robertogreco + drawing   233

Scribble
"Scribble together in real time, from anywhere. Native iOS app and cross-platform web collaboration.

Use with anyone
No iPad? Draw using the web app on Android or desktop. Your whole class, team, or family can join with an instant 4-digit code or shareable link.

Works with what you’ve got
Add a whiteboard alongside any call in seconds - Hangouts, FaceTime, or a phone call. Fellow scribblers won't need an account or subscription.

Endless Space, Synced Focus
Scroll down with two-fingers to create more space on your board instantly and endlessly. Scrolling and focus syncs across all users, so there’s no getting lost.

The world is your canvas

Start with a plain whiteboard, or attach any image or PDF to mark it up. Snap a picture of something and start doodling on it together with just 2 taps!

When you are finished you can share the board as a PDF.

Features
💻 Cross platform
Create new whiteboards from iOS. Invite your Android or desktop friends to draw using the web app.

↕ Infinite Space
Enjoy infinite drawing space and synced focus, so everyone sees the same area at the same time.

👉 Point and gesture
Use the laser pointer to circle or point.

✏️ Better with Apple Pencil
Scribble is the perfect fit for iPad and Pencil.

👀 Broadcast your drawing
Draw and invite others to watch from anywhere.

✨ Glitter
Because everything in this world deserves some glitter!

Who is it for?
Scribble was born out of combined frustration: Bridger was trying to tutor his niece across the country, and May-Li was trying to sketch ideas with designers far away.

It’s ideal for tutors working with a student from home, remote teams, or for anyone who wants to share an idea visually in real time.

Complex thoughts are even harder to communicate without a whiteboard. Download Scribble now and see how simple it is to get your ideas across."
applications  ios  ipad  whiteboard  drawing  collaboration  software  android  webapp 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Pomological Watercolor Collection
"The USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection documents fruit and nut varieties developed by growers or introduced by USDA plant explorers around the turn of the 20th century. Technically accurate paintings were used to create lithographs illustrating USDA bulletins, yearbooks, and other series distributed to growers and gardeners across America.

Fast Facts:

• Time period: 1886 to 1942, with the majority created between 1894 and 1916.
• Content: 7,584 watercolor paintings, lithographs and line drawings, including 3,807 images of apples.
• Fruit origins: The plant specimens illustrated originated in 29 countries and 51 states and territories in the U.S.
• Artists: The paintings were created by approximately twenty-one artists commissioned by USDA for this purpose. Some works are not signed."
archives  art  food  illustration  fruit  nuts  drawing  lithographs 
february 2019 by robertogreco
A year of drawing
"My son Jules woke up on Christmas last year and started drawing. He was 2. (His birthday is in March.)

Inspired by Sylvia Fein’s book Heidi’s Horse, which collects her daughters drawings from toddler to teenage years, I thought it’d be interesting to see how his drawings developed over the next 12 months."
childhood  children  drawing  art  children'sdrawings  austinkleon  2018  2019  juleskleon 
january 2019 by robertogreco
‎Procreate on the App Store
"Apple Design Award winner and App Store Essential – Procreate is the most powerful sketching, painting and illustration app ever designed for a mobile device, built for creative professionals. This complete artist’s toolbox helps you create beautiful sketches, inspiring paintings, and stunning illustrations anywhere you are. Procreate features ground-breaking canvas resolution, 136 incredible brushes, an advanced layer system, and is powered by Silica M: the fastest 64-bit painting engine on iOS.
Create a canvas and start painting with any of Procreate’s exclusive dual-texture brushes. Use the immediately responsive smudge tool to perfectly blend colour with any brush in your library. With Procreate’s incredibly high-resolution canvases you can print your artwork at massive sizes. Experience the revolutionary selection, transform, and perspective tools built exclusively for multitouch and finish your illustration with stunning cinema-quality effects. Procreate’s powerful and intuitive interface always puts your art in focus.

With a deep range of professional quality features, Procreate has all the power a creative needs."
applications  ios  ipad  photoshop  painting  paint  drawing  illustration 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Web Paint - Chrome Web Store
[via: https://chromeunboxed.com/web-paint-chrome-extension-marking-up-websites/ ]

"Draw shapes, lines, and add text to live web pages and take screenshot.
Web Paint provides the following easy to use drawing tools that let you draw shapes, lines, and add text to live web pages and take screenshot (touch screen supported):

Pencil tool - draw a custom line with the selected line width and color.
Eyedropper tool - pick a color from the web page or your drawings and use it for drawing.
Text tool - insert text into the web page with the selected color and transparency.
Line tool - draw a straight line with the selected line width, transparency and color.
Quadratic curve - draw a quadratic curve with the selected line width, transparency and color.
Bezier curve - draw a bezier curve with the selected line width, transparency and color.
Polygon tool - draw a polygon with the selected line width, transparency and color.
Ellipse tool - draw an ellipse or a circle with the selected line width, transparency and color.
Paint bucket tool - fill an area with selected color and transparency.
Color picker - select a color for the text and line.
Transparency slider - select a transparency for the text and line. (Drag the slider to the left to decrease the value and to the right to increase the value)
Line width slider - select a line width. (Drag the slider to the left to decrease the value and to the right to increase the value)
Rectangle tool - draw a rectangle with the selected line width, transparency and color.
Cursor tool - interact with the web page.
Eraser tool - erase part of your drawings.
Screenshot tool - take a screenshot of the current web page with your drawings.
Exit button - clear your drawings and disable the tools.

Please click the extension icon in the upper right of your browser to enable the tools."
chrome  onlinetoolkit  extensions  drawing  painting 
march 2018 by robertogreco
The Challenge of a Straight Line - YouTube
"Explore key methods Concrete Artists in Brazil and Argentina used to create perfectly straight edges in paint. This video is one of three that accompanied the “Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros” (September 16, 2017 – February 11, 2018) at the Getty Museum. For more information visit https://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/cisneros/ "
art  drawing  technique  lines  classideas  arthistory  brasil  brazil  argentina  patriciaphelpsdecisneros  hermelindofiaminghi  raúllozza  juanmelé  rhodrothfuss  willysdecastro  craft  howto  tutorials  research  tape  2017 
february 2018 by robertogreco
idizwadidiz - YouTube
"idizwadidiz
Isiah Medina, CAN, Digital Video, 7 min, Sound, 2016"

"by Isiah Medina

http://kinet.media/films/program-08/idizwadidiz "

"Two take a walk and draw. It is what it is, idizwadidiz, c'est ce que c'est, seskecé. Nice weather."
film  isiahmedina  video  walking  drawing  2016  via:fantasylla 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Caveman drawings
"Our two-year-old, Jules, our little caveman, started drawing dozens of skeletons a few days ago, and in response to my posts about them, an Instagram follower commented, “They’re like ancient cave drawings.” I immediately thought of the work of Sylvia Fein, a painter who wrote two really interesting books about children’s artwork: Heidi’s Horse, a record of her daughter’s drawings of horses from the ages of 2 to 17, and First Drawings: Genesis of Visual Thinking, which compares children’s drawings to the cave paintings and drawings of our ancestors. The books can be hard to track down, so here are a few examples from First Drawings, below:

[images]

I love these books because they honor the work of children’s drawing — their play — by paying close attention to it, and they show how the development of children’s visual thinking echoes the development of our species’ visual thinking. Children do the work of developing powers that we have evolved over thousands of years, all in the span of a decade or two.

I also love these books because they are about intense looking and observation, and they explore their arguments through simple juxtaposition. I know of at least two other books — both favorites of mine — that use this method: David Hockney’s Secret Knowledge, which compares post-photography painting to medieval pre-optics paintings, and Norman Brosterman’s Inventing Kindergarten, which compares the art of kindergarteners to the art of modernist artists and architects.

Sylvia Fein is a terrific painter who, to my knowledge, is still working at the age of 98. Here’s a 2014 documentary about her life and work. There’s a wonderful moment when she speaks of discovering working in miniature when her daughter was very little: “I was just in heaven. Everything seemed to go together: my life and my painting.” I’m inspired by the way Fein was able to integrate motherhood and art-making. (Above is my favorite painting of hers, obviously a self-portrait, from 1947, called “Lady With Her Baby.”)

The only thing remotely similar to Fein’s book Heidi’s Horse that I can think of is a 1939 exhibit at the MoMA, Creative Growth, Childhood to Maturity, which showcased the work of Dahlov Ipcar, from the age 3 to 22. (She was, by the way, the first woman with a solo exhibition at MoMA.) Ipcar’s parents, William Zorach and Marguerite Zorach, were both artists, and they saved much of the artwork she made as a young child. The press release of the show outlines a goal very similar to Heidi’s Horse: “it shows the creative growth from infancy to adulthood of an individual who is neither a genius nor a prodigy.”

