robertogreco + curation   121

Are.na / Arrangement Collage
[also here:
https://github.com/dark-industries/dark-zine/blob/master/lukas_collage.md ]

[See also:
https://www.are.na/lukas-w/arrangement-collage ]

[via:
https://urcad.es/writing/new-american-outline/ ]

"In 2015, Frank Chimero wrote on the “Grain” of the Web, focusing on a web-native media that doesn’t try to fight the inherently rectangle-based HTML Document Object Model (DOM)—also shared with XML and XHTML. This remains true: any site that does not look rectilinear is usually just fooling you; strip the CSS and it’s just a pile of blocks. Perhaps tilted and stretched, or with the corners shaved off, but just a pile of blocks.

As McLuhan would have anticipated, this blocky model has substantial effects toward what web-native media looks like. Chimero documents this well. I’d like to add a psychological component, though, in that as an online culture, we’ve grown accustomed to block-based interfaces. We joke at Web 2.0’s desire to round over corners and balk at clunky Flash plugins; nonlinear, non-blocky interfaces are either salient or sore thumbs.

Native internet users consume media through HTML interfaces at an astounding pace; simple rectangles frame a continuous deluge of multimedia updates. In an age of both physical and digital abundance in the Western world, creation of new media from scratch requires ample justification. Acts of synthesis, archiving, compression, and remix are valuable tools for leveraging information otherwise lost to the unsorted heap. These verbs are ways to construct something new from pre-existing media objects, or at least finding some narrative or meaning within them.

A curator, classically, acts as composer and manager of (typically static) objects so as to convey narrative to a willing audience. The internet audience, however, expects more autonomy in the dynamic content they see. Self-selected content is simply a necessary tactic for navigating nearly limitless information. An explosion of digital “curation” caters to the desire, whether by user directly, tuned algorithms, or third-party human. This manifests when you select topics of interest on Quora and construct a twitter feed of only exactly the people you want. Going to a curated museum is now a relinquishing of control compared to typical digital art consumption, which comes mashed-up through various media platforms.

Even with stream moderation, the modern media viewer is accustomed to lack of coherence between adjacent content blocks. In your tumblr dashboard, a peer-reviewed journal article can sit immediately above an anonymously submitted shitpost. We don’t blink. In an arrangement of DOM blocks, each bit of media similarly carries its own context, history, and qualia. I posit we can effectively navigate our feeds not because we can rapidly jump between the context captured by each DOM block, but rather because we interpolate narrative and construct cohesion. Adjacency implies connection and synthesis, or, in the words of John Berger:
[An image reproduction] becomes itself the reference point for other images. The meaning of an image is changed according to what one sees immediately beside it or what comes immediately after it. (Ways Of Seeing)

Marius Watz, in a response on the New Aesthetic, writes on tumblr image culture: “Its art is juxtaposition: If we put this next to that and this other thing, surely a new understanding will emerge.” To be fair, there are uncountably many combinations that may be devoid of meaning—all I mean to point out is that a diptych is a third object, beyond the original two, with the possibility of value. Some find artistic practice in the form of a relentless stream of rectangles. People go nuts over releases of image dumps from Moodmail and JJJJound, and the Lost Image Desk is making professional practice of it.

(A scan of contemporary sculpture demonstrates that selection and arrangement of objects—often found or folk objects—is an ongoing trend. The viewer is trusted with finding meaning in the arrangement, selection, formal qualities, cultural context, and more in a relational tradition.)

HTML is perfectly built for image adjacency—a blank and infinite canvas, empowered by right-click “Copy Image Address.” Our expansive tumblrs and pinterest boards act as collected and performed narratives, collages of found digital media.
[Traditional] collages, […] were probably laid out carefully, aided by facsimiles, white-out, and tape, existed alongside the book, rather than being subsumed or created through the process of publishing and distribution, as is often the case with internet ‘collage’. Computers conceal distance; their collage move consists of juxtaposing elements that might be stored hundreds or thousands of miles apart, giving an illusion of spatial continuity. (Seth Price, Teen Image)

Traditional art collage used the intrigue and power in composing elements pulled from diverse sources. Meaning constructed by selection, editing, and combination. The HTML collage, however, is copy-pasted. What is the HTML-native collage?

