robertogreco + datamining   43

Shoshan Zuboff on “Big Data” as Surveillance Capitalism
"VII. HOW TO CONSTRUCT A FUTURE THAT WE CAN CALL HOME

Why is it that the declaration of surveillance capitalism has met so little resistance? Searle’s reasoning is a good guide. Agreement? Yes, there were and are plenty of people who think surveillance capitalism is a reasonable business model. (We’ll have to leave why they think so to another discussion.) Authority? Yes. The tech leaders have been imbued with the authority of expertise and idolized as entrepreneurs. Persuasion? Absolutely. All the neoliberal buzzwords of entrepreneurialism, creative destruction, disruption, etc. persuaded many that these developments were right and necessary. A quid pro quo? Yes, powerfully so. The new free services of search and connection were exactly what we needed and have become essential to social participation. When Facebook went down last month, a lot of Americans called 911 (emergency services).

Was there any use of force or other means to foreclose alternatives? No military force was needed. Instead, as the new logic became the dominant business model for online companies and start-ups, it spawned millions of related institutionalized facts— ancillary and intermediary business services, professional specializations, new language, IPOs, tons of cash, network effects, unprecedented concentrations of information power. All these limit our sense that there can be any alternative. And finally, how about a lack of understanding? This is the most salient reason of all. Most people did not and could not appreciate the extent to which the new “facts” depended upon surveillance. This colossal asymmetry of understanding helps explain why Edward Snowden was necessary. Somebody had to be Ed Snowden

What kind of resistance has been offered and why has it failed to stop the spread of surveillance capitalism? Here I depart from Searle in order to introduce two distinct varieties of declaration that I think can help us understand more about how the future unfolds. I suggest that the kind of resistance that has been offered so far takes the form of what I call the “counter-declaration.” A counter-declaration is defensive. It addresses the institutional facts asserted by the declaration. The process of countering seeks to impose constraints or achieve compromise, but it does not annihilate the contested fact. In addressing those facts, it invariably increases their power. Negotiation inevitably legitimates the other. This is why many governments refuse to negotiate with terrorists. As Searle noted, even talking about something or referring to it increases its reality by treating it as a thing that is already real. It’s a classic quick-sand situation in that the more you fight it, the more it sucks you in.

What are examples of counter-declarations? Google and other Internet companies have been the targets of many privacy-related lawsuits. Some of these efforts have imposed real constraints, such as prohibiting Google Street View cars to extract personal data from computers inside homes, or the class action that resulted in Facebook’s suspension of its invasive “Beacon” program. Legal actions like these can limit certain practices for a time, but they do not topple the institutionalized facts of surveillance capitalism in the target or other companies. Encryption is another counter-declaration. When we encrypt, we acknowledge the reality of the thing we are trying to evade. Rather than undoing that reality, encryption ignites an arms race with the very thing it disputes. Privacy tools like “opt out” or “do not track” are another example. When I click on “do not track,” what I am really saying is “do not track me.” My choice does not stop the company from tracking everyone else.

I want to be clear that I am not critical of counter-declarations. They are necessary and vital. We need more of them. But the point I do want to make is that counter-declarations alone will not stop this train. They run a race that they can never win. They may lead to a balance of power, but they will not in and of themselves construct an alternative to surveillance capitalism.

What will enable us to move forward in a new way? As I see it, we will have to move on to a new kind of declaration that I am calling a “synthetic declaration.” By this I mean a declaration that synthesizes the opposing facts of declaration and counter-declaration. It arises from— and draws to it —new and deeper wellsprings of collective intentionality. It asserts an original vision. If the counter-declaration is check, the synthetic declaration is checkmate.

Does information capitalism have to be based on surveillance. No. But surveillance capitalism has emerged as a leading version of information capitalism. We need new synthetic declarations to define and support other variants of information capitalism that participate in the social order, value people, and reflect democratic principles. New synthetic declarations can provide the framework for a new kind of double movement appropriate to our time.

Are there examples? There are glimmers. The past year brought us Ed Snowden, who asserted a new reality at great personal sacrifice by claiming this to be a world in which the information he provided should be shared information. Wikileaks has also operated in this spirit. The EU Court’s decision on the right to be forgotten points in the direction of a synthetic declaration by establishing new facts for the online world. (In my view, it also faltered, perhaps inadvertently, by also establishing new facts that grant Google inappropriate new powers.

