robertogreco + grids   8

Why Rural Roads Sometimes Have Mysterious Detours | Travel + Leisure
"Photographer Gerco de Ruijter's new project explores the places where our highway system goes astray, thanks to the challenges of imposing a rectilinear grid onto the spherical surface of the planet."



"When the Dutch photographer Gerco de Ruijter arrived earlier this year for an artist’s residency at Wichita’s Ulrich Museum of Art, he noticed something strange while driving to a friend’s house outside of town. At several points, the rural road he was on came to an abrupt halt at a T intersection in the middle of nowhere, requiring a quick zigzag to continue on the same road. The detour could be anywhere from a few dozen yards to nearly half a mile, but, in every case, there was no visible reason why the road should shift at all. This wasn't the urban street grid of Wichita, throwing a few random twists and turns de Ruijter’s way. It was the large-scale grid of the country itself—those huge squares of agricultural land visible from airplanes—seemingly gone haywire.

De Ruijter soon learned that these kinks and deviations were more than local design quirks. They are grid corrections, as he refers to them in a new photographic project: places where North American roads deviate from their otherwise logical grid lines in order to account for the curvature of the Earth. You could drive out there your whole life, de Ruijter realized, and not realize that certain stop signs and intersections exist not because of eccentric real estate deals, but because they are mathematical devices used to help planners wrap a rectilinear planning scheme onto the surface of a spherical planet. In order to avoid large-scale distortion, the Jeffersonian grid—shorthand for the founding father's 18th-century geometric vision of six-square-mile township parcels, intended to guarantee equal and democratic land-distribution nationwide—is occasionally forced to go askew.

“It did not take long for legislators to understand that a township could not be exactly six miles on each side if the north-south lines were to follow the lines of longitude, which converged, or narrowed, to the north," explains landscape architect James Corner in Taking Measures Across the American Landscape. "The grid was, therefore, corrected every four townships to maintain equal allocations of land.” This added up to a detour every 24 miles, from sea to shining sea.

In his 2004 book Correction Lines, author Curt Meine explains that these are “places where theory and reality meet." His book uses them as a metaphor for the idea that, in the real world, a perfect plan must always be imperfectly implemented. As the writer Alexander Trevi once observed on his landscape blog Pruned, the results are “sites of displacement” where the road system appears to lose its way, “as if sheared by an ancient earthquake.” These particular doglegs are most clearly seen far from urban centers, in the agricultural countryside, where the regular, quilted appearance of rural land use makes them more visible.

De Ruijter's firsthand experience of these grid corrections came with an interesting artistic irony for de Ruijter. Since the early 1990s, his work has taken altered landscapes as a particular point of focus. Some of his more recent work has included photos of circular pivot-irrigation systems squeezed awkwardly into square property lines, while another project looked at the surreal geometric landscapes of Dutch tree farms.

As de Ruijter explained to me from his studio in the Dutch city of Rotterdam, when he first began producing work in the United States he was stunned by the sheer scale of the landscape here—a common reaction for anyone visiting the vast farmlands of the Midwest or the Great Plains for the first time. The scale inspired him not only to pursue the artistic possibilities of aerial photography even more intensely, but also to look into satellite photography as a means for orienting himself in the open landscape. It was while poring over satellite imagery from Google Earth that he had an epiphany: the Jeffersonian grid and the property lines it created were, in effect, a huge framing mechanism for the landscape. That is, they acted as a kind of photographic viewfinder imposed upon the land, he suggested. In a sense, it was less a technique of federal land management, and more a kind of continental-scale act of graphic design

All of these themes came together for “Grid Corrections,” de Ruijter’s newest project, produced during his residency and accessible on his website. (Selected photographs from “Grid Corrections” will be on display at the Van Kranendonk Gallery in The Hague from December 12 through February 6.) De Ruijter wanted to transform these small turns and detours where the grid seeks to correct itself into a photographic series about locations where abstract ideas collide with on-the-ground realities. He located more than a dozen of these places—including a few in Canada—and extracted aerial images of them using Google Earth. He then traveled to specific corrective intersections in the countryside near Wichita to produce spherical panoramas of the sites. Using a fish-eye lens, he stitched these together into scenes that can best be seen through a virtual reality interface such as Google Cardboard.

But even the traditional flat photographs that resulted from this are intriguing. De Ruijter’s catalog of geographic distortions were, he laughed, simply one way to make “a boring landscape” like the one outside Wichita more interesting, uncovering the embedded rules that govern every straightaway and unexpected turn."
us  gercoderuijter  photography  aerialphotography  earth  maps  mapping  grids  gridcorrections  curtmeine  geoffmanaugh  geography 
december 2015 by robertogreco
ishback» Blog Archive » Moiré in z-axis
"I shoot video and take pictures of screen-based interfaces quite often and Moiré patterns, despite anti-aliasing filters, are very present. I found out that fashion photographers encounter the same issue when taking close-ups of garments. The Moiré effect happens when two or more grids are superposed. A grid can be the interweave of fabric, the array of a digital camera sensor,  the pixels in a screen, etc."
photography  moiré  glvo  grids  fabric  2013  ishacbertran 
november 2013 by robertogreco
On ‘institutional wabi sabi’ | Fresh & New(er)
"Wabi-sabi is a challenging concept for Westerners raised on a diet of Modernism. It celebrates impermanence, imperfection, and incompleteness. It celebrates the small and the intimate. It is the rough hewn bowl, not angular refined box.

Importantly, though, it is not an excuse for incompetence.

Consider how your museum could be ‘a bowl’, rather than ‘a box’. A tumble of objects rather than a grid."
sebchan  corporateculture  art  government  language  wabi-sabi  via:rodcorp  moderinism  impermanence  ephemeral  imperfection  unfinished  incompleteness  small  intimate  audiencesofone  rough  2013  design  craft  museums  museudesign  glvo  tumblr  messiness  grids  perpetualbeta  ephemerality  institutions  canon  openstudioproject  tcsnmy8  tcsnmy  aaronstraupcope 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Debunking the Cul-de-Sac - Design - The Atlantic Cities
"Safest cities in America are the ones incorporated before 1930, when streets were laid out in grids. Fashion and regulation shifted then to favouring winding streets and cul-de-sacs. Which turn out to be inefficient and dangerous"
safety  urbandesign  urban  urbanism  cities  suburbs  suburbia  density  cars  transportation  cul-de-sac  california  research  normangarrick  wesleymarshall  patterns  comparison  grids  traditionalgrid  fha  design  urbanplanning  2011  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Michel de Certeau - Wikipedia [via: http://twitter.com/joguldi/status/73414744849129472 ]
"…Certeau's most well-known & influential work in US has been The Practice of Everyday Life.…combined his disparate scholarly interests to develop a theory of the productive & consumptive activity inherent in everyday life. According to Certeau, everyday life is distinctive from other practices of daily existence because it is repetitive & unconscious. In this context, Certeau’s study of everyday life is neither the study of “popular culture”, nor is it necessarily the study of everyday resistances to regimes of power. Instead, Certeau attempts to outline the way individuals unconsciously navigate everything from city streets to literary texts.<br />
<br />
Perhaps the most influential aspect of TPoEL has emerged from scholarly interest in Certeau’s distinction btwn the concepts of strategy & tactics. Certeau links "strategies" w/ institutions & structures of power who are the "producers", while individuals are "consumers" acting in environments defined by strategies by using "tactics"."
art  culture  history  urbanism  micheldecerteau  via:joguldi  via:steelemaley  research  strategy  strategies  tactics  thepracticeofeverydaylife  power  religion  colonialism  grids  cities  urban  living  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
BBC - BBC Internet Blog: A new global visual language for the BBC's digital services
"About 2 years ago, after printing out the site onto what has now become jokingly known as the 'Wall of Shame' we decided to embark on an ambitious project, called Global Visual Language 2.0, with the aim of unifying the visual and interaction design of bbc.co.uk and the mobile website. ... We've lived with and loved the distinctly 'web 2.0' design for a while now and it's done us proud. However, time's moved on, and in autumn last year we decided it was time to resurrect the project. We set out to broaden our ambitions; to create a design philosophy and world-class design standards that all designers across the business could adhere to. We wanted to find the soul of the BBC. We wanted something distinctive and recognisable; we wanted drama. We knew whatever we created needed to be truly cross-platform and that we needed to simplify our user journeys."
bbc  typography  design  webdev  branding  research  language  redesign  grids  webdesign  web2.0  visual  ux  ui  layout  web  styleguides 
february 2010 by robertogreco
(the teeming void): Array Aesthetics (Olympic Edition)
"The Water Cube and the Birds Nest don't simply display China's modernity, they claim a jump into a digital, sustainable, mega-scaled future. The computational aesthetics of multiplicity that mark these structures are, again like the opening ceremony, a powerful cultural narrative: coherence, strength and beauty made of countless tiny pieces. Like the flickering grid of the drummers, the ordered diversity of these structures is important too, in that it's not total uniformity, a simple (modernist) grid. In fact these buildings contain a kind of post-industrial grid, where the uniformity or regularity is not literal or material, but procedural or computational - the computer's ability to resolve complex distributions of force is what enables the "organic" multiplicity here."
design  technology  society  culture  architecture  cities  china  olympics  beijing  2008  led  patterns  multiplicity  narrative  grids  postindustrial  leapfrogging 
august 2008 by robertogreco

related tags

aaronstraupcope  aerialphotography  ancientrome  architecture  art  audiencesofone  babylon  bbc  beijing  branding  california  canon  cars  china  circleville  cities  civilization  colonialism  comparison  corporateculture  craft  cul-de-sac  culture  curtmeine  density  design  earth  ephemeral  ephemerality  fabric  fha  geoffmanaugh  geography  gercoderuijter  germany  glvo  government  gridcorrections  grids  gur  hammurabi  herodotus  history  ignorance  imperfection  impermanence  incompleteness  institutions  intimate  iran  ishacbertran  italy  language  layout  leapfrogging  led  living  london  mapping  maps  messiness  mexcaltitán  micheldecerteau  moderinism  moiré  multiplicity  museudesign  museums  narrative  neilfreeman  normangarrick  ohio  olympics  openstudioproject  pamanova  patterns  perpetualbeta  photography  postindustrial  power  precolumbian  redesign  religion  research  romans  rough  safety  sebchan  small  society  strategies  strategy  styleguides  suburbia  suburbs  tactics  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  technology  tenochtitlán  thepracticeofeverydaylife  traditionalgrid  transportation  tumblr  tweetstorms  typography  ui  unfinished  urban  urbandesign  urbanism  urbanplanning  us  ux  via:joguldi  via:rodcorp  via:steelemaley  visual  wabi-sabi  web  web2.0  webdesign  webdev  wesleymarshall 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: