robertogreco + digitalnatives   73

Jia Tolentino Wants You to Read Children’s Books - The New York Times
““A really good middle-grade novel,” says the New Yorker essayist, whose debut collection is “Trick Mirror,” “will supersede a lot of contemporary fiction in terms of economy, lucidity and grace.”

What books are on your nightstand?

When I like a book, I carry it around everywhere until I finish it, like a subway rat dragging a slice of pizza down the stairs. So usually if a book is living on my nightstand, it’s not my thing. Right now, though, I’ve got a galley of Anna Wiener’s “Uncanny Valley” keeping me company — it’s so deft and stunning that I started rereading chunks of it as soon as I was done.

What’s the last book that really excited you?

“Death’s End,” the final installment of Liu Cixin’s Three-Body trilogy, in which the narrative and conceptual momentum of the series takes off at a scale and velocity I couldn’t possibly have imagined before reading. The Three-Body trilogy makes insignificance and unknowability and futility seem so spiritually exciting that I felt breathless. I’d join a book club that just discusses it every month for a year.

What’s your favorite book no one else has heard of?

Rebecca Stead’s “When You Reach Me” won the Newbery Medal, so it’s certainly not unheralded, but everyone tunes me out when I recommend it, since it was written for kids. Their mistake! A really good middle-grade novel — and this book, a “Wrinkle in Time”-esque mystery set on the Upper West Side in the late 1970s, is a phenomenal one — will supersede a lot of contemporary fiction in terms of economy, lucidity and grace.

What book should everybody read before the age of 21?

“Random Family,” by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc. It’s so spicy, so riveting, so empathetic and devoted, so alive in the world as it actually is. No shots to Chaucer and “A Separate Peace” and all that, but I think a lot of people might be far more interested in reading (and possibly more interested in other lives in general) if they got to read books like this in high school.

What book would you recommend to people over 40?

“Kids These Days,” by Malcolm Harris. Most writing about millennials has tended to focus on effects rather than causes: After all, it’s easier to make a spectacle of the ways instability manifests itself in young people than it is to really reckon with the fact that capitalism has reached a stage of inexorable acceleration that has broken our country’s institutions and (arguably) my generation’s soul. “Kids These Days,” thankfully, goes straight for the point.

[ Tolentino’s new book, “Trick Mirror,” was one of our most anticipated titles of August. See the full list. ]

Which writers — novelists, playwrights, critics, journalists, poets — working today do you admire most?

Ocean Vuong, Jenny Odell, Doreen St. Félix, Vinson Cunningham, Bryan Washington, Tommy Orange, Jenny Zhang, Ross Gay, Zadie Smith, Rebecca Solnit, Emily Nussbaum, Rebecca Traister, Brit Bennett, Caity Weaver, Rachel Aviv, Kathryn Schulz, Pamela Colloff, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Patrick Radden Keefe, Patricia Lockwood, Samantha Irby, Leslie Jamison, Lauren Groff, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Wesley Morris, Meg Wolitzer, Marlon James, Ted Chiang, Eula Biss.

You once described yourself as “an obsessive and catholic reader.” What moves you most in a work of literature?

Bravery and surrender, which can manifest in so many forms.

Do you prefer books that reach you emotionally, or intellectually?

I’m not sure that I’ve ever had a purely emotional or purely intellectual reaction to anything, let alone to anything I was reading. Systems and concepts are always inextricable from the way they shape our hearts, and I love books that demonstrate this, like Matthew Desmond’s “Evicted,” or George Saunders’s “CivilWarLand in Bad Decline.”

What’s the most interesting thing you learned from a book recently?

From Casey Cep’s “Furious Hours,” that Harper Lee was once neighbors with Daryl Hall and John Oates. What?!

Which genres do you especially enjoy reading? And which do you avoid?

I’ll read almost anything, though I don’t love reading about history and science as much as I love whatever I learn. The only books I actively avoid are the “how X explains all of human civilization” books — the type seemingly written for men who love a counterintuitive idea but find complex thought disturbing — as well as those “how to be a perfectly imperfect goddess who doesn’t give a f**k” books. I don’t like anything with a sales pitch that’s like, “Hey, you’re a woman!” These books feel like dolls of Frida Kahlo dressed as Rosie the Riveter or something, like display objects that chirp the word “badass” when you press their hand.

What’s the best book you’ve ever received as a gift?

My boyfriend got me a first edition of Sherwood Anderson’s “Winesburg, Ohio” — one of my favorite books of all time — about seven years ago, and this past year, he gave me a copy of “Eve’s Hollywood” with a note in it for me from Eve Babitz herself. I almost keeled over on the spot.

Who is your favorite fictional hero or heroine? Your favorite antihero or villain?

Turtle Wexler from “The Westing Game” and Undine Spragg from “The Custom of the Country.”

What kind of reader were you as a child? Which childhood books and authors stick with you most?

I would read while Rollerblading around my neighborhood, read while eating, read in the car, read in the bathtub — my books were stained, swollen, ripped to shreds. I was always just desperate to be constantly reading. I’d memorize the copy on the Herbal Essences bottle in the shower; I read “Gone With the Wind” about 20 times in fourth grade. I remember things from kids’ books much more clearly than I remember anything about my life even a few years ago. I’ve got a mental encyclopedia of useless sensory details: the lavender-and-black bathroom in “Starring Sally J. Freedman as Herself,” the tin peddler’s wares in “Farmer Boy,” the meals that Francie Nolan helped her mother make from stale bread.

You’re a digital native, and your publisher describes you as “what Susan Sontag would have been like if she had brain damage from the internet.” Do you find it difficult to tune out distractions and sink into a book?

In part because I am very aware of what the internet is doing to my sense of scale and reason, I spend a good amount of my life seeking out states of being — like reading — that are so consuming and pleasurable that I won’t grab my phone and interrupt. It also helps that for most of my life I’ve read a paper book for an hour or two every night before falling asleep: It was always a way of managing my insomnia, which I’ve had since I was little, and is now a regular reminder of how much more like myself I feel when I’m not shattering my attention to bits.

Disappointing, overrated, just not good: What book did you feel as if you were supposed to like, and didn’t? Do you remember the last book you put down without finishing?

There are plenty of beloved books I don’t like at all — the most demographically fine-tuned version of this for me is probably Chris Kraus’s “I Love Dick.” But I have a hard time accessing a sense of “supposed to” with pop culture. I read whatever I feel like reading, and if neither the book nor my reaction to it interests me, I put it down without another thought. I’m a big believer, anyway, that reading is like eating: The most fun lies in finding a match for your mood. If I read 20 pages of something people love and I can’t get into it, then I welcome the possibility that a few years from now it could be the perfect thing.

What books are you embarrassed not to have read yet?

Nearly everything about being alive feels embarrassing, but the enormous gap between what I’d like to have read and what I have actually read does not. As it is, I read a hundred books a year and it doesn’t seem to matter — there will always be so many books I haven’t read yet, and I will always be kind of stupid no matter how much I read. For example, I only recently realized that when people turn 30 they are completing their 30th year of life rather than beginning it. It’s possible that I’d have grasped that basic fact and many others much earlier if my head weren’t so stuffed with so much minutiae about the Shackleton expedition, so many descriptions of light from James Salter short stories, all these invisible psychosocial landscapes from all these books.

What do you plan to read next?

I’ve got to read the Lydia Davis translation of “Madame Bovary.” I’m having physical cravings for it. If I could stop time right now I’d lie down in the grass somewhere and go straight through from beginning to end.”
jiatolentino  howweread  reading  books  2019  internet  susansontag  web  online  digitalnatives  attention  yafiction  genre  malcolmharris  adriannicoleleblanc  tebeccastead  liucixin  oceanvuong  jennyodell  doreenstfélix  vinsoncunningham  bryanwashington  tommyorange  jennyzhang  rossgay  zadiesmith  rebeccasolnit  emilynussbaum  rebeccatraister  britbennett  caityweaver  rachelaviv  kathrynschulz  pamelacolloff  gideonlewis-kraus  patrickraddenkeefe  patricialockwood  smanthairby  lesliejamison  laurengoff  johnjeremiahsullivan  wesleymorris  megwolitzer  marlonjames  tedchiang  eulabiss  bythebook  georgesaunders  matthewdesmond  caseycep  sherwoodanderson  thewestinggame  chriskraus  lydiadavis  madamebovary 
5 days ago by robertogreco
/addressbar • heracl.es
"…or laments about the loss of autonomy on the web.

MUSING

The web has lost a great battle, one that it was never given a chance to fight for. Apps got the upper hand for good. They’re easy to find: available through your favorite walled garden of a store. They’re are easy to use: they stay right there in your device, making use of all your device’s sensors; have access to all your files and contacts; they make sharing easy. Although HTML5 APIs are a huge leap forward, they are still in their infancy, whereas apps were the first to bear the benefits of sensors, notifications and offline functionality. All without breaking many UX conventions and the people’s safe zone.

No usage study would argue that people use their mobile phone’s browser more than they actually use the in-app browsers offered by default by Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google Search and co.

What was by design the core aspect of the World Wide Web, the “URL”, also known as web address, was irrelevant for in-app browsers. The user only needs to peek outside for a minute, then return to the silo. There’s really no need for multiple user journeys. And thus the address bar has vanished. I am frequently reminded of this from my parents, as they discovered mobile phones on their own, had little experience with computers beforehand. Even close friends, so called digital natives that can barely remember their life without internet, forget how to use the address bar. Why do if you can Google the website’s name?
The user can type a URL into the bar to navigate to a chosen website.


…says the collective author in Wikipedia: Address Bar. It still has a bit of truth in it. You can type a URL into it, if you can find where to type it. Even if you do have one, you are most likely using it for Google-ing.

All supporters of the open web should be alarmed. Reclaim your autonomy and make your property visible. Make the URL of your pages visible. Please don’t harm any beautiful hyperlinks in the process."
web  internet  online  openweb  autonomy  applications  appification  ux  walledgardens  html  html5  worldwideweb  urls  browsers  digitalnatives  heraclespapatheodorou 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Children are tech addicts – and schools are the pushers | Eliane Glaser | Opinion | The Guardian
"As a culture, we are finally waking up to the dark side of new technology. “The internet is broken”, declares the current issue of Wired, the tech insiders’ bible. Last month Rick Webb, an early digital investor, posted a blog titled “My internet mea culpa”. “I was wrong,” he wrote. “We all were.” He called on the architects of the web to admit that new technology had brought more harm than good.