I call it the “Arrangement Collage”—rectangular, transcontextual compositions of, ostensibly, found media. The arrangement collage does less work for the viewer than traditional collage: elements are kept fully intact rather than trimmed for blended. The composition often mitigates interaction between elements and instead celebrates raw adjacency.
When the historical avant-garde used valorized cultural objects such as the Mona Lisa or a violin, it profaned, overpowered, and destroyed them before going on to aestheticize them. In contrast, contemporary art uses mass-cultural things virtually intact. (Boris Groys, On The New)

The arrangement collage, while easy to construct in print, is truly native to the web, in which all objects are, by default, level rectangles, context-switching is the norm, and media to compose with is bountiful.

Our feeds, plentiful in the digital landscape, help populate the arrangement collage. Tumblr, ostensibly a micro-blogging site, is largely used for image collection; FFFFound is legendary for its contextless stream of collected imagery (and as birthing the name for JJJJound, when Justin Saunders couldn’t get an account); and Buzzfeed publishes “articles” that are frankly just stacks of image macros. A proliferation of mindless image consumption concerns Bob Gill.
There’s nothing original. ‘The Culture’ is the great mass of images and ideas which bombard us every day, and therefore shape the way we think visually. Only by recognising The Culture’s presence and its power, can designers move away from the clichés it promotes.

Irrefutably, the images we consume affect how we think, and what we can imagine. Gill’s words should be considered, and the internet-native should stay aware of “the clichés” promoted. Gill encourages “first-hand” research, but this points at a cultural gap—there is no line between reality and the internet; “first-hand” research takes place on the social web. In-person discussion and close examination of physical objects can be romanticized, but it should not detract from the fact that meaningful discussion and critical consumption can happen in a digital landscape as well.

Of deeper concern is the stripping of value from imagery in overabundance. Edition MK’s 2010 DDDDoomed (the name, I assume, another reference to FFFFound) gets at the kernel of this problem: Image Aggregators (“IAs”—such as JJJJound and other blogs), which typically present images contextless alongside hundreds of others, can strip imagery of its power. IAs do work that is weaker, semiotically, than traditional collage, and less organized than archiving (which is often a process of attaching or generating metadata, whereas IAs frequently remove it). Images that find political power within a context are reduced to purely aesthetic objects in the stream. If you are a tumblr fiend, this very likely rings true: the multitude of streams filled with gorgeous scenery, motivational quotes, and supermodel women quickly reduce this imagery to banality and objectification.
We [distance ourselves] from our critical faculties as we slide into models of passive spectatorship that reinforce our passivity by promoting a one-way mode of cultural consumption. […] Continuous over-stimulation leads to desensitisation. (Peter Buwert, “Defamiliarization, Brecht and Criticality in Graphic Design” in Modes of Criticism 2: Critique of Method)

The arrangement collage might serve as a tool in this battle against desensitization. In Buwert’s essay, referenced above, he describes how Brecht’s famous defamiliarization of the theater encouraged “a condition of active critical spectatorship within the audience.” DDDDoomed is lamenting the supposed death of this critical spectator, replaced with the numb and passive viewer. Buwert is less concerned with context/lessness than Edition MK, and instead focuses on familiarity.

There are valiant efforts towards an inclusion of context and metadata with online imagery, but it is not built into the structure of the internet. Flickr and twitter use image covers to dissuade copy-pasting (circumnavigable by screen-shotting) and Mediachain attempts to inextricably tie media to metadata using blockchain methods. As of writing, however, the JPG is not going anywhere, and the ease of downloading and re-uploading an image far surpasses digging to find its source. Entropy is not on our side, and Google’s reverse image search will never be quite fast or comprehensive enough to keep up.

