robertogreco + dogs   122

Anne Galloway 'Speculative Design and Glass Slaughterhouses' - This is HCD
"Andy: You’ve got quite an interesting background. I’m going to ask you about in a second. I wanted to start with the quote from Ursula Le Guin that you have on your website. It’s from the Lathe of Heaven. “We’re in the world, not against it. It doesn’t work to try and stand outside things and run them that way, it just doesn’t work. It goes against life. There is a way, but you have to follow it, the world is, no matter how we think it ought to be, you have to be with it, you have to let it be.

Then on the More Than Human website, you have these three questions. What if we refuse to uncouple nature and culture? What if we deny that human beings are exceptional? What if we stop speaking and listening only to ourselves? The More Than Human lab explores everyday entanglements of humans and non-humans and imagines more sustainable ways of thinking, making, and doing. Anne, let’s get started by first talking about what do you mean by all of that?

Anne: The Ursula Le Guin quote I love mostly because a critical perspective or an activist perspective, anything that says we ought to be changing the world in any way, it always assumes that we need to fix something, that the world is broken and that designers especially are well-suited to be able to solve some of these problems. I like thinking about what it means to respond to injustice by accepting it, not in the sense of believing that it’s okay or right, because clearly, it’s been identify as unjust. I love Le Guin’s attention to the fact that there is a way to be in the world.

As soon as we think that we’re outside of it, any choices or decisions or actions that we take are, well, they sit outside of it as well. I like being embedded in the trouble. I like Donna Haraway’s idea of staying with the trouble. It’s not that we have to accept that things are problematic, but rather that we have to work within the structures that already exist. Not to keep them that way, in fact, many should be dismantled or changed. Rather, to accept that there is a flow to the universe.

Of course, Le Guin was talking about Taoism, but here what I wanted to draw attention to is often our imperative to fix or to solve or to change things comes with a belief that we’re not part of the world that we’re trying to fix and change. It’s that that I want to highlight. That when we start asking difficult questions about the world, we can never remove ourselves from them. We’re complicit, we are on the receiving end of things. We’re never distant from it. I think that subtle but important shift in deciding how we approach our work is really important."



"Andy: Yes, okay. I was thinking about this, I was reading, in conjunction, this little Le Guin quote, I was trying to think, it’s unusual in the sense that it’s a discipline or a practice of design that uses its own practice to critique itself. It’s using design to critique design in many respects. A lot of what speculative design is talking about is, look what happens when we put stuff into the world, in some way, without much thought. I was trying to think if there was another discipline that does that. I think probably in the humanities there are, and certainly in sociology I think there probably is, where it uses its own discipline to critique itself. It’s a fairly unusual setup.

Anne: I would think actually it’s quite common in the humanities, perhaps the social sciences, where it’s not common is in the sciences. Any reflexive turn in any of the humanities would have used the discipline. Historiography is that sort of thing. Applied philosophy is that sort of thing. Reflexive anthropology is that sort of thing. I think it’s actually quite common, just not in the sciences, and design often tries to align itself with the sciences instead.

Andy: Yes, there was a great piece in the Aeon the other day, about how science doesn’t have an adequate description or explanation for consciousness. Yet, it’s the only thing it can be certain of. With that, it also doesn’t really seem to come up in the technology industry that much, because it’s so heavily aligned with science. Technology, and you’ve got this background in culture studies and science and technology and society, technology is a really strong vein throughout speculative design. Indeed, your work, right? Counting sheep is about the Internet of Things, and sheep. Do you want to tell us a little bit about that and why I am talking to you from the picture things to the Lord of the Rings, it basically looks like you’re living in part of the Shire in Middle Earth?

Anne: I do live in a place that looks remarkably like the Shire. It’s a bit disconcerting at times. The science and technology question in speculative design I think is first of all a matter of convenience. Science fiction, speculation, they lean historically, habitually towards science and tech. It becomes an easy target for critique. Not that it’s not necessary, but it’s right there, so why not? There’s that element to it. It has an easier ability to be transformed into something fanciful or terrifying, which allows for certain kinds of storytelling through speculation, that I think people, both creators and audiences or readers really enjoy.

Now, the irony of all of this, of course is that arguably one of the greatest concerns that people have would be tied to technological determinism, the idea that we’re going to have these technologies anyway, so what are we going to do about it? Now, when you speculate using these technologies, what you’re doing is actually reinforcing the idea that these technologies are coming, you play right into the same technological determinism that you’re trying to critique. In fact, one of the counting sheep scenarios was designed specifically to avoid the technology. It was the one that got the most positive responses."



"Andy: With all of this, and I may this pop at the beginning, just before we were recording, that there’s a sense of, because of everything going on in the world, that if only designers could run the world, everything would be fine, right, because we can see all of the solutions to everything. What would you want designers to get out of this kind of work or this kind of perspective?

Anne: Humility. That simple. I am one of those people. It’s because of being an ethnographer as well and doing participant observation and interviewing many people and their ideas about design. I’ve run into far more people who think that designers are arrogant than ones who don’t. This has always really interested me. What is it that designers do that seems to rub non-designers the wrong way? Part of it is this sense of, or implication that they know better than the rest of us, or that a designer will come in and say, “Let me fix your problem”, before even asking if there is a problem that the person wants fixed.

I actually gave a guest lecture in a class just the other day, where I suggested that there were people in the world who thought that designers were arrogant. One of the post-graduate students in the class really took umbrage at this and wanted to know why it was that designers were arrogant for offering to fix problems, but a builder wasn’t, or a doctor wasn’t.

Andy: What was your answer?

Anne: Well, my answer was, generally speaking, people go to them first and say, “I have this problem, I need help.” Whereas, designers come up with a problem, go find people that they think have it and then tell them they’d like to solve it. I think just on a social level, that is profoundly anti-social. That is not how people enjoy socially interacting with people.

Andy: I can completely see that and I think that I would say that argument has also levelled, quite rightly, a lot of Silicon Valley, which is the answer to everything is some kind of technology engineering startup to fix all the problems that all the other technology and engineering startups that are no longer startups have created. It’s probably true of quite a lot of areas of business and finance, as well, and politics, for that matter. The counter, I could imagine a designer saying, “Well, that’s not really true”, because one of the things as human-centred designers, the first thing we do, we go out, we do design ethnography, we go and speak to people, we go and observe, we go and do all of that stuff. We really understand their problems. We’re not just telling people what needs to be fixed. We’re going there and understanding things. What’s your response to that?

Anne: Well, my first response is, yes, that’s absolutely true. There are lots of very good designers in the world who do precisely that. Because I work in an academic institution though, I’m training students. What my job involves is getting the to the point where they know the difference between telling somebody something and asking somebody something. what it means to actually understand their client or their user. I prefer to just refer to them as people. What it is that people want or need. One of the things that I offer in all of my classes is, after doing the participant observation, my students always have the opportunity to submit a rationale for no design intervention whatsoever.

That’s not something that is offered to people in a lot of business contexts because there’s a business case that’s being made. Whereas, I want my students to understand that sometimes the research demonstrates that people are actually okay, and that even if they have little problems, they’re still okay with that, that people are quite okay with living with contradictions and that they will accept some issues because it allows for other things to emerge. That if they want, they can provide the evidence for saying, “Actually, the worst thing we could do in this scenario is design anything and I refuse to design.”

Andy: Right, that and the people made trade-offs all the time because of the pain of change is much … [more]
annegalloway  design  2019  speculativefiction  designethnography  morethanhuman  ursulaleguin  livestock  agriculture  farming  sheep  meat  morethanhumanlab  activism  criticaldesign  donnaharaway  stayingwiththetrouble  taoism  flow  change  changemaking  systemsthinking  complicity  catherinecaudwell  injustice  justice  dunneandraby  consciousness  science  technology  society  speculation  speculativedesign  questioning  fiction  future  criticalthinking  whatif  anthropology  humanities  reflexiveanthropology  newzealand  socialsciences  davidgrape  powersoften  animals  cows  genevievebell  markpesce  technologicaldeterminism  dogs  cats  ethnography  cooperation  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  slow  slowness  time  perception  psychology  humility  problemsolving  contentment  presence  peacefulness  workaholism  northamerica  europe  studsterkel  protestantworkethic  labor  capitalism  passion  pets  domestication 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
Can You Pet the Dog? (@CanYouPetTheDog) | Twitter
"A catalog of pettable and non-pettable dogs in video games. Manual input resulting in visual representation of petting is required for affirmation."
dogs  animals  videogames  games  gaming  pets  multispecies  twitter  petting 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Waiting for Happiness by Nomi Stone - Poems | Academy of American Poets
"Dog knows when friend will come home
because each hour friend’s smell pales,
air paring down the good smell
with its little diamond. It means I miss you
O I miss you, how hard it is to wait
for my happiness, and how good when
it arrives. Here we are in our bodies,
ripe as avocados, softer, brightening
with latencies like a hot, blue core
of electricity: our ankles knotted to our
calves by a thread, womb sparking
with watermelon seeds we swallowed
as children, the heart again badly hurt, trying
and failing. But it is almost five says
the dog. It is almost five."
poems  poetry  morethanhuman  multispecies  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  dogs  pets  nomistone  relationships 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Russian Subway Dogs — Spooky Squid Games
"Every morning dozens of stray dogs make the commute by train from the Moscow suburbs to the downtown core in search of food and fortune."

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPi2PeKxCh8 ]
games  videogames  gaming  dogs  russia  multispecies  morethanhuman  animals 
june 2018 by robertogreco
From Fire Hydrants To Rescue Work, Dogs Perceive The World Through Smell : NPR
"Specially trained dogs have been known to sniff out explosives, drugs, missing persons and certain cancer cells, but author Alexandra Horowitz tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that extraordinary olfactory abilities aren't just the domain of working dogs.

Horowitz says that all dogs have the ability to create "a picture of the world through smell," thanks, in part, to the design of their snouts. A canine's nose is "stereoscopic," she explains, which means that each nostril is controlled separately, allowing the dog not only to detect a particular smell, but also to locate it in space.

In her new book, Being a Dog, Horowitz discusses the mechanics of canine smell and explains how dogs can use their noses to understand what time of day it is or whether a storm is coming.

Horowitz warns that pulling dogs away from smell-rich environments, such as fire hydrants and tree trunks, can cause them to lose their predisposition to smell. When dogs are living in "our visual world," she says, "they start attending to our pointing and our gestures and our facial expressions more, and less to smells.""
smell  smells  dogs  time  2016  multispecies  animals  pets  morethanhuman 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Miru Kim
"Miru Kim is a New York-based artist and explorer. Her first series, “Naked City Spleen” is based on her exploration of urban ruins such as abandoned subway stations, tunnels, sewers, catacombs, factories, hospitals, and shipyards. Her next series, “The Pig That Therefore I am” juxtaposes her skin against the pig’s skin in industrial hog farms to explore the changing relationship between humans and animals. Her latest series, “The Camel’s Way” has followed her journey to deserts around the world, including the Arabian Desert, the Sahara in Mali, Morocco, and Egypt, the Thar in India, and the Gobi Desert in Mongolia, where she lived with desert nomads, slept in caves, and photographed herself with camels.

Miru's work has been highlighted by countless international publications and online media, and is now in public collections including National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Korea, Seoul Museum of Art, The Museum of Photography Seoul, Leeum Samsung Museum of Art, Borusan Contemporary Turkey, Addison Gallery of American Art, and The Francis J Greenburger Collection"

[Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/miru_kim/ ]

["For her dog from Arabian desert 🐪 follow @guernas"
https://www.instagram.com/guernas/ ]

[See all projects, performances, and writing (pig, camel, city).]
mirukim  art  artists  animals  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  photography  exploration  cities  urban  urbanism  morethanhuman  pigs  rats  eels  camels  dogs  nomads  nomadism 
may 2018 by robertogreco
75% of the World's Dogs Don't Have a Breed, but They Do Have a Name. Meet the Village Dog. | Rover.com
"There are about 250 million pet dogs on the planet, and more than 420 recognized dog breeds. Sounds like a lot, right? But there are an estimated one billion dogs on earth. Once all the pets are counted up, that leaves 750 million dogs who aren’t domestic, but aren’t quite wild animals (source).

These are village dogs, and their place in history and in our modern world is fascinating. Read on to learn more about village dogs!

Defining the Village Dog

It’s almost easier to define “village dogs” by what they’re not. Village dogs are not breeds created by humans, nor are they entirely breed-less. They’re not the same as strays or mongrels, and they’re not feral (i.e., completely unsocialized to humans). But they’re not exactly domesticated, either.

So what are village dogs? According to dog genetics expert Adam Boyko, “When you are looking at village dogs, you have something more akin to natural selection, albeit in an environment that’s managed by humans.”

In other words, they are semi-wild, semi-socialized canines living in or near human settlements. In fact, village dogs may be a living version of the ancient dogs who first chose to live alongside humans almost 15,000 years ago, well before human-directed artificial selection and breeding took over.

For an in-depth look at village dogs and the evolution of the modern dog, check out the groundbreaking book “What is a Dog?” by research partners and married couple Raymond and Lorna Coppinger."
dogs  animals  pets  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  multispecies  morethanhuman  2018 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Diogenes - Wikipedia
"Diogenes (/daɪˈɒdʒəˌniːz/; Greek: Διογένης, Diogenēs [di.oɡénɛ͜ɛs]), also known as Diogenes the Cynic (Ancient Greek: Διογένης ὁ Κυνικός, Diogenēs ho Kunikos), was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynic philosophy. He was born in Sinope, an Ionian colony on the Black Sea,[1] in 412 or 404 B.C. and died at Corinth in 323 B.C.[2]

Diogenes was a controversial figure. His father minted coins for a living, and Diogenes was banished from Sinope when he took to debasement of currency.[1] After being exiled, he moved to Athens and criticized many cultural conventions of the city. He modelled himself on the example of Heracles, and believed that virtue was better revealed in action than in theory. He used his simple life-style and behaviour to criticize the social values and institutions of what he saw as a corrupt, confused society. He had a reputation for sleeping and eating wherever he chose in a highly non-traditional fashion, and took to toughening himself against nature. He declared himself a cosmopolitan and a citizen of the world rather than claiming allegiance to just one place. There are many tales about his dogging Antisthenes' footsteps and becoming his "faithful hound".[3]

Diogenes made a virtue of poverty. He begged for a living and often slept in a large ceramic jar in the marketplace.[4] He became notorious for his philosophical stunts, such as carrying a lamp during the day, claiming to be looking for an honest man. He criticized Plato, disputed his interpretation of Socrates, and sabotaged his lectures, sometimes distracting attenders by bringing food and eating during the discussions. Diogenes was also noted for having publicly mocked Alexander the Great.[5][6][7]

Diogenes was captured by pirates and sold into slavery, eventually settling in Corinth. There he passed his philosophy of Cynicism to Crates, who taught it to Zeno of Citium, who fashioned it into the school of Stoicism, one of the most enduring schools of Greek philosophy. None of Diogenes' writings have survived, but there are some details of his life from anecdotes (chreia), especially from Diogenes Laërtius' book Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers and some other sources.[8]"



"Death

There are conflicting accounts of Diogenes' death. He is alleged variously to have held his breath; to have become ill from eating raw octopus;[36] or to have suffered an infected dog bite.[37] When asked how he wished to be buried, he left instructions to be thrown outside the city wall so wild animals could feast on his body. When asked if he minded this, he said, "Not at all, as long as you provide me with a stick to chase the creatures away!" When asked how he could use the stick since he would lack awareness, he replied "If I lack awareness, then why should I care what happens to me when I am dead?"[38] At the end, Diogenes made fun of people's excessive concern with the "proper" treatment of the dead. The Corinthians erected to his memory a pillar on which rested a dog of Parian marble.[39]"



"Cynicism

Along with Antisthenes and Crates of Thebes, Diogenes is considered one of the founders of Cynicism. The ideas of Diogenes, like those of most other Cynics, must be arrived at indirectly. No writings of Diogenes survive even though he is reported to have authored over ten books, a volume of letters and seven tragedies.[40] Cynic ideas are inseparable from Cynic practice; therefore what we know about Diogenes is contained in anecdotes concerning his life and sayings attributed to him in a number of scattered classical sources.

