Do About Biased Bullying?
What Can I Do About In-Group Bigotry
What Can I Do about A Teacher's Bias?
What Can I Do In Public?
What Can I Do About Biased Customer Service?
What Can I Do About Bigoted Corporate Policy?
What Can I Do About A Stranger's Remarks?
What Can I Do About Retail Racism?
What Can I Do About Racial Profiling?
What Can I Do About My Own Bias?
Six Steps to Speaking Up Against Everyday Bigotry"
racism  politics  bigotry  howto  splc  bias  2016  race 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Getting started with Raspberry Pi — PaulStamatiou.com
"What you can do with a tiny $35 computer and how I built a digital photo frame

In early 2012 an intriguing single-board computer with a weird name hit the market. For the low price of $35, you could get a fully functioning computer that could run a real operating system.

It was called the Raspberry Pi and it was the brainchild of a UK charity called the Raspberry Pi Foundation. They saw the need for an affordable computer after seeing a consistent drop in students applying to study computer science.

Well it turns out this tiny and cheap fully-functional computer had a much larger audience than anticipated. Multiple models have been created since, including the $5 Pi Zero, and over 9 million Raspberry Pis have been sold.

This is a long post so I more than likely made some errors along the way. Feel free to let me know on Twitter, thanks!"
raspberrypi  classideas  hacking  howto  paulstamatiou  tutorials  2016 
september 2016 by robertogreco
bubble103 on Scratch
[Specifically these projects:

"The Colour Divide - Trailer"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/70058680/

"Two | The Colour Divide"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/97663280/

"[Now out] A Colour Divide Q & A!"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/111996769/

"Vectoring Like A Pro #1"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/75539018/

"Vectoring Like A Pro #2"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/102075619/

"Ya Gotta ♥ Variables"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/80209136/ ]

[See also:

https://twitter.com/bubble103_

"Hi, I'm @bubble103's evil clone.
jk... this is my test account...

Follow my main account, @bubble103!
*currently not taking any voice acting requests*"
https://scratch.mit.edu/users/bubbie103/ ]

[via: Thursday Keynote
http://webcast.mit.edu/sum2016/scratch/1631/index-d1.html ]
scratch  vectors  tutorials  coding  drawing  illustration  howto  tarynbasel 
august 2016 by robertogreco
How to create your own 3D GIFs | The Daily Dot
"We're living in the age of 3D GIFs on Tumblr. These images, which use optical illusions to make visuals appear to pop out of the screen, have gotten to be so popular on the website that last year Tumblr's official year in review roundup devoted an entire category to them.

But even though they've been making the rounds on Tumblr for ages, 3D GIFs are only just now making their way into other parts of the Internet. Luckily for you, it's easy to impress other non-Tumblr users with their special magic: All you really need to make one is a few minutes and a copy of Photoshop."
via:sha  tumblr  3d  3dgifs  gifs  howto  photoshop 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Creating Groups – Hypothesis
"If you want to annotate privately with a group of hypothes.is users, then our groups feature is what you”ll want to use. Once you create a group, you can invite others to join it by sharing a special link. That link will also serve as the group home page with a list of members and texts annotated by the group. You can also link to a stream of annotations created by group members from the group home page.

NOTE: after linking to documents to be annotated form the group home page, users must 1) activate hypothes.is and 2) toggle the scope selector in the hypothes.is sidebar to the appropriate group from “public.”"
hypothes.is  annotation  groups  onlinetoolkit  howto  tutorials  via:tealtan 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Annotating PDFs Without URLs – Hypothesis
"For sometime now, you’ve been able to annotate PDFs using Hypothes.is, both on the web and locally, with hosted PDFs syncing with local instances and various local instances syncing with each other. Jon Udell wrote about this magical feature here over a year go.

[video]

For those that tried it out, however, there was one annoying snag, especially if you were trying to lead a large group (of students, say) through the process: users had to create an annotation on a local PDF before they would be able to view any pre-existing annotations created elsewhere–in other local instances or where originally hosted. (The same would happen for identical PDFs hosted at two distinct URLs.)

So it was possible to be sent a PDF that had supposedly been annotated, open it, activate Hypothes.is and not see any annotations. Even if you knew about the need to create an annotation to view annotations, you were entering that conversation blindly or else creating a dummy annotation to be deleted later. This added step admittedly took away some of the “mind-blowingness” of annotating PDFs across multiple locations using Hypothes.is.

