robertogreco + gamedev   34

Robin Hunicke Wants to Change Video Games, But She Can’t Do It Alone | VICE | United Kingdom
""As a developer, it's my job to evangelise the games that I think are different, that are doing new things. And when they come out, I want everyone I know to know about them. But it'd be really awesome if we could somehow give away space, or create platforms of promotion, that were just about innovation."

Robin Hunicke knows a thing or two about going against what the gaming public might perceive as the stylistic grain, the marketable middle-ground, sales-numbers safe spaces of play. Having worked on MySims and Boom Blox at Electronic Arts, the San Francisco-based game designer (and professor of game design, at the University of California, Santa Cruz) moved to thatgamecompany, where she produced Journey. Perhaps you heard of it, as it was kind of a big deal.

Journey was a critical and commercial success that arrived without much in the way of how-it-works precedent, playing like nothing most that picked it up had seen before. A multiplayer game in which human-to-human interactions were all but stripped away. A short experience, coming in at under 90 minutes from start to finish, but with lasting, memory-making resonance. A story told only one way, yet left open to all manner of individual interpretation. Journey earned rave reviews and collected all manner of industry awards (dominating the 2013 Game Developers Choice Awards), and broke PlayStation Network sales records."



"Quite where Woorld fits in the wider gaming landscape, though, is hard to get a handle on. This is a new tool, a new toy, for new technology, coming through at a time when augmented reality is enjoying a spell of popularity courtesy of Pokémon Go; but without that kind of massive IP to drive its marketing, merely the wonderfully colourful and somewhat surreal visuals that Takahashi's fans have come to expect, it's not like the game is about to follow in said record-setter's monstrous footsteps. And Robin sees this problem of visibility, of public accessibility and appetite for something left of the expected, not just as a headache for Funomena, but everyone making games outside of the triple-A sphere.

"There are a lot of very different games out there, but as an industry we're not so good at presenting that in our marketing, and our PR, and the stories that we write. And that's what really carries this medium forward – how people perceive it. How many games get covered that are radically different from whatever else is around? How many of them are featured on the front of the online stores? How many are appearing in top ten lists? When your top ten lists are based on sales, and sales are influenced by marketing budgets, you're only rarely going to see a Papers, Please or That Dragon, Cancer, or Firewatch or even The Witness, right up there amongst the most popular games. And I think it's on us to change that.

"Wouldn't it be great if anyone could make the next Minecraft, or the next Journey, or the next Papers, Please? If independently made games keep growing in popularity, and we keep on expanding the marketplace – because there are a lot of people right now who don't play indie games at all – then that'd be amazing. Let's do that."

One way of doing that would be for distribution channels to place greater emphasis on highlighting experiences that are so far from the norm. "Why not have an innovation tab in online stores?" she asks, rhetorically. "Maybe the labels we're using are out of date. What are they, like, twenty, thirty years old?"

Those labels don't just mean "action", "adventure", "puzzle" or "sports"; Robin's talking about the language that flows through every way that the gaming industry presents itself, how it reflects and addresses issues that eat away at its insides.

"I've been to the White House on this initiative called Computer Science For All, and I try to volunteer for it whenever I can. That's full of fantastic people, and the last time I was there I met with the Chief Technology Officer of the United States, Megan Smith, and she was talking about Maria Klawe's work at Harvey Mudd, and she's been promoting an idea that when people come into the college, as programmers, they get divided into two groups: people who've already programmed a lot, and people who haven't at all.

"So you have experts, and beginners – two safe communities. It's not about gender, or race, or class – it's about how much experience you have. Then, in both of those groups, unconscious bias is being removed from the learning cycle. In this exercise, you will help the robot move rocks into a pile. That's one version. In this exercise, you will help the robot move the groceries from the kart into the boot of the car. The same exercise, essentially. Then in this exercise, you'll help the girls from Frozen move these snow bricks over here so they can build a castle. Same exact programming. Separate the frame from the exercise, separate the communities into beginner and expert, and they're at parity in six years.