Ipcar wrote about her unique upbringing in her essay, “My Family, My Life, My Art”:
My parents had always encouraged me to develop my own style of art. They both had undergone conventional art school training, but when they became involved in the modern art movement, they found they had to unlearn everything they had been taught…. They had deliberately left me unschooled in art, wanting to see what would happen if I were left alone to develop in my own way.

Ipcar and Fein share another connection: they both found a way to integrate their life and art-making. It came naturally to Ipcar, who recalled painting in the studio alongside her mother, and later, painting with her own children:
People always ask me how I managed to paint when my two boys were small. My children were a joy to me, and there was no problem working with them around — I just let them play at my feet as I painted. They would even run toy fire engines up and down my easel, but it didn’t bother me.

This is very much what I am attempting here, at the kitchen table, at this very moment, while the two boys draw quietly beside me, long enough for me to press “Publish.”
children'sdrawings  children'sart  2017  austinkleon  sylviafein  parenting  dahlovipcar  drawing  children  art  artists  moma  childhood 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Out Now: Conditional Design Workbook
"Conditional Design is a design method formulated by the graphic designers Luna Maurer, Jonathan Puckey, Roel Wouters and the artist Edo Paulus which foregrounds process over finished products. As a design strategy, it is defined by playfully designed sets of rules and conditions that stimulate collaboration between participants and lead to unpredictable outcomes.

The Conditional Design workbook provides insights into the Conditional Design method and invites readers to actively join in and participate in the workshops presented in the book. Readers are taken on a step-by-step journey through the workshops, showing how they evolved. Playing with human interaction, frameworks and generative systems Conditional Design offers endless creative opportunities. The systems are simple, the processes are challenging and fun and the results are often surprising. The book can also be used as a guide to create your own workshop.

Just pick up the book, a pen and a piece of paper and get started!

Find out more about Conditional Design: conditionaldesign.org"
art  drawing  design  classideas  books  lunamaurer  graphicdesign  jonathanpuckey  roelwouters  edopaulus  collaboration 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Line-us: The little robot drawing arm
"Line-us is a small internet-connected robot drawing arm.
 
Line-us mimics your motion with a pen and recreates whatever you draw on screen. Draw with your finger, mouse, stylus or
Apple Pencil and watch as it copies your movements in real time.
The Line-us App then lets you save your drawings and share them with friends or other Line-us machines!
 
Line-us is Durrell Bishop and Robert Poll. We both have many years of experience in product design and engineering. If you love drawing like we do Line-us and the Line-us community will be the start of something fun and exciting."

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2017/11/13/filtered ]
robots  drawing  printing  printers  2017 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Jen Bervin: Artist as Researcher de Make/Time
"Jen Bervin’s interdisciplinary work often combines art, science and writing. One recent project is Silk Poems, a poem written nanoscale in the form of a silk biosensor in collaboration with Tufts University’s Silk Lab, and also published as a book. Another project, The Dickinson Composite Series, is a series of large-scale embroideries that depict the variant markings in Emily Dickinson’s original manuscripts. Jen's work as a poet and visual artist takes her in surprising directions. She says, “I love research because I don’t know what I’ll find.”

Make/Time shares conversations about craft, inspiration, and the creative process. Listen to leading makers and thinkers talk about where they came from, what they're making, and where they're going next. Make/Time is hosted by Stuart Kestenbaum and is a project of craftschools.us. Major funding is provided by the Windgate Charitable Foundation."

[via:

"I love @jenbervin's work. @tchoi8, if you don't know about it already, you should :)
via https://twitter.com/jenbervin/status/920512592409513984"
https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/920517416211419136 ]
jenbervin  art  research  interdisciplinary  science  2017  poetry  making  drawing  creating  artists  silk  writing  tolisten 
october 2017 by robertogreco
LOOPY: a tool for thinking in systems
"In a world filled with ever-more-complex technological, sociological, ecological, political & economic systems... a tool to make interactive simulations may not be that much help. But it can certainly try.

play with simulations
It's the ancient, time-honored way of learning: messing around and seeing what happens. Play with simulations to ask "what if" questions, and get an intuition for how the system works!

programming by drawing
Raw code is too inaccessible. Also drag-and-drop is too mainstream. But with LOOPY, you can model systems by simply drawing circles & arrows, like a wee baby

remix others' simulations
Want to build upon your friends' models? Or challenge your enemies' models? LOOPY lets you have a conversation with simulations! You can go from thinking in systems, to talking in systems.

Like duct tape, you can use LOOPY for all sorts of things:

[image]

However you choose to use LOOPY, hopefully it can give you not just the software tools, but also the mental tools to understand the complex systems of the world around us. It's a hot mess out there.

LOOPY is also open source and public domain, meaning it's free for coders, educators, and just about anybody to re-use and re-mix LOOPY as they see fit. (Get the source code on Github!)

LOOPY is made by Nicky Case"

[via: http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/aug/07/seeing-whole-systems/ ]
dataviz  systems  simulation  simulations  onlinetoolkit  maps  mapping  systemsthinking  drawing  feedbackloops  visualization 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Uli Westphal: Elephas Anthropogenus
"After the fall of the Roman Empire, elephants virtually disappeared from Western Europe. Since there was no real knowledge of how this animal actually looked, illustrators had to rely on oral and written transmissions to morphologically reconstruct the elephant, thus reinventing an actual existing creature. This tree diagram traces the evolution of the elephant depiction throughout the middle ages up to the age of enlightenment."

[via: "Uli Westphal's study of elephants as imagined by medieval illustrators: top-notch visual research"
https://twitter.com/golan/status/900625941243842560 ]
animals  art  arthistory  drawing  elephants  history  illustration  uliwestphal  classideas 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Learning how to learn again
"I continue to be fascinated by how slow, seemingly inefficient methods make my self-education more helpful and more meaningful.

Example: This week I was reading Jan Swafford’s introduction to classical music, Language of the Spirit, and I wanted to see the lives of all the composers on a timeline. Instead of googling for one, I decided to just make one for myself with a pencil in my notebook. It was kind of a pain, but I had a feeling I’d learn something. Pretty much immediately I was able to see connections that Swafford wrote about that just hadn’t sunken in yet, like how Haydn’s life overlapped both Bach’s and Beethoven’s while covering Mozart’s completely. Had I googled a pre-made timeline, I’m not completely sure I would’ve studied it closely enough to get as much out of it as the one I drew.

Another example: I copy passages of text that I like longhand in my notebook, and it not only helps me remember the texts, it makes me slow down enough so that I can actually read them and think about them, even internalize them. Something happens when I copy texts into my notebook that does not happen when I cut and paste them into Evernote or onto my blog.

A lot of this way of studying has been inspired by my son, Owen.

Even before I had kids, I wrote, “We learn by copying… Copying is about reverse-engineering. It’s like a mechanic taking apart a car to see how it works.” Funny now that I have a four-year-old budding mechanic, who actually spends a great deal of his time copying photos and drawings of cars, taking them apart in his mind and putting them back together on the page to figure out how they work.

What I love about my son’s drawings is that he does not really care about them once he’s finished them. To him, they are dead artifacts, a scrap of by-product from his learning process. (For me, they’re tiny masterpieces to hang on the fridge.) Milton Glaser says that “drawing is thinking.” I think that drawing is learning, too, and one thing Owen has taught me is that it is more valuable as a verb than it is as a noun.

I felt sure that my children would teach me more than I taught them. I was not anticipating that they would actually teach me how to learn again…"
austinkleon  education  learning  howwelearn  reading  howweread  notetaking  2017  children  parenting  miltonglaser  howethink  memory  notebooks  janswafford  drawing  unlearning  copying  closereading  attention  writing 
august 2017 by robertogreco
When Your Teacher Keeps Saying You Can’t Draw Cats, But Your Paintings Are Photorealistic | Bored Panda
"If you showed somebody these drawings and told them that they were accurate representations of cats, they'd probably laugh at you. But the truth is that they're actually purrfect depictions of our furry feline friends. Sure they're a little abstract, and ok, you might need to use your imagination with some of them, but as you can see from the pictures that inspired them, they're closer to the real thing than you might think. They were drawn by Heloisa, an artist from Brazil who posts their super-realistic creations on their Twitter account called Poorly Drawn Cats. Which one do you like the most? Let us know in the comments."
humor  cats  drawing 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Image-to-Image Demo - Affine Layer
"Recently, I made a Tensorflow port of pix2pix by Isola et al., covered in the article Image-to-Image Translation in Tensorflow. I've taken a few pre-trained models and made an interactive web thing for trying them out. Chrome is recommended.

The pix2pix model works by training on pairs of images such as building facade labels to building facades, and then attempts to generate the corresponding output image from any input image you give it. The idea is straight from the pix2pix paper, which is a good read."

[See also: https://phillipi.github.io/pix2pix/

"We investigate conditional adversarial networks as a general-purpose solution to image-to-image translation problems. These networks not only learn the mapping from input image to output image, but also learn a loss function to train this mapping. This makes it possible to apply the same generic approach to problems that traditionally would require very different loss formulations. We demonstrate that this approach is effective at synthesizing photos from label maps, reconstructing objects from edge maps, and colorizing images, among other tasks. As a community, we no longer hand-engineer our mapping functions, and this work suggests we can achieve reasonable results without hand-engineering our loss functions either."



"Here we show comprehensive results from each experiment in our paper. Please see the paper for details on these experiments.

Effect of the objective
Cityscapes
Facades

Effect of the generator architecture
Cityscapes

Effect of the discriminator patch scale
Cityscapes
Facades

Additional results
Map to aerial
Aerial to map
Semantic segmentation
Day to night
Edges to handbags
Edges to shoes
Sketches to handbags
Sketches to shoes"]
machinelearning  art  drawing  via:meetar  deeplearning  neuralnetworks 
february 2017 by robertogreco
For Teju Cole, John Berger was a kindred spirit | Public Radio International
"You may never have heard of John Berger.

But the English writer and artist, who died this week at 90, changed how countless art students thought about art and maybe even the world.

His 1972 television series and book ''Ways of Seeing" was designed to upend traditional, and what he termed elitist, ways of evaluating art work.

But Berger wasn’t just an art critic. He was also a novelist.

His book, “G,”, a non-linear account of a man travelling around Europe before World War One, won the Booker Prize.

And on top of his novels, he also wrote essays, about everything from his springtime tradition of cleaning out his outhouse, to the lives of migrant workers in Europe.

For author Teju Cole, who also writes novels, art criticism, and political treatises, Berger was a kind of role model.

“It wasn’t just a gathering of many different kinds of things together that made his work influential on me,” says Cole, “it was the particular kinds of things that he gravitated towards. When I started to read him I realized those were the kinds of things I very much cared about.”

Cole says he and Berger wrestle with many of the same questions: “How do you write about photographs?’’ “How do you think about drawing and about art?” “How do you bring the energies of poetry into prose?”

“I was already on a path,” says Cole. “Then I saw, here was this master, who had actually cleared the road.”

In 2014, Cole and Berger even hosted an event together in Ferrara, Italy, called “What We Have In Common.”

Cole fondly remembers sharing a several bottles of wine with Berger that trip.

But he says that one moment that felt especially important to him was when they were sitting backstage together, in the dark, waiting to be called up for their event.

Berger turned to Cole, and made a kind of observation.

“The time before the curtain rises and one goes on stage is a very special species of time", Cole remembers Berger telling him. “Where everything is still held in abeyance, and the moment is still full of potential.”

“And I thought to myself I might be the luckiest human being alive,” Cole says, “because John Berger is unfolding an unwritten essay for me, in real time. We’re sitting, just the two of us, backstage, with no audience, and his mind, which was so avid for what could be interesting about the world, big moments as well as tiny moments, never stops.”

And that, says Cole, kind of sums up the kind of person Berger was.

Lately, Cole has been thinking a lot about one of Berger’s books — in particular a collection of short stories called “Here is Where We Meet.”

In this collection, which came out in 2005, Berger has conversations with friends and relatives who have died.

This is one of Cole’s favorite books.

“Part of the storytelling is about memory,” Cole explains, “but part of it is about how the dead have not gone away. … [They] are always with us, actually supporting us.”

It’s a support that Cole says he is beginning to feel now.

“I felt rather bereft this week,” says Cole, “but as the days passed, I realized that all our encounters -- in person, a little bit in correspondence, and huge, two decades long in his writing -- all of that will always remain vivid and visible to me.”"
johnberger  tejucole  2017  hereiswherewemeet  writing  howwewrite  art  arthistory  artcriticism  drawing  politics 
january 2017 by robertogreco
John Berger: a life in writing | Books | The Guardian
"I just keep on writing and thinking and drawing, which I continued even after I stopped painting. I don't know whether this is true for other people, but it is certainly true for me, that after years and years of drawing it does become a little easier. Unlike writing, which remains as difficult as ever. So while I'm at the stage of a new writing project where I am vaguely hearing, rather deafly, the demands of a new train of thought, the drawing goes on every day. It is that rare thing that gives you a chance of a very close identification with something, or somebody, who is not you. So maybe it is not so different from storytelling after all."

[via: http://jarrettfuller.tumblr.com/post/5697765219/i-just-keep-on-writing-and-thinking-and-drawing ]
johnberger  2011  writing  thinking  drawing  storytelling  noticing  seeing 
january 2017 by robertogreco
bubble103 on Scratch
[Specifically these projects:

"The Colour Divide - Trailer"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/70058680/

"Two | The Colour Divide"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/97663280/

"[Now out] A Colour Divide Q & A!"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/111996769/

"Vectoring Like A Pro #1"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/75539018/

"Vectoring Like A Pro #2"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/102075619/

"Ya Gotta ♥ Variables"
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/80209136/ ]

[See also:

https://twitter.com/bubble103_

"Hi, I'm @bubble103's evil clone.
jk... this is my test account...

Follow my main account, @bubble103!
*currently not taking any voice acting requests*"
https://scratch.mit.edu/users/bubbie103/ ]

[via: Thursday Keynote
http://webcast.mit.edu/sum2016/scratch/1631/index-d1.html ]
scratch  vectors  tutorials  coding  drawing  illustration  howto  tarynbasel 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Why Children's Drawings Matter - YouTube
"Children can’t draw very well in the technical sense - but their art has important value for us nevertheless."
bobbykennedy  children'sdrawings  art  drawing  children  schooloflife  childhood  imagination  play  playfulness  inaccuracies  accuracy  glvo  sfsh 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Assorted Stuff : Wasted Spaces
"When I go to ISTE, I’m mostly looking for interesting and new-to-me ideas for using technology to enhance learning. For adults as well as kids. While you can do much of that inquiry online, there is something about being immersed live in the community that cannot be duplicated digitally.

At the same time I also make it a point to attend sessions by a small group of the same presenters, even if I pretty much know what they’re going to say. Because I also know they are people who will inspire me and jumpstart my thinking in unique ways. One of those people is Will Richardson.

During his ISTE talk, Will compared the very trendy concept of makers spaces with computer labs, saying that schools need a maker culture, not spaces. It was almost a throwaway line, a relatively small point in his talk but also one that got stuck in my warped little mind.

Wiil’s view of maker spaces as the new computer lab* perfectly encapsulates the uneasy, slightly negative feelings I’ve had towards the maker space concept, as the chatter and activity around it has has grown over the past four or five years.

It’s not that I disapprove of the idea of kids as makers. I love it. That’s exactly what school should be. But that’s not how the concept is applied in most schools.

As happened with computing devices, someone’s idea of a “maker space” is set up in a corner of the library, stored in a vacant room, or assembled in a cart rolled between classrooms. With students performing pre-planned activities for a fixed period of time, before returning to their “real” work.

In most schools I’ve observed, maker space is a pull out program for students that we know will pass the spring tests. A reward for completing that real work. An option for kids before or after school, or during lunch. An elective for students with space in their schedule.

Maker space is usually whatever the local advocate says it is. I’m interested in robots, so we buy robot kits. The dollar store had a sale on Popsicle sticks, so we construct towers. The principal bought a 3D printer, so we better use it. (Until the filament runs out and we can’t afford to buy more.)

I’ve seen all of this in schools and more.

A school with a maker culture, however, is one in which students are encouraged to explore all aspects of “maker” that interest them. Music, writing, science, video, coding, drawing, cooking, and many, many more topics that may not even occur to adults who think of “school” in very traditional ways. Auto shop, wood shop, metal shop were maker spaces when I was a kid, all of which have largely been removed from schools in this area.

Once upon a time, all of this was part of a liberal education. Providing kids the opportunity to explore a wide variety of subjects during their K12 years. Making them aware of their options. Preparing them for life, not just for college. I know, it’s an ideal view of school. One that in the real world America of my youth was never perfectly implemented.

That’s exactly what a school built around a maker culture would be. Rather than being a reconfigured computer lab.

*******

*An anachronism that should disappear but only seems to be reconfigured every few years with new devices."
makerspaces  computerlabs  making  makers  schools  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  timstahmer  culture  makerculture  cooking  science  woodshop  metalshop  autoshop  drawing  coding  music  writing  teaching  howweteach  classrooms  schooldesign  materials  iste  willrichardson  2016  vi:audreywatters 
july 2016 by robertogreco
velocipedia by gianluca gimini renders crowd-sourced error-driven bicycle drawings
"bologna-based designer gianluca gimini conducted an experiment by asking friends, family and total strangers, to draw a men’s bicycle by heart using just a pen and a sheet of paper. some accurately remembered a bicycle’s frame design, but others drastically varied.


little did he know psychologists used this type of demonstration to show how our brains sometimes trick us into thinking we know something even though we don’t. gimini ended up collecting hundreds of drawings, building up a collection he calls ‘velocipedia’. ‘there is an incredible diversity of new typologies emerging from these crowd-sourced and technically error-driven drawings,’ says gianluca gimini. ‘a single designer could not invent so many new bike designs in 100 lifetimes and this is why I look at this collection in such awe.’

the designer eventually transformed a select few he found most interesting and rendered them as if they were real. gimini continues – ‘I became the executor of these two minute projects by people who were mainly non-designers and confirmed my suspicion: everyone, regardless his age and job, can come up with extraordinary, wild, new and at times brilliant inventions.’"
bikes  gianluca  drawing  velocipedia  biking  2016  design 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Apparatus: A hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams
"Apparatus is a hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams.

The Apparatus Editor runs in the browser and interactive diagrams created with Apparatus can be shared and embedded on the web (coming soon).

Apparatus is free, open-source software."



"Apparatus is under active development. Discuss how Apparatus should evolve on the Apparatus Google Group.

Source code is available on Github under the MIT license. Contributions are very welcome! Big thanks to all who have contributed code to Apparatus.

Apparatus was originally developed by Toby Schachman as a research project within the Communications Design Group (CDG) sponsored by SAP Labs. Thanks to Bret Victor, Paula Te, Matthias Graf, Michael Nagle, Chaim Gingold, Robert Ochshorn, Glen Chiacchieri, Joshua Horowitz, Ian Johnson, Simon Last, Ivan Zhao, Emily Eiffler, Vi Hart, and Monique DeSalvo for design discussions, beta testing, and encouragement!"

[via: http://roomthily.tumblr.com/post/136019466687/apparatus-a-hybrid-graphics-editor-and ]
graphics  visualization  software  opensource  onlinetoolkit  interactive  programming  classideas  tobyschachman  communicationsdesigngroup  brettvictor  paulate  matthiasgraf  vihart  moniquedesalvo  joshuahorowitz  ianjohnson  simonlast  ivanzhao  michaelnagle  chaimgingold  robertochshorn  glenchiacchieri  drawing  edg  srg 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Dear Data
"Two girls who switched continents get to know each other through the data they draw and send across the pond

Dear Data is a year-long, analog data drawing project by Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec.

We are currently at week 29 and will be updating this site with regular deliveries, check back for more drawings!

New cards are delivered on Wednesdays."

[via: http://migurski.tumblr.com/post/114142193920/week-04-a-week-of-mirrors

See also: http://www.visualisingdata.com/index.php/2015/03/dear-data-pen-pals-in-a-data-age/ ]
data  art  visualization  illustration  dataviz  penpals  mail  giorgilupi  stefaniepsavec  datavisualizai  drawing  analog 
march 2015 by robertogreco
“The world is full of objects, more or less... - robertogreco {tumblr}
“The world is full of objects, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more.

I prefer, simply, to state the existence of things in terms of time and/or place.

More specifically, the work concerns itself with things whose inter-relationship is beyond direct perceptual experience.

Because the work is beyond direct perceptual experience, awareness of the work depends on a system of documentation.

The documentation takes the form of photographs, maps, drawings and descriptive language.”

—Douglas Huebler
time  place  documentation  cv  douglashuebler  art  experience  perception  awareness  belatedness  things  objects  cataloging  description  observation  photography  maps  mapping  drawing  drawings  systems  archives  noticing  collections  collecting  capturing 
march 2015 by robertogreco
#patchwork app
"#patchwork is a simple drawing application for creating images using three basic shapes. Relax and emerge into wonderful world of abstraction and minimalism. Save your result to photo albums or email vector file to edit later on desktop."

[See also: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/patchwork/id574295213 ]
ios  application  drawing  shapes  via:tealtan  ios6  iphone  ipad 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Niky Roehreke
"Hello, my name is Niky Roehreke and I am a german/japanese illustrator
currently living and working in Brooklyn, New York.

I graduated from the Central Saint Martins Graphic Design in London in 2008 and since then

I've been drawing, doodling, painting and making collages (almost) every single day.

There are so many new ways to communicate, but I strongly believe that hands remain the most powerful and honest, sometimes magical way to communicate, which is why my work is hand-made and 'hands' are often a recurring motif in my work."
fashion  illustration  nikyroehreke  drawing  srg  glvo  painting  doodling  collage 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Mapping a Museum’s Collection with Memory
"Hughen/Starkweather’s project, “Re:depiction,” was the latest in a public programming series at the AAM called the Artists Drawing Club. Organized by Marc Mayer, the institution’s educator for public programs, the series commissions Bay Area artists to create a new project in response to the AAM’s collection, exhibitions, location, and/or architecture. “Re:depiction” was an audio and visual intervention in the collection, for which Hughen and Starkweather asked staff to recall from memory works on display that they felt particularly connected to. Using those memories as inspiration, the duo created large, semiabstract works on paper, which were hung like scrolls in the museum’s main staircase for one night only (May 22). Along the handrails small audio players and headphones were set up that allowed visitors to listen to the original interviews while admiring the work — hence the opportunity to hear the director speak so frankly about a camo-wearing rhino.

Upon arriving at the museum on May 22, guests received a map connecting the contemporary drawings and interviews with their corresponding works on display in the permanent collection. Walking through the museum with these multiple layers of meaning and interpretation at hand — the original object, a staff memory, and the subsequent painting — showcased the fresh manner of looking that the Artists Drawing Club is aiming for.

Too often, museums offer only precise and manicured wall text to guide the audience. Maybe that’s okay, but there are so many ways of experiencing and engaging with artwork; featuring only one, as museums tend to do, misses something fundamental about how humans really engage with art. The Artists Drawing Club — somewhat like other intervention series at institutions around the country, such as the Museum of Modern Art’s Artist’s Choice series and the Jewish Museum’s recent Barbara Bloom show — asks how artists can provide us with new means of experiencing work. This may mean approaches that a museum hasn’t considered or provided before, including sight, smell, audio, movement, and more. One of the benefits of contemporary art is that it offers a space in which alternative, creative, and maybe even absurd perspectives are taken seriously; in this way “Re:depiction” became as much a reimagining of the AAM’s collection as it was a showcase of Hughen/Starkweather’s work.

Accompanying the map was a paper with a few questions, inviting the viewer to continue the kind of engagement the artists had started with AAM’s staff. “An Invitation … ,” as it was called, asked four simple questions about an important artwork in our lives, and visitors could submit their answers to be featured on the museum’s website. Like the map, which turned the museum visit into an act of searching and comparison, the questionnaire placed our personal experiences with artwork at the foreground — experiences usually ignored in favor of the “professional” insights of the curator, director, or artist.

How does memory make an artwork? How do our relationships with certain pieces define our perceptions of them? Do any two people actually see and feel the same way before the same work of art? These are the important questions that “Re:depiction” both raised and complicated. We tend think of artworks as static and finite objects, especially in historical and encyclopedic institutions like the AAM. The Artists Drawing Club proves that notion wrong, and seeks instead to reinvigorate the collection with a new sense of curiosity and exploration."
museusm  curation  maps  mapping  memory  art  2014  benvalentine  amandahughen  jenniferstarkweather  jayxu  drawing  exhibitions  exhibitiondesign  exploration  Re:depiction  perception 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 69, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
"When García Márquez speaks, his body often rocks back and forth. His hands too are often in motion making small but decisive gestures to emphasize a point, or to indicate a shift of direction in his thinking. He alternates between leaning forward towards his listener, and sitting far back with his legs crossed when speaking reflectively."



INTERVIEWER How do you feel about using the tape recorder?

GABRIEL GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ The problem is that the moment you know the interview is being taped, your attitude changes. In my case I immediately take a defensive attitude. As a journalist, I feel that we still haven’t learned how to use a tape recorder to do an interview. The best way, I feel, is to have a long conversation without the journalist taking any notes. Then afterward he should reminisce about the conversation and write it down as an impression of what he felt, not necessarily using the exact words expressed. Another useful method is to take notes and then interpret them with a certain loyalty to the person interviewed. What ticks you off about the tape recording everything is that it is not loyal to the person who is being interviewed, because it even records and remembers when you make an ass of yourself. That’s why when there is a tape recorder, I am conscious that I’m being interviewed; when there isn’t a tape recorder, I talk in an unconscious and completely natural way.



GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ I’ve always been convinced that my true profession is that of a journalist. What I didn’t like about journalism before were the working conditions. Besides, I had to condition my thoughts and ideas to the interests of the newspaper. Now, after having worked as a novelist, and having achieved financial independence as a novelist, I can really choose the themes that interest me and correspond to my ideas. In any case, I always very much enjoy the chance of doing a great piece of journalism.



INTERVIEWER Do you think the novel can do certain things that journalism can’t?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ Nothing. I don’t think there is any difference. The sources are the same, the material is the same, the resources and the language are the same. The Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe is a great novel and Hiroshima is a great work of journalism.

INTERVIEWER Do the journalist and the novelist have different responsibilities in balancing truth versus the imagination?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ In journalism just one fact that is false prejudices the entire work. In contrast, in fiction one single fact that is true gives legitimacy to the entire work. That’s the only difference, and it lies in the commitment of the writer. A novelist can do anything he wants so long as he makes people believe in it.



INTERVIEWER How did you start writing?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ By drawing. By drawing cartoons. Before I could read or write I used to draw comics at school and at home. The funny thing is that I now realize that when I was in high school I had the reputation of being a writer, though I never in fact wrote anything. If there was a pamphlet to be written or a letter of petition, I was the one to do it because I was supposedly the writer. When I entered college I happened to have a very good literary background in general, considerably above the average of my friends. At the university in Bogotá, I started making new friends and acquaintances, who introduced me to contemporary writers. One night a friend lent me a book of short stories by Franz Kafka. I went back to the pension where I was staying and began to read The Metamorphosis. The first line almost knocked me off the bed. I was so surprised. The first line reads, “As Gregor Samsa awoke that morning from uneasy dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect. . . .” When I read the line I thought to myself that I didn’t know anyone was allowed to write things like that. If I had known, I would have started writing a long time ago. So I immediately started writing short stories. They are totally intellectual short stories because I was writing them on the basis of my literary experience and had not yet found the link between literature and life. The stories were published in the literary supplement of the newspaper El Espectador in Bogotá and they did have a certain success at the time—probably because nobody in Colombia was writing intellectual short stories. What was being written then was mostly about life in the countryside and social life. When I wrote my first short stories I was told they had Joycean influences.



INTERVIEWER Can you name some of your early influences?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ The people who really helped me to get rid of my intellectual attitude towards the short story were the writers of the American Lost Generation. I realized that their literature had a relationship with life that my short stories didn’t. And then an event took place which was very important with respect to this attitude. It was the Bogotazo, on the ninth of April, 1948, when a political leader, Gaitan, was shot and the people of Bogotá went raving mad in the streets. I was in my pension ready to have lunch when I heard the news. I ran towards the place, but Gaitan had just been put into a taxi and was being taken to a hospital. On my way back to the pension, the people had already taken to the streets and they were demonstrating, looting stores and burning buildings. I joined them. That afternoon and evening, I became aware of the kind of country I was living in, and how little my short stories had to do with any of that. When I was later forced to go back to Barranquilla on the Caribbean, where I had spent my childhood, I realized that that was the type of life I had lived, knew, and wanted to write about.

Around 1950 or ’51 another event happened that influenced my literary tendencies. My mother asked me to accompany her to Aracataca, where I was born, and to sell the house where I spent my first years. When I got there it was at first quite shocking because I was now twenty-two and hadn’t been there since the age of eight. Nothing had really changed, but I felt that I wasn’t really looking at the village, but I was experiencing it as if I were reading it. It was as if everything I saw had already been written, and all I had to do was to sit down and copy what was already there and what I was just reading. For all practical purposes everything had evolved into literature: the houses, the people, and the memories. I’m not sure whether I had already read Faulkner or not, but I know now that only a technique like Faulkner’s could have enabled me to write down what I was seeing. The atmosphere, the decadence, the heat in the village were roughly the same as what I had felt in Faulkner. It was a banana-plantation region inhabited by a lot of Americans from the fruit companies which gave it the same sort of atmosphere I had found in the writers of the Deep South. Critics have spoken of the literary influence of Faulkner, but I see it as a coincidence: I had simply found material that had to be dealt with in the same way that Faulkner had treated similar material.

From that trip to the village I came back to write Leaf Storm, my first novel. What really happened to me in that trip to Aracataca was that I realized that everything that had occurred in my childhood had a literary value that I was only now appreciating. From the moment I wrote Leaf Storm I realized I wanted to be a writer and that nobody could stop me and that the only thing left for me to do was to try to be the best writer in the world. That was in 1953, but it wasn’t until 1967 that I got my first royalties after having written five of my eight books.



INTERVIEWER What about the banana fever in One Hundred Years of Solitude? How much of that is based on what the United Fruit Company did?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ The banana fever is modeled closely on reality. Of course, I’ve used literary tricks on things which have not been proved historically. For example, the massacre in the square is completely true, but while I wrote it on the basis of testimony and documents, it was never known exactly how many people were killed. I used the figure three thousand, which is obviously an exaggeration. But one of my childhood memories was watching a very, very long train leave the plantation supposedly full of bananas. There could have been three thousand dead on it, eventually to be dumped in the sea. What’s really surprising is that now they speak very naturally in the Congress and the newspapers about the “three thousand dead.” I suspect that half of all our history is made in this fashion. In The Autumn of the Patriarch, the dictator says it doesn’t matter if it’s not true now, because sometime in the future it will be true. Sooner or later people believe writers rather than the government.

INTERVIEWER That makes the writer pretty powerful, doesn’t it?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ Yes, and I can feel it too. It gives me a great sense of responsibility. What I would really like to do is a piece of journalism which is completely true and real, but which sounds as fantastic as One Hundred Years of Solitude. The more I live and remember things from the past, the more I think that literature and journalism are closely related.



INTERVIEWER Are dreams ever important as a source of inspiration?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ In the very beginning I paid a good deal of attention to them. But then I realized that life itself is the greatest source of inspiration and that dreams are only a very small part of that torrent that is life. What is very true about my writing is that I’m quite interested in different concepts of dreams and interpretations of them. I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer. But maybe I just have very poor dreams.

INTERVIEWER Can you distinguish between inspiration and intuition?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ Inspiration is when you find the right theme, one which you really like; that makes the work much easier. Intuition, which is … [more]
gabrielgarcíamárquez  1981  interviews  colombia  writing  journalism  truth  reality  fiction  literature  latinamerica  drawing  kafka  jamesjoyce  stories  storytelling  everyday  williamfaulkner  imagination  biography  autobiography  politics  childhood  fantasy  magicrealism  credibility  detail  details  belief  believability  responsibility  history  bricolage  collage  power  solitude  flow  dreams  dreaming  inspiration  intuition  intellectualism  translation  mexico  spanish  español  gregoryrabassa  borders  frontiers  miguelángelasturias  cuba  fame  friendship  film  filmmaking  relationships  consumption  language  languages  reading  howweread  howwewrite  routine  familiarity  habits 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Blessedly Unnecessary | Books and Culture
"Gregory Blackstock is autistic, and because of his extraordinary gifts he is called a "savant" (a problematic word, I feel). Like many autistic people, Blackstock has a passion for order and precision, which shows up in any number of ways. For instance, the autobiography he hand–wrote for his book, Blackstock's Collections, takes the form of a list—"1. MY DATE OF BIRTH … 2. MY PREVIOUS SCHOOLS OF 1950 TO 1964 … 3. MY USUAL CITY NEWSPAPER ROUTE PERIOD"—and in listing his employment history he notes that he began his job at the Washington Athletic Club on September 9, 1975 and retired on January 12, 2001. Though I said that Blackstock worked there for twenty–five years, he prefers to say that it was twenty–five–and–a–third years.

This precision is central to Blackstock's art as well—though I have no idea whether it affects his accordion playing. The book is called Blackstock's Collections because each drawing is just that, a collection of things belonging to a particular category. I find especially intriguing Blackstock's tendency to give his drawings titles that begin with the definite article: "The Knives", "The Dentist's Tools, "The Memorable Vermont Scenes"—as though he aspires to utter completeness, gathering every member of a given set on a single page."



"Most of the "collections" are perfectly comprehensible, even if we suspect that it's not really possible to get all of "The Knives" on one page (Blackstock manages fifty–one of them, a considerable achievement). But Blackstock's passion for taxonomy gets him into some curious corners. Smack in the middle of "The Bells," among cowbells and bicycle bells and doorbells and the Liberty Bell and the bell of Big Ben, there's a diving bell. Not the same kind of thing, you say? But it's a bell, isn't it? I wonder how Blackstock would respond if someone were to point out to him that in his drawing of "The Drums" he omits the eardrum.

One of the few really heterogeneous collections is "The Noisemakers," a highly colorful and (for Blackstock) rather large drawing, forty–four inches tall, which includes not only whistling skyrockets and M–80 firecrackers and chainsaws, but also "thunder–&–rainstorms" and a scowling face accompanied by a speech balloon containing an unusually symmetrical set of signs indicating unprintable words: "##**@@**##!!!" This noisemaker is labeled as "LOUD FILTHY–MOUTH OFFENDER, THE OVEREMOTIONAL DIRTBAG!""



"As Auden also notes, art has now lost that habit of usefulness and does not seem likely to get it back: when we try to unite the useful and the beautiful, he says, we "fail utterly." Though there are some recent developments in industrial design that give one hope, I think Auden is basically correct. It's difficult to imagine a new Piranesi, or an Audubon for the 21st century. We have turned over the task of documenting the world to the various cameras, and for good reason: they perform the task well. But I hope we may occasionally find more Gregory Blackstocks, artists who—unaware that their labors of documentary love are unnecessary—plunge ahead and do their work, thereby reminding us what it means to look, really to look, at the Creation."

[See also: http://blog.ayjay.org/uncategorized/collections/ ]
gregoryblackstock  alanjacobs  art  whauden  2007  katebingamanburt  cataloging  taxonomy  sorting  classification  drawing  drawings  inventory  inventories 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Meteor Blocks
"Meteor Blocks uses the Meteor web framework and X3DOM together to create a collaborative 3D scene editor.

When you want to collaborate, just send the URL of the scene you are editing to someone else and they can edit it with you. When you're done and you want to save a version of your scene, just click Publish and it's enshrined in history.

Check out the code on GitHub."

[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/75842987481/meteor-blocks-simple-collaborative-voxel-editor ]
blocks  wcydwt  meteor  x3dom  sceneeditor  collaboration  drawing  onlinetoolkit  building  buildingtools 
february 2014 by robertogreco
DrawQuest - Free Daily Drawing Challenges on the App Store on iTunes
"Unleash your creativity with DrawQuest—now available for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad! Join people of all ages coming together to complete daily drawing prompts—or "Quests"—that are sure to tap into your creative side.

Here are some examples:

* Create your own superhero
* Draw your dream from last night
* Give the turkey some feathers for Thanksgiving

Have your own idea for a Quest? Create your own and invite your friends to draw with you!

Here's what else you'll find inside DrawQuest:

* Fun, easy-to-use drawing tool
* Follow and be followed by a community of drawers
* Watch stroke-by-stroke replays of other drawings
* Star and share drawings with your friends

Follow us on Facebook (fb.com/drawquest) and Twitter (@DrawQuest) for the latest news and our favorite drawings!

Remember, DrawQuest is all about using your imagination and having fun—there are no right or wrong answers when you draw!"
drawing  ios  applications  drawquest  srg 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Inside the Mind of Hans Ulrich Obrist
"The celebrity curator may be a phenomenon on the rise, but before Klaus Biesenbach and Paola Antonelli, there was Hans Ulrich Obrist. Obrist, who’s currently the co-director of exhibitions and programs and director of international programs at London’s Serpentine Gallery, has a list of curatorial accomplishments so long, it’s daunting. He started out small enough, organizing a show in his kitchen in 1991 (he was 23) that included contributions from Christian Boltanski and Fischli & Weiss; in the decades since, he’s curated and co-curated more than 250 exhibitions, including the first Berlin Biennale and the first Manifesta. He’s also known for his ongoing conceptual projects, among them do it, a roving show built around artist-given instructions for viewers, and The Interview Project, for which he’s racked up more than 2,000 hours of conversation so far, with artists, writers, philosophers, scientists, and others.

It turns out he’s also been taking notes the whole time — making diagrams and sketches, scribbling down ideas and keywords. And when artist Paul Chan, who’s also the founder and publisher of Badlands Unlimited, found out that these copious notes and drawings existed, he knew he wanted to release them.

“I wanted to publish them because I’m surprised they exist, still,” Chan told Hyperallergic over email. “Badland’s publishing program is mindlessly simple: we publish things that no one knew existed. The poems of Yvonne Rainer, speeches on democracy by Saddam Hussein, afternoon interviews of Marcel Duchamp, and now this. I didn’t know he made them. Did you?”

The resulting book, Think Like Clouds, premieres at the New York Art Book Fair, where Badlands has also mounted a small exhibition of the some of the artworks — or whatever you might call them. “I don’t know if these drawings are important,” Chan said. “I don’t even know if they are in fact drawings. This is to me their appeal.”

Badlands sent us six of Obrist’s sketches specifically related to his curatorial practice:"
hansulrichobrist  notes  notetaking  doodling  drawing  drawings  scribbles 
october 2013 by robertogreco
eskerex » Blog Archive » DRAWING MACHINE
"Drawingmachine is a construction involving two pendulums, each suspended from a tower construction and connected through “drawing arms” and moveable joints. A ballpoint pen resting on a drawing surface covered with paper is mounted at the point where the pendulums come together. The pendulums are set in motion by hand, and their movements are represented on the paper. The Drawing Machine serves to purposes: On exhibitions where the movements of the pendulums affect the entire room, and the experience engages the beholder’s body. While the rhythmic repetitions cause the beholder to pause, the drawing emerges on the paper. And as a tool where investigations on the relation between time and movement."
eskerex  art  machines  drawing  spyrograph  pendulums  artists  projectideas  openstudioproject  ncmproject 
august 2013 by robertogreco
What Neurons Look Like (as Drawn by Students, Grad Students, and Professors) - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic
"The authors believed that the undergraduates were missing a "central imaginative step" -- the "ability to embody a neuron's perspective" -- and that it was holding them back from deeper learning. Could they be taught to understand neurons like the more advanced scientists without going through the years of enculturation and research?

They decided to modify the experiment. Before telling the undergraduates to "please draw a neuron," they put had them participate in exercises designed to get the students to think from the perspective of the neuron -- for example, by having students fan out across the lab in a pattern that mimicked a neuron's growth. The authors found that following the interventions, the students drew much more varied images of neurons. "The brief encounters with a teaching approach aimed at embodied knowledge have apparently liberated a divergence of conceptual ideas about brain cells," the authors write. They can't know for sure why, but, "a tempting hypothesis is that postintervention the students have been licensed to show an innately playful and creative approach."

The experiment is a perfect demonstration that knowledge and understanding lead to creativity. The undergraduate drawings weren't wrong; they just were unimaginative, rigid. As people progressed in their scientific careers, their ideas suffused their drawings. If that's not a great reason to commit yourself to trying to understand something new, I don't know what is."
rebeccarosen  representation  drawing  howwelearn  howweteach  neurons  learning  education  understanding  creativity  knowledge  tbs  tcsnmy  science  imagination  conceptualization  play  embodiment  patterns  sensemaking  davidhay  biology 
june 2013 by robertogreco
JORINDEVOIGT.COM » -NEWS-
"For the past decade, Jorinde Voigt has been creating large-scale drawings on paper, using traditional materials such as ink, oil stick, pencil, watercolor, and, more recently, collage. In the drawings that she did before incorporating collage, the artist combined line and text to diagram both factual and fictive activities, such as the flight of eagles, geographical directions, wind patterns, rotations, shifting horizon lines, top-ten pop charts, kisses, and electrical currents. Whirling across the paper, the sinuous patterns of lines and arrows—some of which may overlap—mark relentless change as well as convey the potential for chaos and ecstasy that resides within any system. Classification and pandemonium are inseparable. It is on the porous border of this vast abyss—what is called “infinity”—that Voigt investigates the caesuras between perception & knowledge, form and dissolution…"

[Text from PDF: http://jorindevoigt.com/blog/wp-content/wp-content/uploads/J.Yau_J.Voigt_EN2.pdf ]
meteorology  cartography  geography  collage  lines  nature  currents  wind  patterns  taxonomy  classification  johnyau  data  design  illustration  visualization  drawing  artists  art  memory  time  mapping  maps  jorindevoigt  via:selinjessa  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
ELLEN GROSSMAN Drawings and Sculpture
"ELLEN GROSSMAN These drawings and sculptures are a response to topographic maps, satellite photos, scanning electron microscope images, astronomy and the unfolding of intertwined relationships.

They emphasize the sensuous aspects of water currents, land masses and the wind made visible.

Much of my sculpture developed from an attraction to moiré patterns created by the overlay of two or more grids that are slightly askew."

[Via a search having watched: http://gothamist.com/2012/12/05/video_adorable_old_lady_asks_subway.php#photo-1via https://twitter.com/austinkleon/status/276358290592653313 ]

[Shared here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/37368380844/resurgence-25-x-39-in-metallic-gel-pen-on-blue AND http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/37368712718/subsequent-hills-detail-25-x-39-aluminum-gel ]
satelliteimages  nyc  drawing  drawings  microscopy  mapping  maps  sculpture  artists  art  ellengrossman  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
‘The Matt Ward Manoeuvre’ (part 1) « SB129
"Over self-awareness and the weight of a poor school education are the main factors that stop people making the most of their drawing. We are constantly told what a ‘good’ and ‘correct’ drawing is, with these preconceptions we miss the true power of drawing; the intimate link between mind, eye and hand and its effervescent ability to stimulate invention. Striping back preoccupations of ‘reality’ representation and the need to build confidence in order to allow the mind and hand to meander are two of the main challenges in drawing education.

Ideational drawing is always ‘in action’, it happens in real time and therefore the focus needs to be on the moments it provokes not the product that results. Ideational drawing sets up a thinking space, where ideas can be spatialised, connected and tested. By locating ideas in a visual form on the space of a page, you can see new relationships and opportunities."

[Part 2: http://sb129.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/exercises-in-drawing/ ]
howwethink  thinking  communication  practice  intertextuality  jackschulze  mattjones  berglondon  berg  doing  learning  ideation  design  self-awareness  drawing  2012  mattward  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
Spinoza, Plums, and Why We Draw - NYTimes.com
“Although we do not remember that we existed before the body, we sense nevertheless that our mind in so far as it involves the essence of the body under a species of eternity is eternal and its existence cannot be defined by time or explained by duration.”
time  mind  body  drawing  tejucole  2011  johnberger  bodies  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Art Workshops in Aspen Snowmass Colorado | Anderson Ranch Arts Center
"Anderson Ranch Arts Center Anderson Ranch celebrates artists, art-making, critical dialogue and community. We promote personal and professional development of artists of all levels of expertise through year-round workshops in ceramics, sculpture, photography, new media, painting and drawing, printmaking, woodworking, furniture design and more. Our artists residencies for emerging and established artists, summer internships, visiting artists and critics, community outreach, and public events offer a full spectrum of opportunities to creative people of all levels. The facilities feature fully-equipped art studios and galleries. Anderson Ranch programs and activities including art auctions and artist slide lectures, attract thousands of artists, art-lovers, students, faculty and patrons annually to this historic Rocky Mountain ranch dedicated to the fine arts."
furnituredesign  furniture  woodworking  drawing  painting  newmedia  photography  sculpture  ceramics  workshops  aspen  education  community  design  colorado  residencies  art  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Metropolis M » Magazine » 2011 No5 » dOCUMENTA (13) Thinks Ahead
"A collection of notes is a curious archive of attempts. Attempts to understand the language we use, the logic we trace, and the images we generate to understand life today. Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, the artistic director of dOCUMENTA (13), would say that these notebooks are “worlding” exercises, weaving and stringing together different potentials.’"

"we are really interested in exploring artistic research. Artists, like scientists, are pioneers when it comes to creating new forms of connectivity between worlds that seem to have nothing in common with each other. They embark on the endless study of everything that contributes to different formulations of what we call reality. Taking artistic research seriously means accepting disorganisation within the relationship between disciplines that deal with contemporary art. The rise of cultural studies, critical theory, and the many variations of post-Marxist understanding of the relationship between art and economics is the fruit of…"
sketchbooks  worldbuilding  worlding  sensemaking  meaningmaking  meaning  cv  howwethink  howwecreate  howwelearn  howwework  research  art  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  artisticresearch  connections  potentials  sketching  drawing  language  logic  deschooling  unschooling  glvo  notebooks  2012  carolynchristov-bakargiev  chusmartinez  documenta(13)  documenta  understanding  notetaking  notes  learning  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
dOCUMENTA (13) - dOCUMENTA (13)
"Note taking encompasses witnessing, drawing, writing, and diagrammatic thinking; it is speculative, manifests a preliminary moment, a passage, and acts as a memory aid.

With contributions by authors from a range of disciplines, such as art, science, philosophy and psychology, anthropology, economic- and political theory, language- and literature studies, as well as poetry, 100 Notes – 100 Thoughts constitutes a space of dOCUMENTA (13) to explore how thinking emerges and lies at the heart of re-imagining the world. In its cumulative nature, this publication project is a continuous articulation of the emphasis of dOCUMENTA (13) on the propositional, underlining the flexible mental moves to generate space for the possible. Thoughts, unlike statements, are always variations: this is the spirit in which these notebooks are proposed."

[via: http://frieze.com/issue/article/books2027/ AND http://halloween-in-january.tumblr.com/post/21407577412 AND http://www.jennasutela.com/frieze ]
publishing  conversations  collaborations  essays  notebooks  hatjecantz  memoryaids  memory  noticing  witnessing  writing  drawing  diagrammaticthinking  thinking  2012  2011  notetaking  notes  literature  language  economics  politics  politicaltheory  philosophy  anthropology  art  psychology  books  documenta(13)  documenta  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
Piccolo: The Tiny CNC-bot
"Piccolo is a pocket-sized stand-alone CNC platform. For under $70, you will be able to assemble your personal Arduino-compatible kit for tinkering, and playing with basic CNC output. Be it plotting a quick graffiti, printing a one-off business card on the fly, or multiple Piccolos working together to create a large mural, this kit provides a platform for experimenting with 2D or 3D digital fabrication at a small scale.

We are currently refining the Piccolo prototype into an open-source design that is simple, quick to assemble, and easy to use, and is entirely composed of digitally manufactured components and inexpensive off-the-shelf hardware.

The Piccolo project includes Arduino and Processing libraries, to use Piccolo in a variety of ways such as moving autonomously or responding to sensors and data, whilst providing an accessible educational tool and a new output for Processing sketches."
drawing  srg  edg  make  cnc  arduino  piccolo  processing  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
The Wacom Inkling | The Ministry of Type
"The upshot
The Inkling feels very much like a tool for designers more than illustrators. If you sketch rough ideas – layouts, lettering, schematics and the like, you’ll find it very useful. If you want to record your sketchbook of illustrations, you certainly could, but it might cramp your style having to use that pen - Wacom themselves say it’s good for preparatory drawings, and I agree. I don’t use ballpoints very often for a couple of reasons – I don’t particularly like the quality of line they offer, and the ink smells bad. For the sheer convenience of this tool though, I could live with both.

Too long: didn’t read
It’s a fantastic thing which has the potential to be very useful. You are drawing with a biro though so adjust your expectations accordingly. The software is awful, but not so bad as to make the device useless. Just make sure you export as SVG.

Far too long: didn’t read
If you sketch a lot and need a digital copy of your sketches, get one. I’m glad I did."
wacom  wacominkling  drawing  2011  reviews  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Shapecatcher.com: Unicode Character Recognition
"Draw something in the left box!

And let shapecatcher help you to find the most similar unicode characters!

Currently, there are 10007 unicode character gylphs in the database."
typography  identification  draw  via:kottke  shapecatcher  drawing  recognition  shaperecognition  fonts  text  tools  classideas  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
How I give presentations with the iPad by Austin Kleon
"I took back my first iPad because it didn’t support full mirroring via a projector, but I’ve given several presentations using only my iPad 2, and so far, it’s always worked like a charm. I just double-check with the venue that they have a projector with a VGA input, and I’m good to go — often making adjustments up until the last minute. I love the simplicity of Keynote on iOS and I love being able to illustrate a point by drawing onscreen with my Boxwave stylus in Adobe Ideas. Simple. Easy.

Here’s how I do it. (Drawn with Adobe Ideas — see it bigger on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/deathtogutenberg/6038943626/in/photostream .)"
ipad  presentations  howto  austinkleon  via:lukeneff  drawing  keynote  adobeideas  applications  ios  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Periscope Project: Urban Education Initiative by The Periscope Project — Kickstarter
"Designed by resident contemporary artists, architects, and educators, the first annual Periscope Urban Laboratory will teach high school students drawing, photography, video-making, construction, hydroponic gardening, and critical thinking skills as potent tools for urban analysis, public art, and environmental sustainability.

Each lab in the series will guide high school students in producing an analytically engaging artistic response to a contemporary regional urban issue and will culminate in a gallery show at the end of the summer. More importantly, we hope to equip students with valuable technical, visual, and aesthetic communication tools necessary to understand, interpret, and critically respond to the urgent urban challenges they face.

We already have the space, skilled instructors, and community support. With your help, the next step is equipment and supplies."
sandiego  kickstarter  education  fundraising  urbanlaboratory  highschool  drawing  photography  learning  lcproject  2011  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Private Eye - jeweler's loupes and inquiry method for hands-on interdisciplinary science, art, writing, and math
"The Private Eye is a nationally acclaimed, hands-on learning process that rivets the eye and rockets the mind. With everyday objects, The Private Eye’s easy questioning strategy, and an almost magical magnification tool, a jeweler’s loupe, you’ll accelerate concentration, critical thinking and creativity — for all ages.

In the arts and the sciences, you’ll build close observation skills linked to the mental muscle of thinking by analogy. Learners write, draw and theorize at higher levels. Join us, along with millions of students and teachers. Discover new worlds. Magnify minds."

[via: http://borderland.northernattitude.org/2011/06/04/hearts-and-minds-2/ ]
observation  inquiry  theprivateeye  teaching  learning  art  science  language  languagearts  writing  reading  noticing  magnification  loupes  concentration  systems  systemsthinking  inquiry-basedlearning  analogy  analogies  criticalthinking  drawing  tcsnmy  perspective  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
OKBB — austinkleon: Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of...
Austin Kloen: "This is so great. I’ve read the Palm Sunday chapter where he goes into this a dozen times, but seeing him draw on the chalkboard for the audience is just the best. Thanks, Maud!"<br />
<br />
Kate Bingamam Burt: "Holy Mother. Kurt Vonnegut talking and drawing about the shapes of stories. I LOVE THIS MAN."
vonnegut  drawing  stories  storytelling  classideas  chalkboards  kurtvonnegut  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Sol Lewitt + Mechanical Turk : clementvalla
"Custom software recreates various Sol LeWitt drawings. The software also posts instructions on Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk. Human workers execute the drawings online based on the instructions from the program. The workers are paid 5¢ for each drawing. The software then assembles the drawings in a grid. The computer generated drawings, and the grids filled in by anonymous workers are displayed side by side."
art  design  robots  drawing  crowdsourcing  mechanicalturk  sollewitt  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Back into the Digital Breach: Help Me Out! | Beyond School
"10. I’m a talker. Listen to me for ten minutes & I’ll show you I understand more than the test scores show — & I’ll be way more interesting when doing it.9. I’m an artist…8. I’m a clown. Jon Stewart & Stephen Colbert do history the way I’d like to.…7. I’m a musician…6. I’m interested in film-making…5. I’m a poet / rapper / songwriter…4. I’m a gamer. Let me imagine video games about this stuff & write business pitches explaining how they would help students learn Chinese history through gaming.3. I’m into business. Let me create business plans selling historical tours to China (or other ideas)…2. I’m a creative writer, not an academic essay writer…1. I’m a journalist. Let me write feature articles about stuff that interests me in a magazine or newspaper forma…

If you’re none of the above? Talk to me."

[see also: http://hoc10s2.wikispaces.com/Tech+Page ]
clayburell  teaching  projectbasedlearning  expression  writing  alternative  learning  history  video  videogames  film  filmmaking  fiction  classideas  learningstyles  entrepreneurship  music  art  drawing  conversation  discussion  pbl  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Google Shared Spaces
"Click "Create a Space" next to each gadget to get started w/ your shared space; Yes/No/Maybe Gadget: Useful for gauging interest…RSVPs…Users select yes, no or maybe & provide custom responses; Map Gadget: Collaborate on map of placemarks, paths, & shapes w/ other participants…for planning events & trips; Draw Board: white board for drawing simple images & diagrams together; Waffle: easy way to plan event. Just choose few dates & all participants vote; Shared Sudoku: Solve challenging Sudoku boards together & see who's best; Browse Amazon: search for Amazon products together w/ friends; Travel WithMe: Travel WithMe allows groups of people to plan trips together in real time; Listy: for list needs - share w/ family, sort list automatically, print & take it to store…; Map Cluster Gadget: Add your location to map, & see where everyone else is from, using cluster visualization; ConceptDraw MindWave: Real-time collaborative mind mapping & brainstorming w/ other participants"
google  collaboration  tools  googlesharedspaces  onlinetoolkit  via:robinsloan  classideas  whiteboards  amazon  sudoku  maps  mapping  planning  trips  travel  mindmap  mindmapping  drawing  rsvp  events  lists  brainstorming  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Orion Magazine - nature / culture / place
"Once upon a time, Orion published a regular department called The Place Where You Live. Though the department was discontinued in 2003, we’ve been asked about its fate ever since—and reminded by readers of how important it was to them.

So we’re bringing it back. This is a space for you to exercise your sixth sense and tell us about your place. What connects you to it? What history does it hold for you? What are your hopes and fears for it? What do you do to protect it, or prepare it for the future, or make it better?

A few of the contributions we receive will appear in the print edition of Orion. The Place Where You Live will be published in every issue of Orion (as well as online), so submissions will be considered for the print magazine on a rolling basis…

Your contribution can take the form of a short essay or story of no more than 350 words, up to six photographs, a painting, drawing, or handmade map."
place  landscope  onion  nature  orionmagazine  classideas  local  hyperlocal  life  theplacewhereyoulive  writing  newmedia  drawing  maps  mapping  essays  stories  photography  culture  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
drawRobot 1.0 | "steve" on Vimeo
"steve stretches his legs (nxt servos) for the first time. controlled manually via the keyboard drawing a figure eight."
drawbots  robots  tomake  edg  projects  drawing  lego  legomindstorms  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Lego NXT signature bot
"Using the record/play block this bot can mimic your signature. This one writes something like pep~"
lego  legomindstorms  drawing  drawbots  robots  edg  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - MøBot: DeLeon II [drawbot]
"Newest evolution in the DrawBot series. This video demonstrates the new stylus arm design as well as sets DeLeon on task to begin drawing. I'm inclined to return to the wheel-based system for mobility as it is much more accurate. I really like the the relationship to crop-circles. I think this is starting to go somewhere."

[See also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR8rZnNgNdc ]
lego  legomindstorms  drawbots  robots  drawing  projects  edg  tomake  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Traverse Me
"Traverse Me is a map drawn by walking across campus with a GPS device to invite the viewer to see a different landscape to that which surrounds them. It questions the possibilities of where they are and inspires a personal reading of their movements and explorations of the campus."
maps  mapping  gps  gpsdrawing  drawing  cartography  geography  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Kid Pix: The Early Years
"One day in 1988 while I was using MacPaint, the wonderful paint program that came with the Macintosh, my 3-year-old son Ben asked to try using the program. I was surprised at how quickly he got the knack of using the mouse and how easily he was able to select tools. The problem was that he didn't have total control of the mouse and would occasionally (like every five minutes or so) pull down a menu and bring up a dialog box that he couldn't dismiss without being able to read. Everything was fine as long as I was in the room, but if I stepped out for a few minutes I would come back and find Ben kicking on the floor in frustration. This was not what I had in mind for his introduction to the computer."
via:britta  craighickman  kidpix  evergreenstatecollege  reedcollege  computers  childhood  parenting  programming  software  edtech  education  mac  history  drawing  graphics  art  nostalgia  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Javier Arce's Wardian case - How to meet a girl
"# First, watch your dad draw on placemats at a restaurant.<br />
# Then you should start drawing on every piece of scrap paper that you can find.<br />
# Start reading comic books. A good place to start is at a Meijer’s Thrifty Acres store, with X-Men, preferably issue #192.<br />
# Have a creative-type friend rope you into making a ‘zine’, even though you dont know what a ‘zine’ is yet.<br />
# Stop reading superhero comics and start reading artsy comics from european artists like Moebius (A.K.A. Jean Giraud)<br />
# Stop copying your drawings from the superhero comics also.<br />
# Have a paper route to found your purchase of edgy North American comics like Eightball and Dirty Plotte.<br />
# Stop reading comics and sell off your entire collection, because you’re going to college and you’ll need money.<br />
# Stop drawing comics and focus on real art like painting and writing poetry. …"
humor  howto  jeffreybrown  comics  art  drawing  cicumstance  life  coincidence  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Free Images on French - French Paper - America's family-run paper mill
"CSA Images free when printed on French Paper: Restrictions Apply<br />
<br />
This vast selection of rights managed black & white images are perfect for solid-color offset, letterpress, or silkscreen printing. Free CSA High Resolution Tiff Images capture the authenticity and detail of hand-drawn illustration and the beautifully tactile look of ink printed on paper, allowing you to keep the printing simple and let French paper provide the color."
drawing  illustration  illustrations  graphicdesign  images  design  graphics  diy  icons  frenchpaper  paper  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Slow=Know – Danny Gregory [via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/1032617624]
"The point is not what your lines look like or how accurate your crosshatching might be. The point is not the drawings on the page or the pages in the book. The point is not the opinions of others who love/hate/ignore those lines you made on the page. The point is not the money you make selling your work to galleries or publishers. The point of practicing your craft is not to rise in the rankings of those who draw. It’s not to have your style dominate (sorry, Dan!). The point is to more easily gain access to the moment, to the deeper more peaceful recesses of your Self. The point is to live as well and as fully as you can today, right now, whether your pen is in your hand or not. The point is to See and to Be."
drawing  seeing  slow  knowing  understanding  learningbydoing  thinking  howwework  dannygregory  glvo  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Vellum [iPad] coming soon! /by @velluminousrex | CreativeApplications.Net
"One of the most exciting movements I’ve seen recently in the social enterprise world is the development of Affordable Private Schools. Approximately 100 million children in the developing world are attending ultra low-cost private schools (generally less than $10/month in school fees). Their parents (typically low or working class, living at the base of the pyramid) choose to invest their limited income in their children's education and realize that the affordable private schools tend to offer a far superior education to the local public schools."
ipad  drawing  applications  vellum  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
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