robertogreco + graphics   450

p5.js
“p5.js is a JavaScript library for creative coding, with a focus on making coding accessible and inclusive for artists, designers, educators, beginners, and anyone else! p5.js is free and open-source because we believe software, and the tools to learn it, should be accessible to everyone.

Using the metaphor of a sketch, p5.js has a full set of drawing functionality. However, you’re not limited to your drawing canvas. You can think of your whole browser page as your sketch, including HTML5 objects for text, input, video, webcam, and sound.”

[via: https://usesthis.com/interviews/maya.man/ ]
p5.js  javascript  processing  programming  js  art  coding  visual  sound  graphics  video  webcams  html5 
20 days ago by robertogreco
Listen Up, Look Sharp, Graphic Designers—Bauhaus Moving Image Proves Good Design Isn't Just About Communication | | Eye on Design
“As evidenced by a long-lost short film by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy”



“His sentiments around type and print are echoed across his vast output—painting, drawing, photography, collage, sculpture, film, theater, and writing—but one of its most fascinating distillations is in a recently rediscovered film, Tönendes ABC (ABC in Sound), from 1933. What the piece also conveys is a cheekier side to Moholy-Nagy’s practice, and a brazen approach to “appropriating” other people’s work.

ABC in Sound, a minutes-long experimental optical sound film was missing for more than 80 years, before being found at the BFI National Archive in London and identified as Moholy-Nagy’s for the first time by BFI curators. Its screening coincides with a wider László Moholy-Nagy London exhibition at Hauser & Wirth gallery, which is showing his 1930 film Ein Lichtspiel: Schwarz Weiss Grau (A Lightplay: Black White Grey); alongside works on paper, photographic pieces, and the mesmeric kinetic sculpture Light Prop for an Electric Stage (also 1930), which the aforementioned Lightplay documents in deliciously abstract modes.

The reason ABC in Sound remained undiscovered for so long is partially because, as it turns out, it’s not as original in concept as much of Moholy-Nagy’s other works. ABC in Sound existed, but not in isolated form, or credited to the artist: In 1936, the original nitrate for ABC in Sound was accidentally spliced to a copy of Oskar Fischinger’s Early Experiments in Hand Drawn Sound from 1931 by an archivist for a screening program at the London Film Society.”

[See also: https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-abc-in-sound-1933-online

"Inspired by advances in sound recording and fascinated by the production of synthetic sound, Hungarian artist and Bauhaus professor László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) explored the idea of reverse-engineering an alphabet of sounds from the visual representation they produced by the grooves on gramophone discs. Taking this a step further, after the release of Rudolph Pfenninger’s Tönende Handschrift (Sounding Handwriting), he produced this film of ‘visual sounds’ which showed the image of the track that was passing through the sound head of the projector - so that the audience could directly compare the image with the sound that it made.

In later years Moholy-Nagy recalled that the soundtrack for Tönendes ABC “used all types of signs, symbols, even the letters of the alphabet, and my own finger prints. Each visual pattern on the sound track produced a sound which had the character of whistling and other noises. I had especially good results with the profiles of persons”. In this it differed from its companion piece, Oskar Fischinger’s Early Experiments in Hand Drawn Sound, which used purely abstract shapes in the same way; Moholy-Nagy even wittily uses the word ‘Handschfift’ printed onto his soundtrack. The films were shown together at the London Film Society on 10 December 1933 and the combined print donated to the newly formed BFI, where it was recently rediscovered.

Moholy-Nagy would have undoubtedly seen Fischinger’s film before he made his own. Fischinger’s many experiments with “ornamental animation in sound,” predated ABC in Sound. The films made by the pair are remarkably similar in concept, realization, and form (see screenshots from some of Fischinger’s experiments below): in each we hear synthetic sound, created by white patterns that appear visually along one side of the screen. The variations in the shapes of the lines generate the changes in the sounds—some of which seem quite beautiful, in a strange, non-human way; others more like bone-shaking blasts of a pneumatic drill; all—as was imperative for their creators—impossible to create using the conventional instruments of the time, or the human voice."]

[On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ui_FU-KAZMM

"Missing for over 80 years, this experimental film by Bauhaus teacher and artist László Moholy-Nagy was found by BFI curators embedded in a reel of film that also contained Oskar Fischinger’s Early Experiments in Hand Drawn Sound.

László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) was a tenacious, restless creative who associated with various early twentieth century vanguard art movements. Teaching at the legendary Bauhaus school, which this year sees its centenary, his early optical sound films experimented with the formal properties of film and blurred the lines between sound and image and the act of hearing and seeing sound. Newly scanned at 4K, the restoration of ABC in Sound / Tönendes ABC will receive its world premiere at BFI Southbank on 18 June."]
film  sound  design  graphics  graphicdesign  play  tinkering  filmmaking  video  materials  type  typography  print  appropriation  audio  oskarfischinger  rudolphpfenninger  bauhaus  lászlómoholy-nagy  communication  classideas 
june 2019 by robertogreco
Scratching the Surface — 104. Cab Broskoski and Chris Sherron
"Cab Broskoski and Chris Sherron are two of the founders of Are.na, a knowledge sharing platform that combines the creative back-and-forth of social media with the focus of a productivity tool. Before working on Arena, Cab was a digital artist and Chris a graphic designer and in this episode, they talk about their desire for a new type of bookmarking tool and building a platform for collaborative, interdisciplinary research as well as larger questions around open source tools, research as artistic practice, and subverting the norms of social media."

[direct link to audio:
https://soundcloud.com/scratchingthesurfacefm/104-cab-broskoski-and-chris-sherron ]
jarrettfuller  are.na  cabbroskoski  chrissherron  coreyarcangel  del.icio.us  bookmarkling  pinterest  cv  tagging  flickr  michaelcina  youworkforthem  davidbohm  williamgibson  digital  damonzucconi  stanleykubrick  stephaniesnt  julianbozeman  public  performance  collections  collecting  research  2000s  interview  information  internet  web  sharing  conversation  art  design  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  online  onlinetoolkit  inspiration  moodboards  graphicdesign  graphics  images  web2.0  webdesign  webdev  ui  ux  scratchingthesurface  education  teaching  edtech  technology  multidisciplinary  generalists  creative  creativitysingapore  creativegeneralists  learning  howwelearn  attention  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  algorithms  canon  knowledge  transdisciplinary  tools  archives  slow  slowweb  slowinternet  instagram  facebook 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Home - Linked by Air
"Linked by Air is an internationally renowned graphic design studio specializing in the creation of design systems and technological platforms that grow with institutions. The studio works with major cultural and educational organizations, charities, artists, architects and corporations. It frequently stewards its clients’ flagship websites and apps, and leads the development of organization-wide digital strategies. The studio sometimes describes its expertise as the “production of public space,” whether in the world or online. Its interest is in creating systems that work for all their constituents, and that show their health by evolving successfully over time.

Linked by Air
Dan Michaelson, Tamara Maletic, Dylan Fisher, Christopher Roeleveld, Eric Nylund, Aarati Akkapeddi, Kieran Gillen, Rosa McElheny

Past staff and collaborators
Lauren Adolfsen, Lukas Eigler-Harding, Bojan Filipovic, John Friel, Brendan Griffiths, Jack Jennings, May Kim, Andrea Lausevic, Julia Novitch, James Oates, Sasha Portis, Libby Safford, Laurel Schwulst, Jeffrey Scudder, Nika Simovich, Maurann Stein, Branimir Vasilic, Valerie van Zuijlen, Mary Voorhees Meehan, Brian Watterson, Alexander Wolfe, Jonathan Zong

Website photography: Mary Voorhees Meehan

Some places we have taught, lectured, or given workshops
AIGA/NY
Bard Graduate Center, New York
Chicago Architecture Biennial
ECAL, Lausanne
Google, New York
IDEO, New York
International Biennial of Graphic Design, Brno
Maine College of Art, Portland
Naver/NHN, Seoul
NYU Visual Arts Administration MA program
NYU ITP
Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles
Parsons/The New School for Design, New York
Princeton University
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence
Stroom Gallery, The Hague
SUNY Purchase
University of Seoul
Yale University School of Art, New Haven"

[See also:

"Laurel Schwulst Lecture"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhOnOzAj5wY

"Economy: An easy, powerful, and flexible authoring system for websites that grow with your organization"
http://ecnmy.com/ ]
via:caseygollan  design  graphicdesign  graphics  webdesign  sfsh  laurelschwulst 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Laurel Schwulst Lecture - YouTube
"This Graphic Design Program lecture was recorded in the Boardroom on September 24 at the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts.

Laurel Schwulst was designer in residence at California College of the Arts during the fall 2015 semester.

Schwulst is interested in the intersection of art, nature, and the internet.

She lives in New York, where she is an owner of Beautiful Company and works as a designer and programmer at the design practice Linked by Air.

Since 2012, she has been a lecturer in graphic design at Yale School of Art.

cca.edu/graphic-design "

[See also: https://www.linkedbyair.net/
http://ecnmy.com/ ]
via:caseygollan  laurelschwultst  design  webdesign  graphicdesign  graphics 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The origin of the '80s aesthetic - YouTube
"Memphis Design movement dominated the '80s with their crazy patterns and vibrant colors. Many designers and architects from all around the world contributed to the movement in order to escape from the strict rules of modernism. Although their designs didn't end up in people's homes, they inspired many designers working in different mediums. After their first show in Milan in 1981, everything from fashion to music videos became influenced by their visual vocabulary."
1980s  memphisdesign  ettoresottsass  1981  glennadamson  georgesowdenpetershire  michaelgraves  design  furniture  architecture  graphicdesign  graphics  radicaldesign  radicalism  milan  mtv  1987 
august 2017 by robertogreco
It's Nice That | Graphic Design: Peter Mendelsund's brilliant covers for Julio Cortázar novel
"Some things take a few tries to get right, be it baking, swimming, snogging, or a book jacket design for a much-loved title. In designer Peter Mendelsund’s case, it was the latter he struggled with, and when asked to come up with a book cover for Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch, he and a whole host of other designers set to work trying to whittle it down into a a book-sized visual. The New York Times made a list of the entries, including some of Mendelsund’s, which illustrated the sheer time and effort that goes into the best book covers. I’m not talking no service station fodder, the best books deserve time and money to make their covers sing, and Peter Mendelsund has achieved just that."
juliocortázar  petermendelsund  via:tealtan  design  bookdesign  graphicdesign  graphics  rayuela 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The Edgeless & Ever-Shifting Gradient: An Encyclopaedic and Evolving Spectrum of Gradient Knowledge
"A gradient, without restriction, is edgeless and ever-shifting. A gradient moves, transitions, progresses, defies being defined as one thing. It formalizes difference across a distance. It’s a spectrum. It’s a spectral smearing. It’s an optical phenomenon occurring in nature. It can be the gradual process of acquiring knowledge. It can be a concept. It can be a graphic expression. It can be all of the above, but likely it’s somewhere in between.

A gradient, in all of it’s varied forms, becomes a catalyst in it’s ability to seamlessly blend one distinct thing/idea/color, to the next distinct thing/idea/color, to the next, etc.

In this sense, it is the gradient and the way it performs that has become a model and an underlying ethos, naturally, for this online publishing initiative that we call The Gradient.

Similarly, it’s our hope that this post—an attempt to survey gradients of all forms and to expand our own understanding of gradients—will also be edgeless and ever-shifting. This post will evolve and be progressively added to in an effort to create, as the subtitle says, an encyclopaedic and evolving spectrum of gradient knowledge."
gradients  art  2017  ryangeraldnelson  color  blending  spectrums  nature  design  gender  genderfluidity  computers  music  photography  graphics  graphicdesign  thermography  iridescence  brids  animals  insects  snakes  cephlalopods  reptiles  chameleons  rainbows  sky  math  mathematics  taubaauerbach  science  tomássaraceno  vision  brycewilner  alruppersberg  germansermičs  glass  ignazschiffermüller  lizwest  markhagen  ombré  rawcolor  samfall 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Design Resources
"Select websites, tools, assets, and readings for working in and learning about design.

[categories]
Accessibility resources
Books and zines
Browser features
Brushes
Colors and color palettes
Fonts
Icons and emoji
Inspiration and criticism websites
Mockups
Prototyping tools
Stock graphics
Stock photography
User testing and interactive feedback tools
Design Resources
Select websites, tools, assets, and readings for working in and learning about design.

made by @skullface · view/contribute on GitHub
Accessibility"
design  resources  reference  jessicapaoli  fonts  icons  emoji  webdesign  webdev  color  palettes  stockphotography  stockgraphics  graphics  browsers  zines  extensions  chrome  prototyping 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Stephanie Hurlburt on Twitter: "A bunch of people are asking what resources I recommend to start learning graphics programming. So you get a thread on it!"
"A bunch of people are asking what resources I recommend to start learning graphics programming. So you get a thread on it!