"So let's do that across gaming – separate the gender and the cultural status of developers from their work, and from the way we write about it, and the financing, and the relationship of scale from our evaluation of its innovative qualities, and use better vocabulary. We do all that, and in ten years, we'll have moved very far away from the problems of having to discuss things like gender imbalance in the industry, and towards a situation where our values – the things that we value – are reflected in the things that we write, and the way that we give awards, and the way that we promote.

"I think it's just about living the values that we want to live, and saying the things that we want to focus on, rather than reacting to older labels that may or may not be appropriate. There's always going to be room for great art, and room for new experiences. And, if you invest in those experiences, the chances are that one in ten, or one in twenty, will deliver a really big return, on a level with a game like The Witness, or Journey. But it's impossible for one, small person to really know how we proceed."

Impossible at an individual level, maybe, but Robin's words are essential food for thought for what could, or should, happen on a united front. During our time together I ask for her opinion on how to bring more women into the making and marketing of video games – but as she so neatly elucidates in her answer to me, I'm really speaking to the wrong person. And in many ways, video gaming is constantly asking the wrong questions to the wrong people.

Want to get more women into games? Go and speak to the guys that hold the keys to those positions, not the women knocking on the doors. Want to see more innovative, independent games being played alongside the big-budget shooters and sports sims? Consider why those cover-grabbing games are enjoying such heightened visibility, and if you need to add to their oxygen of hype at the expense of something genuinely new. We could all be better at supporting games-makers who want to progress this medium in all the right ways – through sharing, through inventing, through fun, rather than rinsing and repeating what's known to "work". Robin Hunicke is just one of many people wanting to encourage change in the way we work within and relate to video games, but it's exciting to imagine what'll happen when all of the voices around hers, singing equally inspiring songs, do band together."
robinhunicke  games  gaming  videogames  gamedev  2016  funomena  thatgamecompany  jenovachen  keitatakahashi  computers  compsci  education  learning  play  gender 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Robin Hunicke's extraordinary journey • Eurogamer.net
"Hunicke's path to this moment was unorthodox and unexpected. She grew up near the mountains in Saratoga Springs, New York, close to Vermont. Her mother taught maths and weaved. Her father was a nuclear engineer. They lived on a street alongside 20 or so other families, all with children of similar ages. In the summer Hunicke and her friends would build forts in the forest, and race twig boats in the frothing river. In the winter there were board-games and NES. It was a playful, often idyllic childhood, she recalls. Each summer during high school, Hunicke would be sent to art camp, where she'd paint and build.

One year Hunicke and her father built a grandfather clock. It had been, rather befittingly, her grandfather's project originally. He built the base from African red hardwood then, upon realising the scale of the job, shipped the materials to his son and granddaughter to finish. Hunicke's father ordered the clock mechanism from Germany. The finished clock still lives at her father's house. Every time she returns home she listen to the rounded tock of the mechanism. "It fills me with joy," she says. "I love the experience of seeing something you've made come to life."

Video games were a natural fit for Hunicke's nascent interests, combining her mathematical talent ("At night, when I couldn't get to sleep, I'd count the leaves on a branch out side of my bedroom window," she recalls. "I'd multiply that by the number of branches I estimated the tree to have, and that figure by the number of trees in our yard, then our road, then our town, then our State") and her artistic sensibilities. But she has a magpie temperament. "I was interested in everything", she says. "So when I went to college I made up my major, a combination of fine art, film studies, women's studies and computer science." While at the University of Chicago Hunicke's aptitude for computers earned her a job at a police station where she would schedule the officers on a database system. "I soon discovered that was less fun than working on the computer lab at college so I got a new job managing the Mac lab there." As Hunicke learned more and more computer languages her focus narrowed. She began studying for a doctorate in artificial intelligence.

Video games had, up to this point, played only a supporting role in Hunicke's life. Her first love was M.U.L.E., the Commodore 64 game in which players compete against each other and the computer in a bid for survival, which she'd play at a friend's house when she was 12. "I loved trying to outwit each other and the game at the same time," she recalls. It was only when Hunicke started her PhD in AI, and became interested in adaptive difficulty in video games, specifically Half-Life, that she began hanging out with game-makers."