Yet while geeks, the public and politicians – including Theresa May – grow disenchanted, schools, and those responsible for the national curriculum, seem stuck in an earlier wide-eyed era. My instinct tells me that this innocence is perverse. As a friend memorably described it, when he gave his three-year-old his phone to play with, it was as if a worm had found its way into her head.

I flinch internally when my five-year-old tells me she plays computer games in what primary schools call “golden time” rather than enjoying some other more wholesome reward; and when my eight-year-old says that he’s learned to send an email when I sent my first email aged 20, and email has since taken over my life and that of every other adult I know.

Our kids don’t use computers at home. They watch a bit of television, but we don’t own a tablet. Their school is by no means evangelical about technology, but I nonetheless feel like it is playing the role of pusher, and I’m watching my children get hooked. When they went suspiciously quiet the other day, I found them under the kitchen table trying to explore my phone. Unfortunately for them, it’s a brick.

I’m wary of sounding sanctimonious, and corroding much-needed solidarity between busy parents with different views on screen use. But when I see an infant jabbing and swiping, I can’t help experiencing what the writer James Bridle calls in a disturbing recent essay a “Luddite twinge”; and the research suggests I should trust it.

Earlier this month the children’s commissioner for England warned that children starting secondary school were facing a social media “cliff edge” as they entered an online world of cyber-bullying and pornography. According to Public Health England, extended screen use correlates to emotional distress, anxiety and depression in children. The American College of Paediatricians associates it with sleep problems, obesity, increased aggression and low self-esteem.

And not only is screen technology harmful to children per se, there’s little evidence that it helps them to learn. A 2015 OECD report found that the impact of computers on pupil performance was “mixed, at best”, and in most cases computers were “hurting learning”. The journal Frontiers in Psychology identifies “an absence of research supporting the enthusiastic claims that iPads will ‘revolutionise education’”. Researchers at Durham University found that “technology-based interventions tend to produce just slightly lower levels of improvement” compared with other approaches. Even for the head of the e-Learning Foundation, proving technology improves results remains the “holy grail”.

Education technology is often justified on the grounds that it boosts disadvantaged children, yet research shows it widens rather than bridges socioeconomic divides. The One Laptop per Child programme, which distributed 25m low-cost computers with learning software to children in the developing world, failed to improve language or maths results.

Such evidence does not dent the faith of ed tech’s proselytisers. Children need to be prepared for the future, we are told. But companies don’t want children who learned PowerPoint aged 10, they want employees who know how to think from first principles. All those mind-numbing software programs will soon be obsolete anyway. Most coding classes only teach children to assemble pre-made building blocks. Silicon Valley executives restrict their own social media use and send their own kids to tech-free schools.

Technology does not evolve naturally; programs and devices are promoted by those with a commercial interest in selling them. Ed tech is projected to be worth £129bn by 2020. This week, the world’s biggest ed tech convention, Bett, is in London, “Creating a better future by transforming education”. Google, Microsoft and Facebook are flogging expensive kit to cash-strapped schools using buzzwords such as “engagement” and “interactivity”. The traditional teacher-pupil hierarchy must be “flipped”, they say, “empowering” pupils to direct their own learning.

In reality, children tap on tablets whose inner workings are as arcane and mystical to them as any authoritarian deity – and stare, blinds down, at the giant interactive whiteboard. Children may be temporarily gripped, but their attention spans will shrink in the long term.

Cyber-utopianism promises magic bullets for poverty and the crooked timber of humanity. But it’s old-school solutions that really work in the classroom: good teachers, plenty of fresh air and exercise, and hands-on exploration of the real, physical world. This is even what “digital natives” themselves actually want: a Canadian study of e-learning in universities revealed that students preferred “ordinary, real-life lessons” and “a smart person at the front of the room”.

I don’t want my kids fed into the sausage machine of standardised testing and the bureaucratic “information economy”. I don’t want them to become robotic competitors to the robots we are told are taking their future jobs. I can opt my children out of RE, but where technology is concerned, I feel bound by a blind determinism. Surely we have a choice, as humans, over the direction technology is taking us, and education is the perfect illustration of this capacity. Our children turn up as blank slates, and learn to design the future. It’s time for schools to join the backlash. It’s time to think again."
technology  edtech  schools  education  policy  addiction  computers  tablets  curriculum  2018  elianeglaser  standardizedtesting  standardization  digitalnatives  digital  humanism  siliconvalley 
january 2018 by robertogreco
#vaporfolk #hollyvoodoo. Sponsored by Amazon Readymades.
"With technology invented to fly us to the moon we write LMAO.

The internet tribe abandoned the global village when it started to resemble a shopping mall. After the digital natives were promised that their new ideas would lead to fame and success on global markets, they are now confronted with totalitarian networks and corporate structures. Consequently they turned their heads away from the screen. Facebook owns the copyrights to their ideas, shared infinitely to only disappear in the clouds.

Among all the possible realities imaginable, artists start to look for common ground in products, hardware and brands – commodities made from global materials. A form of recursive materialism emerges. The common ground between seven billion people is that we can all share a micro USB connector. An empty coke bottle will be found in the desert sands and nomads navigate the dunes with a Samsung tablet. Global materials seem to override all phantasies of unique visions and subjective expressions.

But the internet tribe moves to the outskirts of physical production, reusing artifacts from the world of corporate mythologies. They work with concepts of the “Archaic” instead of “New”, choosing to be ‘poorsumers’, transforming ideological waste into something magical. For them, art is a poetic freight and the trade system a collective parable of desire. By imitating commodities in almost shamanic rituals, a higher form of cargo is summoned: be it future wealth, success or even art.

Zsófia Keresztes, Angus McCullough, Alexandra Hackett (A.L.C.H.), Andreas Ervik, Stephanie Syjuco, Michele Gabriele, Pau Sampera, Peter Moosgaard, Bernhard Garnicnig

Opening: 3.6. 18:00
Exhibition: 5.6.–27.6.
Lust Gallery, Hollandstrasse 7 1020 Wien

“An approach to the now which looks widely, sharply, and especially at global materials ripe for use by our village of disenfranchised consumers.” (Quote and image of “Prototype: Axe” by Angus McCullough)

In cooperation with Making.Artistic.Technology (http://artistictechnology.at/) and the Palais des Beaux Arts Wien (http://www.palaisdesbeauxarts.at/). Supported by the Austrian Federal Chancellery.

#walmartsurrealism #hyperethnicity #vaporfolk #brandart #matrixbotanica #productshamanism #favelachic #holycargo #ritualfakes #ancientonline #poplatch #postdigital #ersatzculture #saintpepsi #refundutopia #parableofdesire #neomaterialism #summonwarhola #hollyvoodoo #digitalnaïve #artsypovera"
petermoosgaard  bernhardgarnicnig  pausampera  angusmccullough  alexandrahackett  andreaservik  stephaniesyjuco  michelegabriele  zsófiakeresztes  globalization  technology  art  vaporfolk  hollyvoodoo  capitalism  screens  digitalnatives  cloud  hardware  poorsumers  magic  cargocult  wealth  success  latecapitalism 
june 2015 by robertogreco
We need to ditch generational labels – Rebecca Onion – Aeon
"Generational thinking is seductive and confirms preconceived prejudices, but it’s a bogus way to understand the world"



"But in real life, I find generational arguments infuriating. Overly schematised and ridiculously reductive, generation theory is a simplistic way of thinking about the relationship between individuals, society, and history. It encourages us to focus on vague ‘generational personalities’, rather than looking at the confusing diversity of social life. Since I’m a ‘Gen-X’er born in 1977, the conventional wisdom is that I’m supposed to be adaptable, independent, productive, and to have a good work/life balance. Reading these characteristics feels like browsing a horoscope. I see myself in some of these traits, and can even feel a vague thrill of belonging when I read them. But my ‘boomer’ mother is intensely productive; my ‘Greatest Generation’ grandmother still sells old books online at age 90, in what I consider to be the ultimate show of adaptability and independence.

enerational thinking doesn’t frustrate everyone. Indeed, there is a healthy market for pundits who can devise grand theories of generational difference. Neil Howe and William Strauss, authors of Generations: The History of America’s Future, 1584-2069 (1991) and founders of the consulting firm LifeCourse Associates in Virginia, have made a fine living out of generational assessments, but their work reads like a deeply mystical form of historical explanation. (Strauss died in 2007; Howe continues to run the consultancy LifeCourse.) The two have conceived an elaborate and totalising theory of the cycle of generations, which they argue come in four sequential and endlessly repeating archetypes.

In the Strauss-Howe schema, these distinct groups of archetypes follow each other throughout history thus: ‘prophets’ are born near the end of a ‘crisis’; ‘nomads’ are born during an ‘awakening’; ‘heroes’ are born after an ‘awakening’, during an ‘unravelling’; and ‘artists’ are born after an ‘unravelling’, during a ‘crisis’. Strauss and Howe select prominent individuals from each generation, pointing to characteristics that define them as archetypal – heroes are John F Kennedy and Ronald Reagan; artists: Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson; prophets: John Winthrop, Abraham Lincoln; nomads: John Adams, Ulysses Grant. Each generation has a common set of personal characteristics and typical life experiences.

Plenty of kids at less-privileged schools weren’t intensely worried about grades or planning, like the stereotypical millennial

The archetypal scheme is also a theory of how historical change happens. The LifeCourse idea is that the predominance of each archetype in a given generation triggers the advent of the next (as the consultancy’s website puts it: ‘each youth generation tries to correct or compensate for what it perceives as the excesses of the midlife generation in power’). Besides having a very reductive vision of the universality of human nature, Strauss and Howe are futurists; they predict that a major crisis will occur once every 80 years, restarting the generational cycle. While the pair’s ideas seem far-fetched, they have currency in the marketplace: LifeCourse Associates has consulted for brands such as Nike, Cartoon Network, Viacom and the Ford Motor Company; for universities including Arizona State, Dartmouth, Georgetown and the University of Texas, and for the US Army, too.

The commercial success of this pseudoscientific mumbo-jumbo is irritating, but also troubling. The dominant US thinkers on the generational question tend to flatten social distinctions, relying on cherry-picked examples and reifying a vision of a ‘society’ that’s made up mostly of the white and middle-class. In an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education in 2009 on the pundits and consultants who market information about ‘millennials’ to universities, Eric Hoover described Howe and Strauss’s influential book about that generation, Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation (2000), as a work ‘based on a hodgepodge of anecdotes, statistics, and pop-culture references’ with the only new empirical evidence being a body of around 600 interviews of high-school seniors, all living in wealthy Fairfax County, Virginia.