Walter Benjamin might lament the loss of contextual sensitivity, as it comes intertwined with a loss of “aura.” The authenticity that drives Benjamin’s aura is dependent on the idea of an original—which, in internet ecosystems, simply isn’t a relevant concept, as the original and reproduction can be… [more]
lukaswinklerprins  2016  frankchimero  arrangementcollage  web  online  feeds  juxtaposition  canon  curation  collections  tumblr  html  webdev  form  imagery  images  webnative  decomposition  composition  peterbuwert  aggregation  ffffound  justinsaunders  bobgill  sethprice  moodmail  lostimagedesk  waysofseeing  johnberger  dom  xml  xhtml  marshallmcluhan 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Tarsila do Amaral: Translating Modernism in Brazil - Words Without Borders
It seems the role of the translator is not so different from that of a curator. Just as a translator will often introduce a new text, a curator of an exhibition might present something entirely new, which is certainly the case with the Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition of work by Tarsila do Amaral. Entitled “Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil,” it is the first US show devoted exclusively to the Brazilian artist.

A curator, like a translator, acts not only as a mediator but also as an interpreter—another curator, another translator, would tell a slightly different story. When I asked MoMA curator Stephanie D’Alessandro what narrative she and her colleague Luis Pérez-Oramas set out to tell, she admitted it was “a hard story to write.” Their ultimate goal was to engage audiences who were both familiar and completely unfamiliar with Tarsila; to do justice to her legacy while also making her story accessible.
tarsiladoamaral  translation  brazil  brasil  modernism  art  curation  2018  elisaoukalmino  srg 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Jacob Sam-La Rose en Instagram: “Decluttering. These are the keepers. I harbour a fantasy of my future kids being fascinated with these in the same way I raided my mother’s…”
"Decluttering. These are the keepers. I harbour a fantasy of my future kids being fascinated with these in the same way I raided my mother’s record collection. Not just for the music itself, but the cover design, the appeal of the tangible object... In a digital world, it’s good to have analog anchors..."

[Commented: "Oh, those spacial, ambient, tactile, smell, taste, and sound memories that come from the places where we are raised. Swoon. I just tracked down a book about whales that was in our house as a child. I’d been referencing it for years without remembering the name (The Whale), but recalling so many details of its contents and the situations I was in while pouring over the book. The confines of small-ish collections encourage repeated reencounters that just don’t come as easily in the near infinite expanse of YouTube, Spotify, etc. Maybe this is why I have been so keen to create my on digital collections, something that I can move around in over and over again?"]

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/p/BmL5xv5HcOo/]
jacobsam-larose  2018  decluttering  memory  space  sound  music  collections  senses  mariekondo  taste  smell  sounds  place  finite  curation  tangible  tactile  analog  digital  books  childhood  memories 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Paper Road, by Nicole Lavelle
"PAPER ROAD is a book. It is a research narrative capturing my process of re-orienting myself to an important home-place. A heart-place.



This book is the final document of a year-long research project conducted while I was a Graduate Fellow at the Headlands Center for the Arts from July 2016 to July 2017.

What is PAPER ROAD about? See a weird concept framework I made for this project.

The research process and story both begin at my family's summer cabin in Lagunitas, California. I have spent a lot of time in this place. I use houses as vessels for situating my own located experience within broader California cultural contexts and land use histories. The book is a non-linear narrative of fragments, recontextualized image and text collected from private and public archives and collections. The content I assembled from research materials is annotated in first-person narrative, explaining the wild connections that emerged between everything.

The book contains 450 pages of annotated narrative, an introductory essay, a conversation with archivist and independent scholar Rick Prelinger, a non-functional (but poetic!) index, and a bibliography."
nicolelavelle  books  place  lagunitas  archives  rickprelinger  bibliographies  indices  culture  classideas  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  experience  california  collections  curation  research  storytelling  identity  2016  2017 
august 2018 by robertogreco
.freethought
"freethought aims to blur the boundaries between thought, creativity, and critique and meld them into a trans-language practice, working with and as artists and knowledge producers in a new way. Making radical combinations of critical work and practice in the arts freethought strives to place these new models in unexpected contexts."