Mathias Doepfner’s open letter to Google chairperson Eric Schmidt, published in FAZ last spring, called for a synthetic declaration in the form of a unique European narrative of the digital, one that is not subjugated to the institutional facts asserted by the Internet giants.

Indeed, I think it can be said that the German people are now drawing on their unique historical experience to produce their own synthetic declaration that insists on a different kind of digital future. Note that The Economist just published an article titled “Googlephobia in Germany.” The aim of such language is to suggest that it’s neurotic and therefore irrational to oppose Google’s practices. It’s a classic counter-declaration that reveals the powerful effect of Germany’s new thinking. The real fear is that Germany might produce a synthetic declaration that opens a space for alternative forms of information capitalism to flourish.

I am mindful of a long list of demands that were damned as “neurotic” and unreasonable in America a century ago, as the contest over 20th century capitalism accelerated: labor unions, a living wage, business regulation, racial equality, womens’ right to vote, a high school education…. For anyone who thinks Germany’s concerns are “phobic,” one need only recall the revelations less than a year ago that the NSA was spying on Joaquin Almunia, the EU official who presides over the Google antitrust case. Or the recently published emails that provide fresh glimpses of the collaborative relationship between the NSA and Google. And should we mention that Google’s chairperson, Schmidt, also sits on the board of the Economist Group?

Our world sorely needs more —and more comprehensive—synthetic declarations that point us in a wholly new direction. We need new facts that assert the primacy of humanity, the dignity of the person, the bonds of democratic community strengthened by individual empowerment and knowledge, and the well being of our planet. This does not mean that we should construct utopias. Rather, it means that we should draw upon the authentic promise of the digital— the promise that we grasped before Ed Snowden entered history.

In the shadow and gloom of today’s institutional facts, it has become fashionable to mourn the passing of the democratic era. I say that democracy is the best our species has created so far, and woe to us if we abandon it now. The real road to serfdom is to be persuaded that the declarations of democracy we have inherited are no longer relevant to a digital future. These have been inscribed in our souls, and if we leave them behind— we abandon the best part of ourselves. If you doubt me, try living without them, as I have done. That is the real wasteland, and we should fear it."
soshanazuboff  via:steelemaley  2014  bigdata  declarations  internet  web  online  edwardsnowden  joaquinalmunia  hannaharendt  hamesburnham  frankschirrmacher  germany  europe  advertising  capitalism  surveillancecapitalism  surveillance  privacy  democracy  counterdeclarations  feedom  courage  law  legal  dataexhaust  data  datamining  google 
september 2014 by robertogreco
A day in the life of a data mined kid | Marketplace.org
[inforgraphic here: http://www.marketplace.org/content/lc-privacy-infographic ]

"Nearly everything they do at school can be — and often is — recorded and tracked, and parents don't always know what information is being collected, where it’s going, or how it's being used.

The story begins at the bus stop.

Your child swipes his ID card and climbs on the bus. The card may contain an RFID or radio frequency identification chip, which lets the school know when he gets on and off the bus. In some school districts, parents will get text alerts, letting them know their child arrived safely to school. The bus technology is presented as a way to keep children safer.

“The data collection begins even before he steps into the school,” says Khaliah Barnes, director of the Student Privacy Project at the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

And, says Barnes, in some schools it just keeps on going. RFID chips let schools track kids on school grounds. Administrators could know if a child leaves the building, or if he visits the school counselor.

“The issue is that this reveals specifically sensitive information,” says Barnes.

Location information is just one small part of a child’s data file.

In the classroom, teachers gather data on routine things like attendance, tardiness, test scores and grades. The kinds of records that used to be kept on paper.

In most states, the data are fed into a giant database, known as a “statewide longitudinal data system.” Different states collect different elements of personal student data. (You can look up your state here.)

In the last decade, the federal government has handed states more than $600 million to help them create these databases. The idea, says Stephen Balkam, head of the Family Online Safety Institute, is that “if we could keep track of our kids from kindergarten to 12th grade we'd have a much greater handle on what's working, what's not working, what needs to be added to the curriculum.”

The government isn’t the only one trying to figure out what’s working by investing in and gobbling up data about your kid.

Sales of educational technology software for kids in kindergarten through high school reached nearly $8 billion last year, according to the Software and Information Industry Association.

One of the biggest players is the field is Knewton. It analyzes student data that it collects by keeping track of nearly every click and keystroke your child makes during digital lessons.