Now that step is no longer necessary.

What’s changed?

We used to use the URL as the primary identifier of PDFs. That’s what the Hypothes.is client would search for in the database to anchor annotations on a page. Now we use the digital fingerprint that is baked into PDFs from their generation as part of the spec for the format. We did use this fingerprint previously as a secondary identifier to map local PDFs to hosted ones or PDFs hosted at different URLs to each other, which is what caused the lag between new annotation creation and appearance of pre-existing annotations. This shift from URL to PDF fingerprint will truly enhance the portability of annotations on the format across the web.

For example, if the same scholarly journal article is housed at two different repositories, annotations created at either location will show up at the other (assuming both PDFs have the same fingerprint, an assumption that is not always the case). Public annotations created on a local version of the same PDF will also be immediately viewable. If I annotate an essay at a permanent URL on JSTOR, then download the article and share it via email, or host it on my own WordPress site, my annotations will anchor through all incarnations of that PDF."
via:tealtan  hypothes.is  pdfs  annotation  howto  tutorials  pdf 
july 2016 by robertogreco
adaptive1 | Learning Library
"The Adaptive Design Association abides by the “open source” philosophy of design and fabrication. This does not mean that we simply offer our techniques and processes free of charge, but that we share them with a community who can build and expand upon what we teach. We hope that you -- whether you be a student, teacher, parent, designer, or therapist -- will in turn share your own concepts and designs with us, so that we may grow together.

Our community blog and forum is a platform for individuals to share adaptive design techniques, problems, and solutions with each other from all over the world -- and we encourage you to follow and join the conversation here.

The Adaptive Design Association also embraces a non-proprietary stance with our designs. Our work is not about the item -- but about the child -- and about children in every school or home whose environments might not be built for them.

When we focus on ownership, we delay in building -- and ultimately hinder a child from reaching their full potential. So please Take, Build, Improve, and Expand upon the things you see here -- but understand not only what you are doing -- but for whom -- and do so safely and collaboratively with others."
diy  howto  cardboard  via:ablerism  tutorials  opensource  classideas  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  adaptivedesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Star Simpson on Twitter: "This technique has proved crucial for plowing through my Kindle book collection: https://t.co/bi9PgqFUOo"
"This technique has proved crucial for plowing through my Kindle book collection: https://twitter.com/starsandrobots/status/702898887183482880 [screenshots of iOS settings]"

Rest of thread:

"People have told me audiobooks don't work for them because your mind wanders from the voice. That's okay! It's actually a feature .."
https://twitter.com/starsandrobots/status/754751162545426432

"The mind is excellent at picking features for compression, and many books have occasional uninteresting stretches. Let the mind wander."
https://twitter.com/starsandrobots/status/754751295882268672

"Your mind will return, and you will continue to absorb the interesting parts. This is something that's much harder to do with print books."
https://twitter.com/starsandrobots/status/754751463482466304

"People have asked me "when do you listen to audiobooks?" — literally anytime."
https://twitter.com/starsandrobots/status/754751674997051394

"If you have a 2 minute walk somewhere, you can clear a decent section of a chapter. You find all kinds of time can be spent "reading" audio"
https://twitter.com/starsandrobots/status/754751824855379968 ]
reading  audiobooks  howweread  workflow  starsimpson  2016  howto 
july 2016 by robertogreco
One voice, many hands — Several People Are Typing — The Official Slack Blog
"First, you need to know what voice you’re using. There’s a difference between creating a voice from scratch and building on one that already exists — and we’ll get to the difference between a constructed or a nourished brand voice in a later piece — but once you know your voice, you have to break it down again in order to work out how to scale it.

Starting with the what

When we first started approaching this problem at Slack, we tried to do it from a logistical, logical, mechanical point of view. We started making lists of words and phrases that sound like things we’d say.

Or, more often, lists of things we’d never say. It’s always easier to identify what you don’t want your voice to sound like than what you do. “We should never sound like this,” you say, reading a densely packed jargon-filled piece of marketing copy from a long-defunct service. “We mustn’t ever use this word. Or this phrase. Or… here: I’ll just make a list.”