""I needed a break," she says. Perhaps, but the peak she faced in Bhutan mirrored other towering questions in her life. Was she going to stay in Los Angeles? Was she going to stay in her current relationship? Was she going to continue making games? While ascending the mountain Hunicke met other English-speaking climbers who were also taking a step back to examine their goals and challenges. "It made me realise we are all on a similar journey," she says. "That helped me with imposter syndrome." As she came over the top of the mountain, a burden lifted, she says. Then, when she arrived in Los Angeles, she received a message from an old friend, Jenova Chen: would she like to be lead designer on his new project, a game about a pilgrimage to a mountain where, en route, you meet people who fleetingly join you. "It felt right," she says.

When Hunicke joined thatgamecompany she was the sixth employee. The team was working from a "closet-sized room" and had just completed a prototype of the game, which would later be named Journey, in Flash, in which players were represented as coloured dots. "I supervised the first four player playtest," Hunicke recalls. "We brought people in through different doors so nobody knew it was a multiplayer game. Then we brought them together to discuss what they'd seen. These were just coloured dots that could only move or, if the player hit the space bar, say 'hey!', but people immediately would project emotions and personalities onto the dots they were playing with, calling them the 'mean' one, or the 'helpful' one. That's when I knew the idea was special.""



"Takashi and Hunicke make for a harmonious paring. Both designers have a background in arts and crafts and Hunicke's new studio Funomena, founded in 2012 with her former colleague Martin Middleton, is filled with sand, clay, pipe-cleaners, wire toys and so on. "We often model stuff by hand before putting them in our games," she says. Funomena is currently working on three games, one of which, Wattam, is being directed by Takahashi. Wattam, for which a release date has not yet been announced, reflects the foundations of Hunicke's childhood: playfulness, creativity, collaboration. "Keita's view on childhood and play is similar to mine," she says. "People should make things. We want this game to be more about you as a player than about us as the designers, artists and musicians behind it."

Games that encourage this kind of playfulness rather than than seek to force a specific message are at the core of Hunicke's interest. While she holds up Papers, Please and Cart Life as prime examples of what games can achieve she wants her work to have looser interpretations. "I know people who make films who feel their film has a single interpretation," she says. "But they are rare. The majority of people who write or make films and art are just trying to get something out of them. When it's in the world it's there for everybody to draw what they will from the work. Besides, you can't control the context. For example, art that's made in this moment around Brexit could have a very different interpretation in ten years depending on what happens to Britain's fortunes."

For today's context with its climate of fear and uncertainty, of strongmen on the rise, of nations baring teeth, playfulness is, Hunicke believes, a necessity. "We've been spending a lot of time thinking about mechanics and systems as an industry," he says. "Doing something a little more open is important right now for this difficult, sad and important time. We're having conversations about all of the forces that inform how we behave, and how we sustain our planet. They are crucial conversations. But that needs the counterbalance of playfulness. All of the games I'm working on at the moment are about interacting with others in purely playful ways. I hope they encourage people to help one another, not for what they can get out of it, but just for the sake of it.""
robinhunicke  games  gaming  videogames  gamedev  2016  funomena  thatgamecompany  jenovachen  keitatakahashi  childhood  computers  compsci  education  learning  play 
august 2016 by robertogreco
80 Days at GDC (with images, tweets) · laurajnash · Storify
"Recaps and Livetweets of Meg Jayanth's (@betterthemask) presentation."

Taking Risks

"On #80Days, @betterthemask: "my job was to tempt players into making bad choices." Oh, and also writing those 500,000 words ;)

.@betterthemask: "our goal was to teach players that making a bad strategic decision can lead to a better story" omg I'm in love

.@betterthemask talking about tricking players into making foolish decisions "because it's more fun winning by the skin of your teeth"

"It's the near-misses, the catastrophes, the daring escapes that players remember." This 100%. via @betterthemask http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/237810/Narrative_and_design_insights_from_80_Days_writing_lead

The Dark Stuff

.@betterthemask: Don't avoid sensitive topics, but do think ethically and politically about what you're saying. #GDC2015

.@betterthemask: Slave-catching expedition is not a mechanics punishment. It's a narrative consequence for a narrative decision. #GDC2015

.@betterthemask: 80 Days deliberately deconstructs the classism, racism, and sexism of Verne's novel and steampunk in general. #GDC2015

Playing the Sidekick

.@betterthemask: The world of 80 Days turns, but it doesn't turn around you. Not being the most important person is liberating. #GDC2015

I liked the idea of the world not revolving around the main characters in the 80 days talk #GDC

Props to @betterthemask for that - playing as a minor hero was a refreshing bit of humility from the god complex of too many games n gamers.

Romance

.@betterthemask: Romances in 80 Days are important to players, but those narratives are unpredictable. Can't game the romance. #GDC2015

#gdc .@betterthemask on the value of romances that aren't skill checked and cannot be gamed

Behind-the-Scenes

I love @betterthemask’s description of approaching 80 Days as “a machine for telling stories”.

It's about READING #gosh #gasp @betterthemask

"Talking about mechanics and narrative as oppositional completely misses the point."
#80Days
- @betterthemask

@betterthemask, wonderful talk about building a strong narrative foundation while embracing constraints and collaboration. #GDC2015

On getting lost in research - 80-90% of the research @betterthemask did never made it into the game; rabbit-holes not avoided on 80 Days.

.@betterthemask: In games, you have to create your own editing process. Find a first reader & redraft. Protect redrafting time. #GDC2015

Writers: think ethically about your game writing, what you leave out is as critical as what you put in. seek criticism- @betterthemask

.@betterthemask: Hire writers early and involve them in the process! (I couldn't agree more.) Use each other's strengths. #GDC2015

.@betterthemask: Make efficient design choices; figure out how to be as lazy as possible. It's a necessity. #GDC2015

Things I didn't know about 80 Days:

.@betterthemask: 80 Days has more text than the LOTR trilogy (but not as much as the first five ASOIAF books). :) #GDC2015

.@betterthemask: Europe is all introductory. Asia adds complexity. Americas ramps up the tension. #GDC2015

So it turns out you can die tragically in @betterthemask's 80 days. Kinda stunned here http://www.inklestudios.com/80days/journeys/?id=7qwvUJqmv4&playerName=@john_brindle

Recaps

Narrative and design insights from 80 Days' writing lead
http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/237810/Narrative_and_design_insights_from_80_Days_writing_lead.php

ICYMI @_shortgame on 80 Days, we pile on praise, mock “evocative”, fail at French and hype camels, drag, romance… http://www.theshortgame.net/36-80-days/ "
via:robinsloan  80days  games  gamedesign  videogames  gamedev  gaming  storytelling  writing  megjayanth  edg  srg  research  process  howwework  reading  howweread  text  interactivefiction  collaboration  constraints  tension  complexity  gamedevelopment  if 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Gamasutra - Robin Hunicke's idealistic, silly, wonderful view of video games
""Who is our player?; Why do they care about this experience?; Why would a kid say to their parent, 'Hey, come and play this with me'?; Why would a girl turn to her boyfriend and say, 'Oh my gosh, we have to play this game together!'?" she asks.

These are the questions that Hunicke is asking as she and her team try to figure out how video games impact peoples' lives. They're difficult questions that almost always lead to other, more difficult questions. Possible answers are vetted and proven out through the rigorous playtesting and player analysis that she practices. The whole process is sort of a retro-engineering of emotional output in order to arrive at the game mechanics that can spark these emotions and inclinations.

Designing for empathy

Talking about designing for emotional impact also means understanding (or at least asking questions about) empathy. For Hunicke, she says designing for empathy may start here: "If you wanted to make a game that increased empathy on the planet, you'd ask yourself, 'Why do people not pay attention to one another? Why don't we care about one another?'"

This is an interesting angle. The obvious question, if you're creating something intended to bring people together, is to find out why people connect, and how. But asking why people disconnect from one another, in a world more connected than ever, can yield more interesting results.

It's a question that Jenova Chen, designer at thatgamecompany and Hunicke's former coworker, spent a lot of time pondering, she says.

"What is it that distracts us from one another?" she asks. You don't have to look that far to see that we spend a lot of time looking at our phones, we spend a lot of time worrying about the Likes on our Facebook feeds and who retweeted our Tweets. There are a lot of what we call "2D friends," says Hunicke. And often even when we're surrounded by "3D people," we instead opt to "connect" with the 2D people. (Just look at how many people are glued to their smartphones next time you go out to a supposed social venue, like a bar.)

"That's the trial of our times -- getting away from the immediate feedback of the 2D world that is inside of a device," says Hunicke.

Our culture is one that prides itself on the immediacy of everything, from hamburgers to information. That expectation and hunger for feedback right now causes challenges for game designers who want to encourage players to slow down, think, and feel emotions that are deeper -- or at least different -- than quick adrenaline shots.

"We've talked about this recently, and in my career in general this has come up a lot on the games I've worked on -- the 'gamey-ness' of a game versus the 'feedback' of a game," says Hunicke. "[We talk about] 'juicy' feedback -- the feeling the world is responding you to a beautiful way. … That's more immersive."

She categorizes atmostpheric games like Ed Key and David Kanaga's Proteus and Current Circus' Muse as games that give "juicy" feedback. "I really love that kind of a concept, where you feel like what you do matters, without having to earn points or hearts or that kind of stuff.""
games  gaming  gamedesign  gamedev  robinhunicke  funomena  play  empathy  slow  attention  relationships  videogames 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Sesame best practices guide for children's app development | The Sesame Workshop Blog
"Surprisingly, there are very few resources that are publically available to help guide developers who make educational apps for young children. Much like when Sesame Street was created in the 1960s and little was known at the time about how to best develop educational television, now too there seems to be little standardization for ensuring the best conditions under which children can learn from assets on these new touch screen devices. While understanding learning theories and how children process information through older media can lend some support in these endeavors, we quickly realized that these new technologies were raising additional questions about usability and navigation that could best be answered by experimentation."

[Report is here: http://www.sesameworkshop.org/assets/1191/src/Best%20Practices%20Document%2011-26-12.pdf ]
2012  bestpractices  sesamestreet  appdev  appdesign  education  mobile  gamedev  children  applications  ipad  development  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
The Most Dangerous Gamer - Magazine - The Atlantic
"Thoreau…“With a little more deliberation in the choice of their pursuits,” he proclaimed, “all men would perhaps become essentially students and observers, for certainly their nature and destiny are interesting to all alike.”

Blow clicked off the stereo and turned to me. “I honestly didn’t plan that,” he said.

In so many words, Loud Thoreau had just described Blow’s central idea for The Witness. Whereas so many contemporary games are built on a foundation of shooting or jumping or, let’s say, the creative use of mining equipment to disembowel space zombies, Blow wants the point of The Witness to be the act of noticing, of paying attention to one’s surroundings. Speaking about it, he begins to sound almost like a Zen master. “Things are pared down to the basic acts of movement and observation until those senses become refined,” he told me. “The further you go into the game, the more it’s not even about the thinking mind anymore—it becomes about the intuitive mind."
literature  narrative  taylorclark  miegakure  marctenbosch  interactivefiction  asceticism  storytelling  payingattention  attention  observation  noticing  intuition  myst  littlebigplanet  money  belesshelpful  fiction  jenovachen  flow  tombissell  gamedev  chrishecker  einstein'sdreams  alanlightman  invisiblecities  italocalvino  jonblow  deannavanburen  art  2012  thewitness  thoreau  srg  edg  videogames  gaming  games  braid  jonathanblow  if  cyoa  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
Play My Code | Play, Build and Share games online!
"Play My Code is an online platform for building, playing and distributing browser games. Powered by HTML5, you can build within the browser and embed your games anywhere."
browsergames  projectideas  teaching  learning  children  coding  classideas  srg  edg  programming  gamedev  html5  javascript  from delicious
december 2011 by robertogreco
How Vimeo Lost Me
"I used to prefer Vimeo over YouTube. Vimeo was always a bit better in quality, had a nicer looking player and website. Most importantly, it had a more mature and tasteful community. So when I released my game TRAUMA, it was a no-brainer to publish the trailer for it on Vimeo. It was an arty project that was made exactly for the kind of audience I would meet on Vimeo.