Jose Ferreira is Knewton’s CEO. In a video posted by the Department of Education, he says “We literally know everything about what you know and how you learn best, everything.”

Knewton claims to gather millions of data points on millions of children each day. Ferreira calls education “the world’s most data-mineable industry by far.”

“We have five orders of magnitude more data about you than Google has,” he says in the video. “We literally have more data about our students than any company has about anybody else about anything, and it’s not even close.”

Five orders of magnitude more data than Google is a whole lot of data."
via:audreywatters  2014  education  data  datamining  children  schools  policy  privacy  control  software  datacollection 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The Future of Ed-Tech is a Reclamation Project #DLFAB
"If your education-related lifebits are in your own repository, you are able to audit your education record — to correct incorrect data, to run your own analyses of the things that are meaningful to you as a learner.

You have the ability to control who has access to your lifebits — this is absolutely crucial. With lifebits, you opt in, rather than as now, where we have to opt out of analytics and algorithms. You can decide what is shared publicly or shared privately or what is not shared at all.

You have the technology to help you remember. You retain the ability — and the right — to delete, to forget.

"The technical aspects are somewhat challenging,” Udell wrote in 2007, "but the social and business aspects are even more challenging.”'



"I think one of the most powerful learning technologies humans have ever created is the World Wide Web. Its power doesn’t lie simply in all the “content.” We get too distracted by that. The power of the Web lies in the human connections, in our intellectual and social networks. That schools block the Web and filter the Web and discourage its usage is a terrible shame. That schools fail to help students learn about how the Web works and how they will likely form and perform some digital identity there is a terrible missed opportunity.

Wired Magazine tried to argue back in 2010, “The Web is Dead.” "As much as we love the open, unfettered Web,” wrote then editor Chris Anderson, "we’re abandoning it for simpler, sleeker services that just work. ...Over the past few years, one of the most important shifts in the digital world has been the move from the wide-open Web to semiclosed platforms that use the Internet for transport but not the browser for display.”

But reports of the Web’s death, to paraphrase Mark Twain, are greatly exaggerated. Indeed, despite the interests of many technology companies in funneling our activities into applications that are closed off from the Web — without URLs, without syndication, without data portability, often without privacy protections where all our activities are set to be data-mined — the Web remains. It remains a site of great hope and great promise. It remains easily readable, writable, and hackable. And despite the efforts of the Facebooks and the Blackboards of the world, there’s a push for a return to the Web, the indie Web, many of us fell in love with when we first dialed up to it, when we first escaped AOL.

Today the content we create — we all create, but particularly learners create — is important, even critical I’d suggest to the development of our identities, the protection of our well-being. It is not secure in the hands of startups or big corporations — these companies go away. It is not secure in the hands of schools. Schools are not in the business of long term data storage, and they increasingly outsource their IT to those very startups and big corporations. We must become the holders of our own data, but not so that we bury all of it away from view. We will want to share it with others on our own terms.

We can reclaim the Web and more broadly ed-tech for teaching and learning. But we must reclaim control of the data, content, and knowledge we create. We are not resources to be mined. Learners do not enter our schools and in our libraries to become products for the textbook industry and the testing industry and the technology industry and the ed-tech industry to profit from.

Ed-tech must be not become an extraction effort, and it increasingly is. The future, I think we'll find, will be a reclamation project. Let’s start now to take it back."
2014  audreywatters  web  internet  edtech  content  ownership  adomainofone'sown  privacy  forgetting  memory  archives  data  datamining  business  capitalism  reclaimhosting  indieweb 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Strata Summit 2011: Marc Goodman, "The Business Of Illegal Data..." - YouTube
"While businesses around the world struggle to understand the how to profit from the information revolution, one class of enterprise has successfully mastered the challenge—international organized crime. Globally crime groups are rapidly transforming themselves into consumers of big data. Lessons in how organized crime and terrorists are innovatively consuming both illegal and open source data will be presented."
data  bigdata  crime  organizedcrime  2011  via:timcarmody  information  marcgoodman  datamining 
july 2013 by robertogreco
What are the Habits of Mind? | Institute For Habits of Mind
"Habits of Mind are dispositions that are skillfully and mindfully employed by characteristically intelligent, successful people when they are confronted with problems, the solution to which are not immediately apparent.