I really enjoy giving beginner-level workshops. Here are two that focus on graphics:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1yJSQy4QtcQxcMjr9Wj6kjMd2R1BLNA1mUebDtnaXDL8/edit
https://www.slideshare.net/StephanieHurlburt/graphics-programming-workshop

If you're a graphics coder reading this wondering how you can host a workshop too, I've written about that:
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/11/1/guide-to-running-technology-workshops

I also wrote my own little writeup on graphics, notes from when Rich & I were helping Sophia learn graphics.
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/10/28/casual-introduction-to-low-level-graphics-programming

One more graphics workshop-- this one includes a raytracing and particle demo for you to play with.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1d0StEQMEdz4JUEHXfTPbwKIGYex2p5Mko1Rj66e5M80/edit

I love @baldurk 's blog series, "Graphics in Plain Language" https://renderdoc.org/blog/Graphics-in-Plain-Language/

For those ready to wade into advanced waters, "A trip through the graphics pipeline" by @rygorous is great
https://fgiesen.wordpress.com/2011/07/09/a-trip-through-the-graphics-pipeline-2011-index/

This online book is just an amazing introduction to shaders, by @patriciogv and @_jenlowe_ https://thebookofshaders.com/

Prepare yourself for a monster list of graphics resources on this site! My favorite is the SIGGRAPH papers. http://kesen.realtimerendering.com/

I'm a big fan of Cinder and OpenFramworks, both C++/graphics. They are what I started from.
https://libcinder.org/docs/guides/opengl/index.html
http://openframeworks.cc/learning/

BGFX is also great!
https://github.com/bkaradzic/bgfx

For a more beginner friendly library, Processing is simply lovely. https://processing.org/tutorials/

Shaders! GLSLSandbox is more beginner-friendly, Shadertoy if you want to see some crazy shit
http://glslsandbox.com/
https://www.shadertoy.com/

Can't go without mentioning @CasualEffects 's Graphics Codex-- excellent and comprehensive graphics resource. http://graphicscodex.com/

I stand by this advice on how to approach learning graphics programming.
[image with screenshot of chat]

Since we're now on the topic of getting jobs, do mock interviews and get mentors and talk to people. https://twitter.com/sehurlburt/status/872919452718727168 ["Attn coders who struggle w these, or jr coders:

It is your homework to set up a mock interview w one of these folks"]

My mentor list is FULL of graphics programmers. They all love helping you. I do need to update it with more.
http://stephaniehurlburt.com/blog/2016/11/14/list-of-engineers-willing-to-mentor-you

People ask me about learning math and I point them to @EricLengyel 's book
https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Game-Engine-Development-Mathematics/dp/0985811749/

GPU Performance for Game Artists by @keithoconor
http://fragmentbuffer.com/gpu-performance-for-game-artists/

There are more resources I didn't mention. Check out the last two slides of this https://www.slideshare.net/StephanieHurlburt/graphics-programming-workshop , and http://www.realtimerendering.com

This is a good little collection of resources on advanced GPU optimization and documentation.
https://github.com/g-truc/sdk/tree/master/documentation/hardware/amd/Southern%20Islands

Destiny's Multithreaded Rendering Architecture by @mirror2mask
http://www.gdcvault.com/play/1021926/Destiny-s-Multithreaded-Rendering

An important point: The vast majority of graphics coders I know don't know math very well. Don't be scared away if you aren't a math person.

I say this as someone who adores math, was expecting to use it all the time, & only ever needed basic linear algebra for my graphics work.

Someone made a Slack chat for graphics programming learning/development! Both experienced folks + newbies welcome. https://twitter.com/iFeliLM/status/884801828696805377 ["Great idea. We have a Slack group here:

Invite link here: https://join.slack.com/gfxprogramming/shared_invite/MjExMTIxOTc4NjkwLTE0OTk3ODgxNDYtYTRkNzQ2OGIxOQ "]"
graphics  programming  howto  tutorials  stephaniehurlburt  via:datatelling  math  mathematics  coding 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Mexico 68 - 99% Invisible
"The clear iconography of the Metro system is a reminder of a complicated and sometimes terrible period in Mexico City’s history. It’s a simple design that invites you to explore the massive and complex metropolis. It is a graphic design system that assures that, if you get lost, no matter where you’re from, or what language you speak, you can find your way around, and see the city for yourself."

[See also: http://www.hermanmiller.com/why/talking-pictures.html ]
design  graphicdesign  1968  olympics  mexico  graphics  mexicocity  df  mexicodf  lancewyman  petermurdoch  opart  art  history  typography  luiscastañeda  color  mexico68  government  civics  metro  transportation  subways  worldcup  1970  tolisten 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Best Photo Editor for your Chromebook | Android Central
"Polarr Photo Editor is the best way to edit pictures on your Chromebook."

[See also: https://www.polarr.co/ ]
chromebooks  photoediting  graphics  software 
october 2016 by robertogreco
In Conversation With Eike König – iGNANT.de
"‘Hort’ is an old German word for Kindergarten. What does the word’s meaning say about the values of the collective, and what would you say have been its keys to success?

Yes, ‘Hort’ is a super old word for the place kids go after school. Where I grew up, in Frankfurt – where the Green party was founded – there were lots of independently-organised ‘Horts’. I think the idea of this free space is really interesting, because our lives seem to be so well organised, really structured. You go to school, you sit your exams, you go to uni, you graduate, you start working… you follow this linear path, try to organize your life around this structure, although life is actually constantly in flux, in motion – there are no real moments of graduation, only constructed ones. Having a degree doesn’t really signify anything. It’s just an example of one of the anchors to which we attach ourselves. Of course, we need goals, but these goals don’t give us (a) any satisfaction, because the process is permanent, and (b) they don’t guarantee any success. They don’t have a meaning for me. I studied, but I didn’t complete my course. I dropped out close to the end because I was offered a job as the art director for this label. You don’t get offers like that every day. For my parents, that decision was a little harder to swallow. They told me, “You can’t just not finish something.” They were scared I’d never make anything of myself.

But today it doesn’t work like that. I don’t care if someone hasn’t finished their degree. I’m interested in their personality, and what that person does, and how they share their work with me. And I always looked for a place where I could just be, and keep learning, and make mistakes – sure, you have to keep the business running, but learning and development is such an important part of life. And simply to exercise the skills I already have – that gets tired after a while. After a year, it gets really boring. It just keeps you in my comfort zone, to only use the strategies I already have to become successful. In a traditionally agency context, mistakes are avoided. But actually, for the sake of development, it’s the most important motor. To have the courage to try new things. Sometimes they work, others they don’t. To have the room to be able to take risks is super important to me.

So I thought to myself, why don’t I open my own ‘Hort’, a kind of place where older children – so not-quite adults – can go ‘after school’ – after uni. A safe space where kids from different backgrounds come together, feel safe, start to play, play with the highest level of creative energy possible, socialize, learn, grow, do things together: At its core, I find this idea really beautiful, really positive as a way to be together.

Earlier, we did a lot of playful projects, and today we work on more conceptual stuff, but when we get a brief, we don’t try to take the easiest path, the path we’ve already taken, but we look at the individual circumstances surrounding each brief, and we ask what we can learn from it too. This path always takes more energy, needs more discussion with our clients. Clients often expect ideas or concepts they’ve already seen before, or can picture in their minds. When someone says, “Nothing that you see in our portfolio will be like the concept you get,” you need to trust them. I prefer the path of the new: Let’s think differently about it and try to convey our position. So ‘Hort’ is a good idea. It’s also a nice name, has nice phonetics, and no other really clear meaning for others. Americans wouldn’t know what Hort is, say, though in Spanish it’s related to horticulture – landscape gardening, growing – there’s a lot of positive in there. All of us in the office can relate to that."



"As well as being the founder and creative director of Hort, you’re a Professor of Graphic Design at the University of Arts in Offenbach. What kinds of things are your students teaching you these days?

The role of the teacher has changed from being the professor-as-keeper-of-all-knowledge – the one that knows better than everyone else, and decides between right and wrong. Formerly, education was about repeating what others have already done. I was always a bit sceptical about this model, because the things we know and don’t yet know don’t necessarily impact on truth or falsehood – they are simply part of our biographies, the things we have taken to be true. But those things will be different for the person standing next to me.

Everything that I experienced during my studies and that I was critical of – I try to do those things differently. Today I teach in a University of the Arts – so there are separate disciplines, but they all run parallel to fine arts: painting, sculpture, etc. I’m in this warehouse section of the school, together with the painters and sculptors and the electronic artists and spacial designers. I have a very close-knit relationship with my colleagues in these fields, and I want to offer a research- and development-based approach to my teaching in design, graphics and illustration. I’m really intrigued by this apparent distinction between practical art and fine art. There’s a really interesting overlap between the disciplines.

I want to help my students to probe into this. Each of them is distinctly individual. No-one works like I do, and that’s important – I don’t want clones of myself. Of course they’ll be influenced by me as their teacher, but I try to focus on imparting and discussing ideas as opposed to the formal elements. My students include classic graphic designers, classic illustrators, but also those who do drawing, photography, painting – it’s super diverse, just like in the [Hort] office. Everyone is following the questions they’re personally interested in. I only provide space to do this, guide the group with questions – and draw upon my network to provide them with opportunities like showing their work in a gallery in Düsseldorf, or travelling to Tokyo to exchange their work with artists there, or bring in artists for talks, and introduce them to people to share their portfolio. Not to say, “this is my knowledge base and I will now impart it to you.” Working in this way is exciting, because everyone’s doing their own thing, developing along their own path side by side. We spend most of our time talking, actually. Which is a total inspiration for me too. I learn so much from our discourse.

And it keeps me young! If you work with young people, you can’t grow old. Pokémon Go? Five of my students had it. So of course I needed to see what it was, to keep up to date. I have one class where we just speak about contemporary graphic design. We don’t make anything – we just spend the whole lesson talking about things we’ve seen that inspire us. I want these students to develop their own interests – not to copy what others have done, but to find a form that relates to them, and develop a self-confidence to work on things that might not get 1000 likes on Tumblr, but actually mean something to them. Not to be pushed into the direction of self-promotion, but to find themselves first. You don’t need 1000 likes. Create something that’s relevant and interesting in real life. My teaching focus is on developing the personalities of my students, not on passing on knowledge. It’s super exciting. This daily work with people – whether my students or my colleagues at the office – is my biggest inspiration."
eikekönig  design  education  learning  howwelearn  hort  graphicdesign  art  graphics  berlin  via:jarrettfuller  teaching  howweteach  unschooling  dropouts  deschooling  play  youth  tumblr  socialmedia  discussion  conversation  interviews 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Jamba Juice Just Got Some Serious Design Cred | Co.Design | business + design
"Along the main drag in Pasadena's historic downtown core, Jamba Juice has opened its newest store. When you step inside, the expansive space—with its terrazzo floor, sinuous oak bar, minimalist European furniture, and seafoam-green walls adorned with relief sculptures of fruit—looks more like a chic restaurant than its sterile brethren populating strip malls and food courts across the country. Designed by the prominent L.A. firm Bestor Architecture, the Innovation Bar, as it's known, represents Jamba Juice's first-ever concept store and a foray into design experimentation as a way to lure customers.

"All retail companies, especially brands that are 20 to 25 years old, have to find ways to stay relevant and keep from getting tired," says David Pace, Jamba Juice's CEO. "It's how do we go out there, try some things, experiment, and look at the business, design, and products differently. This was put into place to test current assumptions."

The past few years have been rocky for the smoothie brand, which has been shedding unprofitable stores and has switched to a franchise model to cut costs to stay financially healthy. Amid those changes has been an interest to stoke more consumer interest in the brand. After consulting with 2x4, a New York–based design studio, Jamba decided to build out a concept store.

"They wanted it to feel more like a part of the community rather than a mass experience that gets rolled out," says Georgianna Stout, a partner and creative director at 2x4. "What we've been seeing in all retail experiences—not just in food—is that it's such a competitive market now. If you think of Amazon, you can get anything in a day, from hardware to diapers to food. In general, people who are competitively part of those same markets are needing to rethink their retail spaces to differentiate them. How do you appeal to someone who's used to a mass experience? How do you get customers to come in and stay? We worked to think about the social experience in a store and to make the environment more appealing and comfortable."

Stout and Jamba Juice admired Barbara Bestor's ability to create environments that feel vibrant and fresh, but not in an artificial way—her most recognized work includes Intelligensia Coffee and the splashy headquarters of Beats by Dre. So they didn't give her a specific rubric for the space so much as a general sensibility. "If you walk in the door and say, 'Wow, I can't believe it's a Jamba Juice,' that was almost the brief," Stout says.

To Bestor, the challenge lay mixing local influences and the brand's core identity to create something that spoke to the notion of freshness, an important attribute considering that the store's main products are cold-pressed juice (not the sugar-laden smoothies for which Jamba has become known) and healthy meals.

"In the coffee world, there's a focus on using design as an expression of authenticity, caring for the customer, and adding some delight for them," Bestor says, noting that while ultra-fancy third-wave coffee shops have become the norm in many cities, juice is following suit. "As architects, it’s exciting to look at an established brand and be able to try out ideas to explore 'connoisseurship' of its product."

When Bestor began looking at the brand's current identity, she saw some similarities to the super-saturated oranges, magentas, and teals that L.A. designer Deborah Sussman used in the 1980s. "If you look at how Jamba shows themselves with color—which is embracing it—what would be a way to tune color to a newer palette? What says 'natural, fresh fruit' today?" To that end, she kept the palette vivid, but more organic: light greens, natural woods for the bar and furniture, and a floor made from river pebbles embedded in concrete.

The space is located on a historic street with a landmarked facade, and while there were no laws dictating what Bestor had to do inside—the exterior had to stay the same—she tried to pull some of the exterior influences indoors. The building was originally built as a drugstore in the 1940s, so she decided to incorporate a traditional tin ceiling and used deep moldings to adorn the walls.