"WHO WE ARE
freethought is a collective working in public research and in curating concepts of urgency.

Irit Rogoff, Stefano Harney, Adrian Heathfield, Massimiliano Mollona, Louis Moreno and Nora Sternfeld formed freethought in 2011. Traversing disciplines, blending influences, and borrowing forms freethought experiments with new combinations of criticism and practice in the arts.

For 2016 Bergen Assembly, freethought focused on its continuing collective interest: Infrastructure. By looking at many different understandings of this keyword – from legacies of colonial and early capitalist systems of governance to current conditions of the financialization of the cultural field to the subversive possibilities of thinking and working with infrastructures as sites of affect and contradiction – infrastructure emerged as the invisible force of manifest culture today. This large-scale investigation reworked the term away from the language of planners and technocrats to put to creative and critical use within the cultural sphere.

Throughout 2015-16 freethought led a programme of public seminars, invited guest lectures and independent research in Bergen with the intention of developing a collective body of research and insights. This research, an interrogation of infrastructure on a local and global scale of ecology, finance, administration, labour, communication, hospitality, and the basic act of assembling culminated in a programme of exhibitions, discursive platforms, publications and artistic commissions opening for the Bergen Assembly in September 2016.

Previous projects have included freethought for FORMER WEST: Documents, Constellations, Prospects, Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, 2013, and freethought I: Economy of crisis workshop, Steirischer Herbst Festival, Graz, 2012.

BIOGRAPHY

Stefano Harney
CURATOR

Adrian Heathfield
WRITER/CURATOR

Massimiliano (Mao) Mollona
WRITER/FILMMAKER
ANTHROPOLOGIST

Louis Moreno
URBANIST/THEORIST

Irit Rogoff
WRITER/TEACHER/
CURATOR/ORGANISER

Nora Stenfeld
EDUCATOR/CURATOR"

[via: http://scratchingthesurface.fm/post/176253243375/85-mindy-seu ]
stefanoharney  adrianheathfield  massimilianomollona  louismoreno  iritrogoff  norastenfeld  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  infrastructure  capitalism  decolonization  colonialism  ecology  finance  administration  labor  communication  hospitality  anthropology  urban  urbanism  curation  education 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Machine Project
"Download
Machine Project Guide to Curating and Planning Events
This tool kit covers the basic ideas, philosophies, and techniques for event-based programming. It's for anyone interested in producing events as a form of cultural programming. It's for anyone who wants to make something exciting happen with other people but isn't sure where to start.

Download
Machine Project Guide to Workshops
This tool kit covers the basic ideas, philosophies, and techniques for workshop-based programming.

Download
Machine Project Guide to Starting Your Own Art Space
This tool kit is for anyone who is considering starting an arts or cultural organization. We will guide you through the ins and outs of conceptualizing, setting up, and running your organization."

[via: "Oh nice—Machine Project has published free downloadable toolkit’s for starting your own art space, curating events, etc. nice way to end their terrific 15-year run:"
https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/956683123730808834 ]
machineproject  via:ablerism  curation  lcproject  openstudioproject  workshops  howto  tutorials  events 
january 2018 by robertogreco
The Rib
"The Rib publishes commentary and criticism in the form of reviews, editorials, interviews, and essays that connects artists, spaces, curators, and advocates throughout the United States.

Smaller cities foster dynamic art making that demands a comprehensive critical platform in order for artists and their advocates to freely exchange ideas and opportunities. The Rib is founded on the belief that critical coverage leads to dialogue, dialogue leads to a strong network, and connectivity leads to greater social and economic viability. Like a physical rib--a small but essential bone within a network of other to protect a pulsing organ-- The Rib continuously expands and contracts to facilitate a flow of dialogue and critique in order to collapse boundaries between communities and audiences. To that end, we seek to connect, collaborate with, and safeguard organs of art making on the American periphery.