The Habits of Mind as identified by Costa and Kallick are:

Persisting
Thinking and Communicating with Clarity and Precision
Managing Impulsivity
Gathering Data Through all Senses
Listening with Understanding and Empathy
Creating, imagining and Innovation
Thinking Flexibly
Responding with Wonderment and Awe
Thinking about Thinking (Metacognition)
Taking Responsible Risks
Striving for Accuracy
Finding Humor
Questioning and Posing Problems
Thinking Interdependently
Applying Past Knowledge to New Situations
Remaining Open to Continuous Learning"
thinking  habits  habitsofmind  mind  teaching  tcsnmy  learning  education  lcproject  flexibility  risktaking  humor  creativity  imagination  impulsivity  impulse-control  persistence  clarity  passion  communication  empathy  datamining  wonderment  wonder  wonderdeficit  accuracy  questioning  problemsolving  independence  lifelonglearning  history  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Ascent Stage: Lessons from unmaking urban mistakes
"We've got more data about cities than we know what to do with. It's lying in archives, published on government websites, being sensed from instrumentation in the environment, deduced from aerial imagery, and built from the ground-up by citizens updating, tweeting, and texting a kind of pointillist painting of city life.

There's simply no reason that we can't design tools to bring city-dwellers into a closer relationship with information that can inform their choices. All the raw materials are there: data, visualization, analytics, and tools for socializing one's insight or commentary. This would not obviate the need for town hall meetings or public presentation of a city's plans, but it would equalize the power imbalance, bringing a Jacobsian emergent planning ethic to a suasive critical mass that can interact with top-down planning around a common set of facts."
urbanplanning  urbancomputing  complexity  design  infrastructure  transportation  urban  systems  streets  community  datamining  roads  planning  cities  highline  portland  nyc  chicago  johntolva  via:adamgreenfield  janejacobs  boston  freeways 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Sergey Brin’s Search for a Parkinson’s Cure | Magazine
In other words, Brin is proposing to bypass centuries of scientific epistemology in favor of a more Googley kind of science. He wants to collect data first, then hypothesize, and then find the patterns that lead to answers. And he has the money and the algorithms to do it...But, surprisingly, the concept of genetic information as toxic has persisted, possibly because it presumes that people aren’t equipped to learn about themselves...“People were predicting catastrophic reactions,” Green recalls. “Depression, suicide, quitting their jobs, abandoning their families. They were anticipating the worst.” But that isn’t what happened....In other words, given what seems like very bad news, most of us would do what Sergey Brin did: Go over our options, get some advice, and move on with life...Can a model fueled by data sets and computational power compete with the gold standard of research?
sergeybrin  google  23andme  parkinsons  genetics  genomics  datamining  database  data  dna  disease  medicine  future  search  health  innovation  science  research 
july 2010 by robertogreco
140kit: application : welcome
"Research: 140kit is more than your personal stash of Tweets; when you signup, you have access to two powerful default scrape types: You can either search terms (with/without our similar term branching algorithm enabled) from this moment using the powerful Streaming API or soon access one of our Whitelisted machines for REST access to collect as many tweets as possible from any number of accounts.

Explore: Once your data collection is complete, you have access to an expanding list of analytical offerings to measure your data sets rapidly and in new ways. From there, you can quickly export data, view general charts, and soon have access to an experimental re-tweet network graph visualization. Use this data for academic research, one-off fact-checking blog posts, or anything else you can think of, really.

Collaborate: What if you wanted to combine multiple data sets and look at their sum value?..."
twitter  microblogging  datamining  rss  database  research  scraping  api  data  analysis  via:robinsloan 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Self-organizing map - Wikipedia
"A self-organizing map (SOM) or self-organizing feature map (SOFM) is a type of artificial neural network that is trained using unsupervised learning to produce a low-dimensional (typically two-dimensional), discretized representation of the input space of the training samples, called a map. Self-organizing maps are different from other artificial neural networks in the sense that they use a neighborhood function to preserve the topological properties of the input space."
maps  mathematics  networks  optimization  datamining  database  clustering  classification  algorithms  ai  learning  programming  research  statistics  visualization  neuralnetworks  mapping  som  self-organizingmaps 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Raph’s Website » Gameifying everything
[see also: http://g4tv.com/thefeed/blog/post/702668/DICE-2010-Video-Design-Outside-The-Box.html ]

"The social games market makes extensive use of psych hacks, datamining, & incentive structures, in a small way very much like the above 3 concerns:

• There’s a reason why you invite people with gifts in those games — it triggers a reciprocity effect.
• The architecture of farming games exploits commitment.
• The whole premise is based on sitting atop the social graph — in other words, making use of the fact that you are supplying a giant pile of personal data to the service providers.
• And, of course, there’s been plenty of evidence that they can get you to do things using these structures.