Diogenes maintained that all the artificial growths of society were incompatible with happiness and that morality implies a return to the simplicity of nature. So great was his austerity and simplicity that the Stoics would later claim him to be a wise man or "sophos". In his words, "Humans have complicated every simple gift of the gods."[41] Although Socrates had previously identified himself as belonging to the world, rather than a city,[42] Diogenes is credited with the first known use of the word "cosmopolitan". When he was asked from where he came, he replied, "I am a citizen of the world (cosmopolites)".[43] This was a radical claim in a world where a man's identity was intimately tied to his citizenship of a particular city-state. An exile and an outcast, a man with no social identity, Diogenes made a mark on his contemporaries.

Diogenes had nothing but disdain for Plato and his abstract philosophy.[44] Diogenes viewed Antisthenes as the true heir to Socrates, and shared his love of virtue and indifference to wealth,[45] together with a disdain for general opinion.[46] Diogenes shared Socrates's belief that he could function as doctor to men's souls and improve them morally, while at the same time holding contempt for their obtuseness. Plato once described Diogenes as "a Socrates gone mad."[47]

Obscenity

Diogenes taught by living example. He tried to demonstrate that wisdom and happiness belong to the man who is independent of society and that civilization is regressive. He scorned not only family and political social organization, but also property rights and reputation. He even rejected normal ideas about human decency. Diogenes is said to have eaten in the marketplace,[48] urinated on some people who insulted him,[49] defecated in the theatre,[50] and masturbated in public. When asked about his eating in public he said, "If taking breakfast is nothing out of place, then it is nothing out of place in the marketplace. But taking breakfast is nothing out of place, therefore it is nothing out of place to take breakfast in the marketplace." [51] On the indecency of his masturbating in public he would say, "If only it were as easy to banish hunger by rubbing my belly."[52][53]

Diogenes as dogged or dog-like

Many anecdotes of Diogenes refer to his dog-like behavior, and his praise of a dog's virtues. It is not known whether Diogenes was insulted with the epithet "doggish" and made a virtue of it, or whether he first took up the dog theme himself. When asked why he was called a dog he replied, "I fawn on those who give me anything, I yelp at those who refuse, and I set my teeth in rascals."[20] Diogenes believed human beings live artificially and hypocritically and would do well to study the dog. Besides performing natural body functions in public with ease, a dog will eat anything, and make no fuss about where to sleep. Dogs live in the present without anxiety, and have no use for the pretensions of abstract philosophy. In addition to these virtues, dogs are thought to know instinctively who is friend and who is foe.[54] Unlike human beings who either dupe others or are duped, dogs will give an honest bark at the truth. Diogenes stated that "other dogs bite their enemies, I bite my friends to save them."[55]

The term "cynic" itself derives from the Greek word κυνικός, kynikos, "dog-like" and that from κύων, kyôn, "dog" (genitive: kynos).[56] One explanation offered in ancient times for why the Cynics were called dogs was because Antisthenes taught in the Cynosarges gymnasium at Athens.[57] The word Cynosarges means the place of the white dog. Later Cynics also sought to turn the word to their advantage, as a later commentator explained:
There are four reasons why the Cynics are so named. First because of the indifference of their way of life, for they make a cult of indifference and, like dogs, eat and make love in public, go barefoot, and sleep in tubs and at crossroads. The second reason is that the dog is a shameless animal, and they make a cult of shamelessness, not as being beneath modesty, but as superior to it. The third reason is that the dog is a good guard, and they guard the tenets of their philosophy. The fourth reason is that the dog is a discriminating animal which can distinguish between its friends and enemies. So do they recognize as friends those who are suited to philosophy, and receive them kindly, while those unfitted they drive away, like dogs, by barking at them.[58]

As noted (see Death), Diogenes' association with dogs was memorialized by the Corinthians, who erected to his memory a pillar on which rested a dog of Parian marble.[39]"
philosophy  stoicism  cynicism  diogenes  simplicity  simpleliving  voluntarypoverty  criticism  society  voluntarysimplicity  dogs  presence  present  everyday  plato  ancientgreece  socrates  practice  praxis  obscenity  cv 
march 2018 by robertogreco
Animals with Cameras | About | Nature | PBS
"Go where no human cameraman can go and witness a new perspective of the animal kingdom in Animals with Cameras, A Nature Miniseries. The new three-part series journeys into animals’ worlds using custom, state-of-the-art cameras worn by the animals themselves. Capturing never-before-seen behavior, these animal cinematographers help expand human understanding of their habitats and solve mysteries that have eluded scientists until now.

Wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan and a team of pioneering animal behaviorists join forces to explore stories of animal lives “told” by the animals themselves. The cameras are built custom by camera design expert Chris Watts to fit on the animals unobtrusively and to be easily removed at a later point. From this unique vantage point, experience the secret lives of nine different animal species. Sprint across the savanna with a cheetah, plunge into the ocean with a seal and swing through the trees with a chimpanzee."

"Episode 1 premieres Wednesday, January 31 at 8-9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings)
The astonishing collar-camera footage reveals newborn Kalahari Meerkats below ground for the first time, unveils the hunting skills of Magellanic penguins in Argentina, and follows the treetop progress of an orphaned chimpanzee in Cameroon.

[http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/animals-cameras-episode-1/15926/ ]

Episode 2 premieres Wednesday, February 7 at 8-9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings)
The cameras capture young cheetahs learning to hunt in Namibia, reveal how fur seals of an Australian island evade the great white sharks offshore, and help solve a conflict between South African farmers and chacma baboons.

Episode 3 premieres Wednesday, February 14 at 8-9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings)
Deep-dive with Chilean devil rays in the Azores, track brown bears’ diets in Turkey, and follow dogs protecting flocks of sheep from gray wolves in Southern France."

[See also:
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-42660492
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09qqqgr ]
animals  cameras  cameraencounters  video  photography  morethanhuman  nature  multispecies  2018  meerkats  wildlife  dogs  sheep  namibia  chile  argntina  cameroon  chimpanzees  kalahari  cheetahs  southafrica  australia  sharks  seals  faming  baboons  bears  turkey  rays  classideas  pov 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Animals Week - CityLab
"Urban citizens of all species"

[See also: "When City Life Is Wild: This week, we’re fishing up stories about urban animals of all species."
https://www.citylab.com/life/2017/08/when-city-life-is-wild/536097/

"Curbing Your Dog, All Around the World: This blogger has the inside scoop on cities’ cheekiest signs."
https://www.citylab.com/life/2017/08/dog-poop-signs-around-the-world/535920/

"When Crows Attack: One man is on a mission to map bird-on-human aggression around the world."
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/when-crows-attack/536409/

"Will Cities Ever Outsmart Rats?: The age-old strategy is “see a rat, kill a rat.” The new plan is to end an infestation before it ever begins."
https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2017/08/smart-cities-fight-rat-infestations-big-data/535407/

"Urban Monkeys Are Too Chunky: Put down that banana! Eating human food is making the world’s city-dwelling simians sick."
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/urban-monkeys-are-too-chunky/536055/

"'We Thought We Would Be Ruled By Robots': American crow populations are swelling in cities. Perhaps by better understanding them we can better understand ourselves."
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/we-thought-we-would-be-ruled-by-robots/536118/

"The Deer in Your Yard Are Here to Stay: The deer population of the eastern U.S. has exploded and cities are trying to keep it in check. But the options available to them are limited, and fraught."
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/the-deer-in-your-yard-are-here-to-stay/535938/

"Green Roofs Are Saving Birds and Hatching Bird-Watchers: When landscape architects attract flocks to urban centers, city dwellers are keen to look up."
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/green-design-has-changed-urban-birding/535839/
animals  cities  multispecies  2017  wildlife  pets  nature  birds  deer  monkeys  dogs  rats  crows  corvids 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The Wild Dogs of Istanbul | The Smart Set
"No, you’d rather not cuddle with them. They seem a little too unpredictable and unkempt for that. And it’s not tempting to project human characteristics on them either. But it is easy to feel sorry for some of them, who bear traces of injuries, disease, and accidents. Most resemble one another: large, with a light-brown, sometimes darker coat. Some have short legs paired with unusually large bodies. Despite their scars, the wild dogs of Istanbul seem self-sufficient and untroubled, as if no one could mean them any harm. You can find them everywhere: between parked cars or, early in the morning, under the chairs in front of the Starbucks on Taksim Square. Often they just lie there and doze. Are they recovering from last night’s activities? Most people don’t seem bothered by them, but it’s obvious that some, a little uncertain, take pains to avoid them. But they are not to be made fun of because of that.

The dogs’ presence in this metropolis is not entirely without problems. Some of the animals are said to be so smart they understand traffic lights, but more often they cross streets in front of terrified drivers, keep residents awake with their barking, or even attack someone. In fact, I have myself observed an incident in my neighborhood Tarlabası, where a young man was literally chased by two dogs. He fell to the ground and dragged himself into a barbershop. It was painful to watch, but it all happened so quickly that one couldn’t really intervene; besides, how would one disperse the dogs without any adequate stick or tool? I don’t know what exactly preceded the incident, why the dogs had attacked the man in the first place. These attacks, however, happen far less often than one might expect, considering the dogs’ constant presence. No reliable count exists, but according to estimates, the dogs number about a hundred thousand. When you come to Istanbul, you will see that this doesn’t sound like an exaggeration.

The dogs’ position is a strange one: They are used to having people around, and even depend on them, but they don’t live directly together with humans. Behavioral scientist Konrad Lorenz, who once wrote about Istanbul’s stray dogs, observed that they carefully avoid loose small hens and newborn sheep — a lesson they learned in order to survive. Instead, they feed themselves in two ways. First, residents in the poorer sections of the city often put their trash bags out in front of their houses, where dogs and cats plunder them before trash trucks cart off the remaining piles in the early morning. But more and more metal trash cans are popping up, and their content is inaccessible, at least for dogs. Second, many people follow a custom (unfamiliar to Western observers) of more or less adopting a dog and regularly feeding it, without bringing it into their homes. Some people even make beds out of cardboard that become a dog’s regular spot in front of the house. Animals in these relationships are not full-fledged pets, but they are not complete strays either. In any case, their uncommitted “owners” never take them for walks. This reluctance to take in the animals can’t really be due to the size of the apartments; in a society where the single lifestyle is practically unknown, almost all residences are designed for families, and rarely measure less than 80 square meters. So what is the reason?

In Turkey, relationships to dogs are complex. In his novel My Name Is Red, Orhan Pamuk enters the mind of dog and asks himself about the origins of mankind’s enmity:
Why do you believe that those who touch us spoil their ablutions? If your caftan brushes against our damp fur, why do you insist on washing that caftan seven times like a frenzied woman? Only tinsmiths could be responsible for the slander that a pot licked by a dog must be thrown away or retinned. Or perhaps, yes, cats…

Although there is no clear basis for this belief in the Koran, strict Muslims consider dogs — especially their drool — to be unclean. People don’t let the animals into their homes because they could dirty the prayer rug and because, even today, little tradition exists of keeping dogs as pets. Furthermore, a common belief holds that köpekler, as dogs are called, prevent angels from visiting. Not all Turks share these views. In parts of Istanbul influenced by the West, all sorts of purebred dogs can be found, including traditional fighting breeds. In these cases, dogs are highly desirable status symbols, and many stores sell pet supplies. However, problems with religious neighbors disturbed by the presence of dogs can arise. “Many people want a dog, but don‘t know how to go about it,” says Bilge Okay of the dog protection society SHKD, which works toward better treatment of the animals.

Although keeping pets in this way is a very recent development, the breeding of dogs has a long tradition in the region. One of the oldest pieces of evidence for the domestication of dogs at all comes from Çayönü — in eastern Turkey, near the border with Syria –— from approximately 12,000 years ago. Well-known breeds like the Kangal, a very large shorthair, come to mind as well. Kangals were herd dogs used by Anatolian shepherds even before Islam spread throughout the region; they were associated with one of the 12 months of the year. But back to the wild dogs of Istanbul. Their presence in the city stretches far back, but their origins are the matter of legend: Do they hail from Turkmenistan? Did they arrive with the troops of the conqueror Mehmed II in the 15th century? Wherever their roots may lie, they have been an established part of the city for centuries, skulking in the shadows of the buildings.

Accounts of travelers — sometimes baffled, sometimes disconcerted or frightened — rarely fail to mention the dogs. In the 17th century, Jean de Thévenot noted that rich citizens of Istanbul bequeathed their fortunes to the city’s dogs to ensure their continued presence. And his contemporary Joseph Pitton de Tournefort heard from butchers who sold meat specially intended for feeding the dogs. He also saw how the city’s residents treated the animals’ wounds and prepared straw mats and even small doghouses for their canine neighbors. No less an establishment than the legendary Pera Palas, the best hotel, cared for the dogs and fed them regularly. Edmondo De Amicis, an Italian traveler whose book Constantinople records his impressions of the city in the mid-19th century, went so far as to describe Istanbul as a “giant kennel.” And Grigor Yakob Basmajean, an Orientalist born in Edirne, claimed in 1890 that no other city in the world had as many dogs as the metropolis on the Bosporus. The dogs were so omnipresent that streetcar employees had to drive them from the tracks with long sticks so the horse-drawn wagons could pass through. Passers-by could often stop to watch them fighting with one another. Their howling could be heard all night; there were so many dogs that their voices blended into a constant sound “like the quaking of frogs in the distance,” as one observer vividly described. It sounds like the dogs, not the authorities, set the tone. In popular shadow-puppet plays, dogs were compared to the poor.