Hoover interviewed several people in higher education who voiced their doubts about the utility of Howe and Strauss’s approach. Their replies, informed by their experience teaching college students from across the socioeconomic spectrum, show how useless the schematic understanding of ‘millennials’ looks when you’re working with actual people. Palmer H Muntz, then the director of admissions of Lincoln Christian University in Illinois, noticed that plenty of kids he encountered on visits to less-privileged schools weren’t intensely worried about grades or planning, like the stereotypical millennial. Fred A Bonner II, now at Prairie View A & M University in Texas, pointed out that many of the supposed ‘personality traits’ of coddled and pressured millennials were unrecognisable to his black or Hispanic students, or those who grew up with less money. Siva Vaidhyanathan, a cultural historian and media scholar at the University of Virginia, told Hoover: ‘Generational thinking is just a benign form of bigotry.’"



"Ryder had harsh words for the theorists he called ‘generationists’. He argued that thinkers about generation on a large scale had made illogical leaps when theorising the relationship between generations and social change. ‘The fact that social change produces intercohort differentiation and thus contributes to inter-generational conflict,’ he argued, ‘cannot justify a theory that social change is produced by that conflict.’ There was no way to prove causality. The end result, he wrote, was that grand generational theories tended toward ‘arithmetical mysticism.’"



"As the French historian Pierre Nora wrote in 1996, the careful analyst trying to talk about generations will always struggle: ‘The generational concept would make a wonderfully precise instrument if only its precision didn’t make it impossible to apply to the unclassifiable disorder of reality.’ The problem with transferring historical and sociological ways of thinking about generational change into the public sphere is that ‘unclassifiability’ is both terrifying and boring. Big, sweeping explanations of social change sell. Little, careful studies of same-age cohorts, hemmed in on all sides by rich specificity, do not.

Perhaps the pseudoscientific use of supposed ‘generations’ would irk less if it weren’t so often used to demean the young. Millennials, consultants advise prospective employers, feel entitled to good treatment even in entry-level jobs, because they’ve been overpraised their whole lives. Millennials won’t buckle down and buy cars or houses, economists complain; millennials are lurking in their parents’ basements, The New Yorker cartoon stereotype runs, tweeting and texting and posting selfies and avoiding responsibility."



"Popular millennial backlash against the stereotyping of their generation makes use of the same arguments against generational thinking that sociologists and historians have spent years developing. By drawing attention to the effects of the economic situation on their lives, pointing out that human experience isn’t universal and predictable, and calling upon adults to abandon broad assessments in favour of specific understanding, millennials prove the point: generational thinking is seductive, and for some of us it confirms our preconceived prejudices, but it’s fatally flawed as a mode of understanding the world. Real life is not science fiction."
rebeccaonion  generationalthinking  generations  age  ageism  complexity  humans  society  adaptability  independence  history  individuals  neilhowe  williamstrauss  stereotypes  lifecourse  palmermuntz  sivavaidhyanathan  agesegregation  millenials  genx  generationx  generationy  erichoover  karlmannheimaugusteconte  gottfriedleibniz  normanryder  sociology  causality  robertwohl  pierrenora  bigotry  generationalwarfare  malcolmharris  digitalnatives  hypocrisy  via:ayjay 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Insights: K-HOLE, New York — Insights: K-HOLE, New York — Channel — Walker Art Center
"K-HOLE exists in multiple states at once: it is both a publication and a collective; it is both an artistic practice and a consulting firm; it is both critical and unapologetically earnest. Its five members come from backgrounds as varied as brand strategy, fine art, web development, and fashion, and together they have released a series of fascinating PDF publications modeled upon corporate trend forecasting reports. These documents appropriate the visuals of PowerPoint, stock photography, and advertising and exploit the inherent poetry in the purposefully vague aphorisms of corporate brand-speak. Ultimately, K-HOLE aspires to utilize the language of trend forecasting to discuss sociopolitical topics in depth, exploring the capitalist landscape of advertising and marketing in a critical but un-ironic way.

In the process, the group frequently coins new terms to articulate their ideas, such as “Youth Mode”: a term used to describe the prevalent attitude of youth culture that has been emancipated from any particular generation; the “Brand Anxiety Matrix”: a tool designed to help readers understand their conflicted relationships with the numerous brands that clutter their mental space on a daily basis; and “Normcore”: a term originally used to describe the desire not to differentiate oneself, which has since been mispopularized (by New York magazine) to describe the more specific act of dressing neutrally to avoid standing out. (In 2014, “Normcore” was named a runner-up by Oxford University Press for “Neologism of the Year.”)

Since publishing K-HOLE, the collective has taken on a number of unique projects that reflect the manifold nature of their practice, from a consulting gig with a private equity firm to a collaboration with a fashion label resulting in their own line of deodorant. K-HOLE has been covered by a wide range of publications, including the New York Times, Fast Company, Wired UK, and Mousse.

Part of Insights 2015 Design Lecture Series."

[direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GkMPN5f5cQ ]
k-hole  consumption  online  internet  communication  burnout  normcore  legibility  illegibility  simplicity  technology  mobile  phones  smartphones  trends  fashion  art  design  branding  brands  socialmedia  groupchat  texting  oversharing  absence  checkingout  aesthetics  lifestyle  airplanemode  privilege  specialness  generations  marketing  trendspotting  coping  messaging  control  socialcapital  gregfong  denayago  personalbranding  visibility  invisibility  identity  punk  prolasticity  patagonia  patience  anxietymatrix  chaos  order  anxiety  normality  abnormality  youth  millennials  individuality  box1824  hansulrichobrist  alternative  indie  culture  opposition  massindie  williamsburg  simoncastets  digitalnatives  capitalism  mainstream  semiotics  subcultures  isolation  2015  walkerartcenter  maxingout  establishment  difference  89plus  basicness  evasion  blandness  actingbasic  empathy  indifference  eccentricity  blankness  tolerance  rebellion  signalling  status  coolness  aspiration  connections  relationships  presentationofself  understanding  territorialism  sociology  ne 
march 2015 by robertogreco
89plus
"89plus is a long-term, international, multi-platform research project co-founded by Simon Castets and Hans Ulrich Obrist, investigating the generation of innovators born in or after 1989. Without forecasting artistic trends or predicting future creation, 89plus manifests itself through panels, books, periodicals, exhibitions and residencies, bringing together individuals from a generation whose voices are only starting to be heard, yet which accounts for almost half of the world’s population.

Marked by several paradigm-shifting events, the year 1989 saw the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the start of the post-Cold War period, and the introduction of the World Wide Web and the beginning of the universal availability of the Internet. Positing a relationship between these world-changing events and creative production at large, 89plus introduces the work of some of this generation’s most inspiring protagonists.

Since an introductory panel held in January 2013 at the DLD – Digital, Life, Design conference in Munich, 89plus has conducted research internationally, in Hong Kong and Miami with Art Basel’s Salon series, in Singapore as part of Singapore International Festival of the Arts, in Cape Town with Design Indaba, and in New York and Rio de Janeiro as part of the MoMA PS1 exhibition ‘Expo 1.’ 89plus has also developed a series of residencies with various partners internationally including the Park Avenue Armory in New York, the agnès b. / Tara Oceans Polar Circle Expedition, and the Google Cultural Institute in Paris, which culminated in a one night exhibition at Fondation Cartier, Paris. In late 2013, 89plus partnered with Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo and the Serpentine Galleries for a new annual award for emerging talent, the ‘Re Rebaudengo Serpentine Grants’. The 89plus Marathon was held at London’s Serpentine Sackler Gallery in late 2013, followed shortly after by the 89plus Americas Marathon: Autoconstrucción at Museo Jumex, Mexico City. In early 2014 LUMA hosted the inaugural exhibition, ’89plus / Poetry will be made by all!’, in Zurich, driven by a residency series and an ongoing project which is publishing 1000 books by 1000 poets.

OPEN CALL
89plus is calling for artists, writers, architects, filmmakers, musicians, designers, scientists and technologists.

Submissions are kept on a private research database for consideration by the project’s co-curators. As the project continues in the years to come, those selected will be notified of their inclusion in new endeavors.

Please submit as soon as possible to be considered for our various upcoming events and projects at 89plus.com/submit.

89plus is grateful for the support of The LUMA Foundation
89plus.com is kindly supported by DLD – Digital, Life, Design"
89plus  arthansulrichobrist  simoncastets  millennials  art  design  culture  digital  digitalnatives  generations 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Report: Teachers Better at Using Tech than Digital Native Students -- THE Journal
[Agree, but with some skepticism. While I agree that we shouldn't make assumptions about tech savviness and that the concept of digital natives is problematic, if the primary basis of “using tech better“ is about productivity and academic “success” than. On the other hand “using technology to solve daily problems” sounds like a great measurement. Time to dig into the details of the research. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11423-014-9355-4/fulltext.html ]

"The report's conclusion: "Today's school-age learners are no more technology savvy than their teachers. The previous assumption used to profile students as digital natives did not apply to the students in this study. In fact, teachers' technology use experiences surpassed students whether it [was] inside or outside of school."

The researchers found that "students used technology outside of school for working on school projects, maintaining social networks and entertainment" — but mostly for playing games and listening to music. Teachers showed similar patterns of usage but with greater frequency. Teachers also tended to depend "much more on using technology to solve daily problems, to improve productivity, and as learning aids."

Wang noted that teacher age had no impact on the kinds of technology skills they have. The gap between them and their students lies with how little opportunity students get to practice technology beyond pursuing their personal interests.

"In many ways," the researchers wrote, "it is determined by the requirements teachers place on their students to make use of new technologies and the ways teachers integrate new technologies in their teaching."

The report recommends that "high-quality training" be provided to teachers to help them learn how to integrate content-specific technology into their lessons and how to teach their students how to use technology more effectively."