There are plenty of valid concerns to be had here. But it’s not going to go away. Instead, we need to be thinking about what our accommodation is with these technologies and approaches. Almost all of this arises simply out of better knowledge of ourselves and our psychology paired with improvements in communications technology. And that is not a new problem — it’s an old one.""
ludocapitalism  socialgraph  games  trends  socialmedia  gaming  surveillance  2010  datamining  addiction  incentives  psychology  gamedesign  jesseschell  raphkoster  technology 
february 2010 by robertogreco
the hose drawer (tecznotes)
"The pattern we see here is to keep crises small and frequent, as Ed Catmull of Pixar says in an excellent recent talk. When describing the difficulty Pixar's artists had with reviews ("it's not ready for you to look at"), he realized that the only way to break through resistance to reviews was to increase the frequency until no one could reasonably expect to be finished in time for theirs. The point was to gauge work in motion, not work at rest. "So often that you won't even notice it," said Elwood Blues."
michalmigurski  design  twitter  flow  progress  datamining  measurement  data  iteration  learning  improvement  sharing  glvo  criticism  reviews  stamen  process  work  unproduct 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Borderland › Competitiveness and Excellence
"Competitiveness & excellence are not necessarily related. Competition may lead to excellence, but it may also lead to cheating & lying. Or it may lead to more benign perversions, like data mining & “public relations” initiatives that focus on quality indicators, rather than quality itself...story about how colleges may manipulate their rankings in US News & World Report’s list of top universities. But data mining and publicity campaigns aren’t always necessary for an institution to promote itself. Sometimes ideology alone is enough for a school to stand on. ... My own teaching philosophy and my reservations about using any form of coercion to get kids to learn runs straight back to my early years in school. The need for order has to be balanced with respect and a certain amount of freedom to direct our attention toward what interests us. The teacher has to figure out how to put that together, and the extent to which he or she can do that makes all the difference for kids."
education  tcsnmy  marketing  publicrelations  administration  management  philosophy  progressive  quality  freedom  traditional  alfiekohn  dougnoon  competitiveness  excellence  competition  datamining  colleges  universities  schools  teaching 
july 2009 by robertogreco
N.Y. Times mines its data to identify words that readers find abstruse » Nieman Journalism Lab
"If The New York Times ever strikes you as an abstruse glut of antediluvian perorations, if the newspaper’s profligacy of neologisms and shibboleths ever set off apoplectic paroxysms in you, if it all seems a bit recondite, here’s a reason to be sanguine: The Times has great data on the words that send readers in search of a dictionary."
nytimes  words  language  english  writing  linguistics  dictionary  vocabulary  datamining  journalism  dictionaries 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Schneier on Security: Privacy in the Age of Persistence
"Society works precisely because conversation is ephemeral; because people forget, and because people don't have to justify every word they utter. ... Privacy isn't just about having something to hide; it's a basic right that has enormous value to democracy, liberty, and our humanity. ... Just as we look back at the beginning of the previous century and shake our heads at how people could ignore the pollution they caused, future generations will look back at us – living in the early decades of the information age – and judge our solutions to the proliferation of data.
bruceschneier  privacy  technology  memory  forgetting  society  future  information  security  persistence  surveillance  storage  freedom  identity  data  policy  datamining 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Wolfram Blog : Stock Market Returns by Presidential Party
"The New York Times recently published an “Op-Chart” by Tommy McCall on its Opinion page showing what your returns would have been had you started with $10,000 in 1929 and invested it in the stock market, but only during the administrations of either Democratic or Republican presidents. His calculations showed that if you had invested only during Republican administrations you would now have $11,733 while if you had invested only during Democratic administrations you would now have $300,671. Twenty-five times as much! That’s a pretty dramatic difference, but does it stand up to a closer look? Is it even mathematically plausible that you could have essentially no return on your investment at all over nearly 80 years, just by choosing to invest only during Republican administrations? To answer these questions, I of course turned to Mathematica."
politics  economics  democrats  republicans  history  investing  finance  charts  datamining  us  data  infographics  misleadingwithstatistics 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Clive Thompson on Real-World Social Networks vs. Facebook 'Friends'
