robertogreco + desirelines + users   3

Desire Lines: Let Your Audience Shape Your Design | Van SEO Design
"As designers we want to control how people perceive our designs and keep people on our predefined path. We create lines for the eye to follow so they notice what we want them to notice. We direct them to the actions we want to them to take. We create navigation through our sites for how we expect people to travel our web pages.

And then along come real people who use our sites and view our pages, however they like. These people are creating desire lines through our websites. We can try our best to force them to do it our way, but they won’t. They’ll either do it their way or leave. A better approach would be to understand where the desire lines in our sites being created and adjust our designs to those desire lines."
design  desirelines  elephantpaths  deschooling  control  use  users  web  reading  statistics  ui  accommodations  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Desire path - Wikipedia
"A desire path (aka desire line or social trail) is a path developed by erosion caused by footfall…usually represents shortest or most easily navigated route btwn an origin & destination. The width & amount of erosion of the line represents the amount of demand.

Desire paths can usually be found as shortcuts where constructed pathways take a circuitous route.

They are manifested on the surface of the earth in certain cases, e.g., as dirt pathways created by people walking through a field, when the original movement by individuals helps clear a path, thereby encouraging more travel. Explorers may tread a path through foliage or grass, leaving a trail "of least resistance" for followers.

…take on an organically grown appearance by being unbiased toward existing constructed routes…almost always most direct & shortest routes btwn 2 points…may later be surfaced. Many streets in older cities began as desire paths…evolved over decades or centuries into modern streets of today."
desirelines  elephantpaths  architecture  design  social  human  humans  geography  travel  walking  urban  mobility  urbanism  users  usage  use  unschooling  deschooling  anarchism  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Sonatype Blog » Maven 3.x: Paving the desire lines — Part One
"A desire line usually represents the shortest or most easily navigated route between an origin and destination. The width and amount of erosion of the line represents the amount of demand. The term was coined by Gaston Bachelard in his book The Poetics of Space. Desire lines can usually be found as shortcuts where constructed pathways take a circuitous route. A concrete example: the pathways around the Berkeley campus… During the early years of Berkeley no pathways were paved. Instead they let inhabitants walk in optimal paths between the buildings and location over a period time to form clear pathways over the grass. Once these pathways had been established they could be paved to make the pathway more permanent. This is very similar to what happened with Maven 2.x. Consider Maven 2.x the pathways marked in the grass. Consider Maven 3.x taking all that learning from Maven 2.x and adopting the optimal form of use and codifying those forms of use i.e. paving the desire lines."
desirelines  elephantpaths  design  users  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco

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