"School-age students may be fluent in using entertainment or communication technologies, but they need guidance to learn how to use these technologies to solve sophisticated thinking problems," Wang noted. "The school setting is the only institution that might create the needs to shape and facilitate students' technology experience. Once teachers introduce students to a new technology to support learning, they quickly learn how to use it."
technology  education  digitalnatives  2014  communication  entertainment  criticalthinking  problemsolving  learning  howwelearn  productivity 
october 2014 by robertogreco
MICHEL SERRES – 032c Workshop
"MICHEL SERRES is a French philosopher who specializes in the history of science and whose work attempts to reclaim the art of thinking the unthinkable. Born in 1930 in Lot-et-Garonne, Serres is a member immortel of L’Académie française and has been a professor at Stanford University, in the heart of Silicon Valley, since 1984. He’s authored more than 60 volumes that range in topics from parasites to the “noise” that lingers in the background of life and thought. Serres’ writing is like a slow night of constant drinking, taking us irreversibly to places we didn’t know we were heading towards.

In 1985 he published Les cinq sens, a lament on the marginalization of the knowledge we gain from our fives senses through science and the scientific mind. So it came as somewhat of a surprise for his observers when Serres came out in unrestrained support of online culture, particularly Wikipedia, in the first years of the 2000s. “Wikipedia shows us the confidence we have in being human,” he said in 2007. Whether through technology or our own bodies, the world of information is only ever accessible through mediation (Serres often deploys the Greek god Hermes and angels in his writing). His most recent book, Petite Poucette (2012), or “Thumbelina,” is an optimistic work that discusses today’s revolution in communications and the cognitive and political transformations it’s brought about. “Army, nation, church, people, class, proletariat, family, market … these are abstractions, flying overhead like so many cardboard effigies,” Serres writes in Petite Poucette. It’s been on the French bestseller list since its release and has sold more than 100,000 copies. It’s a sort of love letter to the digital generation, and surprising in many ways. One of these is that almost no one in the English-speaking world has ever heard of it. In this conversation with 032c’s contributing editor Hans Ulrich Obrist, Serres muses on the dawn of our new era."



"HUO: You’ve often collaborated with others, and conversation is an important practice in your philosophy. Do you believe that we can invent new forms through collaboration, or even through friendship?

MS: Yes. Certainly. I think it can be done. The key to inventing through conversation is to ensure that the conversation is not … a sort of fight to the death between two set opinions. Each participant in the conversation must be free and open."
michelserres  hansulrichobrist  interviews  2014  digitalnatives  communication  optimism  petitpoucette  adamcurtis  revolution  tocqueville  21stcentury  micheldemontaigne  wikileaks  julianassange  wikipedia  knowledge  mobile  phones  quasi-objects  objects  future  society  conversation  philosophy  resistance  technology  justice  ecologicjustice  politics  montaigne  collaboration 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Teacher Tom: Figuring Out Those Damned ATMs
"We're so often amazed that kids figure out new technology faster and better than adults. Let me tell you why: because they play with it. In fact, that's why young children learn everything faster and better than adults. Play, not swiping fingers across screens, is what's in their DNA, it's in all of our DNA, but we've unlearned it as we've gotten older. We worry that we're going to break something or look foolish or somehow do it "wrong," so we resort to instruction manuals and tutorials and our kids to show us the way.

Why do we stop engaging new things through play as we get older? I don't know the full answer, but part it must lie in how we're taught to learn as we get older. In our society, the younger children are, the more likely it is that they are allowed the time and space to play, to explore, to discover, to make mistakes, both inside and outside the classroom. This is why most young kids tell us they like school: learning is pleasurable, exciting, and interesting when we pursue it though play. Yet as we get older, the opportunities to play become increasingly rare until by the time we hit middle school, it's pretty much all about instruction manuals and tutorials and getting the "right" answer. That's why in traditional schools, the older kids get, the more likely they are to report they hate school.

The fact that young children "take to" screen-based technology shouldn't surprise us. They also take to rocks and sticks and cardboard boxes and water and other people. We're not so impressed by that, however, because we too have mastered those things, years ago, as we freely played.

Education "reformers" have it backwards. They look at middle schools and high schools and see children struggling, hating school, so they are seeking to make our preschools and elementary schools more like middle school and high school to get them "ready." It should be the other way around: we should be trying to make the middle school and high school experience more like what we find in early years. It's not our job to make kids school ready, it's our job to make schools ready for kids. If we do that, I'll bet we'll find that even adults can figure out those damned ATMs."
2014  tomhobson  edtech  technology  education  schools  unschooling  deschooling  howweteach  play  howwelearn  learning  children  digitalnatives  middleschool  highschool  cv  school  schooling  schooliness  edreform  preschool 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Education’s war on millennials: Why everyone is failing the “digital generation” - Salon.com
"Both reformers and traditionalists view technology as a way to control students — and they're getting it very wrong"



"In addressing the hundreds of thousands who watch such videos, students aren’t the only ones in the implied audience. These videos appeal to many nonacademic viewers who enjoy watching, from a remove, the hacking of obstreperous or powerful systems as demonstrated in videos about, for instance, fooling electronic voting booths, hacking vending machines, opening locked cars with tennis balls, or smuggling contraband goods through airport x-ray devices. These cheating videos also belonged to a broader category of YouTube videos for do-it-yourself (DIY) enthusiasts— those who liked to see step-by-step execution of a project from start to finish. YouTube videos about crafts, cooking, carpentry, decorating, computer programming, and installing consumer technologies all follow this same basic format, and popular magazines like Make have capitalized on this sub-culture of avid project-based participants. Although these cultural practices may seem like a relatively new trend, one could look at DIY culture as part of a longer tradition of exercises devoted to imitatio, or the art of copying master works, which have been central to instruction for centuries."



"Prior to the release of this report, Mia Consalvo had argued that cheating in video games is expected behavior among players and that cheaters perform important epistemological work by sharing information about easy solutions on message boards, forums, and other venues for collaborations.

Consalvo also builds on the work of literacy theorist James Paul Gee, who asserts that video game narratives often require transgression to gain knowledge and that, just as passive obedience rarely produces insight in real classrooms, testing boundaries by disobeying the instructions of authority figures can be the best way to learn. Because procedural culture is ubiquitous, however, Ian Bogost has insisted that defying rules and confronting the persuasive powers of certain architectures of control only brings other kinds of rules into play, since we can never really get outside of ideology and act as truly free agents, even when supposedly gaming the system.

Ironically, more traditional ideas about fair play might block key paths to upward mobility and success in certain high-tech careers. For example, Betsy DiSalvo and Amy Bruckman, who have studied Atlanta-area African-American teens involved in service learning projects with game companies, argue that the conflict between the students’ own beliefs in straightforward behavior and the ideologies of hacker culture makes participation in the informal gateway activities for computer science less likely. Thus, urban youth who believe in tests of physical prowess, basketball-court egalitarianism, and a certain paradigm of conventional black masculinity that is coded as no-nonsense or—as Fox Harrell says—“solid” might be less likely to take part in forms of “geeking out” that involve subverting a given set of rules. Similarly, Tracy Fullerton has argued that teenagers from families unfamiliar with the norms of higher education may also be hobbled by their reluctance to “strategize” more opportunistically about college admissions. Fullerton’s game “Pathfinder” is intended to help such students learn to game the system by literally learning to play a game about how listing the right kinds of high-status courses and extracurricular activities will gain them social capital with colleges."



"However, Gee would later argue in “The Anti-Education Era” that gamesmanship that enables universal access and personal privilege may actually be extremely counterproductive. Hacks that “make the game easier or advantage the player” can “undermine the game’s design and even ruin the game by making it too easy.” Furthermore, “perfecting the human urge to optimize” can go too far and lead to fatal consequences on a planet where resources can be exhausted too quickly and weaknesses can be exploited too frequently. Furthermore, Gee warns that educational systems that focus on individual optimization create cultures of “impoverished humans” in which learners never “confront challenge and frustration,” “acquire new styles of learning,” or “face failure squarely.”"



"What’s striking about the ABC coverage is that it lacked any of the criticism of the educational status quo that became so central for a number of readers of the earlier Chronicle of Higher Education story—those who were asking as educators either (1) what’s wrong with the higher education system that students can subvert conventional tests so easily, or (2) what’s right with YouTube culture that encourages participation, creativity, institutional subversion, and satire."



"This attitude reflects current research on so-called distributed cognition and how external markers can help humans to problem solve by both making solutions clearer and freeing up working memory that would otherwise be tied up in reciting basic reminders. Many of those commenting on the article also argued that secrecy did little to promote learning, a philosophy shared by Benjamin Bratton, head of the Center for Design and Geopolitics, who actually hands out the full text of his final examination on the first day of class so that students know exactly what they will be tested on."



"This book explores the assumption that digital media deeply divide students and teachers and that a once covert war between “us” and “them” has turned into an open battle between “our” technologies and “their” technologies. On one side, we—the faculty—seem to control course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, Internet access to PowerPoint slides and podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. On the student side, they are armed with smart phones, laptops, music players, digital cameras, and social network sites. They seem to be the masters of these ubiquitous computing and recording technologies that can serve as advanced weapons allowing either escape to virtual or social realities far away from the lecture hall or—should they choose to document and broadcast the foibles of their faculty—exposure of that lecture hall to the outside world.

Each side is not really fighting the other, I argue, because both appear to be conducting an incredibly destructive war on learning itself by emphasizing competition and conflict rather than cooperation. I see problems both with using technologies to command and control young people into submission and with the utopian claims of advocates for DIY education, or “unschooling,” who embrace a libertarian politics of each-one-for-himself or herself pedagogy and who, in the interest of promoting totally autonomous learning in individual private homes, seek to defund public institutions devoted to traditional learning collectives. Effective educators should be noncombatants, I am claiming, neither champions of the reactionary past nor of the radical future. In making the argument for becoming a conscientious objector in this war on learning, I am focusing on the present moment.

Both sides in the war on learning are also promoting a particular causal argument about technology of which I am deeply suspicious. Both groups believe that the present rupture between student and professor is caused by the advent of a unique digital generation that is assumed to be quite technically proficient at navigating computational media without formal instruction and that is likely to prefer digital activities to the reading of print texts. I’ve been a public opponent of casting students too easily as “digital natives” for a number of reasons. Of course, anthropology and sociology already supply a host of arguments against assuming preconceived ideas about what it means to be a native when studying group behavior.

I am particularly suspicious of this type of language about so-called digital natives because it could naturalize cultural practices, further a colonial othering of the young, and oversimplify complicated questions about membership in a group. Furthermore, as someone who has been involved with digital literacy (and now digital fluency) for most of my academic career, I have seen firsthand how many students have serious problems with writing computer programs and how difficult it can be to establish priorities among educators—particularly educators from different disciplines or research tracks—when diverse populations of learners need to be served."



