robertogreco + factchecking   13

Greta Thunberg has done her science homework - Faktabaari
"On 21st February 2019 the Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, 16, delivered a strong speech [1] at the European Economic and Social Committee in Brussels. Thunberg teamed up with IPCC [2] science and scientists and encouraged politicians to take urgent action to combat climate change.

Thunberg said that politicians should listen to scientists and ”follow the Paris agreement and the IPCC reports”. The speech was considered a success by eyewitnesses [3] and media [4].

We checked the science references in Thunberg’s speech for pedagogical use with top scientists from Finland.

First three of the four science-related claims below were found accurate. The fourth claim about ”a minimum of 80 % CO2 reduction by 2030” would have required more explanation. Overall, the combination of IPCC climate science and an empowered youth raising concerns about the future is powerful. Strong political messages cannot always be evaluated by fact-checking.

That said, Thunberg’s activism can be claimed to be evidence-based and backed by a number of world-class scientists, well worth a nomination for Nobel Peace Prize [5]. As Thunberg claims, she has done her homework. However, defining exact reduction targets is difficult for scientists but important for politicians.

Greta science-based claims 21.2.2019 (full text here [1])

1. ”…by the year 2020 we need to have bended the emissions curve steep downward.”

2. ”According to the IPCC report we are about 11 years away from being in a position where we set off an irreversible chain reaction beyond human control.”

3. ”To avoid that unprecedented changes in all aspects of society\, [actions] need to have taken place within this coming decade\, including a reduction of our CO2 emissions by at least 50 % by the year 2030. And please note that those numbers do not include the aspect of equity\, which is absolutely necessary to make the Paris agreement work on a global scale\, nor do they include tipping points or feedback loops like the extremely powerful methane gas released from the thawing Arctic permafrost. They do\, however\, include negative emission techniques on a huge planetary scale that is yet to be invented\, and that many scientists fear will never be ready in time and will anyway be impossible to deliver at the scale assumed.”

4. ”We have been told that the EU intends to improve its emission reduction targets. In the new target\, the EU is proposing to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to 45 % below 1990’s level by 2030 [6]. Some people say that is good or that is ambitious. But this new target is still not enough to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. This target is not sufficient to protect the future for children growing up today. If the EU is to make its fair contribution to staying within the carbon budget for the two-degree limit\, then it means a minimum of 80 % reduction by 2030 and that includes aviation and shipping. So [it is] around twice as ambitious as the current proposal.”

The two independent scientists involved with IPCC were asked to review Greta’s public speech for science-based claims. They are:

Christian Breyer, [7] Professor of Solar Economy, LUT University

“I can clearly approve her Brussels speech from a scientific point of view, every single sentence.

Specifically about the fourth claim on 80 % reduction target: this is part of interpretation, but let me explain.
The remaining GHG emission budget is rather ’large’, in case we would like to reach the target with a 50 % probability. For a 66 % probability of target reaching the remaining GHG emissions are much lower (more than linear reduction), but to be on the safe side one should go for a 90 % probability to reach the target. The latter implies a very fast and very deep GHG emission reduction, even more drastic than mentioned by Greta.

Now the relevant comparison: the Boeing 737 Max 8 is on ground after two strange crashes, but for all passengers in all flights in all of these planes the security had been higher than 99.9 %. This is a very high level of security.

Honestly, for surviving on our planet, we should have the same drastic measures, if not more drastic.

In other words, to really achieve the 1.5 C target in a very high probability the targets should be even more drastic, i.e. deeper and faster defossilisation than claimed by Greta. Thus the claim is more than fine.”

Markku Ollikainen, [8] Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics, University of Helsinki & Chair of Finnish Climate Panel

“I agree on the general approach and arguments 1 - 3, but based on the climate research and data given by Greta statement I cannot fully confirm nor reject claim 4 on minimum 80% EU reduction target by 2030, as the fairness principle behind the calculation is not explicated.”

This factcheck was published for the use of Faktabaari (FactBar) medialiteracy project. Read more www.faktabaari.fi/edu."
gretathunberg  science  climatechange  activism  globalwarming  sustainability  2019  research  factchecking  data  emissions  policy  politics 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Four Moves – Adventures in fact-checking for students
[from: https://tinyletter.com/michaelcaulfield/letters/traces-40-force-of-impact ]

"So -- shameless self-promotion: I've launched the Four Moves blog. It's a site that has short web info literacy tasks you can use in your class. They are usually structured with a skills in the front, discussion in the back pedagogy that I've found works. I am going to try to add examples daily, with solution write-ups following within a week or so. The comments go to permanent moderation, not displayed on the site, so I encourage you to have your students submit their answers to use so that we can assess and improve the materials.

For those forgetting, the four moves are:

• Check for previous work
• Go upstream to the source
• Read laterally
• Circle back"
digitalliteracy  medialiteracy  media  culture  literacy  mikecaulfield  factchecking  2018  bullshitdetection 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Checkdesk | Meedan
"SHOW YOUR WORK
Verify digital media consistently and openly for your team and your readers. You can collate and organize your findings on Checkdesk’s verification log so others can replicate the steps. Share your results confidently as you draw research from multiple sources.

INVESTIGATE TOGETHER
Work quickly as a distributed team on Checkdesk with simple user accounts and group management. Open the door to contributions from your newsroom and your broader network of researchers, experts and citizen journalists.

PUBLISH ANYWHERE
Easily share and embed your findings on your primary news site. The Checkdesk embed automatically updates with new reports and a verification status, allowing you to safely share contested media."
meedan  checkdesk  journalism  bookmarking  research  publishing  via:unthinkingly  verification  media  socialmedia  factchecking 
january 2016 by robertogreco
LazyTruth
"LazyTruth is a free Gmail gadget that automatically triggers fact-checked content when you receive a misleading email forward."
lazytruth  truth  factchecking  gmail  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Lifespan of a Fact | W. W. Norton & Company
"An innovative essayist and his fact-checker do battle about the use of truth and the definition of nonfiction.

How negotiable is a fact in nonfiction? In 2003, an essay by John D’Agata was rejected by the magazine that commissioned it due to factual inaccuracies. That essay—which eventually became the foundation of D’Agata’s critically acclaimed About a Mountain—was accepted by another magazine, The Believer, but not before they handed it to their own fact-checker, Jim Fingal. What resulted from that assignment was seven years of arguments, negotiations, and revisions as D’Agata and Fingal struggled to navigate the boundaries of literary nonfiction.

This book reproduces D’Agata’s essay, along with D’Agata and Fingal’s extensive correspondence. What emerges is a brilliant and eye-opening meditation on the relationship between “truth” and “accuracy” and a penetrating conversation about whether it is appropriate for a writer to substitute one for the other."

[via: http://www.theamericancrawl.com/?p=1008 ]
accuracy  facts  truth  journalism  publishing  literarynonfiction  nonfiction  writing  jimfingal  johnd'agata  factchecking  toread  books  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Bull beware: Truth goggles sniff out suspicious sentences in news » Nieman Journalism Lab
"A graduate student at the MIT Media Lab is writing software that can highlight false claims in articles, just like spell check."
journalism  truth  lies  media  news  2011  bullshitdetection  writing  factchecking  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Anna Andersen: A Deconstruction Of “Iceland’s On-going Revolution” | The New Significance
"To the contrary of the message put forth in this article, “Iceland’s On-going Revolution,”  and the notion that Iceland was able to resist the shock doctrine, he says: “The political debate in Iceland has gotten horribly stale and repetitive. In some places Iceland is held up as being a model of how to survive an economic crisis and rebuild society. For most Icelanders this seems totally wrong. Some politicians, including our President, like to flaunt this view when they go abroad, but this is definitely not the feeling in Iceland.”

So, @NaomiAKlein have we crushed the hopes of millions? As a publication we strive to practice good journalism, though we have to say that a part of us is reluctant to correct these kinds of articles, as it is nice to see citizens of other nations, like Spain and Portugal, being inspired by our story. Hope has to come from somewhere."
iceland  2011  naomiklein  journalism  revolution  factchecking  annaandersen  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
All we want are the facts, ma'am
"OK, so Wired had an important insight, but missed the real story, and misquoted me. At the time I was willing to shrug off the misquote. But the New Yorker article inspired me to aspire higher. Publications can and should have a higher standard for accuracy, and we readers should call them on it when they miss.
peternorvig  science  journalism  factchecking  modeling  philosophy  statistics  complexity  chrisanderson  research 
march 2009 by robertogreco
QDN: Improving the classroom learning experience
"I gotta say, this idea — a professor intentionally introducing a single falsehood into each of his lectures, challenging the class to find it and expose it — is pretty great for a slew of reasons."
colleges  universities  factchecking  information  infoliteracy  literacy  skepticism  pedagogy  teaching  learning 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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