"Almost every time he analyzes a group, Waber discovers that the super-connector — the crucial person who routes news among team members — isn't the manager. "The manager is almost always peripheral," Waber says. "It's some random guy." And that person is usually overworked and overstressed. He isn't given enough support to fulfill his role, because nobody in the firm knows he's doing it in the first place. If you study the org chart, the higher-ups are in control. But if you study reality, those same managers barely know what's going on...This type of research has evolved into a new field called reality mining."
research  realitymining  clivethompson  networks  community  collaboration  communication  datamining  management  socialnetworking  psychology  networking  socialnetworks  connectivity 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Salon.com News | Exposing Bush's historic abuse of power
"Salon has uncovered new evidence of post-9/11 spying on Americans. Obtained documents point to a potential investigation of the White House that could rival Watergate."
via:regine  politics  law  surveillance  power  crime  database  corruption  datamining  abuse  georgewbush  panopticon  NSA 
august 2008 by robertogreco
The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete
"Sensors everywhere. Infinite storage. Clouds of processors. Our ability to capture, warehouse, and understand massive amounts of data is changing science, medicine, business, and technology. As our collection of facts and figures grows, so will the oppor
science  statistics  data  google  theory  philosophy  technology  future  database  cloudcomputing  datamining  collaboration  complexity  chrisanderson  visualization  perception  math  information  economics  computing  computers  brain  psychology 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Sense Networks
"Sense Networks, Inc. indexes the real world using real-time and historical location data for predictive analytics across multiple industries."
mobile  phones  geotagging  gps  geocoding  data  location  location-based  location-aware  locative  mapping  datamining  maps  statistics  sensors  sensing  aggregator  realtime  privacy  geolocation  tracking 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Skydeck
"turns your phone bill into a map of your relationships with friends, colleagues, and customers - your true social network. We show you who called you, whom you need to call, and who never calls back. And since we also keep track of how much you're spendi
personalinformatics  socialnetworking  mobile  phones  statistics  firefox  extension  handheld  mobilecomputing  networking  wireless  economics  datamining 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Citysense: Lets You Know What Everybody's Doing - O'Reilly Radar
"The current release of Citysense answers the question "Where's Everybody?" In the future you can expect Citysense to start to answer the question "Where's everybody like me?"."
location  mapping  maps  sensors  gps  realitymining  datamining  cities  privacy  citysense  visualization  data  mobile  phones  urban  tracking  technology  locative  location-based 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: The clowd
"PS your privacy is fairly shot...clowd also knows where you are, camera or no camera..This is going to happen. The only question is whether you are one of the people who will make it happen. I guess there's an even bigger question: will we do it right?"
cloud  cloudcomputing  computing  crowdsourcing  datamining  future  gps  privacy  phones  mobile  sethgodin  socialmedia 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Freebase: an open, shared database of the world's knowledge
"an open database of the world’s information. It’s built by the community and for the community – free for anyone to query, contribute to, build applications on top of, or integrate into their websites."
database  opensource  web2.0  data  search  knowledge  opencontent  wisdomofcrowds  wikipedia  wiki  metaweb  datamining  databases  creativecommons  crowdsourcing  opendata 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Our Data, Ourselves [Bruce Schneier]
"What happens to our data happens to ourselves...Who controls our data controls our lives...We need to take back our data...Our data is a part of us. It's intimate and personal, and we have basic rights to it. It should be protected from unwanted touch."
privacy  security  data  identity  politics  internet  information  datamining  activism  liberty  surveillance  legal  law  bruceschneier  rights 
may 2008 by robertogreco
chris woebken I selected projects - a new relationship to e-money
"I designed devices for different spending behaviors, imagining new parasitical services sitting on top of bank accounts that create feedback mechanisms and a new relationship to our bank-account as an extension of ourselves. I am interested in exploring
currency  via:adamgreenfield  money  transit  transport  urbancomputing  design  rfid  datamining  economics  ecosystems  future  payment 
may 2008 by robertogreco
all streets | ben fry
"All of the streets in the lower 48 United States: an image of 26 million individual road segments. No other features (such as outlines or geographic features) have been added to this image, however they emerge as roads avoid mountains, and sparse areas c
maps  visualization  mapping  us  streets  transportation  processing  via:adamgreenfield  geography  roads  datamining 
april 2008 by robertogreco
MIT Media Lab: Reality Mining
"Reality Mining defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. This new paradigm of data mining makes possible the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and temporospatial location throughou