Thing is, while it’s easy to identify the negative traits, it creates a gaping void for anyone who isn’t inside the mind of the holder of that voice. Anyone who comes to write for you steps off the huge cliff of “not like this” into an empty space. What DO you sound like, then?

A great first step, as used in many style guides (and guides to styling style guides) is the “this but not that” list.

From our style guide, for example:
We are:
Confident (never cocky)
Witty (but not silly)
Informal (but never too informal)
Intelligent (and always treat our users as intelligent, too)
Friendly (but not ingratiating)
Helpful (never overbearing)
Clear, concise and human.

We are characterful
But we never let character overwhelm content. What we have to say is infinitely more important than being admired for the way in which we say it. If people can’t see the substance for the style, we’ve gone wrong.

But having that basic sense of the personality of the company, or the brand, doesn’t mean that people can necessarily step into and out of it when they need to write something.

If people are still relying on checking the lists of things they sound like against things they shouldn’t, they tend to get bound up and overthink. The words are all there, but the feeling behind them is lacking. They’re trying to sound a certain way, but it doesn’t feel clear how or why they’re wanting to sound that way.

Never mind the what — start with the why

Our training in writing at Slack has shifted over time, then, from using the solid ‘examples and end results’ to encouraging people to tap into the feelings behind them.

We’re working on getting people to think of writing — of using the “Slack voice” — as merely using their own voice, but using shared characteristics or values to approach whatever it is they’re about to write. And how do you get into that brain? We use a few of our company values to help focus on how it is we sound. Simple: just ask a few questions, and consider a few things.

Empathy

Whatever someone is about to write, we encourage people to think about the person they’re writing it for. To give them a face, and a name. If it helps to think of someone you know, do that. If it helps to think of an appropriate emoji face that sums it up, why not? Ask yourself:

• What is the reader feeling? Where have we found them?
• Are they angry? Confused? Curious? Excited?
• How often might they see this bit of writing? How would it read after the 20th time?
• How do I want them to feel at the end? How can I help get them there?

Courtesy

Being courteous is about being respectful, but not over-polite. Adding 12 extra pleases and thanks, or a paragraph telling people what you’re about to say in the next paragraph is less courteous than simply telling people what they need to know and then getting out of their way.

• How does this help the person I’m talking to?
• What’s the very essence of what they need to take from this? How quickly can they get to it?
• Do I need to speak at all? Is this something a person will work out by themselves?

Think about what you need to say in advance. Work through all the questions people may have, and answer them. Then delete anything that is extraneous or confusing information.

Craftsmanship

The stuff you put out into the world speaks volumes to people about every other part of whatever you make. You’re representing all your colleagues, your team, all the people that don’t get seen, whatever you type. So being precise about the quality of the work will speak volumes about all the work that people can’t see.

• Can this be tighter? Can I lose the first paragraph?
• Who can give me a second opinion, or a second pair of eyes?
• When I read it out loud, does it make me stumble? Can I rewrite it so that it doesn’t?

Playfulness

At Slack, playfulness is not about the number of emoji you can use, or whimsy or … whatever. It’s about being in a playful stance: being in the spirit of the game, having an open mind, looking at the world sideways or surpassing expectations.

• What does this usually sound like?
• What different angle can I look at this from? How can I approach this differently?
• What word or phrase can I throw in there that will make someone smile?
• What do I need to do to meet expectations? What can I do to surpass them?
• How can I use this opportunity to make someone’s day a little more pleasant?

We tend think of our voice, in addition to being an external representation of the people behind it, as part of the product. And because of that, we aren’t necessarily making rules about what to say or what not to say. We’re trying to find the right traits to tap into, trying to open up the space so people can sound like themselves — because, if they work here, sounding like themselves is sounding like Slack — but come at it from a position of shared characteristics. It’s less about mechanics — more about a sensibility. Of course, even if you’re working from inside out like this, you still need rules (and more of that anon). But working this way means we can be a little more flexible, a little more able to stretch and grow, and be, in general, a little more liberal with our words.

Because we’re hippies.

Not really. It’s because, so far, it actually seems to be (mainly) working."
sfsh  content  contentstrategy  voice  slack  writing  howto  tutorials  organizations  webdev  communication  webdesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
You’re probably using the wrong dictionary « the jsomers.net blog
"The way I thought you used a dictionary was that you looked up words you’ve never heard of, or whose sense you’re unsure of. You would never look up an ordinary word — like example, or sport, or magic — because all you’ll learn is what it means, and that you already know.