"Notice not only how engagement and interactivity are praised and conflated, but also how the rhetoric of novelty in consumer electronics and of short attention spans also comes into play."
education  technology  edtech  control  reform  policy  power  2014  traditionalism  traditionalists  plagiarism  pedagogy  learning  schools  cheating  multitasking  highered  highereducation  politics  elizabethlosh  mimiito  ianbogost  jamespaulgee  homago  betsydisalvo  amybruckman  foxharrell  geekingout  culture  play  constraints  games  gaming  videogames  mckenziewark  janemcgonigal  gamesmanship  internet  youtube  secrecy  benjaminbratton  unschooling  deschooling  collaboration  cooperation  agesegregation  youth  teens  digitalnatives  marshallmcluhan  othering  sivavaidhyanathan  digital  digitalliteracy  attention  engagement  entertainment  focus  cathydavidson 
june 2014 by robertogreco
LILEKS (James) :: The Bleat
"I’m 53. I feel the same way about it. I don't claim it as mine, even though I was here first, watched it grow up…I may not inhabit it in the sense that I feel required to check in on Foursquare or share every damned atom of information, but this mindset is not limited to people who grew up think they have the wisdom of the ages because they had a hotmail account when they were ten…

Perhaps “uncomfortably” worked better in the original Polish; maybe there’s an idiomatic implication to the word that would help me understand him better. Oh, right: global culture is more important than language, so nevermind. But while every system can be replaced, it is wishful thinking to believe this means it’s replaced by something better. Unless he equates efficiency and better suited to his needs as “better.” Isn’t there a moral component to consider? Whether or not something is good? Or are “more opportunities” sufficient? You can Godwin that construct with ease."
webculture  tunnelvision  cyberspace  youth  democracy  piotrczerski  online  web  generations  2012  webgen  digitalnatives  jameslileks  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
We, the Web Kids - Pastebin.com
"We grew up with the Internet and on the Internet. This is what makes us different; this is what makes the crucial, although surprising from your point of view, difference: we do not ‘surf’ and the internet to us is not a ‘place’ or ‘virtual space’. The Internet to us is not something external to reality but a part of it: an invisible yet constantly present layer intertwined with the physical environment. We do not use the Internet, we live on the Internet and along it. If we were to tell our bildnungsroman to you, the analog, we could say there was a natural Internet aspect to every single experience that has shaped us. We made friends and enemies online, we prepared cribs for tests online, we planned parties and studying sessions online, we fell in love and broke up online. The Web to us is not a technology which we had to learn and which we managed to get a grip of. The Web is a process, happening continuously and continuously transforming before our eyes; with us and through us…"

[Update: Response by Alan Jacobs: http://ayjay.tumblr.com/post/18029873515/participating-in-cultural-life-is-not-something ]

[Update 2: Lengthy response, take-down: http://www.lileks.com/bleats/archive/12/0212/022212.html ]

[Chaser: http://metalab.harvard.edu/2012/02/twitter-nprs-morning-edition-and-dreams-of-flatland/ ]

[Cross-posted by Alexis Madrigal: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/we-the-web-kids/253382/ ]
participatoryculture  criticalpractice  memories  govenment  dialog  cooperation  socialstructure  anarchy  anarchism  freedom  change  society  democracy  webculture  culture  cv  prostheticmemory  externalmemory  reality  anonymous  ACTA  2012  piotrczerski  digitalnatives  webkids  manifesto  cyberspace  dialogue  manifestos  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Future Perfect » Mimic, Rote Learn, Evolve
"This photo may not seem like much – just another shot of Omotesando kiddies giving it the “niii”. Except that this was taken by my 22 month old daughter, using a Canon dSLR. That she can lift something that heavy, look through the viewfinder, align the shot, find the button and press it with enough force to trigger the shot, and then peers at the back screen to view what she’s taken is at first glance pretty amazing. Like a kid cocking a Magnum. This is not proud parent post – it merely follows in the wake of many parents commenting about their babies/infants use of tech – swiping/jabbing/drooling on touch screen devices, the ‘my kid can use an iPad’ moment.

This are the tools that make up our children’s landscape – and they are as natural as forks and electronic calculators and electric car windows are to you and me.

At that age we mimic, if there’s enough pay-off we rote learn, and if there’s enough payoff we evolve that learning."
janchipchase  technology  absorption  mimicry  learning  children  cameras  ipad  digitalnatives  observation  copycatkids  2011  evolution  rotelearning  rote 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Heading East: Pens
"Over the past week I've twice heard twenty-somethings wonder whether kids growing up today, kids who were practically born with iPhones in hand, will still have the capacity for wonder.

Yesterday as a present for his first day of second grade I brought home an erasable gel pen for my iPhone savvy six year old. After a brief demonstration, he spontaneously hugged me, "I've been waiting for this pen my entire life!"

I think the kids are alright."

[via: http://bobulate.com/post/10298783599/over-the-past-week-ive-twice-heard ]
digitalnatives  raulgutierrez  children  parenting  digital  analog  wonderdeficit  wonder  capactityforwaonder  2011  pens  officesupplies  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Social Media's Slow Slog Into the Ivory Towers of Academia - Josh Sternberg - Technology - The Atlantic
"Underpinning a disdain for social media in higher education is the assumption that incoming students have an inherent aptitude for new technologies"

"If you took a soldier from a thousand years ago and put them on a battlefield, they'd be dead," Howard Rheingold, a professor teaching virtual community and social media at Stanford University, told me one morning via Skype. "If you took a doctor from a thousand years ago and put them in a modern surgical theater, they would have no idea what to do. Take a professor from a thousand years ago and put them in a modern classroom, they would know where to stand and what to do."
education  learning  technology  teaching  socialmedia  howardrheingold  digitalnatives  2011  change  pedagogy  generations  stasis  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
Open University research explodes myth of 'digital native'
"So, in conclusion, first, there’s no evidence of a clear-cut digital divide. Use of technology varies with age, but it does so predictably, over the whole age span. And secondly, although younger people are more likely to be positive about technology, there is evidence that a good attitude to technology, at any age, correlates with good study habits."
digitalnatives  marcprensky  learning  technology  research  2011  digital  myths  truth  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Where the F**k Was I? (A Book) | booktwo.org
"Where Selvadurai is interested in the space between two human cultural identities, I suppose I am interested in the space where human and artificial cultures overlap. (“Artificial” is wrong; feels—what? Prejudiced? Colonial? Anthropocentric? Carboncentric?)

There are no digital natives but the devices themselves; no digital immigrants but the devices too. They are a diaspora, tentatively reaching out into the world to understand it and themselves, and across the network to find and touch one another. This mapping is a byproduct, part of the process by which any of us, separate and indistinct so long, find a place in the world."
books  iphone  maps  mobile  data  jamesbridle  shyamselvaduri  kevinslavin  digitalnatives  digital  devices  internet  web  singularity  mapping  place  meaning  meaningmaking  digitalimmigrants  understanding  learning  exploration  networkedlearning  networks  ai  2011  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Myth of the Digital Native | Betchablog
"Prensky’s logic falls down for me when I see older folk - those who were clearly born before most people had even heard of a microchip - behave with just as much “native-ness” as many of their Gen-Y counterparts.  Many of the cleverest, most insightful technology users I’ve ever met are in their 40s, 50s and 60s, and should - according to Prensky - be speaking with an almost unrecognizable “digital accent”; and yet they don’t.  So I’m convinced that age has very little to do with it.  I’ve seen 80 years olds who can surf the web effectively, use a digital camera, carry their music around on an iPod and use a mobile phone.  And I’ve seen teenagers that can’t figure out how to Google a piece of information properly, don’t realise that Wikipedia can be edited, and have no idea how to listen to a podcast."
digitalnatives  technology  truth  edtech  marcprensky  myths  2009  via:cburell  ageism  usandthem  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — A Thought on Communication
"Our text-based environment, w/ its countless abbreviations & emoticons & bits of slang, has come us to define us culturally. For those suffering RSI, the constant output & input streams of text have even come to define us physically.<br />
<br />
This is where we are today. In short, text rules, & if you can write effectively (as distinct from writing well), you rule too…<br />
<br />
Your children will know a very different way of relating to people who are not physically present. It will change the way they work, maintain friendships, relate to family members, fall in love, & experience the world. It will change their sense of self, & self-worth. It may be a boon, or it may be harmful. Most likely, it’ll be a bit of both, because after all, it’s still about people.<br />
My generation will be at something of a loss when this new world comes about… [Unable to] compete with the telepresence-native adults that the children of today will grow up to be."
communication  alexpayne  predictions  future  video  speakularity  text  writing  telepresence  beauty  aesthetics  human  people  society  digitalnatives  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Attention versus distraction? What that big NY Times story leaves out » Nieman Journalism Lab
"question, though, is: distraction from what? & also: What’s inherently wrong with distraction?…What that framing forgets, though, is that the other side of fragmentation can be focus: the kind of deep-dive, myopic-in-a-good-way, almost Zen-like concentration that sparks to life when intellectual engagement couples with emotional affinity…Formal education, as we’ve framed it, is not only about finding ways to learn more about the things we love, but also, equally, about squelching our aversion to the things we don’t — all in the ecumenical spirit of generalized knowledge…The web inculcates a follow your bliss approach to learning that seeps, slowly, into the broader realm of information; under its influence, our notion of knowledge is slowly shedding its normative layers…Community, after all, needs the normative to function; the question is where we draw the line between the interest and the imperative…what we really want from digital world = permission to be impulsive."
attention  distraction  unschooling  deschooling  control  impulsivity  impulse-control  apathy  focus  learning  education  culture  information  socialmedia  technology  digitalnatives  constructivism  psychology  21stcenturyskills  criticism  lcproject  schools  formaleducation  informallearning  motivation  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Playful Inventions and Explorations: What’s to Be Learned from Kids? | Architectradure
[direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3jI19vR5bI ]

"With their boundless curiosity, fertile imagination, and natural mastery of the art of self-directed learning, children have much to teach adults about creativity and innovation. That’s perhaps even more true with today’s “digital natives,” says developmental psychologist Edith Ackermann, whose work explores—and exploits—the intersections of play, learning, design, and technology. An educator and researcher, Ackermann has consulted for LEGO and the LEGO Learning Institute for more than 20 years and worked under the direction of Jean Piaget, the Swiss psychologist renowned for his studies on children at play, at the Centre International d’Epistémologie Génétique. She has taught at Harvard, MIT, and other universities."
play  curiosity  lego  jeanpiaget  imagination  creativity  innovation  invention  tinkering  digitalnatives  self-directedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  autodidacts  edithackermann  design  technology  children  piaget 
july 2010 by robertogreco
DNA/How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet
"I suppose earlier generations had to sit through all this huffing and puffing with the invention of television, the phone, cinema, radio, the car, the bicycle, printing, the wheel and so on, but you would think we would learn the way these things work, which is this:

1) everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal; 2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it; 3) anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it’s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.