[see also: http://www.technologyreview.com/read_article.aspx?ch=specialsections&sc=emerging08&id=20247]
attention  culture  technology  phones  realitymining  reality  memory  location-based  privacy  future  data  context  research  social  mobile  datamining  networks  MIT  modeling  networking  psychogeography  pervasive  context-aware  crowds  behavior  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobilecomputing  mobility  location  locative  compsci  psychology  socialgraph  surveillance  statistics  visualization  visual  spatial  medialab  mapping  ai  mitmedialab 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Datawocky: More data usually beats better algorithms
"To sum up, if you have limited resources, add more data rather than fine-tuning the weights on your fancy machine-learning algorithm. Of course, you have to be judicious in your choice of the data to add to your data set."
algorithms  code  computers  computing  database  databases  datamining  efficiency  statistics  semanticweb  programming  netflix  research  metadata  learning  search 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Technology Review: TR10: Modeling Surprise
"Combining massive quantities of data, insights into human psychology, and machine learning can help manage surprising events, says Eric Horvitz."
ai  artificial  chaos  collective  psychology  predictions  serendipity  datamining  forecasting  future  futurism  innovation  visualization  intelligence  modeling  technology  statistics  probability  bayesian 
march 2008 by robertogreco
PresidentialWatch08 » Map
"Access our map of the 292 influential sites making the debate on the presidential race. See how the different political communities are represented on the Internet. Identify the true opinion hubs and shapers in the debate."
2008  elections  visualization  trends  us  opinion  blogging  blogs  datamining  media  journalism  statistics  hyperlinks  maps  mapping  politics  infographics  semanticweb 
january 2008 by robertogreco
PresidentialWatch08 » Trends
"See the candidates who are actually making the news on the Internet, in the mass media or in the different political communities."
data  datamining  elections  2008  politics  us  visualization  trends  media  press 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Schneier on Security: Security vs. Privacy
"The debate isn't security versus privacy. It's liberty versus control...If you set up the false dichotomy, of course people will choose security over privacy -- especially if you scare them first. But it's still a false dichotomy."
government  economics  privacy  rights  security  society  bruceschneier  politics  us  policy  cryptography  control  democracy  liberty  freedom  paranoia  fascism  terrorism  surveillance  censorship  anonymity  bigbrother  identity  law  datamining  fear 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: The social graft
"nifty system: First you get your users to entrust personal data to you, then you not only sell that data to advertisers but you get users to be vector for the ads...what do users get in return? An animated Sprite Sips character to interact with."
socialnetworks  facebook  advertising  ads  interaction  collaboration  community  socialnetworking  datamining  privacy  myspace  business  communication  social  marketing  commentary  media  internet 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Jiglu: Tags that think
"Jiglu is a super-smart engine that pieces your site together, intelligently tagging and linking your web content"
tagging  tags  blogging  blogs  bookmarks  collaboration  datamining  sharing  web2.0  semantics  automation  generator  widgets  webdesign  services  networking  webdev 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Evolution and Wisdom of Crowds
"reason that Wikipedia is as good as it is (and the reason that living organisms are as sophisticated as they are), is not due to the average quality of the edits (or mutations). Instead, it is due to a much harder to observe process: selection."
wikipedia  evolution  wisdom  datamining  statistics  folksonomy  crowdsourcing  behavior  reason  religion  human  information  intelligence  darwin  databases  collaboration  collective  collectiveintelligence  commons  community  economics  learning  algorithms  crowds  systems  recommendations  networks  socialsoftware  psychology  predictions  charlesdarwin 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Edge: LEARNING TO EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
"Our minds are designed to retain, for efficient storage, past information that fits into a compressed narrative. This distortion, called the hindsight bias, prevents us from adequately learning from the past."
blackswans  nassimtaleb  cognitive  datamining  skepticism  decisionmaking  economics  philosophy  learning  future  statistics  psychology  risk  predictions  randomness 
september 2007 by robertogreco
IFTF's Future Now: Quote of the day from "Does Information-mining displace decision-making?"
"At this point, information-mining actually becomes harmful to the extent that it replaces rather than augments real decision-making. Worse Worse, making decisions is a skill, that needs to be flexed, and used. Understanding when and how information-minin
decisionmaking  research  datamining 
september 2007 by robertogreco

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