Indeed, if you look up those particular words in the dictionary that comes with your computer — on my Mac, it’s the New Oxford American Dictionary, 3rd Edition — you’ll be rewarded with… well, there won’t be any reward. The entries are pedestrian:

example /igˈzampəl/, n. a thing characteristic of its kind or illustrating a general rule.

sport /spôrt/, n. an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment.

magic /ˈmajik/, n. the power of apparently influencing the course of events by using mysterious or supernatural forces.

Here, words are boiled to their essence. But that essence is dry, functional, almost bureaucratically sapped of color or pop, like high modernist architecture. Which trains you to think of the dictionary as a utility, not a quarry of good things, not a place you’d go to explore and savor.

Worse, the words themselves take on the character of their definitions: they are likewise reduced. A delightful word like “fustian” — delightful because of what it means, because of the way it looks and sounds, because it is unusual in regular speech but not so effete as to be unusable, is described, efficiently, as “pompous or pretentious speech or writing.” Not only is this definition (as we’ll see in a minute) simplistic and basically wrong, it’s just not in the same class, English-wise, as “fustian.” The language is tin-eared and uninspired. It’s criminal: This is the place where all the words live and the writing’s no good.

The New Oxford American dictionary, by the way, is not like singularly bad. Google’s dictionary, the modern Merriam-Webster, the dictionary at dictionary.com: they’re all like this. They’re all a chore to read. There’s no play, no delight in the language. The definitions are these desiccated little husks of technocratic meaningese, as if a word were no more than its coordinates in semantic space."



"A book where you can enter “sport” and end up with “a diversion of the field” — this is in fact the opposite of what I’d known a dictionary to be. This is a book that transmutes plain words into language that’s finer and more vivid and sometimes more rare. No wonder McPhee wrote with it by his side. No wonder he looked up words he knew, versus words he didn’t, in a ratio of “at least ninety-nine to one.”

Unfortunately, he never comes out and says exactly which dictionary he’s getting all this juice out of. But I was desperate to find it. What was this secret book, this dictionary so rich and alive that one of my favorite writers was using it to make heroic improvements to his writing?

I did a little sleuthing. It wasn’t so hard with the examples McPhee gives, and Google. He says, for instance, that in three years of research for a book about Alaska he’d forgotten to look up the word Arctic. He said that his dictionary gave him this: “Pertaining to, or situated under, the northern constellation called the Bear.”

And that turned out to be enough to find it."



"Who decided that the American public couldn’t handle “a soft and fitful luster”? I can’t help but think something has been lost. “A soft sparkle from a wet or oily surface” doesn’t just sound worse, it actually describes the phenomenon with less precision. In particular it misses the shimmeriness, the micro movement and action, “the fitful luster,” of, for example, an eye full of tears — which is by the way far more intense and interesting an image than “a wet sidewalk.”

It’s as if someone decided that dictionaries these days had to sound like they were written by a Xerox machine, not a person, certainly not a person with a poet’s ear, a man capable of high and mighty English, who set out to write the secular American equivalent of the King James Bible and pulled it off."

Words worth using
I don’t want you to conclude that it’s just a matter of aesthetics. Yes, Webster’s definitions are prettier. But they are also better. In fact they’re so much better that to use another dictionary is to keep yourself forever at arm’s length from the actual language.

Recall that the New Oxford, for the word “fustian,” gives “pompous or pretentious speech or writing.” I said earlier that that wasn’t even really correct. Here, then, is Webster’s definition: “An inflated style of writing; a kind of writing in which high-sounding words are used, above the dignity of the thoughts or subject; bombast.” Do you see the difference? What makes fustian fustian is not just that the language is pompous — it’s that this pomposity is above the dignity of the thoughts or subject. It’s using fancy language where fancy language isn’t called for.

It’s a subtle difference, but that’s the whole point: English is an awfully subtle instrument. A dictionary that ignores these little shades is dangerous; in fact in those cases it’s worse than useless. It’s misleading, deflating. It divests those words of their worth and purpose.