The real showstoppers in the space are supergraphics of fresh fruit—which were designed by Bestor Architecture—that cover some of the walls and also cycle through digital screens. "It was about scale and making really big, visceral impressions," Bestor says. "It gets across the idea of naturalness and freshness but in a contemporary way."

When customers come in, they can order food from iPads in the front of the store, pick things from a grab-and-go shelf, or order from the cashier. One of the biggest differences in the customer experience is being able to sit in the store. To get people to linger, Bestor looked to the design of Viennese cafes from the 19th century. There are a handful of tables, bar stools, and a banquette upholstered in leather that offer places to sit. There's also Wi-Fi in the space.

"I call it 'slow casual,'" Bestor says.

On the menu, Jamba Juice is experimenting with different types of cold-pressed juice at a higher price than it typically sells its products (about $8 a bottle) and healthy complements, like quinoa salads. While the store is a one-off and Jamba doesn't have any plans to create more like it at the moment, it's using the space to test the idea of opening regionally inspired retail spaces, much like Starbucks did with its Reserve line. And some elements that do well in the Pasadena location, like menu items, could be rolled out nationally.

"When your designed space reinforces that you’re about customization and not 'one size fits all,' customers can say it’s kind of my local shop, it's different," Pace says. "But if you stamp out a New York City shop just like one in Albuquerque and there's no customization, there’s where people start to feel worried. Customers want to see convenience, personalization, and new taste profiles. . . . In this business, you always have to reinvent yourself.""
barbarabestor  jambajuice  design  interiors  via:jarrettfuller  deborahsussman  2016  murals  pasadena  architecture  fruit  graphicdesign  graphics  losangeles 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Amazingly Simple Graphic Design Software – Canva
"Use Canva's drag-and-drop feature and professional layouts to design consistently stunning graphics."
onlinetoolkit  chromebooks  webapps  graphics  design 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Kadak
"Kadak is a collective of South Asian women who work with graphic storytelling of different kinds. ‘Kadak’ means strong, severe, sharp - like our tea.

The women in Kadak engage with varied streams of inquiry in their art, which provides an invaluable insight into the preoccupations of a changing subcontinent. The stories and narratives move between the personal and political, question culture and examine subculture."
tumblrs  graphicdesign  design  graphics  art  culture  subcultures  gender  women  southasia  via:anabjain 
april 2016 by robertogreco
The Propaganda of Pantone: Colour and Subcultural Sublimation — LOKI
"Questions of representation are central to the practice of graphic design. An understanding of who we are speaking for, and who we are speaking to, is the starting point of any design brief. It is through this role of mediation, expressed as aesthetic form, that design enacts its power and responsibility. However, this mediation often happens uncritically, guided by a designer’s intuition, stylistic trends, and the instrumental framework of marketing and PR concerns. A multiplicity of factors, conscious and unconscious, play into a designer’s aesthetic choices of imagery, typography, composition and colour. And as much as some might argue to the contrary, none of these choices are neutral.

In the case of colour, Pantone Inc. holds incredible influence with their increasingly marketed and mediatised Colour of the Year campaigns. Purportedly determined through a prescient reading of the cultural zeitgeist (by a select cabal of colour specialists), it is important to understand that the company, and the industry it serves, have their own specific interests and agendas that drive these selections. Pantone’s choice of “Rose Quartz” and “Serenity” as the 2016 Colour of the Year is the most insidious move by this colour-industrial-complex since “Blue Iris” in 2008. As with “Blue Iris”, Pantone has once again mined the subcultural landscape and used their monopoly within the creative industries to propagate their colour properties to the world.

From IK Blue to Blue Iris

Pantone was on point in 2008, presenting a slightly muted version of the IK Blue (International Klein)/RGB Blue trend that evolved out of the Dutch “default design” approach of the early 2000s. Default design advocated against the smooth surfaces of graphic professionalism, employing low-res imagery, system fonts, crude layouts, and the standard web link hex-colour #0000FF. It incorporated a self-referential criticism into its aesthetic, and the prominent use of RGB Blue became a clear signifier of this. The colour was carried forward with the emergence of a vaguely defined “critical graphic design” aesthetic, shifting between Default, IK, and Reflex Blue, and it was often used monochromatically, in large flat swathes that were both vivid and jarring.

Though IK Blue and RGB Default Blue are not the same, their intense visceral effect is similar, stemming from the colours’ physical/digital materiality; Klein’s blue was unique due to the synthetic resin binder which allowed the pigment to maintain its clarity, whereas Default Blue is as pure a blue as the RGB spectrum can achieve. Referenced in William Gibson’s 2010 novel Zero History, the character Hubertus Bigend has a suit made entirely of material in IK Blue. He states that he wears this because the intensity of the colour makes other people uncomfortable, and because he is amused by the difficulty of reproducing the colour on a computer monitor. Gibson, an astute cultural observer, used this reference to acknowledge its avant-garde popularity while pointing to the inherent subversive quality of the colour.

The mainstreaming of “Blue Iris” by Pantone softened the subversive punch of IK Blue (which by 2008 was already an identifiable commodity in contemporary art and fashion circles), further bolstering its popularity amongst designers and the consumer population at large.

Rose Quartz and Serenity

“Rose Quartz” and “Serenity” (hereafter abbreviated as RQ+S) present a far more nefarious situation. There’s no doubt that Pantone’s trend forecasters/cool hunters are once again on point (much more so than last year’s Marsala), yet anyone who has spent a little too much time on Tumblr over the last few years probably could have seen this coming. The tonal pink and blue palette has been growing exponentially in popularity online since the emergence (circa 2010-11), purported death (circa 2012), and expanding influence of the micro-cultures of Seapunk, and its successor, Vaporwave, as part of a more broadly defined subculture of internet-fuelled art employing what can be described as a Tumblr aesthetic.

The popular use of these colours, and specifically their combined usage, has emerged out of a tumultuously contested subcultural space. Pantone’s conceptual framing of RQ+S is disingenuous at best, and once one digs a little deeper, can be seen to represent a clearly reactionary political force."



"Vaporwave: The Jester in the King’s Court

Vaporwave has been hailed as Seapunk’s successor, though it actually emerged in parallel, with less dolphins, and a more mature theoretical grounding. The dolphins have been replaced by renderings of the assorted detritus of techno-capitalism; anachronistic corporate logos, dead media formats, GUI elements, and perspective grids. Musically, the genre samples and remixes the corporate soundscape; elevator and on-hold music, the piped-in pop of shopping malls and office lobbies, smooth jazz, easy listening and motivational new age harmonies. Vaporwave differentiates itself from Seapunk through its critical self-awareness, and it is far more intentional in how it employs its parodic kitsch aesthetics. It is darkly cynical and sickly sweet, exemplified by artist and label names such as The Pleasure Centre, New Dreams Ltd., Fortune 500, Business Casual or Condo Pets.

Analysis of the genre points to Vaporwave operating within what can be described as an accelerationist framework; expanding, repurposing and exaggerating the technosocial processes of capitalism in order to provoke radical social change. Its saccharine caricature of corporate culture engages whole-heartedly with the alienating nostalgia of the post-authentic, playing the role of the jester in the king’s court, or acting as a hall of mirrors in the funhouse enclosures of capital. Its tactics have abandoned confrontational resistance to instead lubricate the symbolic ground upon which capitalism stands, and offer it a series of gentle, yet insistent, nudges.

In 2015, in a desperate attempt to stay relevant, MTV (a Viacom International Inc. company) rebranded with a full-on Vaporwave aesthetic and the Orwellian tagline “I am my MTV”. Undoubtedly counselled by agency customer-engagement experts it was as transparent as it was blatant. Their VMA campaign promos featured Miley Cyrus gesticulating in front of a green screen, enticing the public to fill in the blank(ness) with their unpaid labour. The crowd-sourced results feel tepid at best, with a significant percentage of the content created by agencies and design studios, most-likely commissioned by MTV. And within all of the internet-y visual chaos, a smooth and uniform surface reappears. In spite of this co-option, or perhaps due to it, the Vaporwave aesthetic continues to evolve and expand, within the not so hidden corners of subreddits, and to mutate and accelerate, parading on the front lines of fashion.

It is not my intention to ascribe any sort of authorial/authoritative origin story to this recombinant aesthetic. Popular style emerges from a confluence of tendencies and cultural currents. The lineage of afro-futurist visual culture and contemporary afro-punk fashion have had a significant influence on the development of this aesthetic. Singular artists such as MIA, with her groundbreaking 2005 album Arular and the entirety of her oeuvre since, also provides a prescient cultural touchstone. Japanese kawaii purikura (photobooths), and their viral app counterparts, exemplify how software tools are often indivisible from the aesthetic culture they create and contribute to. And within graphic design, the trajectory of Metahaven's work (and that of their Werkplaats acolytes), with its disordered and distorted forms, photoshop filters and powerpoint layouts, alongside healthy doses of IK Blue and digital debris, can be read as a palimpsest of the overlapping layers that have come to define the look and feel of these times."



"#aesthetic

Tumblr has proven to be a nurturing (though certainly not safe) space for the circulation of subcultural and counter-cultural interests, and the ideas and imagery of these feminist currents run in parallel, overlap and intersect with the aforementioned micro-cultures on the platform. Of course, the diversity of content posted on Tumblr is inherently limitless, yet nonetheless cohesive aesthetic tendencies emerge, reflecting the interests and aspirations of its most avid users. The term "aesthetic" itself has come to represent a specific genre of imagery on Tumblr that can be easily identified as the subcultural inspiration for RQ+S.

We are presented with a visual landscape of soft pinks and blues, a post-ironic poetics articulated through memes, digital art, selfies, and threaded "ask me anything" conversations. Taken as a whole, there is an undeniable ebullient softness to it, but roiling just beneath the surface is a crystalline anger directed at the way things are, be it gender normativity, the surveillance state, or good old-fashioned capitalist alienation. The emergence of this Tumblr #aesthetic represents the reclamation of symbolic vocabulary from the realm of commodity production, placing it back into the hands of the young, the feminine, the marginal."
aesthetics  art  design  culture  pantone  2016  2015  2008  mtv  webrococo  mia  softness  kawaii  afropunk  metahaven  williamgobson  ikb  internationalkleinblue  blue  seapunk  tumblr  subcultures  gra[hicdesign  graphics  rosequartz  blueiris  vaporwave  rgbdefaultblue  zerohistory  web  online  internet  vma  yvesklein 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Apparatus: A hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams
"Apparatus is a hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams.

The Apparatus Editor runs in the browser and interactive diagrams created with Apparatus can be shared and embedded on the web (coming soon).

Apparatus is free, open-source software."



"Apparatus is under active development. Discuss how Apparatus should evolve on the Apparatus Google Group.

Source code is available on Github under the MIT license. Contributions are very welcome! Big thanks to all who have contributed code to Apparatus.

Apparatus was originally developed by Toby Schachman as a research project within the Communications Design Group (CDG) sponsored by SAP Labs. Thanks to Bret Victor, Paula Te, Matthias Graf, Michael Nagle, Chaim Gingold, Robert Ochshorn, Glen Chiacchieri, Joshua Horowitz, Ian Johnson, Simon Last, Ivan Zhao, Emily Eiffler, Vi Hart, and Monique DeSalvo for design discussions, beta testing, and encouragement!"

[via: http://roomthily.tumblr.com/post/136019466687/apparatus-a-hybrid-graphics-editor-and ]
graphics  visualization  software  opensource  onlinetoolkit  interactive  programming  classideas  tobyschachman  communicationsdesigngroup  brettvictor  paulate  matthiasgraf  vihart  moniquedesalvo  joshuahorowitz  ianjohnson  simonlast  ivanzhao  michaelnagle  chaimgingold  robertochshorn  glenchiacchieri  drawing  edg  srg 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Kenya Hara Unveils Rejected 2020 Tokyo Olympics Logo Proposal | Spoon & Tamago
"In September the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Committee announced that they would scrap Kenjiro Sano’s logo amid plagiarism claims and redo the entire process. But when they did that they also effectively scrapped the other 103 proposals, each created by professionals who spent a decent amount of time and resources perfecting their concept.

Now, renowned designer and one of the foremost faces of Japanese design, Kenya Hara, is speaking out. And in doing so, he has released his proposal from the Hara Design Institute.

“Removing the curtain from the design competition will help graphic design become more widely understood,” says Kenya Hara, explaining why he decided to publish his team’s propals. “It will serve as a valuable resource in contemplating our future Olympics logo.” He notes that the Olympics symbol and “Tokyo 2020” have been obscured so as to avoid any copyright claims.

Hara’s proposal is one that symbolizes “our planet making great strides,” “a beating heart” and the “summit.” The two planetary logos reference the sun, the moon and an arena where humans can transcend any bickering and come together for the great games.

In today’s world of design planning it’s no longer sufficient to simply come up with a beautiful logo. Various applications and forms of communication must also be considered. And in that sense, Hara’s design team has created a remarkable proposal that adaptable to various needs.

But in a surprising and rather confounding decision, the Olympics committee has opened up the new round of proposals to the public, allowing anyone over 18 to submit their idea. They’re accepting entries through December 7, 2015. The competition will undoubtedly bulge into a marathon with thousands of runners. We stand with designer Kenya Hara in hopes that this next race, whatever it turns out to be, is more transparent."
kenyahara  design  graphicdesign  logos  olympics  via:tealtan  graphics  japan  tokyo  2020 
november 2015 by robertogreco
New Brand Identity for Poseidon by Kokoro & Moi — BP&O
"Poseidon Helsinki centralises the tasks of architect and builder with the intention of delivering higher quality construction projects based around visionary and uncompromising design solutions. Poseidon’s values are deeply rooted in a love for Helsinki, a belief in aesthetically ambitious architecture and expansive urban spaces, and improving the capacity and quality of the city through sensitive renovation and attic conversions.

Poseidon’s visual identity, inspired by the colors, grids and shapes of modernism, and the architecture and art of Le Corbusier and the masters of geometric abstraction, was developed by design studio Kokoro & Moi, and went on to include stationery, posters and website.

Kokoro & Moi draw an unexpected, distinctive and playful quality from familiar but appropriate architectural, construction and urban planning cues. This is perhaps most acutely observed in the conviviality of brightly coloured geometric shapes drawn from a map of the areas of Helsinki that Poseidon operates, and those it would like to renovate, but also in the aesthetic and functional qualities of graph paper, grids and guides, and subtly through vertical and horizontal type layout inspired by street names on maps.

Footprints of large, immovable and schematised three-dimensional structures are visualised as simple two-dimensional blocks, appearing, absent context and technical detail, unconstrained, and alongside colour, as making a connection with play, experimentation and opportunity. This is accentuated by avoiding the restrictions of a logo-centric treatment but by allowing these shapes to play with scale across business cards and large format of posters, and establishing a memorable and flexible graphic treatment.

Constrast is effectively used to emphasise the aesthetic qualities, disparities and communicative value of each asset. This also extends to type choice and combination. The juxtaposition of the reductive sans-serif characters of GT Walsheim, alongside the engraved detail of Stanley and the flourish of a script handprinted by illustrator Linda Linko, appear as an interesting mix of functionality, historic sensitivity and an element of the personal.

The result confidently blends the familiar with the unexpected, draws the unconventional from the conventional, replaces a favour for asceticism with play, and manages to resolve a variety of assets, leverage their disparate qualities communicatively, and resolve these through a good use of structure and space."
design  architecture  graphidesign  identity  via:tealtan  2015  kokoro&moi  graphics 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Gerd Arntz Web Archive
"The work of Gerd Arntz (1900-1988) is of great importance to the world of visual communication. His signs are drawn with preciseness and a wonderful feeling for dimensions. Ed Annink, Ontwerpwerk, repositioned two of them and made them available in the consumer market as doormats. Doing so the legacy of Arntz became visible for a wider audience."
archive  art  design  illustration  gerdarntz  graphicdesign  graphics  visualcommunication 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Instagram’s Endangered Ephemera - The New Yorker
"The best accounts, like @graphilately, present a basic, steady stream of beautiful things, often against a neutral background. “I want it to be solely about the stamps—raising the profile of stamps and beauty in simple, modernist values,” Blair Thomson, the account’s creator, told me. “They’re about simple, graphic ideas conveyed through a highly visible yet tiny medium.” The husband-and-wife pair behind @purveyors_of_packaging present vintage boxes, bottles, and cans in the same vitrine-like format, making the reds, yellows, and blues really glow.

For some, Instagram has been an easy way to deal with personal collections. If you are the proud owner of thousands of vintage Valentines, embroidered tourist patches, or personalized book plates, digitizing them can feel overwhelming. The dailyness of Instagram—one photo, one day at a time—breaks the task down, and the endorphin boost of likes and followers keeps you rolling. A number of the collectors I spoke to originally included their ephemera in their personal feed, but spun the material off into a dedicated channel after a positive response. This also gave them a chance to polish their presentation. Bill Rose (@junktype) says, “Most of the objects in my feed are no bigger than a couple of inches wide. They are often so small that my phone has trouble focussing given the close range of my subject.” Charles Clarke (@matchbookdiaries) shoots his matchbooks against a white background. “I use the white background because it looks clean, and because you can scroll my profile page and it doesn’t look like there are any dividers between the photos. It looks like a big poster.”

These accounts also provide inspiration for working professionals and act as an early warning system for design revivals. Several of the ephemera accounts that I’ve spotted have turned out to be run by designers. Ara Devejian (@LetterGetter), a creative director, started his when he moved to Los Angeles’s superlatively-signed Theatre District. “Every day, I try to take a new route to work or wherever, especially going way out my way to discover new places on my bike or in the car, and in turn LetterGetter is the happy byproduct of that curiosity.” At first Devejian wanted to document typographic nightmares—the illegible, the mishandled—but, as with most Instagram accounts, things swung over to the positive. The platform’s users have such a strong preference for things that are pretty (however you define it) that it’s difficult to swim against the tide of posting “bests” rather than “worsts.” “@LetterGetter helps inform some of the typographic projects I work on,” Devejian said, “like the title card I designed for Gymkhana 7. The style of the photos is intentionally flat or sparse in order to see the letterforms as they were conceived.”"



"Business cards are probably next on the endangered list. In ten years, that drawer full of business cards could be Instagram gold. The Art Nouveau designer Hector Guimard’s business card, for example, part of the Cooper Hewitt collection, is beautifully out of date. But putting something on Instagram isn’t always the end result. These pieces can have different meaning in real life. “People have yelled at me—thinking I’m about to steal or break something—and then afterwards, realizing that I’m only taking pictures and admiring their car or whatever, tell me their life story,” Devejian says. “I’ve become painfully accustomed to just how fleeting signage is. It’s made me wonder whether I should become some sort of advocate for preservation, in attempt to postpone their inevitable disappearance.”"
instagram  culture  alexandralange  2015  design  businesscards  graphicdesign  graphics  photography  collections  inspiration  stamps  postagestamps  matchbooks  labels  clothinglabels  ephemera  everyday  objects  internet  socialmedia  packaging  typography  lettering  logos 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The oddly beautiful and sometimes disturbing artistic talent of the nation’s drug cops - The Washington Post
"The other important point to consider is that many patches are essentially private documents, made by law enforcement officers for law enforcement officers. "They're made as collectibles," Sherrard says. They're for internal morale-boosting and team-building. Officers from different agencies trade them with one another, "like a business card in some ways," Sherrard says.

When we talk about large federal agencies like the DEA, it's easy to forget that every monolithic bureaucracy is composed, essentially, of individuals.

It's one thing to dismiss the asset forfeiture program as terrible policy, for instance. But it's another to remember that the individual agents who carry out that policy are, in many ways, just regular people doing a job they've been assigned. Field agents don't write policy -- Congress does. Why wouldn't we expect the people who carry out that policy to take pride in their work, and to wear that pride on their sleeve?"
badges  dea  lawenforcement  warondrugs  art  graphics  government  drugs  patches  embroidery  glvo  christopheringraham  police 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Humane Representation of Thought on Vimeo
"Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014.
Preface: http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness):
- The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii's "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/
- but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com
- and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo
- and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

Dynamic conversations and presentations:
- Ken Perlin's "Chalktalk" changes daily; here's a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

Context-sensitive reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

"Explore-the-model" reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/
- http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/
- http://ncase.me/polygons/
- http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html
- http://earthprimer.com/

Evidence-backed models:
- http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring:
- http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/
- http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/
- http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/

Modes of understanding:
- Jerome Bruner: http://amazon.com/dp/0674897013
- Howard Gardner: http://amazon.com/dp/0465024335
- Kieran Egan: http://amazon.com/dp/0226190390

Embodied thinking:
- Edwin Hutchins: http://amazon.com/dp/0262581469
- Andy Clark: http://amazon.com/dp/0262531569
- George Lakoff: http://amazon.com/dp/0465037712
- JJ Gibson: http://amazon.com/dp/0898599598
- among others: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embodied_cognition

I don't know what this is all about:
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/responses.html

---

Abstract:

New representations of thought — written language, mathematical notation, information graphics, etc — have been responsible for some of the most significant leaps in the progress of civilization, by expanding humanity’s collectively-thinkable territory.

But at debilitating cost. These representations, having been invented for static media such as paper, tap into a small subset of human capabilities and neglect the rest. Knowledge work means sitting at a desk, interpreting and manipulating symbols. The human body is reduced to an eye staring at tiny rectangles and fingers on a pen or keyboard.

Like any severely unbalanced way of living, this is crippling to mind and body. But it is also enormously wasteful of the vast human potential. Human beings naturally have many powerful modes of thinking and understanding.

Most are incompatible with static media. In a culture that has contorted itself around the limitations of marks on paper, these modes are undeveloped, unrecognized, or scorned.

We are now seeing the start of a dynamic medium. To a large extent, people today are using this medium merely to emulate and extend static representations from the era of paper, and to further constrain the ways in which the human body can interact with external representations of thought.

But the dynamic medium offers the opportunity to deliberately invent a humane and empowering form of knowledge work. We can design dynamic representations which draw on the entire range of human capabilities — all senses, all forms of movement, all forms of understanding — instead of straining a few and atrophying the rest.

This talk suggests how each of the human activities in which thought is externalized (conversing, presenting, reading, writing, etc) can be redesigned around such representations.

---

Art by David Hellman.
Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "

[Some notes from Boris Anthony:

"Those of you who know my "book hack", Bret talks about exactly what motivates my explorations starting at 20:45 in https://vimeo.com/115154289 "
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574339495274876928

"From a different angle, btwn 20:00-29:00 Bret explains how "IoT" is totally changing everything
https://vimeo.com/115154289
@timoreilly @moia"
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574341875836043265 ]
bretvictor  towatch  interactiondesign  davidhellman  hiroshiishii  softrobotics  robots  robotics  kenperlin  jeromebruner  howardgardner  kieranegan  edwinhutchins  andyclark  jjgibson  embodiedcognition  cognition  writing  math  mathematics  infographic  visualization  communication  graphics  graphicdesign  design  representation  humans  understanding  howwelearn  howwethink  media  digital  dynamism  movement  conversation  presentation  reading  howweread  howwewrite  chalktalk  otherlab  3dprinting  3d  materials  physical  tangibility  depth  learning  canon  ui  informationdesign  infographics  maps  mapping  data  thinking  thoughts  numbers  algebra  arithmetic  notation  williamplayfair  cartography  gestures  placevalue  periodictable  michaelfaraday  jamesclerkmaxell  ideas  print  printing  leibniz  humanism  humanerepresentation  icons  visual  aural  kinesthetic  spatial  tactile  symbols  iot  internetofthings  programming  computers  screens  computation  computing  coding  modeling  exploration  via:robertogreco  reasoning  rhetoric  gerrysussman  environments  scale  virtualization 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Aaron Draplin Takes On a Logo Design Challenge on Vimeo
"Most logos aren't designed in fifteen minutes, but most designers aren't Aaron Draplin. Aaron's a Portland fixture by way of the Midwest, the owner of Draplin Design Co., and an advocate of "blue collar" design: design that works. Here he takes our logo design challenge, creating a dozen iterations of a logo for a fictional construction company. Not inspired? Just wait. Watch as he sketches, brings his ideas into Illustrator, and tests and tunes the different iterations. The logos Aaron creates prove design can elevate any company or brand. Along the way, he provides tips for freelancing, finding inspiration, and providing clients context for logos that won't just live in PDFs."
aarondraplin  logos  design  branding  process  graphicdesign  graphics  2014 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Graphic Design That Encapsulates the Golden State - NYTimes.com
"“It is common practice today to place the word ‘California’ in front of almost any vagrant word and thus achieve a magic combination hopefully intended to make the heart jump and the purse strings fly open,” the designer Alvin Lustig wrote in 1947.

But it wasn’t the word alone. Mr. Lustig and other graphic artists gave “California” a look, for periodicals, posters, packaging and vacation destinations, that also made the heart jump and loosened the purse strings. It was colorful, it was experimental, it was rough, it was digital.

And the same can be said of the new book “Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California Graphic Design, 1936-1986” (Metropolis Books, $55), written and designed by Louise Sandhaus, 59, a graphic designer. As she writes in her introduction, she chose not to honor text over graphics, and she wasn’t interested in being definitive. Rather, looking through archives and talking to makers, she asked questions like, “Is this historically important work, versus is this fabulous and distinctive and sooooooo California?” The pieces in the book range in mood from the calm abstraction of John Follis’s “Arts & Architecture” magazine covers to the pixelated trips in David Theurer’s “I, Robot” Atari game.

Oh, and that title? Ms. Sandhaus wrote in an email, “It’s a cliché about California, but one that encapsulates a place where big dramatic changes happen.” She spoke to a reporter last week. (This interview has been edited and condensed.)

Q. You say in your introduction this project took 10 years. Why?

A. I worked for two-and-a-half years on the millennial exhibition for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, “Made in California.” It was intended to talk about the relationship between California art and images of California, and to complicate that relationship. I saw California visual artists start to pull away from inspirations coming from Europe and from New York. Something similar had to have happened within graphic design.

I was also reading Reyner Banham’s book “Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies.” He said to tell the story of the built environment meant creating a different way to tell that story. That was impetus to think I didn’t have to become a historian, or to try to force this into a conventional model.

You also came up with four ecologies, presented as chapter titles: “Sunbaked Modernism,” “Industry & the Indies,” “Sixties alt Sixties” and “California Girls.” Why those?

