robertogreco + fiction + davidfosterwallace   7

David Foster Wallace on 'The Nature of Fun' | Books | The Guardian
"The smart thing to say, I think, is that the way out of this bind is to work your way somehow back to your original motivation: fun. And, if you can find your way back to the fun, you will find that the hideously unfortunate double bind of the late vain period turns out really to have been good luck for you. Because the fun you work back to has been transfigured by the unpleasantness of vanity and fear, an unpleasantness you're now so anxious to avoid that the fun you rediscover is a way fuller and more large-hearted kind of fun. It has something to do with Work as Play. Or with the discovery that disciplined fun is more fun than impulsive or hedonistic fun. Or with figuring out that not all paradoxes have to be paralysing. Under fun's new administration, writing fiction becomes a way to go deep inside yourself and illuminate precisely the stuff you don't want to see or let anyone else see, and this stuff usually turns out (paradoxically) to be precisely the stuff all writers and…"
ego  writers  readers  audience  psychology  howwewrite  fiction  authenticity  2012  fun  writing  creativity  creativewriting  davidfosterwallace  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
There’s a David Foster Wallace Character in Jeffrey Eugenides’ New Novel -- Vulture
"Certainly, Leonard is distinct from DFW in a number of ways as well — the particularities of his family situation, his being a total stud, that he's a manic-depressive, not just a depressive, that he's not a writer, and all the vagaries of the plot — but the similarities are so iconically David Foster Wallace (a bandanna and chew are not common accoutrements) that Eugenides, who did not have a well-known or documented friendship with Foster Wallace, must intentionally be calling him to mind."
via:lukeneff  jeffreyeugenides  davidfosterwallace  time  life  fiction  literature  2011  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Bookshelf: An Interview With David Foster Wallace
"I had a teacher I liked who used to say good fiction’s job was to comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable. I guess a big part of serious fiction’s purpose is to give the reader, who like all of us is sort of marooned in her own skull, to give her imaginative access to other selves. Since an ineluctable part of being a human self is suffering, part of what we humans come to art for is an experience of suffering, necessarily a vicarious experience, more like a sort of “generalization” of suffering. Does this make sense? We all suffer alone in the real world; true empathy’s impossible. But if a piece of fiction can allow us imaginatively to identify with a character’s pain, we might then also more easily conceive of others identifying with our own. This is nourishing, redemptive; we become less alone inside."
via:preoccupations  davidfosterwallace  2005  empathy  reading  writing  fiction  alone  loneliness  identity  suffering  humanexperience  humans  imagination  self  comfort  discomfort  nourishment 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The Howling Fantods! - The Pale King MLA09 Update
"“The subject of the novel is boredom. The opening of the book instructs the reader to go back and read the small type they skipped on the copyright page, which details the battle with publishers over their determination to call it fiction, when it’s all 100% true. The narrator, David Foster Wallace, is at some point confused with another David F. Wallace by IRS computers, pointing to the degree to which our lives are filled with irrelevant complexity.”"
davidfosterwallace  thepaleking  boredom  complexity  life  irs  fiction  truth  irrelevance 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Sam Anderson on When the Meganovel Shrank - The 00's Issue -- New York Magazine
"What new species of books, then, have proved themselves fit to survive in the attentional ecosystem of the aughts? What kind of novel, if any, can appeal to readers who read with 34 nested browser tabs open simultaneously on their frontal lobes? And, for that matter, what kind of novel gets written by novelists who spend increasing chunks of their own time reading words off screens?"
2000s  bestof  literature  writing  media  books  culture  fiction  newmedia  reading  attention  technology  robertobolaño  googlebooks  samanderson  davidmitchell  michaelchabon  davidfosterwallace  infinitejest  postmodernism  daveeggers  junotdíaz  toread  00s 
december 2009 by robertogreco
it’s in ohio - mammoth // building nothing out of something
"Back in August, while on vacation, I read David Foster Wallace’s first novel, The Broom of the System. A pair of geographies he invented, the suburb of East Corinth and the Great Ohio Desert, particularly fascinated me, as they demonstrate how ordinary ideas (the urban plan as figure and landscape as moral coercion) can become utterly alien, when stretched to extreme scale"
geography  fiction  davidfosterwallace  libya  ohio  iceland 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Head of the tiny pack (Phil Gyford: Writing)
"One of the things I love about this non-fiction work is how personal it is, full of reflection on what his subject makes him feel, a searching for why that is and whether he should be feeling something different. It’s an honest self-awareness and self-scrutiny that too few people seem willing to go through. And the self that was exposed to readers was one I wish I could have known. The world, mine and yours, is worse off for his passing."
davidfosterwallace  writing  fiction  nonfiction 
september 2008 by robertogreco

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