Take “pathos.” This is one of those words I used to keep looking up because I kept forgetting what it meant — and every time I’d go to the dictionary I would get this terse, limiting definition: “a quality that evokes pity or sadness.” Not much there to grab a hold of. I’d wonder, Is that really all there is to pathos? It had always seemed a grander word than that. But this was the dictionary, and whatever it declared was final.

Final, that is, until I discovered Webster:

pathos /ˈpāˌTHäs/, n. 1. The quality or character of those emotions, traits, or experiences which are personal, and therefore restricted and evanescent; transitory and idiosyncratic dispositions or feelings as distinguished from those which are universal and deep-seated in character; — opposed to ethos.

It continued. 2. That quality or property of anything which touches the feelings or excites emotions and passions, esp., that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; as, the pathos of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry.

Dear god! How did I not know about this dictionary? How could you even call yourself a dictionary if all you give for “pathos” is “a quality that evokes pity or sadness”? Webster’s definition is so much fuller, so much closer to felt experience.

Notice, too, how much less certain the Webster definition seems about itself, even though it’s more complete — as if to remind you that the word came first, that the word isn’t defined by its definition here, in this humble dictionary, that definitions grasp, tentatively, at words, but that what words really are is this haze and halo of associations and evocations, a little networked cloud of uses and contexts.

What I mean is that with its blunt authority the New Oxford definition of “pathos” — “a quality that evokes pity or sadness” — shuts down the conversation, it shuts down your thinking about the word, while the Webster’s version gets your wheels turning: it seems so much more provisional — “that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; as, the pathos of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry” — and therefore alive.

Most important, it describes a word worth using: a mere six letters that have come to stand for something huge, for a complex meta-emotion with mythic roots. Such is the power of actual English."



"There’s an amazing thing that happens when you start using the right dictionary. Knowing that it’s there for you, you start looking up more words, including words you already know. And you develop an affection for even those, the plainest most everyday words, because you see them treated with the same respect awarded to the rare ones, the high-sounding ones.

Which is to say you get a feeling about English that Calvin once got with his pet tiger on a day of fresh-fallen snow: “It’s a magical world, Hobbes. Let’s go exploring!”

Appendix: How to start using Webster’s 1913 dictionary on your Mac, iPhone, Android, and Kindle [continues with instructions]"
2014  dictionaries  language  words  english  writing  jamessomers  howto  noahwebster  history  etymology  johnmcphee  howwewrite  merriam-webster  srg  dictionary 
june 2016 by robertogreco
I need to find a public domain image of _______. How do I do that? | librarian.net
"Reference question of the day was about finding public domain images. Everyone’s got their go-tos. If I am looking for illustrations or old photos specifically I’ll often use other people’s searches on top of the Internet Archive’s content. Here’s a little how to."
search  howto  publicdomain  copyright  free  images  imagesearch  jessamynwest  2016 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Pragmatic Shopping — Medium
"I resented shopping until I got good at it. I got good at it by overthinking it. This is the story of how that happened and what I learned from it."
dianakimball  shopping  furniture  home  clothing  2016  howto  advice 
june 2016 by robertogreco
A Manager’s FAQ — The Startup — Medium
"How do I get employees to perform better? Tell them what they are doing well.

How do I give negative feedback? By being curious.

How do I decide what to delegate? Delegate the work you want to do.

How should I prioritize? Fix problems. Then prevent problems.

How should I grade employees? Don’t. Teach them to self-evaluate.

When do I fire somebody? When you know they can’t succeed.

How do I fire somebody? By apologizing for our failures.

Why can’t I just tell people what to do? Because the more responsibility you have, the less authority you have.

How do I know if I am a good manager? Employees ask you for advice.

How do I know if I have good management team? Shit rolls uphill.

***

[Each point elaborated upon like…]

How do I get employees to perform better?
Tell them what they are doing well.

Most managers attempt to minimize an employee’s bad work instead of maximizing their good work. When 98% of an employee’s work is great and 2% is not, managers give feedback on the 2%.

We do this because schools taught us to. Tests started with a maximum score of 100 and points were deducted for every wrong answer. If tests started at zero and awarded points for every correct answer, we would be encouraged to continue doing better. Instead, we learn to fear mistakes and point them out in others.

Startups start at zero and earn points along the way. We expand our strengths instead of minimize our weaknesses. There is no maximum score. Steady progress, not expected outcome, is the measuring stick.

Treat employees similarly. An employee has a finite amount of time. Doing more good work leaves less time for bad work. Double-down on what your employees do well.
It also creates a positive feedback loop. Reinforcing great work encourages more great work, which creates more reinforcement. When you try to correct bad work, the best you can hope for is to stop giving feedback.

Maximizing good work instead of minimizing bad work requires patience and confidence. Fight the urge to tell people to “do better.” Instead, tell employees when they do something well. It takes conscious effort to find these opportunities but with practice it becomes habit. And your people will be more effective for it.

[and…]

How do I decide what to delegate?
Delegate the work you want to do.

When I ask this question most managers respond with, “I delegated the call to Mary because she needs to learn how to handle an angry customer” or, “I delegated the report to John because he’s good at writing.”

It is funny how managers rationalize giving employees shitty work as a benefit to them. Mary’s manager delegated the call because he didn’t want to deal with the angry customer. John’s manager delegated the report because she didn’t want to write it.

Many managers treat their position as a privilege and delegating shitty work is one of the perks. They are lousy managers.

I can give you a simple rule to decide what to delegate. Delegate the work you want to do. There are reasons to do this:

1. Employees will love working for you. The work you want to do is probably the work they want to do, and they will be happy employees because of it.

2. You will train future leaders. They will see you doing the hard, miserable work that nobody wants to do. One day they will want to do it too. Not because they enjoy the work, but because they see you doing it as their leader, and they want to be leaders too.

3. You will grow. Most people want to do the work they are good at. If you delegate the work you are good at, the remainder will mostly be work you are bad at. You will struggle, suffer, and learn. That is where growth comes from.

To extend the eShares 101 sports analogy, hockey coaches talk about “skating to the hard parts of the ice.” This is the ice in front of the goal where defenders punish players. But this is where goals are scored, and those who suffer most score most. The best managers are always found on the hard parts of the ice.

[…and…]

How should I grade employees?
Don’t. Teach them to self-evaluate.

Employees often ask, “How am I doing?” I respond with, “How do you think you are doing?” Self-evaluation is the most important skill you can teach an employee. I am happy to offer my perspective, but only as feedback on theirs. They can evaluate themselves every day, minute, and second. I am lucky if I see their work once a week.

This may seem strange after years of receiving report cards and employee performance reviews. Companies (and schools) have convinced us we should be graded. It benefits the institution to do so. They can sort, rank, and filter employees. They can use it to decide who to fire and keep. They can set compensation against it. It is easer to manage employees as a distribution of scores rather than as unique individuals.

But employees gain nothing from it. It is selfish for us to reduce employees to a letter grade. Instead, we should become experts on our people’s strengths and weaknesses and help them become experts too.

We ask employees to have a ten-year career at eShares. If the only evaluation they come away with is a letter grade or employee rank, we have failed them as managers. They deserve more and the most valuable skill we can teach them is self-evaluation. They will carry that for the rest of their careers."
management  leadership  administration  howto  motivation  via:ableparris  tests  testing  grades  grading  howweteach  howwelearn  henryward  power  authority  evaluation  assessment 
june 2016 by robertogreco
How to reset your Chromebook: Powerwash it! | Android Central
"If you're going to sell your Chromebook, give it to someone or just want to switch accounts, you'll want to reset it and wipe away all your user settings and data. Much like your Android, this is pretty easy and doesn't need any fancy developer tools or voodoo magic. Just Powerwash it.

Before we get into it, let's talk about what Powerwashing actually does. When you wipe your account from your Chromebook with Powerwash, every single bit and byte of data connected with every account on the Chromebook's actual storage is gone. If you just want to get rid of a single user account (not the primary user, that requires a powerwash), you can do that by finding the profile picture at the login screen and clicking the arrow in the upper right to remove the user. That removes the data associated with that particular account, without erasing everything from other accounts.

When you Powerwash, nothing on an SD card or any external storage device is erased. But all the data — pictures, search history, passwords, credit card info and everything else — that's stored securely on the Chromebook's internal storage is erased. The data that's backed up to your Google account in the cloud is not erased. You'll need to visit your account settings via a web browser to do that. But the Chromebook itself is returned to a clean version of the OS, just as it would be if it were brand new."
chromebooks  howto 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Explore your world through field mapping with OpenStreetMap | Mapbox
"Now that you have started mapping the world on OpenStreetMap from the comfort of your chair, let’s see how to add addresses, street names, and amenities using first-hand observations with field mapping. Field mapping is a survey technique to capture the details of one’s physical surroundings. Let’s use a simple paper map to survey the location of a waste basket in a neighborhood.

Mapping tools

To get started, gather the following items:

• A printed map from field papers, or a notepad
• Pencil or pen
• Camera (optional)
• Fellow explorers (optional)

Begin your journey

Make sure you are in an area that is safe for field mapping. A residential neighborhood, shopping street or a park are all great places to start. Doing this as a group activity with friends makes it even more interesting to compare notes after you are done.

The general idea with field mapping is to collect the details of what you observe around you while navigating a space. Details could include anything that catches your attention: shops and street signs, public amenities like benches and ATMs, street information like cycle lanes and pedestrian crossings or important facilities like hospitals and police stations.

Here are some tips:

• When mapping in groups, make sure to divide the area to cover maximum ground.
• It helps to think about what you are interested in mapping to allow you to be more focused on the field.
• If you are taking photos or recording an audio narration, make sure to note the locations on a paper map or using a GPS.
• Above all else, enjoy your walk!

Mapping on paper

Pen and paper are the most convenient way to capture observations from the field. It is simple, low cost and helps build a stronger sense of space and distance. The important aspect of paper mapping is to maintain a consistent scale. To help maintain scale, you can print an existing map and use it as a reference to add missing details on top. A tool called field papers allows you to conveniently make a printable atlas for this purpose.

While field mapping:

• Always begin by marking your starting point on paper. This could be anything from a house address, a known landmark or a shop.
• To orient yourself, make sure to keep an eye out for navigational aids like street signs, building names and addresses.
• Use symbols to represent common features like a medical store or a post box that do not have a name. Specifically, note features that you wish to map.
• If you are using field papers, you can upload your scan and use it as a background in iD or JOSM to map the missing details on OpenStreetMap.

Once you have become comfortable with basic field mapping using a pen and paper, you can explore other tools for collecting data and mapping on OpenStreetMap.

Other tools for field mapping

Collecting data for field mapping can also be done by taking photographs and recording GPS traces. For example, you could:

• Capture crowdsourced street view imagery with your phone using Mapillary.
• Accurately record GPS locations and trails using apps like OSMTracker for Android or Pushpin for iOS.

For more mapping techniques take a look at the OpenStreetMap Wiki."
aarthychandrasekhar  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  fieldmapping  maps  mapping  exploration  2016  fieldpapers  howto  tutorials 
february 2016 by robertogreco
How to Read for Grad School | Miriam E. Sweeney
"In graduate school the work load increases and students will find that they are expected to master two to three times the material that they were used to as an undergraduate. This can be intimidating to the point of overwhelming a student into paralysis. Following these tips should help you master your readings instead of allowing the readings to master you!

1. Read Strategically, Not Linearly. Reading for graduate school is different than reading a book for pleasure. When we read for pleasure we often start at the beginning of the book, reading carefully in a linear fashion. If you do this with your academic material, it will take twice as long and it is likely you won’t retain the right kind of information from the reading. Instead of reading linearly, read strategically. As an academic reader your job is to mine the text you are reading for information. Instead of cruising along the narrative, you need to dive in, find the information you need, and move along to the next stack of readings for class.

If you are reading a book this means you should look over the table of contents, then read the entire introduction carefully. In academic books, the introduction is where the author states all of their main points, the framework they will use, and an outline of what information will be covered in each chapter. Next, look over the last chapter. This is the conclusion, which will restate the main arguments of the author and will often contextualize these arguments in a broader context, suggest next steps, or speculate solutions or alternatives. From here you can go to the parts of the book you want deeper knowledge about. Individual chapters will be laid out similarly to the book structure with an introduction, and middle and the conclusion. Skimming the beginning and end of the chapter will give you the main points, then you can gather evidence by browsing the middle parts of the chapter. Remember, you are not really expected to read every single word of the book; your mandate is to understand the author’s main ideas, arguments, and be able to articulate why this discussion matters.

If you are reading a journal article, start by checking the name of the journal that published the article. This will key you in to the scope and boundaries that the article is working within. Next, carefully read the title and the abstract of the piece. A good abstract should clearly explain the main argument of the article, the kind of evidence the author uses, and a succinct conclusion, or what the author found out. Armed with this information, look over the introduction to see how the author is framing their work, paying attention to the citations they use. This tells you who the author is trying to be in dialogue with. Next, flip to the discussion section. Sometimes this is separate than the conclusion, sometimes not, depending on the disciplinary standards of the author and journal. Read the discussion and conclusion carefully. These sections will explain the author’s main arguments and the “why you should care” piece. Now you can go back through the article armed with the knowledge of where the author is leading you and browse over methods and results sections. Pay attention particularly to images and data visualizations. Note how these things relate to or support the discussion and conclusion sections you read.

Reading strategically instead of linearly will make you a more efficient and effective academic reader. Getting familiar with how different formats of writing are structured will give you the confidence and control to find the information you need in them more efficiently.

2. Take Notes! As you are reading strategically, you absolutely must take notes simultaneously. Otherwise it is guaranteed you will not remember the kinds of details you need to recall in class, in your paper, in your own research down the road. Develop a system of your own whether it is sticking a post-it note in the book and jotting something down, or opening up RefWorks or Zotero, or Word and throwing some notes down as you read. Whatever you do, remember that future you will have NO IDEA what present you is thinking, no matter how brilliant a thought it is. Be specific, include detailed citations and pages numbers for direct quotes so you don’t have to chase them later.

If you are reading as preparation for a class, make sure you are also jotting down 3-5 questions, observations, or provocations that you can use in class for participation. In grad school, everyone is expected to participate on a high level, so have something to say ahead of time to avoid the high-blood pressure that comes from your professor’s cold, hard stare.

3. Be purposeful. Being purposeful in your readings means that as you are moving strategically through the text you are also being deliberate about what you want to glean from the reading, what are meant to glean, and how this fits with the other readings and conversations you have had in class, along with your own life experiences. Ask yourself, “What is the author trying to say? What is motivating her exploration of this topic? What does this research contribute? What academic conversations is the author trying to align with? What are the main arguments of this piece? How does this relate to my other assigned readings?” Going in with these questions in mind will focus you as you read and aid you in pulling out the most relevant information.

4. A Critical Perspective. Lastly, applying a critical perspective in your reading is helpful for situating a reading in broader contexts. Contrary to how it sounds, being critical does not simply mean being negative or criticizing wantonly. Critical perspectives are those that trace and name flows of power: Who has power and who does not? Who benefits from particular social arrangements, and whom do they marginalize? Critical perspectives also question assumptions and values that are implicit in arguments: What values are underlying this work? What experiences and perspectives do these values privilege? How might centering different values or experiences re-frame the argument or conversation? Asking questions like this will help you have deeper conversations about your readings, and really, isn’t that the whole point of graduate school?

Time to make your reading work for you- good luck!"
reading  pedagogy  teaching  2012  miriamsweeney  howto  tutorials  studying  notetaking  criticalthinking  gradschool  howtoread  academia  academics 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Open Marginalis
"Above is a breakdown of some applied best practices for using Tumblr in the context of libraries, archives, and special collections I’ve learned in as both a longtime Tumblr user and recent MLIS.  

Information represented above is based on project overview shared in early 2015, Open.Marginalis: Tumblr as Platform for Digital Scholarship in Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections."

[via: https://twitter.com/freifraufitz/status/693956215324426240
via: https://twitter.com/wynkenhimself/status/693993268812587010 ]
libraries  tumblr  howto  archives  collections  specialcollections  hypertext  annotation  access 
february 2016 by robertogreco
How to Hire — # S W L H — Medium
"TLDR

Hiring Principles:
Hiring means we failed to execute and need help
Startup employee effectiveness follows a power law
False Positives are ok, False Negatives are not
Culture is defined by who we hire

Hiring Heuristics:
Hire for Strength vs Lack of Weakness
Hire for Trajectory vs Experience
Hire Doers vs Tellers
Hire Learners vs Experts
Hire Different vs Similar
Always pass on ego"
hiring  2016  henryward  howto 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Gazler/githug · GitHub
"Githug is designed to give you a practical way of learning git. It has a series of levels, each requiring you to use git commands to arrive at a correct answer."
git  tutorials  github  howto  githug 
august 2015 by robertogreco
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