Lorraine Wild, a graphic designer in Los Angeles, mentored this project early on, and she came up with those titles to be able to organize the work. A commonality was a left turn or a break from tradition. There was a colorfulness to the work. There was an independent spirit that was less about following and more about defining.

Ms. Wild’s essay for the ’60s chapter is all about the color orange. How does orange define California design?

Lorraine started that essay on an impulse. The sunset seems orange. The ubiquitous poster for “The Endless Summer” (1964) has that kind of luminosity. The Victor Moscoso “Neon Rose” series, the luminosity of orange in there. In public consciousness, that color does become conflated with California. We grow oranges.

Orange shows up in the architecture, too.

When I think of architecture of the period, Sea Ranch is front and center. Properties were going up that were more natural, and people were starting to introduce more earthy colors: avocado and burnt orange.

You also argue that California design was a more hospitable place for women, fostering the careers of designers including Marget Larsen for the department store Joseph Magnin and Susan Kare for the Apple Macintosh.

The women attracted to here were independently minded to begin with. But because it was a backwater, women had more latitude and developed bold work that got a lot of attention. Frank Gehry invited Deborah Sussman and Gere Kavanaugh to share his office. That said, Deborah Sussman, who died earlier this year, told me about how she had to assert herself in meetings and wasn’t always taken seriously.

You seem like you had fun with the design of the book. I love the pink-and-orange endpapers with little Californias and palms.

Originally I wanted there to be four books glued back to back, to suggest other books to come. This wasn’t a finished story. So the patterned papers between the chapters are like endpapers, retaining that suggestion. I had an intern this summer who did something wacky with the In-N-Out Burger palm tree."
california  graphicdesign  design  graphics  alexandralange  louisesandhaus  books  toread  interviews  2014 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Yusef Alahmad Art & Design
"Graphic designer from Saudi Arabia (Al Khobar), based in San Francisco, California.
Freelancer + Graphic Design MFA Candidate (Academy of Art University)."
graphicdesign  graphics  design  arabic  typography  yusefalahmad  art  sanfrancisco  saudiarabia 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Release Material Design Icons · google/material-design-icons · GitHub
"Today, Google Design are open-sourcing 750 glyphs as part of the Material Design system icons pack. The system icons contain icons commonly used across different apps, such as icons used for media playback, communication, content editing, connectivity, and so on. They're equally useful when building for the web, Android or iOS.

Read on for the release notes, view a live preview of the icons or download the icon pack now.
What's included in the release?

• SVG versions of all icons in both 24px and 48px flavours
• SVG and CSS sprites of all icons
• 1x, 2x icons targeted at the Web (PNG)
• 1x, 2x, 3x icons targeted at iOS (PNG)
• Hi-dpi versions of all icons (hdpi, mdpi, xhdpi, xxhdpi, xxxhdpi) (PNG)"

[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/100505705546/material-design-icons-google-have-open-sourced-a ]
google  design  graphics  icons  svg  googledesign  glyphs  opensource 
october 2014 by robertogreco
MEMORY CARD SEA POWER - David Southwood
"MEMORY CARD SEA POWER is the title of a broadsheet newspaper featuring a project that documents Tanzanian stowaways living under the National Road One in Cape Town.

The posters and prints live ephemerally under bridges and on walls in the public realm. The newspaper is printed with a single colour, black, and presents the hard, monotonous, grey underpass life of the stowaways with saturnine accuracy.

The text which the newspaper carries consists of writing by Sean Christie and pidgin Swahili graffiti reincarnated in big black League Gothic set by master designer Francois Rey at Monday Design.

Many of the newspaper’s 12 flat A1s are parts of composite photographs which means that a start-to-finish reading of the paper renders the life of the stowaways in a jerky, heroin-ripped collage. When the paper is disassembled it can be reconstituted as a series of posters and very large photographs.

It’s very difficult to reassemble the broadsheet in it’s original form because the pages are unnumbered so the collage effect is enhanced again as the parts of the story crash against each other. Like a foamy wave washing through the city centre, for example. Both Sean Christie’s diaristic entries and the bust-up stowaway aphorisms, or particles of hope, suit chance."
françoisrey  southafrica  davidsouthwood  mondaydesign  seanchristie  design  graphics  photography  graphicdesign  newspapers  broadsheets  capetown  tanzania  stowaways  migration  via:asfaltics  leaguegothic 
august 2014 by robertogreco
It's Nice That : Watch Portuguese designers the Royal Studio turn graphic design on its head
"Their website is a combination of fluorescent colours, textures, media and effects so hectic that you can’t help but surrender yourself to it, but it’d be foolish to assume that The Royal Studio’s design work is as chaotic as it appears. Behind the madness is a method which elevates their vibrant, contemporary design beyond the realms of trendy and into something actually very interesting, whether it’s an Honest Manifesto which claims that “everyone loves titles and captions” but they “don’t give a fuck about content” (repeated to fill) or a very well-executed poster advertising the studio’s 15-day-long tour around cities including Zagreb, Ljubljana, Dijon and Porto. The fact remains that Portugal-based Royal Studio are taking conventional graphic design and turning it on its head to see what happens, and we’re really enjoying admiring the results."

[Strange that there is no link to The Royal Studio in the article. Adding some here:

Website: http://www.theroyalstudio.com/
Tumblr: http://royalstudio.tumblr.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/royal_studio
Instagram: http://instagram.com/theroyalstudio
Vsco: http://royalstudio.vsco.co/1
Behance: https://www.behance.net/royalstudio
Dribbble: https://dribbble.com/Royalstudio ]
manifestos  portugal  design  graphics  graphicdesign  theroyalstudio  srg  porto 
august 2014 by robertogreco
deborah sussman interview
"DB: please could you tell us about your background and how you became interested in design?

DS: I grew up in brooklyn where my parents exposed us to the arts from a young age: we had dance lessons, piano lessons, french lessons, trips to museums, performances and galleries. after high school I went to study painting and acting at bard college in new york, which was a very radical school at that time. in those days I thought I’d become an actress or an artist but then I heard about a school in chicago, the institute of design, ran by lászló moholy-nagy and I really wanted to go there and see what it was all about. I got transferred to chicago and design completely took over my life from then on.

one of my teachers in chicago was konrad wachsmann, who was friendly with charles and ray eames. in my first year there the eames came to give a talk at our school and also afterwards asked konrad to recommend them a student who could work with them for the summer, as a graphic designer. he suggested it should be me.

DB: how was it to work at the eames office?

DS: I was extremely happy. as a young designer in my early twenties there was nobody I would rather have worked for. it was a dream job. originally I was only supposed to work there that one summer and then go back to finish my studies in chicago. at the end of the summer I approached charles to say goodbye and he said ‘goodbye? why? where are you going?‘ I told him ‘I need to go back to school and finish my degree‘ he simply replied ‘I don’t have a degree. why do you need one? ray and I are going to europe for a few months, why don’t you stay in our house until we come back?‘. I didn’t need any more persuading than that!

DB: what did you work on while you were there?

DS: a bit of everything; photography, graphic design, illustration, ads for herman miller, sets for films. many, many different things. after working there for three years I applied for a fulbright scholarship to study at the hochschule für gestaltang in ulm, germany and a year later I got it. so I was there for four years in my first stint.

DB: have the eames been the biggest influence on your work?

DS: ray and charles along with alexander girard who worked with us were great mentors to me. another experience from those days that really shaped me a lot was my first trip to mexico. I went there in the early 1950s to take photos as part of the research for ‘the day of the dead’ film and was really taken-back by the place, the people, the culture. the vibrancy of color that I discovered there has always stayed with me, the bright yellow and magenta icing on the sugar skulls and sweet breads – amazing! it was the first time I had been to another country and I absolutely loved it. that really whetted my appetite to travel more and before I knew it I was off to germany.



DB: what eventually made you want to start your own company?

DS: in my second stint at eames I worked on mathematica, then I went to india to work on the exhibition ‘nehru: the man and his india’ and then ended up back in california. at that time people started asking me to work on things for them and I was using my desk at the eames office after-hours to get these side projects done. as the side projects became bigger and more frequent I became uncomfortable working on them at their office, I didn’t want to disrespect them in any way so decided I’d go it alone. frank gehry offered me a space at his office and I started working from there. I worked with him on some projects and also with other architects, advertising agencies, shops and slowly ended up needing my own space. over the years the office has grown and switched locations several times and in the middle of it all I met my husband, paul prejza and we work together with our team on an interesting blend of civic, cultural and commercial projects.

DB: how would you describe your style to someone who hasn’t seen your work before?

DS: exuberant and bold.

DB: what traps should a young designer avoid when working on an environmental design project?

DS: one of the most common traps is not understanding scale. you need to test your design with physical scale-models and if possible at full scale. that’s a very important exercise, you can’t always understand scale on on a computer screen.

DB: what are your thoughts on specialization vs generalization?

DS: I’m most certainly a generalist. I enjoy all the different arts too much to only do one thing all of the time.

DB: what are you passionate about apart from design?

DS: poetry. I would have said photography some years back but now it’s definitely poetry. I write free verse poetry, often about the way I see things and for the last few years myself and juan felipe herrera (poet laureate of california) have been writing poems back and forth to one another, that’s something I have a lot of fun with.

DB: do you have any superstitious beliefs?

DS: I do and it’s a bit silly but I’ll tell you! I think that whatever you do on new year’s day, you will do for the rest of the year… so it’s nice to drink plenty of champagne.

DB: what’s the best piece of advice you have ever been given?

DS: a couple of pieces of advice that I often remember are:
‘stick to the concept’ – charles eames
‘the best thing we can do for our clients is not obey them, but inspire them’ – alexander girard

DB: what’s the worst piece of advice you have ever been given?

several people have told me over the years ‘just give them what they want‘ with regards to clients, and I just can’t bring myself to do it. I have to inspire them and that can sometimes be a very dangerous attitude to have because you can loose yourself a lot of money!"
deborahsussman  2013  interviews  charleseames  eames  eamesstudio  design  education  losangeles  graphicdesign  graphics  konradwachsmann  illustration  alexandergirard  generalists  specialization  specialists  california 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The colorful world of Deborah Sussman | A Walker in LA
"The last story I wrote about Deborah was an as-told-to about the 84 Olympics published in Los Angeles Magazine’s 80s issue this summer. As soon as I heard we had lost Deborah, I decided to publish the entire interview here, not only because she tells some fabulous stories about the Olympics, but also because the whole conversation reveals so much about Deborah herself. Just as I was typing it all in here, I could feel her personality leaping off the screen.

I spent several hours at Deborah’s home, which is filled with colorful trinkets gathered from around the world (and Eames loungers, of course). She insisted on pouring us tall flutes of cava at 4 in the afternoon. “It’s much better than champagne,” she said as she set the bottle on the counter, definitively. I took a sip and held up the flute to the light. She was right. The bubbles were tinier and sparklier than any effervescent drink I’d ever had. How had I never noticed this? Of course Deborah had.

For those of us who were lucky enough to know her work—and her blue fur boas and her Rudi Gernreich dresses—you can see that it is that same attention to detail which drove all her creative decisions, from her adamant insistence to use native LA flowers for the athletes’ bouquets during the Olympics, to always selecting the perfect shade of hot pink.

When I wrote a story for New York Times about the opening of her retrospective, one thing she said still resonates with me:
“Isn’t this something?” Sussman remarked, her turquoise-lined eyes glittering behind purple-framed eyeglasses. “All my life, I was a hard worker, and I would add that much of the time, I loved what I was working on.”

I hope one day I can stand in a room looking back at my life like that and think the very same thing. I think she would really enjoy me sharing with you some of these never-before-heard tales about one of the things she loved working on the most."

[See also: http://blogs.kcrw.com/dna/deborah-sussman-passes-after-long-and-vivid-career
http://www.designboom.com/design/deborah-sussman-interview-12-11-2013/
http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/17/on-view-the-designer-who-helped-give-l-a-its-look/ ]
deborahsussman  2014  losangeles  design  interviews  eamesstudio  graphics  graphidesign  alissawalker  eames 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Old School Color Cycling with HTML5 | EffectGames.com
"Anyone remember Color cycling from the 90s? This was a technology often used in 8-bit video games of the era, to achieve interesting visual effects by cycling (shifting) the color palette. Back then video cards could only render 256 colors at a time, so a palette of selected colors was used. But the programmer could change this palette at will, and all the onscreen colors would instantly change to match. It was fast, and took virtually no memory. Thus began the era of color cycling.

Most games used the technique to animate water, fire or other environmental effects. Unfortunately, more often than not this looked terrible, because the artist simply drew the scene once, picked some colors to be animated and set them to cycle. While this technically qualified as "color cycling", it looked more like a bad acid trip. For an example, just look at the water in this game.

However, there was one graphic artist who took the technique to a whole new level, and produced absolutely breathtaking color cycling scenes. Mark J. Ferrari, who also illustrated all the original backgrounds for LucasArts Loom, and some for The Secret of Monkey Island, invented his own unique ways of using color cycling for envrironmental effects that you really have to see to believe. These include rain, snow, ocean waves, moving fog, clouds, smoke, waterfalls, streams, lakes, and more. And all these effects are achieved without any layers or alpha channels -- just one single flat image with one 256 color palette.

Unfortunately the art of color cycling died out in the late 90s, giving way to newer technologies like 3D rendering and full 32-bit "true color" games. However, 2D pixel graphics of old are making a comeback in recent years, with mobile devices and web games. I thought now would be the time to reintroduce color cycling, using open web technologies like the HTML5 Canvas element.

This demo is an implementation of a full 8-bit color cycling engine, rendered into an HTML5 Canvas in real-time. I am using 35 of Mark's original 640x480 pixel masterpieces which you can explore, and I added some ambient environmental soundtracks to match. Please enjoy, and the source code is free for you to use in your own projects (download links at the bottom of the article)."

[See also: http://www.effectgames.com/demos/canvascycle/ ]
animation  graphics  html5  javascript  colorcycling  via:vruba  canvas  8bit 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Brandon - an album on Flickr
"Exhibition of Machine Project Documentation at The Brandon, Houston, 2014"

[See also: http://thebrandoncontemporary.com/machine-project ]

"The Brandon is pleased to present the first retrospective of the screen prints and performance documentation of Los Angeles art collective Machine Project. Bringing together over 50 posters and 25 videos made between 2003 and 2013, topics covered in this show include:

Indoor shipwrecks

Fire starting with sticks

Dog Operas (by and for dogs)

Vacations for plants

Converting cacti into musical instruments

Kimchee

Pizza

Psychics

Music for parking garages

Three disturbed big box store employees

Simultaneous aerobics and butter making

A drag tableaux-vivant reenactment of scenes from the Marlene Dietrich western Destry Rides Again

A workshop on how to escape from the trunk of a car "so that the next time you're kidnapped it doesn't have to ruin the rest of your day."

Described in the LA Weekly as "Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of 'The Anarchist Cookbook", Machine Project is a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, and literature in an informal storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Machine Project also operates as a loose collective of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under the direction of founder Mark Allen, Machine has produced over 1500 events, workshops and installations.

Mark Allen is the founder and executive director of Machine Project, a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, literature, and food in a disheveled storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Beyond their storefront space, Machine Project operates as an informal group of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under his direction Machine has produced over 1000 events, workshops and installations. Mark received his MFA from the California Institute of the Arts, following a residency with the Core Fellowship of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

Opening reception: Friday, April 18, 6pm-9pm.

Additionally we will be screening select videos from the Machine Project archives every Wednesday from April 23-May 21.

Gallery talk: Saturday, April 19, 3pm. Please join us for an artist discussion with Machine Project founder Mark Allen and Houston-based designer and typographer Sibylle Hagmann.

Sibylle Hagmann started her career in Switzerland after earning a B.F.A. from the Basel School of Design in 1989. She explored her passion for type design and typography while completing her M.F.A. at the California Institute of the Arts. Over the years she developed award winning typeface families, such as Cholla and Odile. Cholla was originally commissioned by Art Center College of Design in 1999 and released by the type foundry Emigre in the same year. The typeface family Odile, published in 2006 was awarded the Swiss Federal Design Award. Her work has been featured in numerous publications and recognized by the Type Directors Club of New York and Japan, among others. Her typeface collections are available from Kontour.com, a type foundry launched in 2012.

Machine Project Website
http://machineproject.com/

Kontour
http://www.kontour.com/ "
machineproject  exhibits  thebrandon  houston  losangeles  2014  graphicdesign  design  graphics  print  screenprinting  kontour  sibyllehagmann  typography 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Everything Studio
"We are a multidisciplinary design firm in New York City, working in all areas of print and interactive design.

Everything Studio is the annoyingly self-aggrandizing name of our company, but don’t let it put you off. We’re not implying that we can do everything or know everything. We are people who hold many uncertain and contradictory ideas about design. It is impossible for us to ever settle on a house style or methodology so our name is deliberately indeterminate.

Our logo is a Bucky Fuller geodesic dome, which for us represents uplifting Modernist optimism. Some people miss our reference and see it as a jungle gym — an even more joyous and apt allusion for a design practice.

Jessica Green and Tom Griffiths are the proprietors of Everything Studio. They first met at Pratt Institute in 2000 while studying graphic design. In 2004 Tom went on to receive an MFA at Yale while Jessica started a design company in New York. In 2007 they joined forces and began designing under the name Everything Studio."

[via http://blog.tanmade.com/post/90074624316/versocovers-frederic-gros-a-philosophy-of
http://www.versobooks.com/books/1640-a-philosophy-of-walking ]
design  graphics  graphicdesign  studios  openstudioproject  nyc  print  interactivedesign  everythingstudio  jessicagreen  tomgriffiths 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Preview: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum | New at Pentagram
"Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum today announces a new name and graphic identity, custom typeface and website to accompany the expansion of the museum, which will open to the public on November 14. Designed by Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and team, the bold identity establishes a flexible branding system for the museum built around a new custom typeface, Cooper Hewitt, created by Chester Jenkins of Village.

Opara and his team worked closely with Cooper Hewitt and Jenkins to develop the identity. Located in the historic Andrew Carnegie Mansion in New York, Cooper Hewitt is part of the Smithsonian Institution, the group of 19 museums and galleries administered by the U.S. government and popularly known as the “nation’s attic.” In a first, the new Cooper Hewitt identity has been conceived as a design that truly belongs to the people: The identity also exists as a new typeface that will be made available free to the public, who are encouraged to utilize it in their own designs. The font has also been acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“We are spreading good design by making our elegant new typeface, Cooper Hewitt, available as a free download on cooperhewitt.org, as well as collecting it as an important example of the design process,” says Cooper Hewitt director Caroline Baumann. “We look forward to seeing how the public uses this new design tool in their lives.”

Opara also helped develop the museum’s new name. Formerly the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, the new name replaces “National” with “Smithsonian” and eliminates the hyphen, simplifying the brand while emphasizing its heritage.

Iconic, engaging and highly functional, the new Cooper Hewitt wordmark forms a perfect rectangle that can easily be scaled, positioned and colorized without losing its strong visual presence. There is an intriguing relationship between the words “COOPER” and “HEWITT” in the new identity: Set normally, the words are different widths. Here, each character has been tailored to help define the overall typographic frame. The wordmark has been expressly designed to serve as the basis for a wide variety of uses.

“Cooper Hewitt’s new identity plays it straight, with no play on visual or theoretical complexity, no puzzling contradiction or ambiguity, no distracting authorship,” says Opara. “Function is its primary goal, and ultimately the logo is important, but not as important as what the museum does.”

In some applications the new Cooper Hewitt wordmark will be accompanied by the signature “Smithsonian Design Museum,” which uses the Smithsonian’s existing identity, designed by Chermayeff and Geismar in 1997 and set in the contrasting serif typeface Minion Pro.

The Cooper Hewitt typeface is a contemporary sans serif with characters comprised of modified geometric curves and arches. The font evolved from a customization of Galaxie Polaris Condensed that Opara originally commissioned for the identity. Jenkins designed a new, purely digital form built on the structure of Polaris. The new font is redrawn from scratch, using the existing forms of Polaris as a rough guide.

Cooper Hewitt will be available as a free download as installable fonts, web font files, and open source code on cooperhewitt.org. Widely used across all Cooper Hewitt media and collateral—from object labels to the museum website—the unique font will become closely associated with its namesake.

Opara and his team have also redesigned the Cooper Hewitt website with a modular format that complements the physical transformation of museum and serves the expanding digital needs of the institution. Optimized for mobile devices, the design makes Cooper Hewitt’s activities, collections, programs and content easily accessible to visitors. The site, currently in beta, is being implemented in WordPress by Matcha Labs, in conjunction with the museum’s in-house digital team. Opara and his team have also created an extensive collateral systems for the various museum departments, including membership, education and the shop.

Pentagram’s Michael Gericke and his team are currently developing signage and wayfinding based on the new identity, to be introduced with the museum’s reopening in November. The revitalization of the museum includes a major expansion and renovation developed in collaboration by Gluckman Mayner Architects and executive architect Beyer Blinder Belle, with reconfigured galleries designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Opara and his team are collaborating with DS+R on the exhibition design and labeling system for the galleries, which utilize a digital collecting device for a unique user experience."

[See also:
http://www.cooperhewitt.org/colophon/cooper-hewitt-the-typeface-by-chester-jenkins/
https://github.com/cooperhewitt/cooperhewitt-typeface ]
cooper-hewitt  design  typography  fonts  free  eddieopara  pentagram  chesterjenkins  2014  branding  identity  graphidesign  graphics 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Cereal Box Characters Look Down at Kids - Scientific American
"Tony the Tiger and his kid-friendly cohort tend to gaze downward whereas the Quaker Oats guy stares straight ahead at thee. Karen Hopkin reports"

[See also: http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/trix-strikes-back/ ]
children  design  marketing  2014  cereal  graphicdesign  graphics  perspective 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Muriel Cooper: Turning Time into Space — The Gradient — Walker Art Center
[see also: http://messagesandmeans.com/ ]

"Who was Muriel Cooper?

RW: Muriel Cooper (1925–1994) was a graphic designer who spent the bulk of her career working at MIT. In the mid-50s, she started as a designer in the Office of Publications. By the mid-60s she was the first Design Director at the MIT Press, where she rationalized their production system and designed classic books like The Bauhaus (1969) and Learning from Las Vegas (1972), along with about 500 others. In the mid-70s she founded the Visible Language Workshop in MIT’s Department of Architecture, where she taught experimental printing and hands-on production. And by the mid-80s, she was a founding member of the MIT Media Lab, designing early computer interfaces."



"The GSAPP exhibitions team did a smart job creating a custom steel structure that suspends three long walls in the gallery, two of them angled. The works are sandwiched between sheets of clear plexi, and appear to float. We tried to mix media, as Muriel would, and treat all media in the same way. We also wanted to mix visual and verbal material, reveal process and show some of Cooper’s teaching materials. Work by students and colleagues runs through the show — traditional notions of authorship weren’t terribly important, and it was an extremely collaborative environment. In many cases, Muriel is the author of the process or system, or created the environment in which it was produced, whether or not she designed the graphic you’re looking at."



DR: Central to our approach is Muriel’s idea of responsive graphic systems and design processes that embed an explicit feedback loop. Describing Messages and Means, the course she taught at MIT and which gives our exhibition its name, she said:

“Messages and Means was design and communication for print that integrated the reproduction tools as part of the thinking process and reduced the gap between process and product.”



What was the MIT’s relationship to design at the time she began working there?

"RW: MIT was doing serviceable design work when Muriel began there. Gyorgy Kepes, a former colleague of Moholy-Nagy’s, and since 1947 a teacher at MIT, thought MIT’s design presence could be much stronger and suggested that they hire a dedicated designer for their Office of Publications. Both there and at the MIT Press Muriel created systems to standardize formats and production and give a consistent look to publications. And her earliest work at MIT — which we debated whether or not to include — is in fact quite “pretty” in a mid-century way that Paul Rand would be proud of (and indeed was proud of; Cooper met Rand during a brief stint at ad agencies in New York, and he later recommended her to work for the MIT Press). It’s not really representative of her later work, which is rougher, and more about process and dynamism, but does suggest her formation, and a point of departure."



"… make more intelligible the highly complex language of science… and articulate in symbolic, graphic form the order and beauty inherent in the scientist’s abstract vision." —Muriel Cooper



"Experiment and play as a part of professional discipline is difficult at best. This is not only true of an offset press but of all activities where machines are between the concept and the product." —Muriel Cooper



"What do you think was her interest in transitioning between spaces, from print to digital, or from flat to dimensional?

DR: Muriel was frustrated with the limitations of the printed page, and always interested in quicker feedback, non-linear experiences and the layering of information. She used an offset printing press, as she said, as “an interactive medium.” So when she first encountered computers, it was clear that these would present even greater possibilities.

RW: Integrating word and image on screen (“Typographics”), in a way that filtered and communicated information based on the reader/user’s interest, was her goal. The computer screen offered more depth, and information environments — real or simulated — offered more possibilities for orientation within this space. It was crucial to her that information be usable. She saw the designer’s job as creating dynamic environments through which information would stream, rather than designing unique and static objects.

Do you think she was aware of how deep our contemporary relationship would be with technology and interfaces?

RW: Muriel seems to have always had the newest gizmo, whether it was a special digital watch or the highest-resolution computer displays available outside NASA — and whether or not she always knew exactly how to use them (she was a bit of a klutz). It also seems that she predicted so much of our connection to interfaces and the need for them to be intuitive and anticipatory. Yet even she may have been surprised at the extent of it. And very likely frustrated. Not so much at their usability — so many products are pretty and intuitive — but at their inflexibility, their resistance to being hacked, or to using them to make new things. I think she would also be deeply troubled by their intrusiveness, and current questions of privacy and mass surveillance. As she noted in an essay for the Walker’s Design Quarterly in 1989 (one of the few that she would publish), artificial intelligence in computers presents important ethical questions for the designer of these systems. Coupled with her awareness of the corporate and defense sponsorship model for the MIT Media Lab, which was indispensable for her research, the question of the ends to which her research might be put was not far from her mind. In addition to being a technologist, she was, I think, always also a humanist."