Today, I’m regretting that decision…"
vimeo  gamedev  gamedesign  videogames  2011  video  trauma  indievideogames  krystianmajewski  hostng  videohosting  videosharing  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Codify – iPad
"Codify for iPad lets you create games and simulations — or just about any visual idea you have. Turn your thoughts into interactive creations that make use of iPad features like Multi-Touch and the accelerometer.

We think Codify is the most beautiful code editor you'll use, and it's easy. Codify is designed to let you touch your code. Want to change a number? Just tap and drag it. How about a color, or an image? Tapping will bring up visual editors that let you choose exactly what you want.

Codify is built on the Lua programming language. A simple, elegant language that doesn't rely too much on symbols — a perfect match for iPad."
ipad  programming  ios  development  gamedev  multitouch  codify  applications  via:kottke  interactivity  accelerometers  touch 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Gamasutra - Features - Creating A Glitch In the Industry
"Q: This is like the unholy marriage of Animal Crossing & EVE Online.

SB: …That's actually a very good way [of describing it.] LittleBigPlanet is obviously an inspiration…in the aesthetics. I wish that we had a PS3 underneath this & that we're a lot better on 3D. But EVE, MOOs, & Animal Crossing have a cult following [here]

…I've never played EVE before…never got into it because it just seemed too hard to me. It's my favorite game to read about.

Q: Most games are boring to play & boring to read about. I'm not sure if EVE's boring to play; it's just an investment I don't want to make. But it's fascinating to read about.

SB: I've always imagined that while the fights can be exciting & it can be cool…to have victory in one of the fights, it's not really what it's about. I mean, people are playing the game to create the world. They're part of the corporations because they're buying into the agenda, even if it's roleplaying, against some other agenda. That's where the fun is."
stewartbutterfield  glitch  tinyspeck  games  eveonline  gaming  reading  cv  worldbuilding  2010  interviews  animalcrossing  littlebigplanet  gamedev  gamedesign  homoludens  play  facebookconnect  facebook  zynga  mmo  flickr  gne  wow  simcity  sims  everquest  muds  mushes  metaplace  secondlife  social  experience  thesims  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
GameSalad Creator for Mac - Feed your inner game designer ™ - GameSalad
"Designed for designers.

There's no faster or easier way to get started building a game than with GameSalad Creator. Its visual, drag & drop based style requires absolutely no coding whatsoever. Avoid spending hours poring over code, and spend more time finding the fun.

"Rapid" is an understatement. GameSalad's wide variety of complex behaviors provide almost limitless freedom for varied game genres, styles, and mechanics. On top of its incredible versatility, GameSalad brings a whole new meaning to the phrase "rapid prototyping". Explore the possibilities in hours and days instead of weeks. It's fast. It's versatile. It's GameSalad."
applications  design  gamedesign  gamedev  games  gaming  edg  srg  coding  videogames  ipad  osx  iphone  ios  todo  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Less Talk More Rock- Boing Boing
"Remember when Miyamoto made that videogame about those plumbers? The real revolution with that videogame was in the style of communication. It was a tremendous leap forward in how articulate synesthetic audiovisual could be. Coins looked like they sounded and they sounded the way they behaved in the context of the mechanics. Each element -- the brick, the turtle, the pipe -- was a well-formed, understandable audiovisual videogame unit.
gamedesign  games  gaming  videogames  creativity  design  gamedev  writing  storytelling  supermario  miyamoto  brandonboyer  superbrothers 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Game Design, Psychology, Flow, and Mastery - Blog - External Rewards and Jesse Schell's Amazing Lecture [Saves me the time of writing my response to Schell's lecture]
"I urge you to be vigilant against external rewards. Brush your teeth because it fights tooth decay, not because you get points for it. Read a book because it enriches your mind, not because your Kindle score goes up. Play a game because it's intellectually stimulating or relaxing or challenging or social, not because of your Xbox Live Achievement score. Jesse Schell's future is coming. How resistant are you to letting others manipulate you with hollow external rewards?"

[See also Ian Bogost: "when people act because incentives compel them toward particular choices, they cannot be said to be making choices at all": http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/4294/persuasive_games_shell_games.php?page=2 ]

[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20120531002102/http://www.sirlin.net/blog/2010/2/22/external-rewards-and-jesse-schells-amazing-lecture.html ]
jesseschell  design  gamedesign  ethics  flow  psychology  business  gaming  ludocapitalism  rewards  motivation  games  intrinsicmotivation  persuasion  videogames  education  culture  gamedev  via:preoccupations  gamification 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Perlin Noise
"Many people have used random number generators in their programs to create unpredictability, make the motion and behavior of objects appear more natural, or generate textures. Random number generators certainly have their uses, but at times their output can be too harsh to appear natural. This article will present a function which has a very wide range of uses, more than I can think of, but basically anywhere where you need something to look natural in origin. What's more it's output can easily be tailored to suit your needs."
animation  mathematics  processing  algorithms  math  graphics  perlinnoise  random  howto  programming  visualization  software  design  gamedev  texture  noise  tutorial  via:robinsloan 
february 2010 by robertogreco
the art of play
"Games are now generally acknowledged as culturally significant, comparable with film or television in their economic strength if not their public mindshare. But can they be art?
gamedesign  games  videogames  play  gaming  programming  gamedev  design  art  events 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Ian Bogost - Not Interdisciplinarity, But Love
"As educators in games -- or by extension in any subject formed by the love affair between unlikely mates -- we are more matchmakers than pedagogues. Our job is not to find the best way to merge disciplines that share little commonality of history and method, but to let the two embrace, snit, settle, grouse, infuriate, storm off, and reconcile. Let's reject the cold industrialism of interdisciplinarity and embrace the warm humanity of unlikely mates. Indeed, perhaps the right word for the binding of inherently different disciplines is the same as that of inherently different people: love."
ianbogost  via:preoccupations  games  gaming  theory  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  academia  creativity  innovation  videogames  gamedesign  gamedev 
july 2009 by robertogreco
LÖVE - Free 2D Game Engine
"LÖVE is an unquestionably awesome 2D game engine, which allows rapid game development and prototyping in Lua.
gameengine  gamedev  games  gaming  graphics  free  opensource  coding  linux  lua  programming  tcsnmy  mac  osx  windows  edg 
june 2009 by robertogreco
PLAYPOWER | learning games for radically affordable computers
"We support affordable, effective, fun learning games. We're starting with an existing $10 TV-computer as a platform for learning games in the developing world."
games  learning  videogames  edutainment  gamedev  education  opensource  elearning  etech 
march 2009 by robertogreco
LÖVE - Free 2D Game Engine
"LÖVE is an unquestionably awesome 2D game engine, which allows rapid game development and prototyping in Lua. This project is constantly evolving and changes come and go, sometimes initiated by us and sometimes by the recommendations of others. If you have an idea on how to make the game engine better, it is greatly desired that you contact us and let us know what you think."
design  education  games  software  videogames  programming  edg  coding  osx  gaming  processing  windows  linux  graphics  opensource  mac  development  gamedev  2d  lua 
january 2009 by robertogreco
MTV Multiplayer » “A Higher Standard” — Game Designer Jonathan Blow Challenges Super Mario’s Gold Coins, “Unethical” MMO Design And Everything Else You May Hold Dear About Video Games
"if people get things out of games different from other media ... those things obviously can't be pure escapism"; "the way people act & think 50 years from now will in significant part be determined by the games we create now"; "happiness comes at a cost"
via:preoccupations  games  braid  gaming  culture  videogames  gamedesign  gamechanging  society  escapism  narrative  play  challenge  creativity  storytelling  design  fiction  film  books  industry  gamedev  reward 
july 2008 by robertogreco
welcome to re:Text: Let's Be Serious: Non-Casual Investigations into Alternate Reality Gaming
"I wanted to get a better understanding of the non-casual face of alternate reality gaming. There are a wonderful variety of people out there doing interesting things in the ARG world, and this is by no means a complete catalog of everything going on. Rat
arg  gamedev  games  gaming  storytelling  via:foe  digitalculture  gamedesign 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Giant Mice » Alternate Reality Gaming - A Quickstart Guide [also posted at: http://www.mirlandano.com/arg-quickstart.html]
"So, you’ve discovered the world of Alternate Reality Gaming and are completely confused by it all. You are not alone! Hopefully this little guide will answer a few of your basic questions and direct you to places to learn more."
arg  games  gaming  gamedev  entertainment  howto  tutorials  play 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Gamasutra - Q&A: Quizzing The Queen Bee Of ARGs, Jane McGonigal
"At Serious Games Summit at GDC this year, Gamasutra has a chance to chat with 'alternate reality game' creator Jane McGonigal, formerly one of the team behind Halo 2 ARG ilovebees and a host of others."
ubicomp  seriousgames  arg  games  gamedev  pervasive  janemcgonigal  ilovebees  gaming  culture  collectivism  collaboration  performance 
june 2008 by robertogreco
AvantGame
"about Jane McGonigal's game design, game studies, game research, alternate reality gaming, future forecasts, the science of happiness, engagement, quality of life, immersive experience, collaborative learning, collective intelligence, computer games, pat
games  research  art  play  gamedesign  arg  janemcgonigal  gamedev  future  futurology  pervasive  performance  adventure  gaming 
june 2008 by robertogreco
42 ENTERTAINMENT
"We are the storytellers who pioneer new forms of cross-platform narratives and build powerful online communities, to create highly participatory experiences for our audiences."
arg  games  agency  marketing  interactive  design  gamedesign  gamedev  experiencedesign  entertainment  ilovebees  immersive  gaming  pervasive  play  multimedia  interactivity  studio  42entertainment  agencies  branding  media 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Extenuating Circumstances – SXSW 2008: Jane McGonigal Keynote
"satisfying work to do, experience of being good at something, time spent with people we like, chance to be a part of something bigger, Not money [or] fun...nothing gives you these four things in higher or better quality than games.
arg  janemcgonigal  keynote  storytelling  seriousgames  socialmedia  psychology  economics  play  gamedev  games  gaming  happiness  technology 
june 2008 by robertogreco
iMedia Connection: Alternate Reality Gaming 101
"Curious about ARGs and how to use them in your campaign? Get the history of, and best uses for, this up-and-coming marketing technique."
gamedev  games  gamedesign  arg  pervasive  play  gps  locative  marketing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Christy Dena :: ARG Stats
"The following list provides information about the uptake, impact and awards garnered from ‘alternate reality games’ (ARGs). I have gathered this information from published sources, preferencing of course information provided by the producers of the p
arg  statistics  data  gamedesign  gamedev  ilovebees  gaming  games  play  pervasive  immersive  research  information  videogames 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Core Techniques and Algorithms in Game Programming
"core programming curriculum every game designer should be well versed in-and he's outlined it in these pages! By focusing on time-tested coding techniques-and providing code samples that use C++, and the OpenGL and DirectX APIs-Daniel has produced a guid
programming  games  gamedesign  coding  gamedev  algorithms  development  tutorials  education  learning  via:tomc 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Avant Game: "Reality is Broken" - My GDC Rant
"take what we’ve learned by making games & apply it to reality...not make our games more realistic, lifelike, but make real life more game like...people wake up every morning with a mission, allies, sense of being a part of bigger story, system that wan
janemcgonigal  games  play  arg  gamedesign  gaming  happiness  life  work  human  design  gamedev  psychology 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Areae, Inc.
"Areae, Inc. is a company dedicated to taking the tired old virtual world and making it into something fresh and new. Something anyone can jump into. Something where anyone can find something fun to do or a game to play. Something where anyone can build t
mmog  multiplayer  socialsoftware  games  play  interface  social  web  online  community  gne  internet  software  society  secondlife  metaverse  areae  sandiego  raphkoster  programming  gaming  comics  metaplace  mmorpg  gamedesign  gamedev  virtualworlds  virtual 
december 2006 by robertogreco
The Education Arcade
"The Education Arcade is committed to research and development projects that drive innovation in educational computer and video games. Our research-based creative design, pedagogical development, and student evaluation activities inform the production and
curriculum  computers  e-learning  education  games  videogames  play  learning  interactive  socialsoftware  students  teaching  technology  innovation  social  research  multimedia  kindergarten  seriousgames  henryjenkins  mit  simulations  mobile  edutainment  elearning  gamedesign  gamedev  gaming  pedagogy 
october 2006 by robertogreco

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