Corey Oberlander > Managing Editor
Leah Triplett Harrington > Editor
Lindsey Stapleton > Creative Director

We are interested in hearing from anyone and everyone. Please send a note to rib@the_rib.net with any thoughts you have. To submit work, writing or a concept to us, please go to our submissions page."
art  cities  small  coreyoberlander  leahtriplettharrington  lindseystapleton  museums  curation  us 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Fantasies of the Library | The MIT Press
"Fantasies of the Library lets readers experience the library anew. The book imagines, and enacts, the library as both keeper of books and curator of ideas--as a platform of the future. One essay occupies the right-hand page of a two-page spread while interviews scrolls independently on the left. Bibliophilic artworks intersect both throughout the book-as-exhibition. A photo essay, “Reading Rooms Reading Machines” further interrupts the book in order to display images of libraries (old and new, real and imagined), and readers (human and machine) and features work by artists including Kader Atta, Wafaa Bilal, Mark Dion, Rodney Graham, Katie Paterson, Veronika Spierenburg, and others.

The book includes an essay on the institutional ordering principles of book collections; a conversation with the proprietors of the Prelinger Library in San Francisco; reflections on the role of cultural memory and the archive; and a dialogue with a new media theorist about experiments at the intersection of curatorial practice and open source ebooks. The reader emerges from this book-as-exhibition with the growing conviction that the library is not only a curatorial space but a bibliological imaginary, ripe for the exploration of consequential paginated affairs. The physicality of the book—and this book—“resists the digital,” argues coeditor Etienne Turpin, “but not in a nostalgic way.”

Contributors
Erin Kissane, Hammad Nasar, Megan Shaw Prelinger, Rick Prelinger, Anna-Sophie Springer, Charles Stankievech, Katharina Tauer, Etienne Turpin, Andrew Norman Wilson, Joanna Zylinska"
books  toread  libraries  future  bookfuturism  anna-sophiespringer  etienneturpin  erinkissane  hammadnasar  meganshawprelinger  rickprelinger  charlesstankievech  katharinatauer  andrewnormanwilson  joannazylinska  print  prelingerlibrary  curation  opensource  ebooks  kaderatta  wafaabilal  markdion  rodneygraham  katiepaterson  veronikaspierenburg  2016 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Colpa | Colpa
"COLPA is the collaborative art practice of Luca Antonucci and David Kasprzak. We work together as a publisher, designer, printer and curator.

COLPA PRESS publishes art books, limited edition prints and art objects, often working with artists on unique projects.

Founded by Carissa Potter and Luca Antonucci in 2010, with great assistance from Hailey Loman, COLPA has grown to include international events and exhibitions.

COLPA has exhibited with SFMOMA at the FOG Design + Art Fair, The NY Art Book Fair at PS1 MoMa, The LA Art Book Fair at the Geffen Contemporary MOCA, the Kadist Foundation and the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Our publications are in the permanent collection of The Getty Foundation, The Los Angeles County Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum, Stanford University, Reed University and The Kadist Foundation.

We are lucky to have worked with amazing assistants such as Eva Struble, Cecile Legnaghi, Maëlle Brientini, Nino Galluzzo, Sarah Kim, Jenna Jorgenson, Jackson Brinkley, Madison Voekel, Nelly Ansruther, Lindsey Watson and Amy Burek.

For a quote or other inquiry, please contact us at hello@colpapress.com."
art  books  artbooks  sanfrancisco  lucaantonucci  davidkasprzak  publishing  design  printing  curation  carissapotter  colpa  artistsbooks 
june 2016 by robertogreco
No. 225: Helen Molesworth, Jennifer Raab | The Modern Art Notes Podcast
"Episode No. 225 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Helen Molesworth and art historian Jennifer Raab.