"Some people believe that the computer will eventually think for itself. If so, it is crucial that designers and others with humane intentions involved in the way it develops." —Muriel Cooper"
murielcooper  design  graphidesign  srg  time  space  davidreinfurt  robertwiesenberger  theservinglibrary  dextersinister  exhibitions  print  digital  interfacedesign  graphics  mixedmedia  gyorgykepes 
april 2014 by robertogreco
The Great Discontent: Ellen Lupton
“It was in college when I realized that graphic design was all about writing—that was an unbelievable discovery for me. I had always viewed writing and art as two separate things; I had chosen the art path and my sister had picked the writing path. I knew that I liked language and words, especially cartoons and visual puns. Even in high school, I liked creating conceptual illustrations that were visually funny, but I never saw myself as a writer. Then I took a typography class at Cooper Union and realized there was an intimate relationship between writing and design. Prior to that, I had no idea what typography was; back in the ’80s, it wasn’t as accessible. Typography wasn’t something you could just do.”



"I think having kids was a big risk. Leaving New York was also big risk."



"Do you feel a responsibility to contribute to something bigger than yourself?
I think that’s why I do the things I do; they are outward and public. Teaching is very much a giving profession, and I put a lot of mental energy and time into it. Time is all we really have, and teachers give their time to others. The other things I do—writing, lecturing, and curating—are about sharing something of value."



“You have to be prepared to give creative work 150%. I hear a lot of young people talking about life/work balance, which I think is great when you’re in your 30s. If you’re in your 20s and already talking about that, I don’t think you will achieve your goals. If you really want to build a powerful career, and make an impact, then you have to be prepared to put in blood, sweat, and tears. I don’t think everybody is willing to do that, but if you have the opportunity to do so, you should. That’s why many people go to graduate school in their late 20s: it forces them to devote intense time and focus to their work. It’s an experience that will change you forever.”



"Speaking of being around others, is it important to you to be part of a creative community?
Yes. Sharing is the whole point of doing creative work. I love being part of a museum and college community; I like doing lectures and being an author because I have readers and the general public to respond to. In return, I also share other people’s work, read their writing, and go to their lectures and exhibitions. Taking part in the community is important."
ellenlupton  2014  interviews  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  design  writing  teaching  education  learning  creativity 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Seventeen-day Studio
"Seventeen-day Studio writes about books, experimentation & experience. "

"The Seventeen-day Studio began on March 29, 2013 and ended seventeen days later on April 14. We formed the studio as an exploration in collaboration, an exhibition of the design process, and an evaluation of the field as we know it. What came from the studio greatly outweighs what we put into it, due to the kindness and generosity of our colleagues, advisors, and all those who stopped by."



[Projects]

"Studio as critique.

As much as the studio is about showing designers in their element, we felt a need to be critical about what we do. Through open collaboration with each other and visitors, we embrace the loss of explicit authorship. We recognize our own ego but do not believe in solitary genius. To achieve this we developed projects which spanned the 17 days. These parts of the studio are meant to challenge the traditional notion of the graphic designer through our relationships with clients and the greater public.

Posters, books, and logos are quintessential so we began there. To explore our use of technology, media, and medium as they relate to the deliverable, we created these systems of making and interaction. The Poster Machine, Logo Parlor, and Bookshop as we called them produced work for a walk-in clientele. They act as introduction to basic concepts of design[ing] and being designed for in a way that was personal for each visitor.

We want to expand the space of graphic design criticism. Through our studio space and by working in the gallery, performing, we present design, the verb, to more than our peers. We used one of our 23 ft high walls to proclaim a diagnosis of the field. Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers, toward eccentric perceptions, unusual actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.

Bookshop.

The print-per-request Book Shop interprets an individual’s reading preferences and habits. We posit that reading is distracting, because it is plastic, creative work that is affected by methods of publishing and the devices we use. Visitor input went into editing and producing a 100 page book that focuses on the parts of books and reading that cannot be read or are routinely glanced over, though contribute the how a reader reads.

The poster machine, an alternative interface.

The poster machine was made to challenge the digital tools that designers conventionally use in making. A series of knobs and switches are used by the machine’s operator to alter the mood and layout of their poster. Each poster is then handmade and machine-made. After playing with the machine the maker sends her poster to print, where it is also automatically fed to our website for all to see.

Logo Parlor, a generative identity system.

The logo parlor generates a logo and 20 business cards in 8 minutes. The piece was developed based on a system in which visitors fill out a form where they rank different skill sets in a scale of 1 to 10. The skill sets are gathered from a survey of most repeated characteristics mentioned by prospective candidate during interviews across different fields. During the exhibition visitors were encouraged to fill out a form and spend 8 minutes with the designer as the process of creating their customized logotype unfolded."



"Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers toward eccentric perceptions, inappropriate actions and feelings, our withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation."
design  designprocess  classideas  projectideas  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  books  making  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  manifestos  workshops  events  studios  printing  publishing  eventideas 
march 2014 by robertogreco
ClipArt ETC: Free Educational Illustrations for Classroom Use
"Welcome to quality educational clipart. Every item comes with a choice of image size and format as well as complete source information for proper citations in school projects. No advertisement-filled pages with pop-up windows or inappropriate links here. A friendly license allows teachers and students to use up to 50 educational clipart items in a single, non-commercial project without further permission.

66,902 pieces of free clipart and growing every week."
clipart  free  graphics  design  images 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Deborah Sussman loves Los Angeles | A Walker in LA
"Sussman/Prejza along with the Jerde Partnership designed one of the most important things to ever happen to Los Angeles. Olympic games are legendary for going over budget and out of control, sometimes leaving cities in worse economic and infrastructural shape than they were before. The brilliance of the 1984 Olympics was that organizers vowed to stay fiscally responsible, electing not to build monumental new stadiums, for example, and use almost all existing structures as venues. The branding elements were made from inexpensive materials—inflatables, scaffolding, cardboard—which carried a huge visual impact with a light touch. A foundation was established with the profits that continues to support local athletic programs. It remains the only financially successful Olympics in history.

And the colors. OH THE COLORS. With shades drawn from Pacific Rim cultures in the Americas and Asia, the palette was amazingly prescient for its time. Just looking at that hot coral color reminds me of a certain new iPhone…

The Olympics are of course not the only project that Deborah and her team worked on—she started her career working under Charles and Ray Eames and has completed projects all over the world—but her legacy is best seen through the work she did right here in LA, in the shops, parks, museums, and many public spaces that built this colorful, contemporary city.

And that’s why I’m so excited that Woodbury University is mounting an exhibition to bring Deborah’s work to life for the next generation of Angelenos."

[See also:
http://observatory.designobserver.com/alexandralange/feature/la-loves-deborah-sussman/38169/
http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/making-la-deborah-sussman-loves-los-angeles.html ]
losangeles  2013  graphicdesign  deborahsussman  1984  olympics  alissawalker  graphics  design  typography  color  eames 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Ben Pieratt, Blog - Internetland v. Print v. Self
"Yesterday I announced Internetland v. Print. a solo art show which includes three startups and hundreds of original print works. It started yesterday and will continue through Fall 2014.

You can read more about it on my site.

The list of New Things I’m trying to pull-off is hard to stomach. Some of them are new to everyone, and some are just new to me:

• Defining startups as art
• Introducing scrolls as a unique media format
• Defining and presenting myself as an artist
• Designing and filling a large gallery space with prints and sculpture
• Pitching a respectable NYC art gallery (or in the case of failure booking a pop-up shop)
• Raising over $350k from sponsors
• Hacking and giving away 1,000 tablets
• Launching three startups in 5 months

And since I have no funding or savings I’ll be trying to pull this off while I do full-time client work and support my family.

In frequent moments of honesty and paranoia, I feel ridiculous and foolish, caught in a loop of my own ambition.

It’s difficult to come to peace with."

[See also: http://pieratt.com/
http://pieratt.com/2.html
http://pieratt.com/3.html
http://pieratt.com/october2013.html
http://pieratt.com/november2013.html
http://pieratt.com/spring2014.html
http://pieratt.com/internetland_vs_print.html ]

"What I've learned through my work is that I love the internet.

I love that a few well-placed bits and rules can grow into a living organism from the behaviors of people all over the world.

I love that it's an abstraction that sits just above us. A new chance to build on our shared humanity, independently of what's come before us.

So I'm starting an art studio called Internetland.

In spirit it's a combination of Disneyland, the Promised Land, and Mad Max. In practice it's a love letter written in the language of startups, and lasting for my foreseeable career.

I've done a series of scrolls to announce them.

A scroll is akin to an interactive poster, but more basic. Ideally they're a new take on an old practice.



Additionally, surprisingly, I've built an analog art process that not only threads and flattens the last 100 years of print, but speaks directly to my digital work.

I'm not ready to talk about it too much yet, but here are a few examples of the output."
benpieratt  internetland  art  design  internet  scrolling  scrollers  startups  print  graphidesign  graphics  2013  web  online  lookwork  varsitybookmarking  2014  holyshit  macland  internetasliterature  internetasart  internetasfavoritebook 
october 2013 by robertogreco
3 | A Rare Look At The Eames Office's Graphic Design | Co.Design: business + innovation + design
"A recent exhibition showcased the ads, packages, and pamphlets often overshadowed by the studio’s work in furniture and film."
packaging  posters  typography  via:johnpavlus  eamesstudio  design  graphics  graphicdesign  eames  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Karel Martens on Vimeo
"Evoking meaning, rather than boldly presenting truth: this is the essence of typographer Karel Martens' work. To achieve this he likes to experiment with numbers, abstract figures and vivid colors.

During the seventies Karel Martens worked for SUN, a socialist publisher led by a group of highly motivated individuals. He succeeded in giving all their publications a very distinctive appearance.

Martens has been teaching throughout most of his career. Like for instance here at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem."

One quote:

"The nicest way to deal with students is to take them seriously, to listen to them well, and to trust them."

[Posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/30376075304/evoking-meaning-rather-than-boldly-presenting AND here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/30377108566/the-nicest-way-to-deal-with-students-is-to-take ]
via:litherland  reality  fabric  numbers  color  listening  trust  graphics  cv  teaching  typography  design  graphicdesign  karelmartens  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Library and archive culture
"an eclectic collection of images and documents of the library, archive, and information management profession"
history  posters  graphics  docspopuli  documents  images  humor  information  informationmanagement  archives  libraries  library  politics  culture  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
MAPS OF FICTIONAL WORLDS
“When I first decided I wanted to be a writer, when I was 10, 11 years old, the books that I loved…came with maps and glossaries and timelines—books like Lord Of The Rings, Dune, The Chronicles Of Narnia. I imagined that’s what being a writer was: You invented a world, and you did it in a very detailed way, and you told stories that were set in that world.”
—Michael Chabon…

My undergrad thesis argued that world-building wasn’t just for fantasy & sci-fi writers—every tale has a setting, every tale creates a world in the reader’s mind—& it explored ways that drawing that world (visual thinking!) can lead to better fiction.

Some of my favorite “lit’ry” books are accompanied by maps.

[examples]

Some writers use previously-made maps to help create their fiction: Melville used whaling charts, Joyce used Ordnance surveys of Dublin, & Pynchon used aerial maps.

Poking around the ‘net I found maps for Faulkner’s books, Treasure Island, and of course, Tolkien…"

[See also the comments.]
fictionalmaps  fictionalworlds  books  literature  literarymaps  storytelling  reference  graphics  writing  michaelchabon  2008  visualthinking  worldbuilding  cartography  mapping  visualization  fiction  maps  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Lessons from the paperback revolution - Salon.com
"…can’t help but imagine how Agel & Fiore would go about packaging a book today. So much about culture has turned porous; surely the range of multimedia possibilities would excite them to no end, resulting in books as radical as ones they produced over 40 years ago. Perhaps they would film a reality TV show based on the production of a book, inviting viewers to vote on book’s content, format, design, & title as an author, designer, & editor tried to work under such circumstances in a studio that also served as their living quarters?

Whatever the result of working w/ today’s tools, I’m sure they would not deviate from what had been their primary focus: the reader. Schnapp & Michaels locate common ground all these experimental paperbacks share in how they empower readers: “Even if this book is ‘by’ a major thinker, you will fill in the blanks, you connect the dots, you navigate the book forward or backward to find the tasty tidbits; look for the patterns, ideas, & story lines yourself."
marketing  1967  graphicdesign  graphics  design  realitytv  infromations  carlsagan  ideas  communication  jeromeagel  buckminsterfuller  electricinformationage  media  print  doubleday  pocketbooks  jacquelinesusann  bernardgeis  jeffreyschnapp  adammichaels  quentinfiore  marshallmcluhan  books  2012 
january 2012 by robertogreco
The Electric Information Age Book (out in January 2012)
"…excavation of moment from e-Book’s prehistory & metabook on cut-&-paste genre of original paperbacks…explores…60-70s when former backstage players—designers, graphic artists, editors, “coordinators,” & “producers”—stepped into spotlight to create a set of exceptional paperback books…period begins in 1966 when Jerome Agel & Quentin Fiore, in collaboration w/ Marshall McLuhan, first developed The Medium Is the Massage into “an inventory of effects”…continues to 1975, publication year of Other Worlds, Agel’s collaboration w/…Carl Sagan. Graphic designers such as Fiore employed a variety of radical techniques—verbal visual collages & other typographic pyrotechnics—…as important to content as the text. Aimed squarely at young media-savvy consumers of “Electric Information Age,” these small, inexpensive paperbacks brought the ideas of contemporary thinkers to mass audiences & established a distinctive new graphics-rich, montage-based genre of bookmaking that still resonates loudly today."

[See also: http://www.projectprojects.com/projects/the_electric_information_age_book
https://www.papress.com/html/book.details.page.tpl?isbn=9781616890346 ]

[Supplement available here in PDF: http://www.inventorypress.com/product/the-electric-information-age-book-supplement ]
adammichaels  2011  2012  text  graphicdesign  graphics  graphicarts  metabooks  otherworlds  paperbacks  ideas  bookmaking  projectideas  media  design  electricinformationage  jeromeagel  quentinfiore  carlsagan  jeffreyschnapp  1970s  1960s  history  marshallmcluhan  themediumisthemassage  toread  booksprojectprojects  from delicious
december 2011 by robertogreco
CSA / Flat File
"The CSA Flat File features current projects from CSA Images, including the daily feature Paper Cuts, a full-bleed source of printed inspiration curated from the millions of images that make up the CSA archives. Paper Cuts span the history of design and preserve the legacy of ink on paper in the digital age."
design  graphics  CSA  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Katie Lewis
"My current work traces experiences of the body through methodical systems of documentation, investigating chaos, control, accumulation and deterioration. The artificially rigid organization of my materials alludes to control-- of the individual body as an institutional domain, and of irrational experience as a manageable, concrete set of events. My choice to use the body as a starting point aims to give visual form to physical sensations that are invisible to the eye and medical imaging, and only exist in the subjecetive realm. I collect data through daily documentation processes, and then generate numerous systems to allow the information to exist in a material form. I abstract and quantify the data in order to give authority and agency to subjective experiences.

The work alludes to the body in certain pieces, through the text or a particular material, but the reference remains abstracted…"

[And from her resume; "1997-98 Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion, Chile"]
katielewis  art  visualization  data  graphics  design  chile  artists  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Paper.js
"Paper.js is an open source vector graphics scripting framework that runs on top of the HTML5 Canvas. It offers a clean Scene Graph / Document Object Model and a lot of powerful functionality to create and work with vector graphics and bezier curves, all neatly wrapped up in a well designed, consistent and clean programming interface."<br />
<br />
[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/7095795141/q-bertify-your-images-with-this-example-of ]
design  web  visualization  vector  graphics  html5  bezier  paperjs  javascript  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
eye | feature : All you need is love: pictures, words and worship [Great piece on Sister Corita Kent]
"Corita’s cultural contribution spanned several decades. Although she described herself as an artist rather than a design professional, her 1960s work spanned both fields. Graphic strategies such as lettering and layout were central to her artistic voice. At the same time, she had no qualms about accepting commissions for magazine covers, book jackets, album sleeves, ads and posters, although even here she should be seen less as a jobbing designer than as an artist with a distinctive and easily recognisable graphic sensibility. As Harvey Cox said, “The world of signs and sales slogans and plastic containers was not, for her, an empty wasteland. It was the dough out of which she baked the bread of life.” 12 At its best, her work proposed a symbolic template that blurred the boundaries between art, design and communication, between a life of worship and the everyday life of her time."
sistercorita  art  vernacular  life  everyday  glvo  design  communication  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  advertising  signs  symbols  via:britta  teaching  printmaking  serigraphs  accessibility  urban  urbanism  decontextualization  photography  noticing  seeing  seeingtheworld  fieldtrips  unschooling  deschooling  education  immaculateheartcollege  eames  viewfinders  process  julieault  2000  1960s  martinbeck  society  perspective  activism  coritakent  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Most Beautiful Magazine You Probably Haven't Heard Of - Steven Heller - Life - The Atlantic
"Tod Lippy is the best magazine art director and cover designer who was never trained for the job. And he's more—editor, curator, filmmaker. What he does so well is conceive and publish, and design, his own magazine, on his own terms for his own pleasure, and under his own steam. Esopus magazine started in 2003 and is now up to issue number 16. It is a foundation-funded, advertising-free, art, literature, and culture bi-annual that employs the most ambitious special printing effects being done today—and each issue also contains a music CD, which Lippy produces.

Esopus is more than the proverbial labor of love. It stands along with Dave Eggers' McSweeney's for its driving cultural significance. But what I am most interested in are the covers."
art  magazines  design  graphicdesign  graphics  literature  toread  todlippy  onemanshows  artdirection  culture  2011  music  sound  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
HORT | better taste than sorry.
"Even the word “HORT” is great. It’s a German word for an after school care center. Why did they choose it?

“HORT – a direct translation of the studio’s mission. A creative playground. A place where ‘work and play’ can be said in the same sentence. An unconventional working environment. Once a household name in the music industry. Now, a multi-disciplinary creative hub. Not just a studio space, but an institution devoted to making ideas come to life. A place to learn, a place to grow, and a place that is still growing. Not a client execution tool. HORT has been known to draw inspiration from things other than design.”"

[Another post on Hort from the same blog: 
http://bettertastethansorry.com/2009/11/eike-konig-everyday-is-like-christmas/ ]

[And look at this, the video that started this whole Hort binge is also on the blog: 
http://bettertastethansorry.com/2011/03/a-tribute-to-eike-konig/ ]
hort  eikekönig  play  learning  studioclassroom  lcproject  design  education  playgrounds  unschooling  deschooling  graphics  graphicdesign  teaching  tcsnmy  openstudio  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  learningplaces  learningenvironments  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
12 Paradoxes of Graphic Design | Abduzeedo | Graphic Design Inspiration and Photoshop Tutorials
"These 12 graphic design paradoxes were designed and written by Tobias Bergdahl and it's great advice for young graphic designers out there. Each piece has it's own paradox followed by an important message."
via:lukeneff  design  paradox  outsiders  graphics  graphicdesign  tobiasbergdahl  clients  education  work  howwework  writing  verbalskills  ideas  professionalism  perspective  self-promotion  understanding  outsider  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Under the hood of the Cognitive Cities Conference. – Your Neighbours
"The logo can be interpreted in many ways, and that is exactly what the conference is all about. Some interpret the C as a map of a city, others see it has a circuit board, or even a collection of Lego blocks. Whatever you see in it, the logo reflects a certain playfulness and level of depth that you’ll also see at the event itself. All the shapes in the “C” are based on a grid which has similar proportions to the New York City Grid Plan. The colors of the logo are randomly generated from a hand picked color palette. Through the use of Scriptographer, we were able to generate many different color combinations that could be used for different purposes. All the colors work on both black and white backgrounds. The type we used for the logo is Forza, a font that was originally commissioned by Wired. Coincidentally, the moderator of the Cognitive Cities conference is Editor at Large of Wired."
cocities  cognitivecities  design  yourneighborhood  graphics  graphicdesign  logos  evolvinglogos  colors  map  mapping  cities  2011  forza  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
NounProject
"Mission: “sharing, celebrating and enhancing the world's visual language”<br />
The Noun Project collects, organizes and adds to the highly recognizable symbols that form the world's visual language, so we may share them in a fun and meaningful way. Here is our pledge to you:

FREE: The symbols on this site are and always will remain free. We believe symbols can not be effectively shared with the world if they are not free

SIMPLE: Everyone like simplicity. We want you to be able to come to our site and effortlessly find and obtain what you are looking for. Simple as that.

FUN: We think a language that can be understood by all cultures and people is a pretty amazing thing. We also think our symbols and the objects or ideas they represent are works of art worth celebrating.

HIGHEST QUALITY: We get excited about things like scale, proportion, and shape. We are committed to design and quality in everything we do."
icons  design  free  graphics  symbols  semiotics  search  archives  nouns  classideas  images  visuallanguage  language  communication  simplicity  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Frog Round
"What a queer bird the frog are:
When he sit he stand (almost);
When he walk he fly (almost);
When he talk he cry (almost);
He ain't got no sense (hardly);
He ain't got no tail, either (hardly);
He sit on what he ain't got (hardly)."
music  graphics  audio  animation  via:britta  poetry  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Kid Pix: The Early Years
"One day in 1988 while I was using MacPaint, the wonderful paint program that came with the Macintosh, my 3-year-old son Ben asked to try using the program. I was surprised at how quickly he got the knack of using the mouse and how easily he was able to select tools. The problem was that he didn't have total control of the mouse and would occasionally (like every five minutes or so) pull down a menu and bring up a dialog box that he couldn't dismiss without being able to read. Everything was fine as long as I was in the room, but if I stepped out for a few minutes I would come back and find Ben kicking on the floor in frustration. This was not what I had in mind for his introduction to the computer."
via:britta  craighickman  kidpix  evergreenstatecollege  reedcollege  computers  childhood  parenting  programming  software  edtech  education  mac  history  drawing  graphics  art  nostalgia  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Lifework - Herman Miller ["Ideal Live/Work Space: Graphic Designer Juliette Bellocq"]
"This interview with Juliette Bellocq is the fourth in the BROODWORK IdealLive/Work Space series. Her studio, Handbuilt specializes in work for cultural, educational and non-profit organizations. In addition, Juliette teaches at Otis College of Art and Design, is part of Project Food LA, a collective seeking to propose alternative nutrition choices to underprivileged communities. Juliette is also a member of BROODWORK, a collective focusing on the relationship between creative practice and family life."
broodwork  juliettebellocq  losangeles  glvo  families  design  graphics  creativity  parenting  handbuilt  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
After the City, This : handbuilt
"This text on urbanism, real estate development and architecture borrows the structure of a screenplay to introduce the reader to the city of Los Angeles. Literally and graphically, this 160-page pamphlet blurs the lines between novel, essay, screenplay and photographic report. The fourth of a series produced by the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design, this publication is aimed at an audience of designers, architects, urbanists and anyone interested in the development of Los Angeles."
handbuilt  losangeles  cities  urban  urbanism  text  design  graphics  architecture  development  screenplays  pamphlets  lafaud  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Seed Booklet : handbuilt
"This small book introduces the story & philosophy of a charter school dedicated to children of immigrant native families. It is designed with a combination of sacred imagery, hand-drawing, and computer generated diagrams. For this extremely low budget book we used newsprint paper and basic black and white printing."
lcproject  schools  printing  handbuilt  design  graphics  papernet  schooldesign  losangeles  learning  education  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Free Images on French - French Paper - America's family-run paper mill
"CSA Images free when printed on French Paper: Restrictions Apply<br />
<br />
This vast selection of rights managed black & white images are perfect for solid-color offset, letterpress, or silkscreen printing. Free CSA High Resolution Tiff Images capture the authenticity and detail of hand-drawn illustration and the beautifully tactile look of ink printed on paper, allowing you to keep the printing simple and let French paper provide the color."
drawing  illustration  illustrations  graphicdesign  images  design  graphics  diy  icons  frenchpaper  paper  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero — Anonymous asked: What advice would you give to a graphic design student? [This is not just for graphic design students.]
"Look people in the eyes when you are talking or listening to them. The best teachers are the ones who treat their classrooms like a workplace, & the worst are ones who treat their classroom like a classroom as we’ve come to expect it… Libraries are a good place. The books are free there, & it smells great… beat them by being more thoughtful. Thoughtfulness is free & burns on time & empathy… The best communicators are gift-givers… Don’t become dependent on having other people pull it out of you while you’re in school. If you do, you’re hosed once you graduate. Keep two books on your nightstand at all times: one fiction, one non-fiction… Buy lightly used. Patina is a pretty word & beautiful concept… Learn to write, & not school-style writing… Most important things happen at a table. Food, friends, discussion, ideas, work, peace talks & war plans. It is okay to romanticize things a little bit every now & then: it gives you hope… Everyone is just making it up as they go along."

[Book list: http://blog.frankchimero.com/post/993864785/you-put-together-the-remarkable-text-playlist-along ]
advice  design  education  frankchimero  empathy  thoughtfulness  patina  beausage  teaching  learning  interestingness  libraries  books  work  life  careers  glvo  tcsnmy  writing  craft  whatmatters  meaning  mindfulness  hope  truth  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  gifts  self-directed  self-education  relationships  discipline  graphics  graphicdesign  tools  wisdom  toshare  topost  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Lazy Hammer [Too much to quote here. Read the whole thing. Don't miss Franks memory from childhood that opens and closes the essay.]
"maybe we should be risky. Many designers waste an opportunity to make new, meaningful things by instead letting someone else pretend for them and making work that is overly referential. Instead of that, designers can use their skills to collaborate with others to create new things. We can pick up that dinosaur toy and play with it a bit instead of the He-Man toy.

Rather than spin our wheels because we’re left without content, we should partner with others who have a message but not the savvy to properly communicate it. It’s combustion through collaboration…

Designers are excellent producers. We do well to steer and hone other people’s creative impulses, we can fine-polish ideas, and craft successful ways to communicate and tell stories. So, I’d say the next time you’ve got the impulse to make something but don’t have a message or story of your own, consider collaboration."
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august 2010 by robertogreco
bruketa & zinic: kvarner visual identity
"the new visual identity for kvarner county tourism office has been developed by advertising agency bruketa & zinic. throughout history, kvarner located in croatia has been known as an intersection of four transport routes. according to bruketa & zinic, the very name kvarner evokes this quadrant, navigational spatial orientation. this is why the source of this visual identity proposal begins with the familiar symbol of the wind rose, which also includes references to navigation, four-sided spatial orientation and wind direction. this motif is then divided into simple geometrical visual elements, their simple forms and colors creating a kind of 'toolbox' for further development of the visual identity of the kvarner region and each one of its individual parts."
relationships  evolvinglogos  design  identity  graphics  logos  branding  croatia  spatial  navigation  geometry  visual 
july 2010 by robertogreco
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