Apply this list to movies, rock music, word processors and mobile phones to work out how old you are."

[Most recently via: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2010/06/cognitive-surplus-blog-all-dogeared-pages.html ]
douglasadams  culture  communication  philosophy  humor  sociology  society  technology  media  web  age  digitalnatives  history  internet 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Educational Insanity » The Logic of “Our” Arguments
"In sum, then, I think “we” are putting broken carts before the horses. “We” are concentrating too much on the “why change” argument without first fully and clearly articulating what it is “we” want from schools. Furthermore, the “why change” arguments, I argue (meta?), are fundamentally flawed. [The “Digital Natives” Argument, The Economics Argument, The Business Argument] There are lots of reasons for the institution of schooling to be transformed. Likewise, there are lots of reasons to consider the affordances of ubiquitous computing for learning. I ask you to help me think through those reasons in ways that are well-informed and logical…especially those of you with whom I hope to have fully maximized face-to-face experiences this weekend at Educon. I look forward to deliberating with many of you there!"
digitalnatives  edtech  education  change  reform  tcsnmy  purpose  technology  engagement  democracy  sla  chrislehmann  educon  learning  logic  jonbecker  richardflorida 
february 2010 by robertogreco
On Using Technology without Understanding It at Beyond School
"Surely s/he knew that the 21st Century writer learns as much from the 21st Century reader as the reader does from the writer. (Because 21st Century readers — the best ones, anyway — write with the writer. Just look at Nobel-winning economist Paul Krugman’s blog, all the references he makes in his writing to what his readers are saying in comments. Look at Rolling Stones’ Matt Taibbi having conversations with his readers in the space beneath his articles — you know, those silly “forum”-like things. Just look.)

So yeah, I wanted to respond to it, and share to the world here on my (real) blog. I thought the writing and the critique of the rush to laptop use in the classroom were that good.

But the editorial was on that precious resource and traditional tool called — what was it? It’s been so long since I’ve written on it–oh yeah, paper, so no luck there (for me, or the forests, or the atmosphere, or the students’ future environmental situation)."
21stcenturyskills  students  digitalnatives  clayburell  publishing  tcsnmy  technology  luddism  teaching  learning  edtech  education  schools  writing  newmedia  21stcentury  21stcenturylearning  pedagogy  future 
december 2009 by robertogreco
digital natives (draft) (the explicit)
"I can understand why the thought of spending four years at a university could raise a native eyebrow. universities are emblematic of a different, much older understanding of power. they are meant to be an oasis of access to knowledge and influence in contrast to a world where access is withheld. they provide libraries full of information, and allow students to rub elbows with professors who don't return emails. but as access to knowledge and influence flattens, universities seem less like oases and more like training camps."
zefrank  technology  digitalnatives  germany  society  culture  education  universities  colleges  experience  power  laws  youth 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The Millennial Muddle: How Stereotyping Students Became an Industry - Student Affairs - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Those who have shaped the nation's understanding of young people are not nearly as famous as their subjects, however. That's a shame, for these experts are colorful characters in their own right. Some are scholars, and some aren't. Many can recall watching the Beatles on a black-and-white television, and some grew up just before Barney the purple dinosaur arrived. Most can entertain an audience, though a few prefer to comb through statistics.
millennials  scamartists  generalizations  stereotypes  strauss&howe  netgen  generations  digitalnatives  truth  labels  tcsnmy  callingthemout 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Net Gen Skeptic: OECD New Millennium Learners' Conference
"It is not enough to know how to send text messages, use word processing tools, post to blogs, use Facebook etc. We all need to be able to to use these technologies to locate, analyze, evaluate and synthesize information that is relevant to our lives and work. Clearly, this is a fundamentally different perspective than the one put forward in the net generation discourse and it is supported by some excellent research that has been undertaken by OECD CERI."
education  schools  learning  technology  digitalnatives  netgen  21stcenturyskills  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Net Gen Skeptic: Evidence Doesn't Support Generational Distinction
"There is very little consensus of opinion and scholarship about whether generational differences exist that are worth taking into consideration in the workplace, colleges, and universities, and other contexts. The gross generalizations based on weak survey research and the speculation of profit-oriented consultants should be treated with extreme caution in a research and development context."
education  learning  science  digitalnatives  millennials  generations  netgen  marcprensky  dontapscott  strauss&howe  tcsnmy  lcproject 
august 2009 by robertogreco
"Living and Learning with Social Media"
“it's important to realize that most teens are engaging with social media without any deep understanding of the underlying dynamics or structure. Just because they understand how to use the technology doesn't mean that they understand the information ecology that surrounds it. Most teens don't have the scaffolding for thinking about their information practices. ... because young folks pick up a technology before you do doesn't inherently mean that they understand it better than you do. Or that they have a way of putting it into context. What they're doing is not inherently more sophisticated – it's simply different. They're coming of age in a culture where these structures are just a given. They take them for granted. And they repurpose them to meet their needs. But they don't necessarily think about them. Educators have a critical role when it comes to helping youth navigate social media. You can help them understand how to make sense of what they're seeing.”
danahboyd  digitalnatives  tcsnmy  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  youth  teens  online  web  education  learning  teaching  socialmedia  facebook  privacy  myspace  networks  research 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Technology is Great, but Are We Forgetting to Live? - ReadWriteWeb
"The fine line between what's worth documenting and what's not is a hard one to define. We immediately assume that the most important, the biggest, the most incredible moments are those that should be recorded. But it's these very moments that are best to experience live, with our full focus."
technology  life  digitalnatives  balance  socialmedia  lifestreaming  culture  addiction  alienation  readwriteweb  firstlife  mobile  phones  digital  digitalcameras  recording  engagement  twitter  facebook  friendfeed  overload  sidelining  inbescreen  cameras 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The natives aren't quite so restless | The Australian
"You might expect that my workshops are teeming with digital natives. But in my experience digital natives are the exception rather than the rule.

While most of my students are familiar with email, mobile phones and word processors - and are deft hands at updating their Facebook profile during class while I'm explaining the finer points of web design - very few have blogs. Neither do they seem to use Flickr. Fewer still are out there making digital movies or creating mash-ups. And only a tiny minority have made a website or used other high-end design software."
teaching  literacy  digitalnatives  technology  email  blogging  flickr  facebook  students 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: "Hanging Out, Messing Around, Geeking Out": A Conversation with the Digital Youth Project (Part Two)
"danah boyd: Many of those who use these terms often do so with the best of intentions, valorizing youth engagement with digital media to highlight the ways in which youth are not dumb, dependent, or incapable. Yet, by reinforcing distinctions between generations, we reinforce the endemic age segregation that is plaguing our society. Many social and civic ills stem from the ways that we separate people based on age. If we want to curtail bullying and increase political participation, we need to stop segmenting and segregating."
technology  children  youth  teens  digitalnatives  age  digitalculture  anthropology  sociology  research  ethnography  danahboyd  mimiito  henryjenkins  media  games  online  internet  unschooling  homeschool  schooling  deschooling  education  learning  web  social  socialnetworking  collaboration  creativity  tcsnmy  lcproject  geekingout  autodidacts  self-directedlearning  ples  peers  homago  hangingoutmessingaroundgeekingout 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: "Hanging Out, Messing Around, Geeking Out": A Conversation with the Digital Youth Project (Part Three)
"I think it's our fault as adults--particularly adults who are parents, educators, and media makers--for not making an effort to understand the Internet from a kid's point of view and for preventing kids from having the time and space to mess around in ways that encourage them to learn to evaluate what they come across online." "If kids are doing things online that seem unproductive or problematic, we don't feel that the answer is to ban the media. Instead we think that it is important to look at and try to shape the underlying social issues. That may be the commercialization of online spaces, lack of connection between kids and teachers, or the fact that academic knowledge seems irrelevant to many kids. It is rarely something that is being driven by the technology alone."
digitalnatives  youth  internet  social  tcsnmy  newmedia  technology  teens  online  learning  literacy  henryjenkins  danahboyd  mimiito  geekingout  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  autodidacts  self-directedlearning  ples  peers  homago  hangingoutmessingaroundgeekingout 
november 2008 by robertogreco
FINAL REPORT | DIGITAL YOUTH RESEARCH
"Social network sites, online games, video-sharing sites, and gadgets such as iPods and mobile phones are now fixtures of youth culture. They have so permeated young lives that it is hard to believe that less than a decade ago these technologies barely existed. Today’s youth may be coming of age and struggling for autonomy and identity as did their predecessors, but they are doing so amid new worlds for communication, friendship, play, and self-expression. We include here the findings of three years of research on kids' informal learning with digital media. The two page summary incorporates a short, accessible version of our findings. The White Paper is a 30-page document prepared for the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning Series. The book is an online version of our forthcoming book with MIT Press and incorporates the insights from 800 youth and young adults and over 5000 hours of online observations."
ethnography  socialmedia  elearning  digitalnatives  education  culture  internet  online  social  youth  media  research  danahboyd  mimiito 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Futures of Learning
"Futures of Learning is a collective blog dedicated to the topic of new media and learning. The members of the blog are part of a project, funded by the MacArthur Foundation, that is conducting an international survey of research in the field. We are focusing on two areas. One is an international review of research on how people are adopting digital and networked media. The second area is a review of learning institutions that are incorporating new media in innovative ways. We welcome suggestions for literature and programs that we should be looking at!"
education  networking  learning  newmedia  digitalnatives  elearning  onlinelearning  ethnography  mimiito  blogs  pedagogy  online  technology  digital  research  media 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Just How Large Is The Business World's Digital Divide? | The Future Buzz
"There are plenty of people my own age (25) or younger that are at the same level (perhaps even further behind) than those twice their age. In fact, age has nothing to do with this, there are many high level and highly influential bloggers/social media power users that span demographics. The divide exists between those who have dove in and actively use the innovative tools of communication that have changed our world forever, and those who have not."
via:hrheingold  socialnetworking  marketing  literacy  digitaldivide  digitalnatives  technology  change 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Generational Myth - ChronicleReview.com
"Consider all the pundits, professors, and pop critics who have wrung their hands over the inadequacies of the so-called digital generation of young people filling our colleges and jobs. Then consider those commentators who celebrate the creative brilliance of digitally adept youth. To them all, I want to ask: Whom are you talking about? There is no such thing as a "digital generation.""
digitalnatives  academia  education  technology  universities  academics  ignorance  students  youth  literacy  informationliteracy  colleges  generations  generationy  millennials 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Natives ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"George Siemens offers this interesting quote from Chris Lott: 'Academics tend to err on the side of nuance and precision, eschewing generalizations and coarse labels. This is great for documenting cultural dynamics, but not so great for making interventions." Well, yeah - if interventions are what you want, then distortions and simplifications are what you're going to need. But perhaps in the light of this we should be questioning the ethics of making an intervention. Perhaps we should be asking what it means to do this, and to query whether we don't create more harm than good in the process."
stephendownes  danahboyd  netgen  digitalnatives  georgesiemens 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Natives
"Digital Natives is an interdisciplinary collaboration of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Research Center for Information Law at the University of St. Gallen. Our aim is to understand and support young people as they grow up in a digital age. Within the project, we make use of a variety of methods to investigate a range of themes pertaining to young people and their use of technologies. Our outputs range from academic publications to hands-on legal, educational, and technological interventions."
education  digitalnatives  technology  legal  learning  teaching  socialmedia  edtech 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Natives » Digital Natives Definitions Redux, Episode n+x
"term Digital Natives was “relying too much on age as determining factor of Internet & technology savviness”...DNs are “not a generation but a population"..."As long as we divide the world into digital natives & immigrants, we won’t be able to talk meaningfully about the kinds of sharing that occurs between adults & children & we won’t be able to imagine other ways adults can interact with youth outside of these cultural divides."..."Technology does not have a moral component: it is the people who use it. Technology does not do the work: it is the people who use it. Today or yesterday or tomorrow, everything is mediated through technologies - it’s different technologies, but the same humans mediating."
digitalnatives  howardrheingold  communication  digital  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  children  generations  adults  youth  teens  genx  generationx  generationy  morality  technology  online  internet  web 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Aspirations
"what matters in the age where, for example, South Korean popular television shows hours of Starcraft competitions, all moderated by a trio doing color, stats and play-by-play? Who are our cultural heros? What are our the aspirations of digital kids as defined by their peers? By their parents?"
julianbleecker  society  expectations  change  aspirations  peers  parenting  success  competition  digitalnatives  children  youth  teens  education  play  games  culture 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Natives in Our Midst | Advice and Opinion
“We’ve never before seen sub-groups working across organizational boundaries to advance the interests of the sub-group at the expense of the corporation...Few companies are prepared to deal with these issues in any comprehensive way.”
via:preoccupations  digitalnatives  millennials  generations  work  socialnetworking  workplace  collaboration  culture  society 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Putting people first » French ethnographic study on teens and mobiles [more evidence of the digital native, net gen, google generation innacuracies]
"fact that young people are more adept at using latest technologies has less to do w/ expertise, experience or access...more with their “non-dramatic” relation w/ these technologies, evidenced by way they deal w/ small failures & technological problem
ethnography  france  mobile  phones  youth  technology  teens  research  digitalnatives  netgen  usage 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Net Gen Nonsense - "dedicated to debunking the myth of the net generation, particularly as it relates to learning, teaching and the use of technology...
"By using this forum I hope to start conversation around this issue & promote an informed discussion of strategies that postsecondary institutions can use to harness the power of Web 2.0 and other learning technologies that is based in fact not rhetoric."
digitalnatives  millennials  myth  netgen  research  education  learning  edtech  technology  colleges  universities  generations 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Young Minds, Fast Times: The Twenty-First-Century Digital Learner - "How tech-obsessed iKids would improve our schools." - Edutopia
"tradition in education has been not to ask students what they think or want, but rather for adult educators to design the system and curriculum by themselves, using their "superior" knowledge and experience...this approach no longer works."
marcprensky  digitalnatives  schools  change  reform  technology  learning  teaching  schooldesign  curriculum  children  ux  schooling  training  engagement  democracy  lcproject  deschooling  unschooling  homeschool  students  ict  education  edtech 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Computer Literacy 3.0: What today's students know (and don't know) about information technology
"Few have thought about the implications of information technology for individuals, organizations and society, leaving them poorly prepared to make political judgements. Finally, as Ivan Illich has pointed out, working with poorly understood technology ca
literacy  information  informationliteracy  instruction  students  technology  web  internet  online  digitalnatives 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Wired Campus: A Sociologist Says Students Aren't So Web-Wise After All - Chronicle.com
"Eszter Hargittai, an assistant professor in Northwestern University’s sociology department, has discovered that students aren’t nearly as Web-savvy as they, or their elders, assume."
informationliteracy  literacy  technology  education  students  digitalnatives  highereducation  instruction  internet  youth  teens  edtech  research  digital  information 
may 2008 by robertogreco
"Teen Socialization Practices in Networked Publics"
"learning how to live in new mediated world by hanging out...how society & culture are constructed. As much as we like to shield our children from...problems in world, they know that they need to learn to interact with them...how to interact in public"
demographics  danahboyd  digitalnatives  culture  privacy  teens  socialnetworking  facebook  networking  youth  socialmedia 
april 2008 by robertogreco
I, Cringely . The Pulpit . War of the Worlds | PBS
"the younger technical generations are so empowered they are impatient and ready to jettison institutions most of the rest of us tend to think of as essential, central, even immortal. They are ready to dump our schools"
education  future  schools  reform  change  learning  technology  culture  society  certification  homeschool  deschooling  unschooling  generations  e-learning  cringely  knowledge  search  gamechanging  millennials  digitalnatives  via:preoccupations  software  philosophy  sharing  pedagogy  singularity  literacy  elearning  academia  demographics  parenting  schooling  internet  futurism 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Never Friend Anyone Over 29 - Blog Maverick
"In this day and age, 25 years post the first IBM PC, pretty much everyone is able to adapt to, accept and become accomplished with consumer technologies. Your granddad is going to want to be your friend, text or IM you and get a GPS enabled phone.. Get u
facebook  digitalnatives  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  markcuban  socialmedia  media  journalism 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Teens not so cyber-obsessed after all - but they're more social than oldsters [more digital native clarification]
"research...challenges conventional assumptions...about technological sophistication of teenagers...spend far less time online than adults...very limited number of activities...attitudes surprisingly unsophisticated"
digitalnatives  technology  online  internet  teens  youth  web  social  socialsoftware  networks  privacy  security  skills  blogs  myspace  facebook 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Dawn of the digital natives - is reading declining? | Technology | The Guardian
"challenge NEA to track economic status of obsessive novel readers & obsessive computer programmers over next 10 yrs. Which group will have more professional success? more likely to found next Google/Facebook, go from college to $80K job?"
books  reading  stevenjohnson  children  programming  online  internet  technology  trends  research  culture  audience  digitalnatives  generations  literacy  media  teens  youth  publishing  statistics  education  coding  teaching 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The Autumn of the Multitaskers
"Neuroscience is confirming what we all suspect: Multitasking is dumbing us down and driving us crazy. One man’s odyssey through the nightmare of infinite connectivity"
multitasking  continuouspartialattention  attention  psychology  neuroscience  behavior  brain  cognition  cognitive  concentration  memory  connectivity  culture  society  stress  productivity  education  learning  lifehacks  slow  mind  organization  theatlantic  technology  recession  trends  bubbles  mobile  phones  distraction  etiquette  economics  freedom  simplicity  digitalnatives 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Seek and ye shall get confused at Joanne Jacobs
"The report finds “little time is spent in evaluating information, either for relevance, accuracy or authority” when young people use the web, he notes...Confident, but not competent. There’s a lot of that going around. "
technology  schools  education  learning  digitalnatives  google  search  literacy  information  curriculum  infoliteracy  online  internet  facebook 
january 2008 by robertogreco
FRONTLINE: coming soon: growing up online | PBS
"In "Growing Up Online," FRONTLINE peers inside the world of this cyber-savvy generation through the eyes of teens and their parents, who often find themselves on opposite sides of a new digital divide."
culture  danahboyd  digitalnatives  education  generations  identity  myspace  youth  children  online  facebook  documentary  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  technology  teens  youtube 
january 2008 by robertogreco
‘Google Generation’ is a myth, says new research : JISC
"The findings also send a stark message to government - that young people are dangerously lacking information skills. Well-funded information literacy programmes are needed, it continues, if the UK is to remain as a leading knowledge economy with a strong
information  literacy  uk  generations  googlegeneration  digitalnatives  myth  libraries  research  future  education  colleges  universities  web  online  internet  users 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: The Official Weblog of Henry Jenkins: Reconsidering Digital Immigrants...
"Surely, we should recognize what digital immigrants bring with them from the old world which is still valuable in the new, rather than simply focus on their lacks and inadequacies"
digitalnatives  digitalculture  education  digital  digitalimmigrants  medialiteracy  generations  youth  learning  media  brokenmetaphors  marcprensky  henryjenkins 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Students tell universities: Get out of MySpace! | E-learning | EducationGuardian.co.uk
"Businesses are banning social networking websites like MySpace and Facebook - but, to the alarm of students, universities are using them more and more"
digitalnatives  myspace  facebook  education  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  universities  colleges  business  work  workplace  students  learning 
november 2007 by robertogreco
William Gibson: The Rolling Stone 40th Anniversary Interview : Rolling Stone
"...our grandchildren will find quaintest about us is that we distinguish digital from real, virtual from real. In future, that will become literally impossible...distinction between cyberspace and that which isn't is going to be unimaginable."
williamgibson  futurism  cyberspace  culture  ubicomp  pessimism  optimism  scifi  sciencefiction  science  fiction  technology  interviews  cybernetics  digitalnatives  future  nanotechnology  nuclear  environment  ubiquitous  society  biology  cyberpunk  books  gamechanging 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Ipseity :: E-Learning Myth #1: The “Net Gen” Myth :: August :: 2006
"Recent sociological and governmental studies paint quite a different picture of this same generation. Often focusing specifically on the Internet, they report –similar to the sources above– that “children and young people [are generally] claiming g
digitalnatives  marcprensky  debunked  education  future  technology  myth  facts  web2.0  digital  children  videogames  gaming  games  media  television  teaching  learning  schools  pedagogy  policy  critique  critical  culture  e-learning  instruction  millennials  publishing  trends  youth  net 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Connectivism Blog - Digital natives and immigrants: A concept beyond its best before date
"Aside from insulting an entire generation and coddling to the needs of younger learners, Prensky doesn't provide us with a compelling model forward (other than "use digital games"). Lately, I've noticed an increasingly strong resistance among educators t
digitalnatives  marcprensky  debunked  education  future  technology  myth  facts  web2.0  digital  children  videogames  gaming  games  media  trends  television  teaching  learning  schools  pedagogy  policy  critique  critical  culture  change 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Digital Nativism [a rebuttal to Marc Prensky's "digital immigrants" and "digital natives" theory]
"In a rather shallow piece lacking in evidence or data, Prensky offers the terms "digital natives" and "digital immigrants" to set up a generational divide. His proposition is simple-minded. He paints digital experience as wonderful and old ways as worthl
digitalnatives  marcprensky  debunked  education  future  technology  myth  facts  web2.0  digital  children  videogames  gaming  games  media  television  teaching  learning  schools  pedagogy  policy  critique  critical  wasteland  tseliot 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Children Of The Web
Zuardi and Agarwal represent the demise of the one-way globalization of American culture that reached its zenith in the 1970s and '80s...marketers simply fed the worldwide appetite for Levi's, Coke, ...Now it's a two-way street.
adolescence  business  children  culture  demographics  digitalnatives  international  teens  global  youth  web  marketing  advertising  capitalism  world  globalization 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Project Inkwell
"The goal of SNS Project Inkwell® is to accelerate the deployment of appropriate technologies onto K-12 desktops worldwide."
1to1  business  computers  digitalnatives  education  future  laptops  nonprofit  planning  teaching  technology  schools  learning  world  international  hardware  interface  gui  children  standards  edtech  inkwell  1:1  nonprofits 
may 2007 by robertogreco
MacArthur Foundation Spotlight Blog | Mimi Ito: Do young people really take “naturally” to digital media?
"Unstructured time, friends and family who support technology-related interests, and most importantly, ongoing and sustained engagement with new technology from an early age are the conditions that produce tech-savvy youth."
children  teens  millennials  digital  technology  mobile  phones  society  media  literacy  digitalnatives  learning  education 
october 2006 by robertogreco

related tags

1:1  1to1  21stcentury  21stcenturylearning  21stcenturyskills  89plus  abnormality  absence  absorption  academia  academics  ACTA  actingbasic  adamcurtis  adaptability  addiction  adolescence  adriannicoleleblanc  adults  advertising  aesthetics  age  ageism  agesegregation  ai  airplanemode  alexandrahackett  alexpayne  alienation  alternative  amybruckman  analog  anarchism  anarchy  andreaservik  angusmccullough  anonymous  anthropology  anxiety  anxietymatrix  apathy  appification  applications  art  arthansulrichobrist  aspiration  aspirations  attention  audience  autodidacts  autonomy  balance  basicness  beauty  behavior  benjaminbratton  bernhardgarnicnig  betsydisalvo  bigotry  biology  blandness  blankness  blogging  blogs  books  box1824  brain  branding  brands  britbennett  brokenmetaphors  browsers  bryanwashington  bubbles  bureaucracy  burnout  business  bythebook  caityweaver  callingthemout  cameras  capactityforwaonder  capitalism  cargocult  caseycep  cathydavidson  causality  certification  change  chaos  cheating  checkingout  children  chriskraus  chrislehmann  class  clayburell  cloud  coding  cognition  cognitive  collaboration  colleges  commonsense  communication  competition  complexity  computers  concentration  connections  connectivity  constraints  constructionism  constructivism  consumption  context  continuity  continuouspartialattention  control  conversation  coolness  cooperation  coping  copycatkids  corydoctorow  creativity  cringely  critical  criticalpractice  criticalthinking  criticism  critique  crtiticalthinking  culture  curiosity  curriculum  cv  cybernetics  cyberpunk  cyberspace  danahboyd  data  davidsmith  debunked  democracy  demographics  denayago  deschooling  design  devices  dialog  dialogue  difference  digital  digitalcameras  digitalculture  digitaldivide  digitalimmigrants  digitalliteracy  digitalnatives  distraction  documentary  dontapscott  doreenstfélix  douglasadams  douglasrushkoff  e-learning  eccentricity  ecologicjustice  economics  edithackermann  edreform  edtech  education  educon  elearning  elianeglaser  elizabethlosh  email  emilynussbaum  empathy  engagement  entertainment  environment  erichoover  establishment  ethnography  etiquette  eulabiss  evasion  evolution  expectations  experience  exploration  externalmemory  facebook  facts  fashion  fatalism  fiction  firstlife  flickr  focus  formaleducation  foxharrell  france  freedom  friendfeed  future  futurism  gamechanging  games  gamesmanship  gaming  geekingout  generalizations  generationalthinking  generationalwarfare  generations  generationx  generationy  genre  genx  geny  georgesaunders  georgesiemens  germany  gideonlewis-kraus  global  globalization  google  googlegeneration  gottfriedleibniz  govenment  gregfong  groupchat  gui  hangingoutmessingaroundgeekingout  hansulrichobrist  hardware  health  henryjenkins  heraclespapatheodorou  highered  highereducation  highschool  history  hollyvoodoo  homago  homeschool  howardrheingold  howeteach  howwelearn  howweread  howweteach  html  html5  human  humanism  humans  humor  hypocrisy  ianbogost  ict  identity  ideology  ignorance  illegibility  imagination  impulse-control  impulsivity  inbescreen  independence  indie  indifference  individuality  individuals  infoliteracy  infooverload  informallearning  information  informationliteracy  inkwell  innovation  instrinsicmotivation  instruction  interface  international  internet  interruptions  interviews  invention  invisibility  ipad  iphone  isolation  ivanillich  jamesbridle  jameslileks  jamespaulgee  janchipchase  janemcgonigal  jeanpiaget  jennyodell  jennyzhang  jiatolentino  johndewey  johnjeremiahsullivan  jonathankozol  jonbecker  journalism  julianassange  julianbleecker  justice  justintimelearning  k-hole  karlmannheimaugusteconte  kathrynschulz  kevinslavin  knowing  knowledge  knowledgeproduction  labels  laptops  latecapitalism  laurengoff  laws  lcproject  learning  legal  legibility  lego  lesliejamison  libraries  life  lifecourse  lifehacks  lifestreaming  lifestyle  literacy  liucixin  logic  luddism  lydiadavis  madamebovary  magic  mainstream  malcolmharris  manifesto  manifestos  mapping  maps  marcprensky  markcuban  marketing  marlonjames  marshallmcluhan  massindie  matthewdesmond  maxingout  mckenziewark  meaning  meaningmaking  media  medialiteracy  megwolitzer  memories  memory  messaging  michaelwesch  micheldemontaigne  michelegabriele  michelserres  middleschool  millenials  millennials  mimicry  mimiito  mind  mobile  montaigne  morality  motivation  multitasking  myspace  myth  myths  nanotechnology  neilhowe  neoliberalism  neologisms  neoteny  net  netgen  networkedlearning  networking  networks  neuroscience  newmedia  nonprofit  nonprofits  normality  normanryder  normcore  nuclear  objects  observation  oceanvuong  officesupplies  online  onlinelearning  openweb  opposition  oppression  optimism  order  organization  othering  overload  oversharing  palmermuntz  pamelacolloff  paradigmshifts  parenting  participatoryculture  patagonia  patience  patricialockwood  patrickraddenkeefe  paulofreire  pausampera  pedagogy  peers  pens  people  personalbranding  pessimism  petermoosgaard  petitpoucette  philosophy  phones  piaget  pierrenora  piotrczerski  place  plagiarism  planning  play  ples  policy  politics  poorsumers  poverty  power  predictions  preschool  presentationofself  privacy  privilege  problemsolving  productivity  programming  prolasticity  prostheticmemory  psychology  publishing  punk  purpose  quasi-objects  rachelaviv  raulgutierrez  reading  readwriteweb  reality  rebeccaonion  rebeccasolnit  rebeccatraister  rebellion  recession  recording  reform  relationships  research  researching  resilience  resistance  revolt  revolution  richardflorida  robertwohl  rossgay  rote  rotelearning  scamartists  school  schooldesign  schooliness  schooling  schools  science  sciencefiction  scifi  screens  search  secrecy  security  self-directed  self-directedlearning  semiotics  seymourpapert  sharing  sherwoodanderson  shyamselvaduri  sidelining  signalling  siliconvalley  simoncastets  simplicity  singularity  sivavaidhyanathan  skills  sla  slow  smanthairby  smartphones  social  socialcapital  socialconstructs  sociality  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  socialstructure  society  sociology  software  speakularity  specialness  standardization  standardizedtesting  standards  stasis  statistics  status  stephaniesyjuco  stephendownes  stereotypes  stevenjohnson  stpauls  strauss&howe  stress  students  subcultures  success  survival  susansontag  systemization  tablets  talks  tcsnmy  teaching  tebeccastead  technology  tedchiang  teens  telepresence  television  territorialism  text  texting  theatlantic  thewestinggame  tinkering  tocqueville  tolerance  tomhobson  tommyorange  traditionalism  traditionalists  training  trends  trendspotting  truth  tseliot  tunnelvision  tv  twitter  ubicomp  ubiquitous  uk  understanding  universities  unschooling  urls  usage  usandthem  users  ux  vaporfolk  via:audreyatters  via:ayjay  via:cburell  via:hrheingold  via:preoccupations  video  videogames  vinsoncunningham  visibility  walkerartcenter  walledgardens  wasteland  wealth  web  web2.0  webculture  webgen  webkids  wesleymorris  wikileaks  wikipedia  williamgibson  williamsburg  williamstrauss  wonder  wonderdeficit  work  workplace  world  worldwideweb  writing  yafiction  youth  youtube  zadiesmith  zefrank  zsófiakeresztes 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: