robertogreco + delayedgratification   11

S’More Inequality
"Cognitive psychology—“the mind’s new science” of the last several decades—has directed both popular and scholarly attention to the cultivation of individual willpower as a tool of personal maximization. The Stanford marshmallow experiment on delayed gratification among preschoolers serves as a widely recognized touchstone for this revivification of interest in the will. But the marshmallow test is more than a handy synecdoche for the cold new logic behind shrinking public services and the burgeoning apparatus of surveillance and accountability. It also shows how the sciences of the soul can be deployed to create the person they purport to describe, by willing political transformation. The individual agent of willpower—“executive function,” in the argot of the cognitive sciences—becomes both the means and the end of school privatization. This body of work offers a way to read savage social inequality and a bifurcated labor market as individual mental functions whose ideal type is corporate decision making; it also aids the transition to corporate control of education itself. Following this trope from the realm of cultural logic to public policy allows us to watch neoliberalism operating simultaneously as ideology and agenda and to recognize the consistent denial of reproductive labor that gives the lie to its pretensions."

[via: https://twitter.com/yayitsrob/status/517691187516280832
https://twitter.com/yayitsrob/status/517691603280879616 ]
executivefunction  via:robinsonmeyer  cognitivescience  psychology  cognitivepsychology  willpower  self-control  marshmallowtest  delayedgratification  control  neoliberalism  bathanymoreton  2014  children  schools  schooling  edreform  policy  education  preschool  privatization  ideology  popscience  capitalism  latecapitalism  labor  behavior 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Coding Horror: Buying Happiness
"Despite popular assertions to the contrary, science tells us that money can buy happiness. To a point…

Emotional well-being also rises with log income, but there is no further progress beyond an annual income of ~$75,000…

But even if you're fortunate enough to have a good income, how you spend your money has a strong influence on how happy – or unhappy – it will make you. And, again, there's science behind this…

What is, then, the science of happiness? I'll summarize the basic eight points as best I can, but read the actual paper (pdf) to obtain the citations and details on the underlying studies underpinning each of these principles.

1. Buy experiences instead of things…

2. Help others instead of yourself…

3. Buy many small pleasures instead of few big ones…

4. Buy less insurance…

5. Pay now & consume later…

6. Think about what you're not thinking about…

7. Beware of comparison shopping…

8. Follow the herd instead of your head…"

[Interesting references in some comments]
impulsepurchases  impulse-control  impulsivity  dangilbert  poverty  mazlow'shierarchyofneeds  income  helping  comparisons  comparisonshopping  shopping  delayedgratification  consumerism  cv  consumption  2012  money  wealth  research  science  via:aaronbell  experiences  well-being  jeffatwood  codinghorror  insurance  psychology  stumblingonhappiness  happiness 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Taylor & Francis Online :: The preference for experiences over possessions: Measurement and construct validation of the Experiential Buying Tendency Scale - The Journal of Positive Psychology - Volume 7, Issue 1
"There is growing support that money spent on experiential items increases an individual's happiness. However, there is minimal research on the causes and long-term consequences of the tendency to make experiential purchases. Given the importance of experiential buying for improving well-being, an understanding of the preference for experiential purchasing is imperative. Thus, we developed the Experiential Buying Tendency Scale (EBTS) to measure habitual experiential purchasing. Across eight samples (n = 9634), the EBTS was developed, and shown to be reliable, valid, and predictive of consumer behavior and psychological well-being. An experiential purchasing tendency was related to higher extraversion, openness, empathic concern, and reward seeking. Further, non-materialistic values predicted a preference for experiential purchasing, which led to increased psychological need satisfaction, and, ultimately, increased subjective well-being. The discussion proposes that experiential…"
purchases  openness  extraversion  rewardseeking  empathicconcern  empathy  rewards  delayedgratification  appreciation  ebts  emotions  cv  experiences  2011  raviiyer  paulinapchelin  ryanhowell  spending  money  materialsm  via:aaronbell  consumerism  consumption  well-being  happiness  experientialliving  experiential 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Capitalism only creates misery – we need a system that puts human wellbeing first | Comment is free | The Guardian
"…appeal to give up pursuit of wealth isn't an automatic vote-winner. But the alternative to the pursuit of riches is pursuit of a richer vision: neither austerity nor excessive wealth, but rather "sufficiency plus", where needs are met, & then some, while a fuller understating of human welfare is championed.

Having less can be more. Too much choice is not liberating. There is something to be said for rhythms of life, for patience & delayed gratification, where everything isn't available instantaneously. Seasons are enjoyed because they aren't there all year round. 50-hour weeks come at the expense of family & friends. That's if we have a job at all.

As well as robbing us of our lives, the system pits us against one another in an endless quest for more, which fuels greater inequality, dissatisfaction and unfulfilment—for both the winners & losers. We feel left behind our neighbours & other countries if we don't better ourselves economically. We have forgotten who the economy is for."
socialism  paradoxofchoice  choice  patience  delayedgratification  simplicity  sustainability  environment  progressive  progressivism  materialism  humanism  jonathanbartley  economics  policy  politics  uk  well-being  consumerism  wealth  greenparty  marxism  capitalism  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
For Kids, Self-Control Factors Into Future Success : NPR
"Economists and public health officials want to know whether teaching self-control could improve a population's physical and financial health and reduce crime. Three factors appear to be key to a person's success in life: intelligence, family's socioeconomic status and self-control. Moffitt's study found that self-control predicted adult success, even after accounting for the participants' differences in social status and IQ.

IQ and social status are hard to change. But Moffitt says there is evidence that self-control can be learned.

"Identical twins are not identical on self-control," she says. "That tells us that it is something they have learned, not something they have inherited."

Teaching self-control has become a big focus for early childhood education."
tcsnmy  preschool  teaching  self-control  justice  society  learning  behavior  crime  success  health  lcproject  classdieas  delayedgratification  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Creating a sick system [sounds way too much like so many schools]
"Really disturbing piece about how to make someone dependent on you...i.e. "creating a sick system". Here are the four basic rules:
abuse  employment  management  psychology  relationships  workplace  schooling  control  rewards  kottke  tcsnmy  delayedgratification  work  scary 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - America on Deadline - NYTimes.com
"Some years ago, psychologists posed a deceptively simple question: if I were to offer you $100 right now, or $110 a week from now, which would you choose? Most subjects chose to take $100 right then. It didn’t seem worthwhile to wait an entire week for only $10 more.

[via: http://blog.longnow.org/2009/12/04/discounting-the-future/ ]
psychology  davideagleman  procrastination  afghanistan  uncertainty  certainty  future  politics  policy  barackobama  instantgratification  delayedgratification  crisis  2009  subprime  shortterm  longterm  longnow 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Dept. of Science: Don’t!: The secret of self-control. - The New Yorker
"Once Mischel began analyzing the results, he noticed that low delayers, the children who rang the bell quickly, seemed more likely to have behavioral problems, both in school and at home. They got lower S.A.T. scores. They struggled in stressful situations, often had trouble paying attention, and found it difficult to maintain friendships. The child who could wait fifteen minutes had an S.A.T. score that was, on average, two hundred and ten points higher than that of the kid who could wait only thirty seconds."
psychology  science  children  delayedgratification  learning  success 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Can You Tell the Truth About Being Self Interested? > Trusted Advisor Associates > Trust Matters
"desire for immediate gratification is often enemy of longer-term happiness...5-year-olds were analyzed according to ability to defer gratification...lives then traced over decades...kids who chose more later were notably happier, more successful, more st
time  life  happiness  research  gratification  longterm  shortterm  delayedgratification 
july 2008 by robertogreco

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