Dealings with canines were always marked by ambivalence. Although dogs formed part of a romantic cityscape, caricatures from the Ottoman period depict them as threats to be stopped, along with cholera, crime, and women in European clothing. Again and again, attempts were made to catch them and remove them from the city. In the late 19th century, Sultan Abdülaziz decreed that the dogs should be rounded up and deported to Hayirsiz, an island of barren, steep cliffs in the Marmara Sea. Sivriada, a tiny island to which Byzantine rulers once banned criminals, made headlines in 1911 when the governor of Istanbul released tens of thousands of dogs there. A yellowed postcard shows hundreds of dogs on the beach; their voices could be heard even at great distances. However, an earthquake that occurred shortly thereafter was taken as a sign of God’s displeasure, and the dogs were brought back.

Attempts to stem the plague of dogs in the city continued, with more or less success. Their presence was always seen as a sign that the city could not impose order and guarantee the safety of residents. Cities like New York and Paris, where the problem was under control, became role models. Shortly after the revolution, Mary Mills Patrick, an American who taught at Istanbul’s Women’s College, thanked the new Turkish regime for its efforts in this area; after all, a civilized city was no place for packs of dogs. But even in the decades that followed, the dogs never completely disappeared. Occasional efforts to eliminate them were seen as acts of barbarism. Until 2004, when a law to protect the animals was finally passed, meatballs laced with strychnine were not uncommon. But today such draconian measures are things of the past.

Real change will only come once new solutions for the city’s trash problem are found and garbage is no longer simply placed on the curb, as it is in many neighborhoods today. Then things will be tough for the dogs. Animal protection activists today call for a concerted effort to catch the dogs, vaccinate them against rabies, sterilize them, and tag them before releasing them back into their territory. The World Health Organization also recommends this strategy. But gray areas exist in how authorities deal with the problem. Animal advocates claim that inexperienced veterinarians pack the neutered dogs into overcrowded cages, load them into trucks, and dump them in Belgrade Forest, about 10 miles northeast of the city near the Black Sea coast. There, the dogs are often attacked by wild animals or starve. “In the end, it would be better to put the animals to sleep than to release them in the unfamiliar wilderness,” says Bilge Okay. “But that would be against the religious beliefs of the people operating these facilities.”

… [more]
via:tealtan  2012  istnbul  dogs  multispecies  cities  urbanism  cats  animals  pets  orhanpamuk  history  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  strays  quiltros 
august 2017 by robertogreco
(2) '"A dog who I know quite well": everyday relationships between children and animals.' Children’s Geographies, 9(2) | Becky Tipper - Academia.edu
"Adult discourses often represent relationships between children and animals as beneficial for children's psycho-social development or as reflecting a natural‟ connection between children and animals. In contrast, this paper draws on recent work in sociology and geography where human – animal relationships are seen as socially situated and where conventional constructions of the human–animal boundary are questioned. Focussing on children's own perspectives on their connections with animals, it is argued that these relationships can also be understood within the social and relational context of children's lives. It is argued that this "relational‟ orientation to children's relationships with animals might significantly enhance our understanding of children's lives and also open up ways of thinking about the place of animals in children's (and adults') social lives."
animals  multispecies  2011  becktipper  human-animalrelationships  dogs  pets  sociology  geography  human-animalrelations  children 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Why Dogs Belong Off-Leash in the Outdoors | Outside Online
"If the owners are responsible, the presence of off-leash dogs can actually make the outdoors a better place"



"Responsible Dog Ownership

“I am a huge believer in enforcement,” says Bekoff, arguing that the best way to retain the privilege to walk your dog off-leash in a place like Boulder is to obey the rules—and have a reason to do so. “You need both the carrot and the stick to alter human behavior,” he continues. Having your dog off-leash means you need to be responsible.

There absolutely are places that dogs should not be off-leash, of course. And there are places dogs should not be at all. But there are also areas where human children should not be permitted to wander unsupervised and areas where humans should not tread at all. But just like laws that govern people are written to respect the decision-making powers of reasonable men, laws that govern dogs should also allow for the reasonable man.

I’m not about to let Wiley run amok in a sensitive bird nesting site or let him loose on a beach full of elephant seals. In fact, please give me a sign warning of those things. But on a backpacking trip, while camping, or just spending time in the mountains, I do want him to be off-leash. He’s happier that way, so I’m happier, too. And I don’t want that freedom to be limited by blanket legislation, personal prejudice, or fear.

It is the burden of any dog owner or caretaker to be responsible and considerate. Just like Americans traveling abroad, each of us is an ambassador for our culture. Every time someone steps in dog poop, that’s someone who’s going to thing negatively about dogs. Anyone who’s ever been bitten is going to feel even worse about them.

You know the saying “that’s why we can’t have nice things”? That’s how I feel every time I see a dog barking incessantly, every time I see dog poop laying around on a trail or sidewalk, and every time an armada of untrained chihuahuas attempts to kill Wiley. They never succeed, obviously, and Wiley is convinced they’re just playing, but a bad dog is the product of a bad dog owner. If you and I want to be able to take our dog places, then it’s up to us to make sure the dog is a positive thing, not a negative. There is no excuse: train your damn dog. And pick up his poop.

Want a real villain in this story of pets in conflict with nature? Domestic cats are reportedly killing 4 billion animals per year in the United States and are solely responsible for the extinction of at least 33 bird species. It’s cats, not dogs, that are our real enemies."
dogs  animals  pets  multispecies  outdoors  wessiler  2016  nature  wildlife 
may 2017 by robertogreco
How Michelle Garcia told the story of Juárez, a city lost to violence, through its dogs - Nieman Storyboard
"The Al Jazeera America piece, reported with Mexican reporter Ignacio Alvarado Alvarez, haunts with its indelible portrait of pets paying the price when a terrorized place goes feral"

[Referring to:
"Mexico's city of dogs: A portrait of ambitions and failures in Ciudad Juarez"
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2013/9/4/city-of-dogs.html ]
michellegarcía  carolinamiranda  dogs  animals  multispecies  ignacioalvaradoálvarez  juárez  ciudadjuárez  pets  photography  journalism  juarez  mexico  2017  2013 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Monstrous, Duplicated, Potent | Issue 28 | n+1
"On first read, I was dazzled and bewildered. Desperate to impress the organizer, who I thought brilliant, I strained over it line by line in hopes of insight. In the end, I mumbled through our meeting. I didn’t understand the Manifesto until I’d read it three more times. In truth, I probably still don’t. But for a young woman struggling to understand the world after Hurricane Katrina and a global financial crisis, Haraway beckoned. She offered a way to make sense of the things that seemed absent from politics as I knew it: science, nature, feminism.

The Manifesto proclaims itself to be against origin stories, but its own is hard to resist. In 1982, the Marxist journal Socialist Review — a bicoastal publication originally titled Socialist Revolution, whose insurrectionary name was moderated in the late 1970s as politics soured — asked Haraway to write five pages on the priorities of socialist feminism in the Reagan era. Haraway responded with thirty. It was the first piece, she claimed, she had ever written on a computer (a Hewlett-Packard-86). The submission caused controversy at the journal, with disagreement breaking down along geographic lines. As Haraway later recalled in an interview, “The East Coast Collective truly disapproved of it politically and did not want it published.” The more catholic West Coast won out, and the Manifesto was published in 1985 as “A Manifesto for Cyborgs: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the 1980s,” though it has been known colloquially as the Cyborg Manifesto ever since.

In one sense, Haraway did what she was asked: she outlined the contemporary state of political economy from a socialist-feminist perspective. Her reading of the shift to post-Fordism was loose but lucid. The rise of communications technologies made it possible to disperse labor globally while still controlling it, she noted, scattering once-unionized factory jobs across the continents. The gender of industrial work was changing too: there were more women assembling computer chips in East Asia than men slapping together cars in the American Midwest. Automation was lighter and brighter: in place of hulking industrial machinery, our “machines are made of sunshine” — but this light, invisible power nevertheless caused “immense human pain in Detroit and Singapore.” Family structures were changing: mothers increasingly worked outside the home and headed up the household. The result was what Haraway, drawing on Richard Gordon, called the homework economy — a pointed term for what’s euphemistically and blandly called the service economy.

The Manifesto offered a new politics for this new economy. Prescient about the need to organize the feminized, if not always female, sectors, Haraway explicitly called leftists to support SEIU District 925, a prominent campaign to unionize office workers. She also criticized the idea of a universal subject, whether held up by Marxists (the proletarian) or radical feminists (the woman). A new politics had to be constructed not around a singular agent but on the basis of a patchwork of identities and affinities. How, then, to find unity across difference, make political subjects in a postmodern era, and build power without presuming consensus? “One is too few, but two are too many,” she wrote cryptically. “One is too few, and two is only one possibility.” Acting as isolated individuals leads nowhere, but the effort to act collectively cannot leave difference aside. Women of color, Haraway suggested, following Chela Sandoval, could not rely on the stability of either category; they might lead the way in forging a new, nonessentialist unity based on affinity rather than identity.

This is where the metaphor of the cyborg comes in. For Haraway, the cyborg is a hybrid figure that crosses boundaries: between human and machine, human and animal, organism and machine, reality and fiction. As a political subject, it is expansive enough to encompass the range of human experience in all its permutations. A hybrid, it is more than one, but less than two.

In place of old political formations, Haraway imagined new cyborgian ones. She hoped that “the unnatural cyborg women making chips in Asia and spiral dancing in Santa Rita Jail” would together “guide effective oppositional strategies.” Her paradigmatic “cyborg society” was the Livermore Action Group, an antinuclear activist group targeting the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a nuclear-weapons-research facility in Northern California. The group, she thought, was “committed to building a political form that actually manages to hold together witches, engineers, elders, perverts, Christians, mothers, and Leninists long enough to disarm the state.”

What set the Manifesto apart from other reconceptions of feminism was its embrace of science. The cyborg was a figure that only a feminist biologist — herself an unlikely figure — could imagine. While by the 1980s many feminists were wary of biological claims about sexual difference, evading charges of essentialism by separating sex from gender (biology might give you a certain body, but society conditioned how you lived in it), Haraway argued that failing to take a position on biology was to “lose too much” — to surrender the notion of the body itself as anything more than a “blank page for social inscriptions.” Distinguishing her attachment to the body from the usual Earth Mother connotations was its famous closing line: “I would rather be a cyborg than a goddess.”

Who wouldn’t? The cyborg’s popularity was no doubt fueled in part by the vision of a bionic babe it suggested — a Furiosa or the Terminator — though it couldn’t be further from her meaning. Asked what she considered a true moment of cyborgness in 1999, Haraway responded, “the sense of the intricacy, interest, and pleasure — as well as the intensity — of how I have imagined how like a leaf I am.” The point was not that she shared some biological commonality with a leaf, or that she felt leaves to be kindred spirits (though she very well might have). What made her giddy was the thought of all the work that had gone into producing the knowledge that she was like a leaf — how incredible it was to be able to know such a thing — and the kinds of relationship to a leaf that such knowledge made possible.

Despite her frequent reminders that it was written as a “mostly sober” intervention into socialist-feminist politics rather than “the ramblings of a blissed-out, techno-bunny fembot,” many still read it as the latter. Wired profiled her enthusiastically in 1997. “To boho twentysomethings,” they wrote, “her name has the kind of cachet usually reserved for techno acts or new phenethylamines.” (More recently, the entrepreneurial synthetic biologist Drew Endy deployed the Manifesto in support of his bid to label synthetic biological products as “natural” under federal guidelines to increase their appeal to cautious consumers.)

Its Reagan-era coordinates may have changed, but the Manifesto remains Haraway’s most widely read work. The cyborg became a celebrity, as did Haraway herself, both serving as signifiers of a queer, savvy, self-aware feminism. Yet she has grown weary of its success, admonishing readers that “cyborgs are critters in a queer litter, not the Chief Figure of Our Times.”

Somewhat counterintuitively, it’s Haraway herself who sometimes seems the Chief Figure. There’s no Harawavian school, though she has many acolytes. She does not belong to any particular school herself, though many have attempted to place her. You can’t really do a Harawavian analysis of the economy or the laboratory; other than the cyborg, she’s produced few portable concepts or frameworks. Her own individual prominence runs counter to her view of intellectual work as collectively produced. Yet for thirty years she’s been ahead of intellectual trends, not by virtue of building foundational frameworks but by inspiring others to spawn and spur entire fields, from feminist science studies to multispecies ethics. Her work tends to emerge from problems she sees in the world rather than from engagement with literatures, thinkers, or trends, yet it manages to transcend mere timeliness.

Her new book, Staying with the Trouble, is a commentary on the most pressing threat of our era: catastrophic climate change. It’s hard to think of someone better suited to the task. Climate change requires ways of thinking capable of confronting the closely bound future of countless humans and nonhumans, the basis for certainty in scientific findings, the political consequences of such knowledge, and the kinds of political action that such consequences call for. If Haraway has long practiced such hybrid thinking, that also means the problem best suited to challenging her thought — to testing its mettle, and its usefulness to our political future — has decisively arrived."



"Under Hutchinson’s supervision, she wrote a dissertation heavily influenced by Thomas Kuhn’s 1962 landmark The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Kuhn had caused an uproar with his argument that rather than steadily progressing toward truth, the production of scientific knowledge was marked by conflict and upheaval. What scientists had once been certain was true would eventually be considered wrong. Each emerging framework was often incommensurable with what had come before. Kuhn called this phenomenon a “paradigm shift.” A classic example was the transition from Newtonian physics to Einsteinian relativity."

[See also: "Cthulhu plays no role for me"
https://www.viewpointmag.com/2017/05/08/cthulhu-plays-no-role-for-me/ ]
donnaharaway  2017  science  scientism  feminism  cyborgs  serviceeconomy  economics  academia  philosophy  1982  1985  california  ucsantacruz  queerness  biology  nancyhartstock  marxism  fredericjameson  hueynewton  angeladavis  historyofconsciousness  teresadelauretis  climatechange  anthropocene  naomiklein  blockadia  rustenhogness  kinstanleyrobinson  cyborgmanifesto  jamesclifford  histcon  alyssabattistoni  blackpantherparty  bobbyseale  jayemiller  historyofscience  radicalism  radicalscience  multispecies  animals  praxis  gregorybateson  systemsthinking  language  storytelling  politics  intersectionality  situatedknowledge  solidarity  perspective  thomaskuhn  epistemology  reality  consciousness  primatology  theory  empiricism  octaviabutler  sciencefiction  scifi  patriarchy  colonialism  racism  ignorance  objectivity  curiosity  technology  biotechnology  technofuturism  companionspecies  dogs  ethics  chthulucene  capitalocene  ursulaleguin  utopia  mundane  kinship  families  unity  friendship  work  labor  hope  sophielewis  blackpanthers 
may 2017 by robertogreco
'"A dog who I know quite well": everyday relationships between children and animals.' Children’s Geographies, 9(2) | Becky Tipper - Academia.edu
"Adult discourses often represent relationships between children and animals as beneficial for children‟s psycho-social development or as reflecting a „natural‟ connection between children and animals. In contrast, this paper draws on recent work in sociology and geography where human–animal relationships are seen as socially situated and where conventional constructions of the human–animal boundary are questioned. Focussing on children‟s own perspectives on their connections with animals, it is argued that these relationships can also be understood within the social and relational context of children‟s lives. It is argued that this„relational‟ orientation to children‟s relationships with animals might significantly enhance our understanding of children‟s lives and also open up ways of thinking about the place of animals in children‟s (and adults‟) social lives."
children  animals  multispecies  sociology  pets  kindship  family  relationality  relationships  beckytipper  2011  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  dogs  sfsh 
march 2017 by robertogreco
Dogs Remember More Than You Think : Shots - Health News : NPR
"You may not remember what you were doing a few minutes ago. But your dog probably does.

A study of 17 dogs found they could remember and imitate their owners' actions up to an hour later. The results, published Wednesday in Current Biology, suggest that dogs can remember and relive an experience much the way people do.

That's probably not a big surprise to people who own dogs, says Claudia Fugazza, an author of the study and an animal behavior researcher at Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest. Fugazza owns a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog named Velvet.

"Most dog owners at least suspected that dogs can remember events and past experiences," she says.

But demonstrating this ability has been tricky.

Fugazza and her colleagues thought they might be able to test dogs' memory of events using a training method she helped develop called "Do As I Do." It teaches dogs to observe an action performed by their owner, then imitate that action when they hear the command: "Do it."

In the study, a trained dog would first watch the owner perform some unfamiliar action. In one video the team made, a man strides over to an open umbrella on the floor and taps it with his hand as his dog watches.

Then the dog is led behind a partition that blocks a view of the umbrella. After a minute, the dog is led back out and lies on a mat. Finally, the owner issues the command to imitate: "Do it."

The dog responds by trotting over to the umbrella and tapping it with one paw.

In the study, dogs were consistently able to remember what their owners had done, sometimes up to an hour after the event.

The most likely explanation is that the dogs were doing something people do all the time, Fugazza says. They were remembering an event by mentally traveling back in time and reliving the experience.

Even so, the team stopped short of concluding that dogs have full-fledged episodic memory.

"Episodic memory is traditionally linked to self-awareness," Fugazza says, "and so far there is no evidence of self awareness in dogs and I think there is no method for testing it."

For a long time, scientists thought episodic memory was unique to people. But over the past decade or so, researchers have found evidence for episodic-like memory in a range of species, including birds, monkeys and rats.

Dogs have been a special challenge, though, says Victoria Templer, a behavioral neuroscientist at Providence College.

"They're so tuned into human cues, which can be a good thing," Templer says. "But it also can be a disadvantage and make it very difficult, because we might be cuing dogs when we're totally unaware of it."

The Budapest team did a good job ensuring that dogs were relying on their own memories without getting any unwitting guidance from their owners, says Templer, who wasn't involved in the study.

She says the finding should be useful to scientists who are trying to understand why episodic memory evolved in people. In other words, how has it helped us survive?

One possibility, Templer says, is that we evolved the ability to relive the past in order to imagine the future.

So when we're going to meet a new person, she says, we may use episodic memories of past encounters to predict how the next one might go.

"If I can imagine that I'm going to interact with some individual and that might be dangerous, I'm not going to want to interact with them," she says.

And that could help make sure the genes that allow episodic memories get passed along to the next generation."
dogs  animals  memory  pets  multispecies  2016  brain 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Why aren’t coyotes, dingoes and wolves treated like our dogs? | Aeon Essays
"Coyotes, dingoes and wolves are all dogs, as intelligent and loyal as our familiars. Our treatment of them is unconscionable"



"Some dogs exist inside the circle of human domesticity: beloved companions and friends, respected and often pampered. They sleep in our homes, sometimes in our beds. We buy them plush toys. Other dogs live outside, free and independent. They possess the essential cognitive and emotional faculties as our dogs; domestication has introduced refinements, but the raw material was already there. They have personalities, memories, love their pups, and are devoted to their packs. Every so often, they play with toys we don’t bring inside."



"Coyote-killing is different from hunting deer, elk or so-called game birds, traditions that are steeped in an ethos of stewardship, provision and even fairness. It’s killing for fun. YouTube abounds with videos that revel in the death of a coyote; in many parts of the western US, so-called coyote derbies are common, documented in photographs of stacked bodies – the kinds of photos we associate with the rapaciousness of the 19th-century frontier."
coyotes  dingoes  wolves  animals  dogs  multispecies  wildlife  nature  2016  brandonkeim  domesticity 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Foxdog Farms: Year of the Dog
"YEAR OF THE DOG is a slice-of-life game about living with a Shiba Inu in San Francisco.

You are placed in the role of a reluctant rookie dog owner, tasked with taking care of a Shiba while his real owner (your partner) is abroad for a year. Each chapter of the game recounts a snapshot from a month of that year, as your bond with the dog grows as you learn how and what it means to care for another living being.

Some features:

• 12 game vignettes about dog ownership: Meet a furry friend, learn how to take care of him , and learn something about yourself
 
• Camera mode and photo album to capture and store all your memories
 
• Explore recreations of sections of San Francisco's Outer Richmond district with your pal: locales like Sutro Baths, Land's End, and more
 
• Encounter and get to know a neighborhood's local characters: other dogs, other dog owners, and the local weirdos
 
• Minigame interludes between chapters provide fun asides and may even put you in the shoes (paws?) of the dog himself
 
• The story is structured an epistolary novel, following the emails between you and your partner overseas, who's very concerned about how well you're taking care of their dog
 
• As you play, the emails to your partner are dynamically generated based on choices you made, leaving a unique record for each playthrough recounting details both banal (like where you let the dog pee or poop) and meaningful
 
• Learn what it's like to own one of these bratdogs - those interested in getting a Shiba may consider this game's contents as a warning

More details coming soon! Follow development updates on my Twitter and Tumblr. I can also be contacted directly at keane@foxdogfarms.com."
games  gaming  videogames  dogs  sanfrancisco  2016  via:tealtan 
october 2016 by robertogreco
ドコノコ、はじまりました。[Dokonoko]
[via: "reminder that Dokonoko is a social network for animal pics & those are better than tweets also they sent a kerchief"
https://twitter.com/RealAvocadoFact/status/772534496373637122 ]
animals  pets  japan  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  dogs  cats  animalpics  photogrphy 
september 2016 by robertogreco
The first contemporary art exhibition for dogs - YouTube
"MORE THAN has commissioned a unique art exhibition for dogs which renowned British artist and inventor Dominic Wilcox has created for us. Wilcox’s interactive exhibits include ‘Cruising Canines’ - an open car window simulator, ‘Dinnertime Dreams’ - an oversized 10 foot dog bowl filled to the brim with hundreds of play balls to look like dog food, and ‘Watery Wonder’ - a series of dancing water jets that jump from one dog bowl to the next for dogs to chase. A selection of paintings and drawings created in a dog’s colour spectrum are also on display at the exhibition for the visiting dogs to enjoy.

The exhibition has been created as part of our #PlayMore campaign where we want to encourage owners to spend more time playing with their pet, while also inspiring them to find new ways to ensure they stay emotionally happy and physically healthy. What’s more if you take the #PlayMore Pledge to spend 15 minutes more a day with your pet and we’ll donate £1 to the RSPCA – find out more at http://www.morethan.com/pet-insurance/news/play-more/pledge "

[via: https://twitter.com/netanimals/status/769826958800777216
http://networkedanimals.tumblr.com/post/149594716750/interactive-more-than-art-exhibition-for-dogs-in ]
art  dogs  animals  multispecies  2016  pets 
august 2016 by robertogreco
When my dog died, I didn’t understand why it felt like a human had died. Then I read the research. - Vox
"The reason it felt like a human died is because, in so many ways, dogs are like us. They spend much of their life caring for us, and letting us care for them. Their life arc is our life arc, from suburb to city, from hardship to bliss. I didn’t know how to say goodbye. But in the moment, there was only one thing I actually wanted to say to Rainbow, my white dog: Thank you."
pets  dogs  multispecies  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations  animals  2016  alvinvhang  history  evolution  psychology  companions  companionship 
july 2016 by robertogreco
dog archaeology | archaeological research on dogs, domestication
"Described here are our archaeological studies on dogs, and their relationships with humans, in the far distant past. Our project is based at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada and is led by Dr. Robert Losey, an archaeologist who specializes in human-animal interaction, particularly those with dogs.

Our multi-disciplinary research team conducts most of its studies in Eastern Russia, including Siberia and the Russian Far East. We are primarily funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), but the team also collaborates and integrates its studies with a number of other international projects.

For our work to be successful, we need your input and help! Please click on the links above to learn more."

[via https://uofa.ualberta.ca/arts/about/people-collection/robert-j-losey
via https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/719347988976377857 ]
dogs  archaeology  animals  multispecies  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Skyrim Player Composes Eye-Watering Saga on His Harrowing Quest to Adopt a Virtual Dog - Cheezburger
"Shoutout to Patrick Lenton for putting together this unexpected, drama-soaked saga. The tale vividly portrays the trying loops any player will jump through to adopt a virtual dog in Skyrim. It's gold, and painfully accurate."

[Twitter thread begins here: https://twitter.com/PatrickLenton/status/717163582115307521 ]
pets  animals  dogs  patricklenton  videogames  games  gaming  multispecies  emotions  via:tealtan  skyrim  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Art of a Dog - From the Current - The Criterion Collection
"Consider the story of Lolabelle, the rat terrier cast by Laurie Anderson—her human companion—in Anderson’s stirring, tender film Heart of a Dog. In extraordinary footage, Anderson reveals her four-legged friend’s remarkable ability to both appreciate and create richly textured musical scores. As we witness Lolabelle’s aptitude for piano—her command of the keyboard, her innate sense of rhythm and her strategic deployment of the pause—we behold the creative potential in every pooch. For Anderson and her fellow artists, dogs represent a vast, untapped audience for creative endeavors.

Anderson is a pioneer in the emerging field of creativity for canines. She has cannily identified a massive wet-nosed population of potential art enthusiasts: dogs live in 44 percent of U.S. homes, which means that there are upwards of 50 million pooches hungry for culture. In 2010, Anderson performed her first dog concert, with several hundred pups in attendance, on the steps of the Sydney Opera House. Anderson has staged several such performances since, including one early this year in New York’s Times Square, conducted in honor of Heart of a Dog. Despite the January evening’s arctic temperature, the canine community was out in force. Dogs clad in sweaters and puffer coats gathered around Anderson as she delivered a violin concert in haunting frequencies that both the canines and their humans enjoyed. In a rousing finale, Anderson called for the dogs to lift their voices in a chorus of barks: From the tiniest Pom to the most formidable Bernese, the assembled spectators created their own sweet music.

It was a remarkable evening, the kind that renews an art lover’s faith in creativity and connection. And it prompted the sort of uncomplicated joy that the art world desperately needs right now.

In these early decades of the twenty-first century, you might imagine that art aficionados would be ecstatic. After all, we are in contact with more creativity than ever: there are art fairs opening every other week on every continent; biennials, triennials, and quinquennials occurring the globe over; images of artworks streaming across our Instagram and Facebook feeds.

And yet, something vital is missing. Somewhere in the incessant flow of pictures we’ve lost the spark that great art gives us—the aha! that shifts our vision, expands our worldview, and enlivens our senses. The profound experiences we crave remain out of reach.

But what to do?

Turns out that one answer is right under our noses—it’s in our lap right now, napping. Our beloved pooches, the ones who protect and obey us and vibrate with excitement when they see us, can liberate us from our suffering.

I can attest to this myself, as my own gallery-going experience has been transformed by Rocky, a spirited Morkie whom I met several years ago in a SoHo shelter. To my surprise, Rocky panted with pleasure each time I suggested a Chelsea gallery crawl, even as I remained wary of the dealers’ overhyped wares. I wondered: What was Rocky’s secret? As we spent more and more time together, it became clear that Rocky had something to teach me—to teach all of us—about finding joy in today’s art world. Among his many skills, I noticed a singular capacity to remain in the moment and to see each artwork with fresh eyes.

Rocky’s fearlessness, his capacity to remain curious, and, most importantly, his indifference to the pronouncements of New York Times reviews, were the inspiration for a talk I gave in February to a group of art world insiders gathered in a gallery in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick. The lecture, titled Five Things My Dog Taught Me About Art, not only considered the dog’s capacity to teach us about human ingenuity but also served as the launch event for a radical new exhibition I’m organizing called dOGUMENTA. The premise of dOGUMENTA is this: If canines like Rocky and Lolabelle can teach us so much about human creativity, what if they had a show of their own? How would artists respond to this massive new audience?

Now in development, dOGUMENTA (I) NYC will be the world’s first exhibition of art for dogs. It’s a labor of love, dedicated to my beloved Rocky and canine companions the world over. This will be a show not of or by dogs, but for them. It offers an unprecedented opportunity for the creative community to engage with an entirely new species of art lover, and to consider its concerns, interests, and worldview. Anderson’s explorations in Heart of a Dog and her performances are the first dispatches from the vanguard. I am eager to see how other artists will respond to this mandate.

It’s safe to say that dOGUMENTA is a revolutionary step forward for human creativity, and it is long overdue. After all that dogs have given us, isn’t it time we gave something back?"
dogs  film  animals  pets  jessicabarrowdawson  multispecies  via:anne  laurieanderson  companions  perspective  audience  dogumenta  art  music 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Office dog | Mapbox
"We’re looking for an office dog who loves to cuddle and accept back rubs to join the Mapbox team. You’ll be joining a seasoned team of Mapbox dogs that are excited to smell you. You’ll help us start every day by happily jogging towards us as we enter the office.

You should have some experience in laying in the sun. We’ll help you get accustomed to the office by providing you with treats and walks around the neighborhood.

This role is based in either our Washington, DC. or San Francisco office.

Qualities we’re looking for

• Exercises loyalty. You’ll visit the office at least once a week and get excited when it’s a three dog day at Mapbox.

• Knows when to use a barking voice. You’ll bark if someone is at the door and know that one bark is enough.

• Exhibits compassion. You know the team works hard and cannot pet you all day long, so you’ll jump into a lap or curl around our feet.

To apply

Please have your human apply for a position at Mapbox. We have a variety of positions from sales and business to engineering and support. We’d love to hear how your human can help us build the future of mapping.

(And once your human joins the team, we’ll automatically accept your application!)"
animals  pets  multispecies  companions  dogs  mapbox  via:vruba  2016  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Feeds...
"Here is a live kitten feed
Here is a live puppy feed
Here is a live penguin feed
Here is a live English Bulldog puppy feed
Here is a live parakeet feed
Here is a live sea otter feed
Here is a live panda feed
Here is a live calf feed
Here is a live chick feed
Here is a live sloth feed"
multispecies  livefeeds  animals  pandas  calves  cattle  cows  puppies  dogs  kittens  cats  penguins  parakeets  seaotters  otters  sloths 
december 2015 by robertogreco
What’s a Species, Anyways? | New Republic
"The search for the red wolf's origins have led scientists to a new theory about how evolution actually works."



"Evolution had always been represented as a “tree of life,” with animals diverging from each other until each species slotted into a terminal bud. In recent years, however, scientists have begun to adopt a more dynamic view of what constitutes a species. In 2011, Frank Rheindt and Scott Edwards, two researchers at Harvard, published a paper about hybridization in the scientific journal The Auk. They argued that “introgression”—the scientific term for when genes of one species enter the genome of another species through hybridization—had long been “underappreciated” and was, in fact, an “important and pervasive mechanism” in evolution. It allowed for the rapid introduction of “advantageous novelty” into a species’ gene pool. For example, the Neanderthal genes in the human genome affect the outer skin cells that produce hair, which researchers have suggested might have helped Homo sapiens adapt to colder climates when they migrated out of Africa some 60,000 years ago. Another research paper indicated that Tibetans gained the genes that help them breathe at high altitudes from the Denisovans, another ancient and extinct member of the Homo genus.

It is possible, certainly, for distinctive forms to be lost through hybridization. Non-native rainbow trout, for instance, have overwhelmed some of their idiosyncratic relatives in Western streams. But it is also possible for new forms to arise. No animal has demonstrated the rapid evolutionary advantages of hybridization better than the coyote. The coyote was native to the Great Plains but pushed eastward in the twentieth century into wolves’ former range along a front from Texas to southern Canada. The expansion, however, was not in lockstep. The coyotes that spread via Canada colonized new territory at a rate five times faster than their southern counterparts. A research team at the New York State Museum in Albany found that the northern coyotes encountered and hybridized with Algonquin wolves in Canada, producing larger offspring that could more easily hunt deer in Northeastern forests. These hybrid “coywolves” then spread into New York and Maine, states that had lacked wild canids since the nineteenth century. Evolution, a process that typically took thousands of years, had created a new form in a matter of decades. Hybridization held the key."



"To some biologists, the red wolf demonstrates how wrongheaded it is for the Fish and Wildlife Service to organize its conservation efforts around species in the first place, given how fuzzy the concept has proven. “I think it’s nonsensical for us to argue conservation-management practices on the basis of genomes that haven’t been impacted by genes from other species,” said Michael Arnold, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Georgia. “If we do that ... then there won’t be anything conserved.”

Instead, Arnold suggested a whole new paradigm for the natural world: not a “tree of life,” with its ever-multiplying and distinct branches, but a “web of life,” with species continually diverging and recombining over time —a truer picture of what actually happens in nature. He proposed that rather than spending conservation money to preserve what we have defined as a species, the U.S. government should buy up tracts of land and let natural evolutionary processes—including hybridization—run their course.

Scientists had hoped that DNA testing would yield clear definitions for animal species. Instead, it’s revealed just how impossible such precise determinations are. And yet few would suggest jettisoning the concept of a species altogether: It is, as E.O. Wilson wrote, too fundamental to human ideas of nature. The difference would be recognizing that a species is a human construction rather than a biological reality—a shift in perspective that would, if anything, give conservationists more flexibility to pursue their goals. “The Endangered Species Act is tied to typology, where it should be more oriented toward process,” Wayne said.

In this view, the red wolf need not be a paragon of genetic purity in order to deserve protection; it need only fill a niche in its ecosystem that no other animal does. Jenks echoed this point as well. “It should be about what an animal does in its habitat, and preserving that habitat, that ecology,” she said.

What that would mean for conservation efforts on the ground in North Carolina remains unclear. For the Fish and Wildlife Service, rescuing the red wolf from extinction is one of its greatest accomplishments. But as the agency continues to deliberate about the future of the recovery program, it has also signaled that it doesn’t have much heart left in the red wolf fight. This summer, a female red wolf wandered onto a landowner’s property in Hyde County. Typically, Fish and Wildlife employees trapped and removed unwanted red wolves from private property, but the wolves often journeyed back, and fed-up landowners have started to deny the agency access to their land. Rather than skirmish with another angry resident, the agency capitulated. It gave the man permission to shoot and kill the red wolf—a decision that drew the ire of environmental groups, who launched a lawsuit against the agency. On June 17, the man picked up a gun and, for the first time since the 1960s, intentionally took aim at and lawfully killed the red wolf. When he handed the corpse over to the Fish and Wildlife Service, they discovered that the wolf was nursing. Her pups would not survive without her care. "
biology  evolution  science  species  wolves  bencrair  joelsartore  animals  redwolves  coyotoes  dogs  hybrids  hybridism  wildlife  eowilson 
december 2015 by robertogreco
SF: Science Fiction, Speculative Fabulation, String Figures, So Far - Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology
"The British social anthropologist Marilyn Strathern, who wrote The Gender of the Gift based on her ethnographic work in highland Papua New Guinea (Mt. Hagen), taught me that “It matters what ideas we use to think other ideas (with)” (Reproducing the Future 10). Marilyn embodies for me the practice of feminist speculative fabulation in the scholarly mode. It matters what matters we use to think other matters with; it matters what stories we tell to tell other stories with; it matters what knots knot knots, what thoughts think thoughts, what ties tie ties. It matters what stories make worlds, what worlds make stories. Marilyn wrote about accepting the risk of relentless contingency; she thinks about anthropology as the knowledge practice that studies relations with relations, that puts relations at risk with other relations, from unexpected other worlds. In 1933 Alfred North Whitehead, the American mathematician and process philosopher who infuses my sense of worlding, wrote The Adventures of Ideas. SF is precisely full of such adventures. Isabelle Stengers, a chemist, scholar of Whitehead, and a seriously quirky Belgian feminist philosopher, gives me “speculative thinking” in spades. Isabelle insists we cannot denounce the world in the name of an ideal world. In the spirit of feminist communitarian anarchism and the idiom of Whitehead’s philosophy, she maintains that decisions must take place somehow in the presence of those who will bear their consequences.[2] In this same virtual sibling set, Marleen Barr morphed Heinlein’s speculative fiction into feminist fabulation for me. In relay and return, SF morphs in my writing and research into speculative fabulation and string figures. Relays, cat’s cradle, passing patterns back and forth, giving and receiving, patterning, holding the unasked-for pattern in one’s hands, response-ability, Octavia Butler’s Patternmaster series. My debts mount. Again and again, SF has given me the ideas, the stories, and the shapes with which I think ideas, shapes, and stories in feminist theory and science studies. There is no way I can name all of my debts to SF’s critters and worlds, human and not, and so I will record only a few and hope for a credit extension for years yet to come. I will enter these debts in a short ledger of my teaching and publishing. I start with Marge Piercy’s Woman on the Edge of Time, a typescript of my curriculum vitae that was part of a file for consideration for promotion in the History of Science Department at Johns Hopkins in 1979-80, and a bottle of chalky white out. I had written an essay review of Woman on the Edge of Time for the activist publication, Women, a Journal of Liberation and duly recorded this little publication on the CV. “The past is the contested zone”—the past that is our thick, not-yet-fixed, present, wherewhen what is yet-to-come is now at stake—is the meme that drew me into Piercy’s story, and I was proud of the review. A senior colleague in History of Science, a supporter of my promotion, came to me with a too-friendly smile and that betraying bottle of white-out, asking me to blot out this publication from the scholarly record, “for my own good.”[3] He also wanted me to expunge “Signs of Dominance,” a long, research-dense essay about the semiotics and sociograms developed in mid-20th-century primate field studies of monkeys and apes.[4] To my shame to this day, I obeyed; to my relief to this day, no one was fooled. Piercy’s temporalities and my growing sense of the SF-structure of primate field work made me write two essays for the brave, new, hyper-footnoted, University of Chicago feminist theory publication, Signs, and to title the essays in recognition of Piercy’s priority and patterned relay to me.[5] I could not forget—or disavow—Piercy’s research for Woman on the Edge of Time, which led her to psychiatrist José Delgado’s Rockland State Hospital experiments with remote-controlled telemetric implants, and my finding in my own archival research Delgado’s National Institutes of Mental Health-funded work applied to gibbon studies in the ape colony on Hall’s Island. The colonial and imperial roots & routes of SF are relentlessly real and inescapably fabulated. Later, living (non-optionally, in really real SF histories) with and as cyborgs, Piercy and I played cat’s cradle again, this time with my “Cyborg Manifesto” and then her He, She, and It. Cyborgs were never just about the interdigitations of humans and information machines; cyborgs were from the get-go the materialization of imploded (not hybridized) human beings-information machines-multispecies organisms. Cyborgs were always simultaneously relentlessly real and inescapably fabulated. Like all good SF, they redid what counts as—what is—real. The obligatory multispecies story-telling script was written in 1960 United States space research, when Manfred Clynes and Nathan Kline coined the word “cyborg” in an article about their implanted rats and the advantages of self-regulating human-machine systems in outer space."
speculativefiction  scifi  sciencefiction  donnaharaway  toread  speculativefabrication  isabellestrengers  alfrednorthwhitehead  knowledge  ideas  philosophy  anarchism  marilynstrathern  octaviabutler  manfredclynes  nathankline  cyborgs  joannaruss  samueldelany  evahayward  katieking  gregorybateson  historyofconsciousness  hiscon  herscam  jamestiptree  suzettehadenelgin  linguists  linguistics  johnvarley  fredjameson  suzymckeecharnass  ursulaleguin  worlding  cat'scradle  anthropology  ethnography  gwynethjones  heidegger  kant  multispecies  sheritepper  laurenoyaolamina  helenmerrick  margaretgrebowicz  dogs  animals  marleenbarr  marilynhacker  sarahlefanu  pamelasargent  viviansobchack  margaretatwood  vondamcintyre  ericrabkin  laurachernaik  sherrylvint  joshualebare  istvancsicsery-ronay  shulamithfirestone  judithmerril  franbartkowsky  2013 
october 2015 by robertogreco
I Met A Dog On The Internet And I Am Not Ashamed About It - Tom Cox
"Billy and I were sitting outside a pub on the north eastern edge of Dartmoor, inhaling a much-needed pint when the septuagenarian lady in the Barbour jacket approached us. Well, I was inhaling a much-needed pint; Billy, who is a miniature-toy poodle cross, was inhaling some much needed water from a margarine tub beneath the table with “DOG ALE” scrawled on it in black marker pen. Billy had a considerable portion of the moor stuck to his flanks, but that didn’t bother the lady in the Barbour jacket - she was straight in there to give them a good rub.

“Oh, isn’t he delightful!” she said. “Is he a puppy?”

“No, he’s actually two now,” I replied. “He’s got bags of energy. We’ve just walked twelve miles and he still wants more.”

Billy was looking up at her grinning now: a different dog to the one who, three quarters of an hour earlier, I'd had to perform a near rugby tackle on in order to stop him chasing approximately seventy eight sheep into the River Bovey.

“Well, you’re very lucky to have him.”

“Oh, he’s not actually mine.”

“Oh, really?” she suddenly seemed nervous. I could see her eyeing my flared trousers, Hall & Oates t-shirt and longish hair and re-evaluating the situation. This isn’t a wholesome rambler, after all; this is the infamous Disco Dancing Small Poodle Thief Of North Bovey. “Does he... belong to a friend?”

“Well, sort of.” I took a slight breath, although perhaps not as deep as the one I might have taken before saying the same thing a month or two ago. “We initially met... online.”

It’s taken a while for me to be comfortable in admitting I met my part-time dog on the Internet, but I’m okay with it now, and so is my dog. Of course, others might have a problem with it, but in the end, it’s their problem, not ours. Way back in the previous decade I borrowed dogs from people I met in real life. There was Nouster, a proud birthday card border collie who lived with my landlord and who I’d walk around the broads near my house in Norfolk. Then there was Henry, my friend Hannah’s cocker spaniel, who liked to roll around in pheasant carcasses and steal chips. But that was a different era, and a different world. Since then, the lives of humans and dogs have become more virtual, and different ways to meet dogs have become more acceptable.

The spring before last, I moved to a completely new part of the country - Devon - but my initial attempts to meet dogs to borrow in the real world there proved unsuccessful. My ad in the village shop (see below) drew a blank. I could borrow a terrier belonging to a friend of a friend but he was only available on Wednesdays, needed to wear a muzzle if he was being walked in an area where there were lots of other dogs and would reportedly attack any cat he saw. A labrador belonging to a hairdresser in Exeterwas available for walks but when I had been to get my haircut there and said “Please can you take hardly anything off at all?” she’d misheard me and thought I’d said “Attack my hair like it’s a hedge in a sunny period in June immediately following heavy rainfall.” “Would borrowing her dog mean a long term commitment to looking like I worked in an insurance broker’s office in 1949?” I worried."

[continues]
dogs  animals  multispecies  internet  online  web  tomcox  pets  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Denali on Vimeo
"There's no easy way to say goodbye to a friend, especially when they've supported you through your darkest times.

Made possible by Patagonia
Generous support from: First Descents, Ruffwear and Snow Peak

In order of appearance: Ben Moon & Denali
Producer: Ben Moon // Moonhouse
Directed / edited / written: Ben Knight // Felt Soul Media
DP: Skip Armstrong // Wazee Motion Pictures
Second Camera: Page Stephenson
Co-Writer: Katie Klingsporn
Wet Camera: Justin Harris
Sound Recordist: Jim Hurst
Music Supervisor: Ben Knight and Chris Parker
Sound Mix: Justin Harris
Narrated by: Ben Knight

Music by: Chihei Hatakeyama, Images of a Broken Light — chihei.org
Music by: Odesza, It's Only [feat. Zyra] In Return, odesza.com, courtesy of Counter Records 2014

Still Photographs by: Ben Moon, Lisa Hensel, Carli Davidson, Miranda Moon, Vivian Moon, Jean Redle Dawn Kish, Lisa Skaff, Pete Rudge, Kristen & Ian Yurdin, and John Sterling"
animals  pets  dogs  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  2015  benmoon  companionship  death  multispecies 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Why Dogs Look Like Their Owners | Co.Design | business + design
"The similarity is—well, pick whatever description you're most comfortable with, but it's certainly evident. And it's evidence-backed, too. In several studies over the past decade, behavioral scientists have found that some people look so much like their pets that outside observers can match them based on pictures alone. The above image, for instance, comes from a 2005 study in which test participants identified owner-pet pairs at a success rate far greater than what you'd get with random guessing. The effect has held in the United States, South America, and Japan, suggesting it just might be universal.

So the resemblance truly exists, according to science. The question then becomes why. Humans do occasionally keep their young ones on leashes, but they don't actually give birth to pets—or the Internet would surely know about it—so it's safe to say the similarities aren't genetic. It's possible that people and pets somehow grow to look like one another over time, though how exactly that would occur is a bit of a mystery—short of a person telling a barber to give them the Bichon Frise.

Far more likely is that some people, either intentionally or subconsciously, choose a dog that resembles them, says social psychologist Nicholas Christenfeld of the University of California-San Diego. "I've certainly heard stories of people coming to resemble their pets," he tells Co.Design. "It's not really clear what the mechanism for that would be. I guess you could both exercise together—both catch Frisbees in your mouth, or something. But really coming to look like your dog would pretty much have to be you changing your appearance to resemble the dog, rather than the other way around. So it's not entirely crazy. But picking a dog that looks like you seems more plausible.""



"Christenfeld suspects evolution might have something to do with it. The impulse to care for a child is enormously adaptive in the eyes of natural selection, and one way a child might trigger this caretaking desire—aside from the whole emerging from the womb thing—is by looking like a parent. So when a person sees a "little, helpless, non-verbal creature that looks like them" in the form of a pet, Christenfeld says, some of those same basic nurturing instincts could spring into action.

"The feeling people have about their children is often very similar to the feeling people have about their pets," he says. "Lots of couples will use pets as a sort of practice trial for kids. And when kids go away to college, they're often replaced by pets. They come back for spring break and it's, 'Sorry, you have to sleep in the garage. Fluffy has your room now.'""
animals  pets  dogs  multispecies  ucsd  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  nicholaschristenfeld  michaelroy  2015 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Dog-eyed view: the camera that takes a photo whenever your dog gets excited - video | World news | The Guardian
"A new gadget has been developed that straps a camera to your dog's chest, monitors its heart rate and takes a picture whenever it's excited. The product comprises the camera, a specially designed camera case, and a heart-rate monitor strap that communicates with the case via Bluetooth to cause the shutter to trigger when the dog's heartbeat increases"

[http://heartography.nikon-asia.com/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5a6fd-wvIdw ]
pets  cameras  dogs  quantifiedpet  2015  nikon  photography  animals  multispecies  heartography 
may 2015 by robertogreco
The Guilty Looking Companion | Dog Spies, Scientific American Blog Network
"Live with a dog, and you’ve probably met the “guilty look.” It all happens so fast — you come home, the plants are knocked over, soil is tracked all over the floor, and there’s the dog, frozen, averting gaze, and tail thumping. Whip out your phone to record the behavioral evidence for YouTube, and bam, you’ll not only get millions of views, but you can even be invited on ABC’s Good Morning America. All hail the dog’s “guilty look.”

But there’s a problem. Research to date, including a new, open-access study published earlier this year, has not found that a dog’s “guilty look” necessarily corresponds with dog’s knowledge of a misdeed. Additionally, scolding or punishing a dog in an attempt to tell them that what they did is wrong will not necessarily lead to a decrease of that “bad” behavior in the future. This is because a dog’s supposed “guilty look” does not have the same meaning that it has for humans.

Which shouldn’t really surprise anyone. Any dog lover who has watched a dog hold her nose centimeters from a lamp post or another dog’s bum knows that the dog worldview differs from ours. When researchers create experiments to better understand dogs’ conceptual frameworks, we often find that although their behaviors might seemingly be on par with our own, their cognitive framework or understanding of a situation might differ. This in no way minimizes our special relationship or their standing as our “best friend.” It just means that the modern dog, even after thousands of years of domestication, is still better understood as a dog, a member of Canis familiaris, than as a human in dog fur.

Enter today’s star, the beloved “guilty look.”

In humans, a guilty look tips you off that someone knows not only that they have done something wrong, but also how they feel about it (badly). Guilt can be exceedingly useful for social beings like us because admitting you did something wrong is a step toward repairing a relationship, effectively minimizing the impact of your misdeed. Appeasement and reconciliation are also part of the package, and someone who ate the last of the chocolate ice cream and then left the empty container in the freezer may avert their gaze and even slightly constrict their posture. Hopefully, the person who kicked the ice cream will also engage in reparative behavior and buy more.

Then, there’s your dog.

“I behave in a particular way when I feel guilty; my dog behaves in a similar way in equivalent circumstances; I know intuitively that my behaviour is motivated by guilt; therefore the behaviour I see in my dog is also accompanied by feelings of guilt” (Bradshaw and Casey, 2007, p. 151)

For some, this is an open and shut case. You ate the ice cream. The dog peed on the floor. You look and act guilty. So does the dog. Both are equally guilty. Case closed. Owners asked to describe a dog’s “guilty look” comment that dogs tend to become smaller and essentially assume a non-threatening pose. Some dogs avert their gaze or freeze. Sometimes there is a quick or slow thump-thumping of the tail. Others lift a paw. Some approach the owner with low posture. Others retreat to hide under the bed or simply to increase distance.

Animal behavior researchers classically refer to behaviors like these as elements of submission or fear. These cohesive displays are employed by social species, like dogs and their wild-type progenitor the wolf, to reduce conflict, diffuse tension, and reinforce social bonds. Many dog owners, by contrast, observe these behaviors as clear-cut evidence of guilt, a dog’s knowledge that he did something wrong. Researchers have tried to assess this claim.

In 2009, Alexandra Horowitz of Barnard College (and author of “Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know”) published a study in Behavioural Processes exploring what precedes the “guilty look.” By varying both the dog’s behavior (either eating or not eating a disallowed treat) and the owner’s behavior (either scolding or not scolding), Horowitz was able to isolate what the dog’s “guilty look” was associated with. She found that the guilty look did not appear more when the dogs had done something wrong. Instead, the “guilty look” popped out in full form when the owner scolded the dog. In fact, Horowitz also found that when scolded, the most exaggerated guilt look was performed by dogs who had not eaten the treat but were scolded anyway because the owner thought the dog had eaten it. In a multi-dog household, a dog could easily look guilty without ever having transgressed.

“But wait!” cries the peanut gallery. “It can’t only be about scolding.” The claim is as follows: you come home only to be greeted by your beloved dog, this time, with low posture, ears back, squinty eyes, lip licking and a tail wagging low and quick. Or maybe the dog is under the bed and won’t budge. You enter the kitchen and find that the dog has done a lovely job rearranging the trash all over the floor. Not your design of choice, but you can see what he was getting at. In this context, owners claim dogs show the “guilty look” prior to an owner discovering the misdeed. This, they claim, indicates that dogs know they have done something wrong because the owner is not scolding yet.

In 2010, I investigated this scenario while conducting research with the Family Dog Project in Budapest. In the experiment, published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science in 2012, dogs had the opportunity to break a rule (that food on a table is for humans and not dogs) while the owner was out of the room. When the owner returned, but before they saw whether the dog ate the food, the dogs who ate were not more likely to look guilty than those who did not eat. We also wondered whether owners would be better able to recognize their dog’s transgression in their behavior than a researcher simply coding for the presence of the commonly assigned “look.” Owners who had previously witnessed their dog attending to the rule were not able to identify whether or not their dog had transgressed in their absence. The study did not find that owners could identify a “guilty dog” without scolding.

To date, researchers have not found direct support for the claim that dogs look “guilty” in the absence of concurrent scolding, but this doesn’t necessarily mean nothing’s going on. In her book “For the Love of a Dog: Understanding Emotion in You and Your Best Friend,” Patricia McConnell, Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison comments on what numerous clients have said: “So often people think their dog ‘knows’ she shouldn’t potty in the house because she greets them at the door looking ‘guilty,’ with her head and tail down, her eyes all squinty and submissive” (p. 17).

In the late 1970s, a veterinarian received a call from a client. The client’s dog, Nicki, apparently took to shredding paper in the owner’s absence. Spite, the owner assumed, was behind the behavior. Together, the veterinarian and the owner explored the claim by having the owner shred the paper, leave the house, and then return home. Since Nicki had not performed the misdeed this time, she should not look guilty if the “guilty look” is associated with a knowledge of one’s own transgression. If she did look “guilty” it could instead suggest that — as many other studies find — dogs are incredibly sensitive to environmental and social cues, and paper on the floor could be an indication of potential scolding to come. As you might imagine, it was the latter. When the owner returned, Nicki looked “guilty” even though she did nothing wrong. McConnell continues, “All that crouching and groveling is a white flag to avoid her owner’s wrath, not a sign she’s aware she’s broken some moral code of dog/human relationships.”

“Evidence + Owner = Trouble” explains primatologist Frans de Waal, in “Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals.” As a social species aiming to maintain relationships, dogs could show submissive displays prior to an owner scolding without the behavior indicating an apology or admittance of guilt as you might find with humans. Instead, these displays can aim to appease or pacify. In a questionnaire with study participants, I found that nearly 60% of owners surveyed reported that the dog’s “guilty look” led them to scold their dog less. What owners call “guilty” behavior could, in theory, serve an appeasement function in this context.

Ljerka Ostojić and Nicola Clayton of the University of Cambridge, and Mladenka Tkalčić of the University of Rijeka investigated whether a dog’s guilty look could be triggered by environmental cues. Earlier this year, they published an open-access study in Behavioural Processes investigating “whether the dogs’ own actions or the evidence of a misdeed might serve as triggering cues” for the guilty look in the absence of a scolding owner. By using a manipulation somewhat similar to that of Horowitz, Ostojić and colleagues found that the “guilty look” was not affected by dog’s own behavior (either eating or not eating the food), or whether the food was present or absent.

As researchers tend to do, Ostojić and I recently pondered the future of the “guilty look” in a Skype conversation. She highlights that it would be useful to investigate the behavior “in the exact situation in which owners claim that it appears. It also might be useful to look into what happens individually with each dog, and in this case, the stimulus would be specific to each dog.” Researchers could investigate how dog personality traits and life experiences affect the presentation of the “guilty look,” and Ostojić also wondered whether future studies should remove the experimenter or bystander from the scenario to better mimic real-world claims.

You may wonder why many people such as myself harp on this topic … [more]
dogs  pets  multispecies  animals  juliehecht  2015  psychology  guilt  social  anthropomorphism 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Dogs vs. drones: the war begins | Fusion
"Small camera-equipped drones are poised to revolutionize all kinds of industries in the next few years. More importantly, they’re going to revolutionize the way we mess with our pets.

Like the Roomba, the quadcopter drone is deeply polarizing among dogs. Some dogs see drones as terrifying killer robots, while others (like mine) just view them as strange new toys to be chased around the yard. But one thing is clear: this will end in war.

Here are 13 of the best dog vs. drone battles of all-time."
pets  animals  dogs  quadcopters  drones  droneproject  kevinroose  2015 
april 2015 by robertogreco
The Trouble With Truffles | Here & Now
"Truffle season in forests across the Pacific Northwest is coming to a close. The fungus is prized by restaurants and can sell for 400 dollars a pound or more. But, this year, despite their protests, truffle hunters in Oregon were shut out of some of their favorite foraging spots. Amelia Templeton, from Here & Now contributor Oregon Public Broadcasting reports."

[See also:
http://www.eater.com/2015/2/6/7993099/truffle-hunt-oregon-dogs-italy
http://www.eater.com/2014/12/17/7402073/white-truffles-Italy-emilia-romagna ]
truffles  oregon  food  dogs  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations  multispecies  2015  italy  animals  pets 
april 2015 by robertogreco
'White God' Director on Unleashing 250 Dogs on Budapest a | Indiewire
"Q: Can you tell me about the logistics of working with the dogs? There were 200, correct?

A: 250. It was a huge process. On the one hand, everybody thought, Kornél, you can't do this movie without CGI. And I thought no, my main conception was no CGI, no pure breed dogs. Just mixed breeds, mostly from the dog pound. Because I believe in equality, I didn't want to illustrate it as a human. I wanted to show what an animal feels without drawing that through a computer. It's really against the soul of this movie. Then I found two amazing people, Teresa Miller and Árpád Halász, the two lead trainers. Teresa was the trainer for the hero dogs, and Árpád was for the crowd, the bunch. And what they do is amazing. They used a totally new method for that, I can't remember what it's called....

Q: Positive reinforcement?

A: Exactly, yes. That's so great, and easily forgotten. The dogs felt they were playing. It's a dramatized nature movie, somehow. We gave lots of freedom for the animals. I don't like most animal movies because the animals [feel] dead. They follow orders with lots of fear of the trainer. What were are doing was just the opposite. Logistically, we had half a year of training time. We had a very special method for shooting: one week shooting, one week rehearsing. We built a kind of town in the countryside where we could rehearse, because you cannot block locations in the city. And for me, personally, it was like therapy. I forgot how it was to be close to animals. How much patience and how much time you need, and concentration and curiosity. I have an adult control freak attitude. The dogs taught me a lot.

Q: What did they teach you, exactly?

A: Curiosity, patience, and to change perspective. Not just using my perspective as the truth. It also taught me a lot of positive things as a father. I started to use positive reinforcement with my children, which is much better."

[via: http://morethanhumanlab.tumblr.com/post/114538083685/white-god-director-on-unleashing-250-dogs-on ]
dogs  animals  film  filmmaking  unpredictablity  messiness  whitegod  kornélmundruczó  interviews  multispecies  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  perspective  pov  truth  behavior  mutts  authenticity 
march 2015 by robertogreco
In Brooklyn, gentrification wipes out pigeons and chickens to make room for cats and dogs | Money | The Guardian
"Gentrification of inner-city neighborhoods into pseudo-suburbs have created a line between the haves and the have-nots"

[See also: http://gothamist.com/2015/03/21/photos_lamb.php ]
brooklyn  animals  cats  dogs  chickens  pigeons  birds  2014  pets  nyc 
march 2015 by robertogreco
‘Goodbye to Language’ is Jean-Luc Godard in 3-D. ’Nuff said. - Movies - The Boston Globe
"Yes, there are people here. A few black-suited German security forces dash through the early scenes (the director is of the opinion that we lost World War II — we were fighting fascism, remember?) and we get shards of an adulterous romance between a quintessential Godardian couple, a woman who’s anchored in reality and a man who keeps disappearing up the hindquarters of his own intellect. (See 1965’s “Pierrot Le Fou” — a movie that’s in this writer’s personal Top Five — for the purest treatment of the theme.) Godard films them often nude, often cropped from the neck down, upstaged by vases and other foreground bric-a-brac. You almost can’t hear the characters for all the visual noise, which is at least partly the point.

The main character of “Goodbye to Language,” though, is a dog: a soulful black-and-tan mixed breed named Roxy Miéville that belongs to the director and his longtime partner, filmmaker Anne-Marie Miéville. Godard films the animal with rough iPhone-level camerawork, trailing Roxy through lakefronts and rivers, urban wastelands, forests of lush, Rousseau-ian greenery. For a film obsessed with language, these scenes are an island of respite, honoring the simple dogness of being. “What is outside can be known only via an animal’s gaze,” says Godard, quoting Rainer Maria Rilke.

“Goodbye to Language” is a film of dualities, then — the yin/yang of male and female, of nature (all that is real) and metaphor (everything we use to refer to reality: words, images, the cinema), of dog and human, of idealism and earthiness, of the left and right eyes we use to order perception into graspable shape."

[trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibffxoK5gs0 ]
jeanluc-goddard  2015  dogs  film  towatch  animals  pov  perspective  3d  goness  rainermariarilke  pets  human-animalrelations  multispecies  language  communcation  human-animalrelationships 
march 2015 by robertogreco
White God - Official Trailer - YouTube
"Winner of Cannes Film Festival's Prize Un Certain Regard Award and official selection of Sundance Film Festival, White God premieres in theatres March 27th, 2015.

Kornel Mundruczo’s newest film is a story of the indignities visited upon animals by their supposed “human superiors,” but it’s also an brutal, beautiful metaphor for the political and cultural tensions sweeping contemporary Europe. When young Lili is forced to give up her beloved dog Hagen, because it's mixed-breed heritage is deemed 'unfit' by The State, she and the dog begin a dangerous journey back towards each other. At the same time, all the unwanted, unloved and so-called 'unfit' dogs rise up under a new leader, Hagen, the one-time housepet who has learned all too well from his 'Masters' in his journey through the streets and animal control centers how to bite the hands that beats him …"

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_God
http://www.magpictures.com/whitegod/
http://whitegodfilm.com/

Sundance clip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ox2BiuaiBqo ]
dogs  film  animals  pets  human-animalrelations  mutts  towatch  via:anne  whitegod  multispecies  hungary  edg  srg  glvo  human-animalrelationships  kornélmundruczó 
march 2015 by robertogreco
How My Dog Sends Selfies
"A few weeks after we got our puppy, we taught her how to turn on a light.
Turns out Kaira will do just about anything if you can clearly communicate your desires and have a treat in your hand. There’s an Ikea lamp in our bedroom that’s activated by stepping on a floor switch. We started Kaira’s training by placing her paw on the switch, saying “Light,” and giving her a treat. Once she had that down, we’d press down on her paw and withhold the treat until she heard a “click.” Eventually, we got to the point where we could say “Light” from across the room and Kaira would run over and do the job:

[video]

So let’s say you’ve a dog that can press a button. What could you do with that?
Doggy Selfies
A couple months after Twilio launched MMS, I was reading through one of Ricky Robinett’s hardware hacking posts and started to wonder if there was a way to get Kaira to send me selfies. Thanks to the Arduino Yun, the answer to that question is a resounding “Yes!”

[video]

What you’re seeing in the video is a cigar box that houses a massive arcade button and an Arduino Yun. The second cigar box merely serves as a stand for the webcam that’s plugged into the Yun. (My local cigar shop sells empties for $2 — they make for sturdy and stylish enclosures for your hardware projects)."
dogs  animals  cameras  selfies  arduino  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  arduinoyun  twilio  gregbaugues  buttons  multispecies 
march 2015 by robertogreco
From the series Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert,... - robertogreco {tumblr}
[self-bookmarking for easier retrieval thanks to the superior tagging features of Pinboard]

"From the series Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert, John Divola, 1996-1998
From 1995 to 1998, I worked on a series of photographs of isolated houses in the desert at the east-end of the Morongo Valley in Southern California. As I meandered through the desert, a dog would occasionally chase my car. Sometime in 1996 I began to bring along a 35mm camera equipped with a motor drive and loaded with a fast and grainy black-and-white film. The process was simple; when I saw a dog coming toward the car I would pre-focus the camera and set the exposure. With one hand on the steering wheel, I would hold the camera out the window and expose anywhere from a few frames to a complete roll of film. I’ll admit that I was not above turning around and taking a second pass in front of a house with an enthusiastic dog. Contemplating a dog chasing a car invites any number of metaphors and juxtapositions: culture and nature, the domestic and the wild, love and hate, joy and fear, the heroic and the idiotic. It could be viewed as a visceral and kinetic dance. Here we have two vectors and velocities, that of a dog and that of a car and, seeing that a camera will never capture reality and that a dog will never catch a car, evidence of devotion to a hopeless enterprise.

That’s quoting Divola from the Amazon page for the book of the same title. See also Divola’s Dog Sequences (Look inside the book here.) and “John Sevigny: On John Divola’s Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert.” (via referencescout)"
dogs  animals  photography  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations  cameras  johndivola  deserts  socal  california  multispecies 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Commune | Daily: Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert
"Occasionally, while working in the Morongo Valley, John Divola’s car would get chased by a dog. When Divola saw one coming towards him, he would pre-set his camera, stick his arm out of the window, and expose the film. Sometimes, he admits, if the dog was especially enthusiastic, he would loop around for a second pass."
dogs  animals  cars  photography  johndivola 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Japan's Robot Dogs Get Funerals as Sony Looks Away
[See also: “http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/12/mourn-robotic-dog-human-sony”
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/12/mourn-robotic-dog-human-sony

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/sony-aibo-robot-dog-funeral-in-japan/
http://www.popsci.com/worlds-saddest-funeral-robot-dogs-held-japan
http://toyland.gizmodo.com/japan-is-holding-actual-funerals-for-sonys-robotic-aibo-1688175542
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2968691/Funerals-held-ROBOTIC-dogs-Japan-owners-believe-souls.html ]

"In 1999, Sony launched a robot dog named Aibo in the U.S. and Japan that not only responded to external stimuli, but was able to learn and express itself. These capabilities, a press release from the time explained, “allow each unit to develop a unique personality including behavior shaped by the praise and scolding of its owner.” And Aibo, short for “Artificially Intelligent Robot,” quickly became a hit--especially in Japan.

At around $600 to $2,000 a pup, each iteration of Aibo cost less than some real dogs. And the perks didn’t end there. “When I leave on holiday I can just turn him off, I don’t need to feed him,” Hideko Mori, a robot dog owner of eight years, told AFP. “He doesn’t need taking out, well, not exactly. From time to time he cocks his leg and there’s this noise like water running. It’s a beautiful noise.”

Mori purchased the pooch after the death of her husband and, like many other Aibo owners, became attached to her unique cyborg companion.

“I can’t imagine how quiet our living room would have been if Ai-chan wasn’t here,” Sumie Maekawa, a longtime Aibo owner, told The Wall Street Journal, using an honorific suffix applied to girls’ names.

Tatsuo Matsui, who owns two digital dogs with his wife, added, “I can’t risk my precious dogs because they are important members of our family.”

Despite the loyal fanbase, Sony decided to discontinue the bot in 2006, after selling around 150,000 units.

"Our core businesses are electronics, games and entertainment, but the focus is going to be on profitability and strategic growth," a Sony spokeswoman said at the time. "In light of that, we've decided to cancel the Aibo line."

For years following the announcement, Sony would repair Aibos that experienced technical difficulties. But in July 2014, those repairs stopped and owners were left to look elsewhere for help.

“The first time I spoke directly to a client he told me, ‘He’s not very well, can you examine him?’” Hiroshi Funabashi, a robot dog repairman, told AFP. “I realized he didn’t see it as a robot, but as a member of his family whose life was more important than his own.”

The Sony stiff has led not only to the formation of support groups--where Aibo enthusiasts can share tips and help each other with repairs--but has fed the bionic pet vet industry.

“The people who have them feel their presence and personality,” Nobuyuki Narimatsu, director of A-Fun, a repair company for robot dogs, told AFP. “So we think that somehow, they really have souls.”

While concerted repair efforts have kept many an Aibo alive, a shortage of spare parts means that some of their lives have come to an end. The following images show the funerals of 19 Aibos that engineers at A-Fun were unable to save.

Each formerly automated animal is wearing a tag with its owner’s name, as well as where it is from.

Newsweek reached out to Sony about Aibo’s gradual extinction and those who are watching their not-so-furry friends vanish, but they declined to comment.

"It’s not at all unusual for people to develop strong emotional attachments to non-living objects or machines," says cyberpsychologist Eleanor Barlow, giving the common examples of naming a car, or a child becoming attached to a doll. "Research suggests this can happen in order to satisfy a need in us...to care for something to improve our own sense of well-being or by way of a child substitute."

As artificially intelligent machines are increasingly incorporated into our modern lives, Barlow forsees people substituting robot interfacing for human interaction. And when a machine resembles something living (like Aibo), people are likely to both form a stronger bond to it and feel a greater sense of loss when it vanishes, she added.

The funerals show that this notion is not so far-fetched."
aibo  dogs  japan  robots  pets  sony  2015  technology 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Elke Vogelsang's dog portraiture - Telegraph
[See also: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/27/elke-vogelsang_n_5042132.html

“Elke Vogelsang has taken dog portraits to a new level.

After buying a compact camera a few months ago, the photographer from Hildesheim, Germany, decided to use it to start a photo series, Nice Nosing You, in which she takes humorous photos of her three rescue dogs, Today reported.” ]

[See also: http://www.today.com/pets/so-nosy-dogs-get-their-close-charming-photo-series-2D79435237 and
http://wieselblitz.de/schnauuuze-nice-nosing-you/ ]
dogs  pets  via:anne  cameras  photography  elkevogelsang  animals 
march 2015 by robertogreco
DOGO!
"Connecting friendly dogs with friendly people.

We work with local shelters to connect dog-loving people with people-loving dogs in need.

Enjoy the companionship of a sweet pup for whatever adventure you have planned that day, without the commitment of adoption.

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To give shelter dogs fresh air and socialization.
To provide companionship without commitment.
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Get started by signing up below.
We offer an orientation through Family Dog Rescue.

Family Dog Rescue
Family Dog Rescue is devoted to pairing rescue dogs with people to create families. Their special mission is finding dogs who get along well with kids and adults. Many of these dogs are eager to get moving! They would love to join you for a walk, run, hike, beach or park day. You are able to get started after one 2 hour long orienation + one supervised walk.
www.norcalfamilydogrescue.org

255 Alabama Street
10am to 7pm everyday."
via:anne  pets  animals  dogs  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships 
february 2015 by robertogreco
In Japan, Dog Owners Feel Abandoned as Sony Stops Supporting ‘Aibo’ - WSJ
"Masters Run in Circles Seeking Help for Aged Robotic Pets; Failing Joints"
via:debcha  pets  robots  aibo  sony  japan  2015  dogs 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Learning From Animal Friendships - NYTimes.com
"Science has not entirely ignored unusual interactions between species. Biologists have described relationships formed to achieve a specific goal, like the cooperative hunting between groupers and moray eels. And in the mid-1900s, Konrad Lorenz and other ethologists demonstrated that during critical periods after birth, certain birds and other animals would follow the first moving object they saw, whether animal, human or machine, a phenomenon known as imprinting. Dr. Lorenz was famously photographed with a gaggle of “imprinted” geese trailing behind him.

Yet until recently, any suggestion that interspecies relationships might be based simply on companionship would probably have been met with derision, dismissed as Pixar-like anthropomorphism. That has changed as research has gradually eroded some boundaries between homo sapiens and other animals. Other species, it turns out, share abilities once considered exclusive to humans, including some emotions, tool use, counting, certain aspects of language and even a moral sense.

To be sure, some scientists remain skeptical that the examples of cross-species relations offer much more to science than a hefty dose of cuteness.

Clive Wynne, a professor of psychology at Arizona State University, said that the videos he has seen all portray interactions that take place “in a human-controlled environment.”

“To me, that’s what kind of removes what would otherwise be interesting,” he said. “Because it ceases to be directly a story about animal behavior and becomes a story about human impact on the environment, like the difference between gardening and the beauty of natural landscape.” But others see fertile ground for investigation even in bonds formed in captivity or other domesticated settings. “There are so many questions,” said Barbara Smuts, a primate researcher at the University of Michigan who in 1985 shocked some of her colleagues by applying the word “friendship” to describe bonds between female baboons. “We know this is happening between all sorts of species. I think eventually the scientific community will catch up.”

In the meantime, there is no shortage of stories about animals that have reached out across species barriers, some supplied by researchers like Dr. Smuts, who described watching her dog, Safi, an 80-pound German Shepherd mix, forge a friendship with a donkey named Wister on a ranch in Wyoming in the 1990s."



"It is probably no coincidence that many of the better-known animal pairings involve dogs, which have honed the art of cross-species communication through millenniums of having lived with humans. The dogs at the safari park, each housed with a cheetah, are adept at reading body language and take a dominant role with their feline companions — Donna J. Haraway, a professor emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author of “When Species Meet,” suggested that the dogs function almost as “social psychologists.”

And sometimes that means figuring out how to speak the other species’ language.

When one dog, Clifford, had trouble persuading his feline companion, Majani, to play, he adopted a new tactic, Ms. Rose-Hinostroza said. Having learned from a trainer how to fake a limp, Clifford tried it out on the cheetah, looking much like a wounded gazelle. The disability, she said, proved irresistible to the cheetah, who came down off its perch to join the game.

But it is grooming, not playing, that cements a dog-cheetah friendship, Ms. Rose-Hinostroza said. Initially, the young cheetahs are terrified by the puppies’ attempts to play, but gradually the two animals begin to trust one another, and at some point, the cheetah begins to lick and groom the dog.

“When you see that happen, you go, ‘Yes, the cat actually likes the dog now,’ so that’s a good day,” she said.

Communing between species, researchers said, can inspire speculation not just about the animals but about the humans that are so fascinated by them.

Dr. Bekoff, for example, said that videos of interspecies interactions offer a way for people to connect with a natural world from which they feel increasingly detached.

“People are really craving to be ‘re-wilded,’ ” he said. “They’re craving to be reconnected to nature, and it’s these odd examples that are really seductive.”

Others see in the meeting of dog and doe, goat and rhino, tiger and bear, an ideal of peaceful connection that humans too often find elusive.

At Haller Park in Kenya — where Mzee, a 130-year-old tortoise, tends to Owen, an orphaned baby hippo — a man visiting the park with his child gazed at the unlikely couple and remarked, during a documentary about the pair, “If two very different creatures get along like this, then why cannot Iraqis and the British, Americans, Palestinians, the Israelis not get on?”

Or as Dr. Haraway, put it: “In a situation in which terrorism is cultivated from every angle and we are taught to fear practically everything, why should anybody be surprised that there’s a profound desire for the pleasures of the peaceable kingdom?”"
animals  friendship  2015  interspecies  multispecies  ericagoode  relationships  donnaharaway  dogs  pets  via:tealtan  marcbekoff  konradlorenz  barbarasmuts  anthropology  barbaraking  craigpacker  janetrose-hinostroza 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Black lab in Seattle likes to hop on bus, take solo ride to her dog park stop | CTV News
"A black Labrador named Eclipse just wants to get to the dog park. So if her owner takes too long finishing his cigarette, and their bus arrives, she climbs aboard solo and rides to her Seattle stop.

Young says his dog sometimes gets on the bus without him and he catches up with her at the dog park three or four stops away.

Bus riders report she watches out the window for her stop.

A Metro Transit spokesman says the agency loves that a dog appreciates public transit."
dogs  animals  pets  seattle  2015  publictransit 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Frontiers | Difference in quantity discrimination in dogs and wolves | Comparative Psychology
"Certain aspects of social life, such as engaging in intergroup conflicts, as well as challenges posed by the physical environment, may facilitate the evolution of quantity discrimination. In lack of excessive comparative data, one can only hypothesize about its evolutionary origins, but human-raised wolves performed well when they had to choose the larger of two sets of 1–4 food items that had been sequentially placed into two opaque cans. Since in such paradigms, the animals never see the entire content of either can, their decisions are thought to rely on mental representation of the two quantities rather than on some perceptual factors such as the overall volume or surface area of the two amounts. By equaling the time that it takes to enter each quantity into the cans or the number of items entered, one can further rule out the possibility that animals simply choose based on the amount of time needed to present the two quantities. While the wolves performed well even in such a control condition, dogs failed to choose the larger one of two invisible quantities in another study using a similar paradigm. Because this disparity could be explained by procedural differences, in the current study, we set out to test dogs that were raised and kept identically as the previously tested wolves using the same set-up and procedure. Our results confirm the former finding that dogs, in comparison to wolves, have inferior skills to represent quantities mentally. This seems to be in line with Frank’s (1980) hypothesis suggesting that domestication altered the information processing of dogs. However, as discussed, also alternative explanations may exist."

[via: https://twitter.com/pomeranian99/status/545284157405143040
http://www.scienceworldreport.com/articles/20124/20141216/wolves-better-counting-numbers-domesticated-dogs.htm ]

[Related (and shared with Clive): https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:88a5928ab54d ]
wolves  dogs  numbers  domestication  2014  friederikerange  juliajenikejew  isabelleschröder  zsófiavirányi  counting  quantities  animals 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Dog Park
"Dog Park is a local multiplayer dog 'em up created by Kevin Cancienne.

Become a dog as you chase, wrestle, cavort and gambol with other players in a chaotic struggle to have as much fun as you can. A fighting game without the fighting, Dog Park asks you to release your inner pup."

[See also: juegosrancheros.com/362/events/dog-park-slam-city-oracles/
http://www.indiecade.com/games/selected/dog-park/
http://via2014.com/people/via-games/ ]
dogs  animals  via:tealtan  games  gaming  videogames  kevincancienne 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Here, Ansel! Sit, Avedon! - NYTimes.com
"It was in 2007 that Juergen Perthold, an engineer living in Anderson, S.C., strapped a tiny camera of his own design to the collar of his cat, Mr. Lee. When the images Mr. Lee captured while roaming around their neighborhood were posted online, they went, predictably, viral. Mr. Lee received a flurry of attention from the international media and became the star of a documentary, “CatCam: The Movie,” which made the film festival rounds in 2012 and even won a few awards.

Mr. Perthold has since refined his tiny camera, which was designed to record video or still photographs at programmable intervals, and has sold nearly 5,000 to pet owners in 35 countries, many of whom send their images back to Mr. Perthold, who displays them on his website. For Mr. Lee is not the only pet photographer, and his CatCam is not the only pet-oriented photographic device.

Last week, GoPro, a camera company made famous by surfers and other athletes who clip on its waterproof miniature Heros to record their adventures, introduced its own version: Fetch, a harness and camera mount designed for dogs. For years, pet owners had been rigging Heros to attach to their pets; perhaps you’ve seen the YouTube video of that surfing pig? (GoPro, a 10-year-old company that enjoyed a stunning I.P.O. in June, couldn’t say how many Heros have been used “off-label” in this way, but it did share its 2013 revenue: $985 million, up from $150,000 a decade ago. And GoPro’s spokesman was quick to remind this reporter that last year Americans spent nearly $60 billion on their pets.)

As programmable digital cameras get smaller and cheaper, the universe of pet, uh, journalism — or is it fine art? — has exploded. Scientists on both sides of the Atlantic have been using these technologies to learn more about the habits of all manner of animals, including house cats. The work of Leo, a cat from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, has been made into a poster. Cooper, from Seattle, has had a gallery show of his work, which has also been collected into a book. A collaborative (what else to call them?) of Swiss cows posts their oeuvre at cowcam.ch.

Inevitably, copyright disputes have arisen over who exactly owns the images taken by nonhumans. As The Washington Post and others reported last month, David Slater, a British photographer whose camera was snatched up and passed around by macaque monkeys while he was in Indonesia in 2011, has been sparring with various media outlets, including Wikimedia, over their use of the winsome “selfie” one monkey shot with Mr. Slater’s camera."
animals  photography  gopro  pets  cats  dogs  pigs  cows  monkeys  2014  intellectualproperty  copyright  wikimedia  petcams  cameras  chriskeeney  juergenperthold  tortoises  georgejacobs  art  tonycenicola  catcam  vivianmaier  jamescoleman  dianaoswald  jamesdanziger  markcohen  paulfusco  streetphotography  alanwilson 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Sympathy for a Desert Dog - NYTimes.com
"“/Kunta,” he said addressing me by my Bushman name, “the problem with you whites is that you think dogs behave like humans or even that your dogs think that they are humans. They are not humans. They are dogs. Their ways are different.”

It took me a while to understand Kaice’s point and the apparent indifference of the Ju/’hoansi to the suffering of dogs. It seemed at odds with the idea that Ju/’hoansi and other hunter-gatherers had deeply empathetic relationships with the animals they lived among. But in time I learned that this is precisely what justifies the indifference.

Ju/’hoansi insisted that animals were people. Not humans but people. They asserted that each species of animal had its own physical forms, customs, habits and ways of experiencing and interacting with the world. Ju/’hoansi claimed to know this because they observed, engaged with and empathized with the animals with whom they shared their world.

Most pet owners claim that the sympathy they offer their pets is based on an empathetic relationship with them built on traits our species and their species have in common — in the case of dogs their sociability, their loyalty, their gratitude.

But this is a different understanding of empathy than that which hunter-gatherers like the Ju/’hoansi had for their animal neighbors.

For them animal empathy was not a question of focusing on an animal’s human-like characteristics, but of assuming the whole perspective of the animal. Their animal empathy defied verbalization. To empathize with an animal you couldn’t think like a human and project your mind-set into it; you had to “be” the animal.

This view of empathy was the product of millennia of living among the wild animals of the Kalahari as “neighbors” and hunting them. Where other peoples defined themselves by reference to other tribes or nations, Ju/’hoansi defined themselves in terms of the their differences from the lions, elephants, aardvarks, elands and many other desert creatures they lived among. Their animal neighbors were a constant source of fascination. Any interesting or unusual animal behaviors, habits and interactions would generate considerable discussion. Their knowledge of the animals was such that they were able to establish an animal’s apparent motives and actions from a few scuffs in the sand, sometimes a day or two old, and accurately predict its movements or behavior on this basis. But their success as hunters, after all, depended on their ability to accurately anticipate the behavior of their prey. And this, they insisted, required empathy.

Typically Ju/’hoansi hunted with small poison arrows that lacked fletching. It took great skill and knowledge to get close enough to an animal to shoot it and even greater skill to able to track the animal down as the poison did its work, which could take between six and 48 hours depending on the size of the animal. After shooting a large animal like an oryx or a giraffe, a hunter would memorize the individual animal’s spoor and return the following morning to track it down.

When a hunter found and followed his prey’s spoor he would not merely read it but surrender himself into it, living each footfall that scuffed the sand. In doing so he plunged into his prey’s consciousness, dissolving the boundary between the hunter and the hunted. Finally, by consuming their prey, the hunter and the prey’s relationship would move from an empathetic union to a physical one as they literally became of one body.

But this kind of empathy did not persuade Ju/’hoansi and other hunter-gatherers to feel sympathy for animals or assume a duty of care for them. Rather it made people focus more on the non-human behaviors of animals rather than what they had in common. Among people who considered themselves to be just one of many different kinds of animal-people in a wild environment, hunting, death and pain were parts of everyday life. Human compassion did not extend to other species.

My relationship with Dog, as the Ju/’hoansi reminded me, was an artifact of the Neolithic Revolution. The domestication of the wolf was but a small part of a transition that fundamentally reconfigured how humans related to their environments. Where they once saw themselves as one of many creatures sharing environments, they now placed themselves at its center and sought mastery over it. Accordingly animals were divided into a series of new categories based on how they fit into the human world. Some were designated pets or “livestock” – and a duty of care was extended to them. Others were designated pests or vermin. Animals ceased to be considered different kinds of “people,” and those like dogs were selected and bred, for human-like traits, among other things, that we could easily empathize with without displacing our sense of ourselves as humans.

My and Dog’s lives intersected momentarily. And I am glad they did. We were both Neolithic orphans stranded in a Paleolithic world. The Ju/’hoansi’s sense of interspecies relations and their extraordinary empathy was right for the wild animals that shared their world, and there is much we can learn from it. But when it comes to dogs, and other creatures that have evolved to crave our affection, I am glad to be a child of the Neolithic."
dogs  pets  animals  culture  anthropology  ethnography  empathy  sympathy  anthropomorphism  2014  africa  jamessuzman  via:anne  relationships  animalhumanrelationships 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Petcube – Interactive wireless pet camera. Smart monitor for your cat or dog.
"Check on your furry loved ones when out of home
Play with your pet using a safe built-in laser toy
Save your pet from obesity with daily exercise
Share access to your petcube and play with other shared pets
Make friends. Discover cuteness."
pets  hardware  technology  surveillance  play  dogs  cats  cameras  animals 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Matthew Battles: Going Feral on the Net: the Qualities of Survival in a Wild, Wired World on Vimeo
"How do we balance the empowering possibilities of the networked public sphere with the dark, unsettling, and even dangerous energies of cyberspace? Matthew Battles blends a deep-historical perspective on the internet with storytelling that reaches into its weird, uncanny depths. It’s a hybrid approach, reflecting the web’s way of landing us in a feral state—the predicament of a domestic creature forced to live by its imperfectly-rekindled instincts in a world where it is never entirely at home. The feral is a metaphor—and maybe more than just a metaphor—for thriving in cyberspace, a habitat that changes too rapidly for anyone truly to be native. This talk will weave critical and reflective discussion of online experience with a short story from Battles’ new collection, The Sovereignties of Invention."
feral  matthewbattles  internet  via:tealtan  2012  web  online  cyberspace  networkculture  dogs  storytelling  paulford  everchanging  uncertainty  unnatural  discomfort  middlegrounds  survival  wild  caution  nomansland 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Friendly Dog Collars Australia - Collars, Leads & Harnesses for Responsible Dog Owners
"The best-selling new dog collars, leads & harnesses for responsible dog owners

Our unique range of colour coded dog collars, leads and harnesses are helping responsible dog owners all over the world to educate the public about their dog's behaviour, thus avoiding any unwanted encounters"
dogs  communication  leashes  pets 
may 2014 by robertogreco
CleverPet: A Console that Teaches and Feeds Your Dog All Day by CleverPet — Kickstarter
"A smart WiFi-connected device your pet can use. Automatically entertain and educate your dog, even when they're home alone."
dogs  pets  technology 
may 2014 by robertogreco
LUNARES
[http://maria-cactus.blogspot.com/2014_01_01_archive.html ]

"María Fernanda
Chile
clase media
tomo té
tengo un perro
tengo gatos
uso el computador
veo Facebook
tengo un cactus
leo libros
bajo música
la cargo en mi iphone
salgo a la calle
camino al ritmo de la música
nadie cacha que estoy escuchando canciones de películas
es chistoso."

[http://maria-cactus.blogspot.com/2014/01/arq.html ]

"tengo 18 años
voy a entrar a la universidad

se aleja la adolescencia
chao
chao

cada vez hay menos formas de justificar las vacilaciones
la bipolaridad
lo pendeja
llegó la universidad
arquitectura en la católica
(el domingo entregan los resultados, pero estoy segura de que quedé, no pedían tanto)

es difícil decidir qué estudiar, yo postulé a arquitectura pero también quería estudiar periodismo (puede que a simple vista no se parezcan mucho, pero es la misma razón la que me mueve por ambos)

¿qué voy a hacer entre el agorex, el cartonero y las maquetas con esta llama que me mueve a la escritura? porque me gusta mucho escribir, me gusta expresarme de esta forma.

¿qué va a ser de mi futuro como arquitecta?
tengo 18 años
la gente espera mucho de mi vida
y de la maría fernanda
y que se vuelve aquitecta
que se vuelve adulta
que se vuelve
se transforma
la vida lo pide
le quita los berrinches
la hace aguantarse los llanto
ahora la maría fernanda
la maría fernanda arquitecta, adulta



no puedo seguir, porque no sé qué pasará, en verdad sólo espero que sea divertido y que me apasione así como lo siento desde aquí: el fin del cuarto medio y el declive de la adolescencia."

[See also: http://derere.tumblr.com/ ]
blogs  chile  valparaíso  youth  design  tea  pets  animals  dogs  cats  socialmedia  identity  whatwedo  howwelearn 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Twitter / tejucole: Where did that dog that used ...
"Where did that dog
that used to be here go?
I thought about him
once again tonight
before I went to bed.

–Shimaki Akahiko (d. 1926)"
poems  poetry  animals  dogs  relationships  1926  shimakiakahiko 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Watching these dogs confused by a magic trick is hilariously cute
"Dogs can be incredibly smart but—when it comes to trusting humans—they are as naive as a little kid who doesn't know what a lie means yet. Watching these dogs getting completely confused when magician Jose Ahonen mades a treat disappear right in front of their eyes (and noses) makes me laugh and awwww at the same time."
dogs  2014  magic  illusion  joseahonen  humor  animals  intelligence 
march 2014 by robertogreco
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