Molesworth’s “Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957” is on view at the Hammer Museum through May 15. It is the first exhibition to examine Black Mountain College, an experimental, inter-disciplinary and immensely influential liberal arts college in the mountains of western North Carolina. The school attracted faculty and students from all over the world at a time when World War II was forcing significant global emigration, and thus provided a place where questions of globalism and the role of the artist in society were considered and furthered. Among the artists who spent time at Black Mountain and who are included in Molesworth’s exhibition are Ruth Asawa, Willem de Kooning, Josef and Anni Albers, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, Ray Johnson, Jess and plenty more. Ninety artists are included in Molesworth’s show. The show’s outstanding, must-own catalogue was published by Yale University Press.

Molesworth is the chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Her previous exhibitions include “This Will Have Been,” which examined the impact of feminism on the art of the 1980s, and “Work Ethic,” which looked at how mostly 1960s artists merged everyday life with art-making.

On the second segment, art historian Jennifer Raab discusses her new book, “Frederic Church: The Art and Science of Detail.” The book examines how and why Church used unusually detailed passages in enormous paintings to engage contemporary debates about Union, nation and science. Raab teaches at Yale University."

[Direct link to SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/manpodcast/ep225 ]
helenmolesworth  jenniferraab  leapbeforeyoulook  bmc  blackmountaincollege  2016  art  curation  history  education  artseducation  liberalarts  diversity  highered  highereducation  progressive  progressiveeducation  learning  howwelearn  pedagogy  teaching  howeteach  inquiry  modernism  postmodernism  form  process  materials  via:jarrettfuller  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  collaboration  disciplines  ruthasawa  mercecunningham  josefalbers  theastergates  rebuildfoundation  lowresidencymfas  bardcollege  oberlincollege  vermontcollege  bhqfu  noahdavis  undergroundmuseum  mountainschoolofarts  andreazittel  greggbordowitz  artinstituteofchicago 
april 2016 by robertogreco
The Garden and the Stream: A Technopastoral | Hapgood
[Brought back to my attention thanks to Allen:
"@rogre Read this and thought of you and your bookmarks & tumblr:"
https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/720121133102710784 ]

[See also:
https://hapgood.us/2014/06/04/smallest-federated-wiki-as-an-alternate-vision-of-the-web/
https://hapgood.us/2014/11/06/federated-education-new-directions-in-digital-collaboration/
https://hapgood.us/2015/01/08/the-fedwiki-user-innovation-toolkit/
https://hapgood.us/2016/03/03/pre-stocking-the-library/
https://hapgood.us/2016/03/04/bring-your-bookmarks-into-the-hypertext-age/
https://hapgood.us/2016/03/26/intentionally-finding-knowledge-gaps/
https://hapgood.us/2016/04/09/answer-to-leigh-blackall/
http://rainystreets.wikity.cc/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Gi9SRsRrE4

https://github.com/federated-wiki
http://fed.wiki.org/
http://journal.hapgood.net/view/federated-wiki
http://wikity.net/
http://wikity.net/?p=link-word&s=journal.hapgood.net ]

"The Garden is an old metaphor associated with hypertext. Those familiar with the history will recognize this. The Garden of Forking Paths from the mid-20th century. The concept of the Wiki Gardener from the 1990s. Mark Bernstein’s 1998 essay Hypertext Gardens.

The Garden is the web as topology. The web as space. It’s the integrative web, the iterative web, the web as an arrangement and rearrangement of things to one another.

Things in the Garden don’t collapse to a single set of relations or canonical sequence, and that’s part of what we mean when we say “the web as topology” or the “web as space”. Every walk through the garden creates new paths, new meanings, and when we add things to the garden we add them in a way that allows many future, unpredicted relationships

We can see this here in this collage of photos of a bridge in Portland’s Japanese Garden. I don’t know if you can see this, but this is the same bridge from different views at different times of year.

The bridge is a bridge is a bridge — a defined thing with given boundaries and a stated purpose. But the multi-linear nature of the garden means that there is no one right view of the bridge, no one correct approach. The architect creates the bridge, but it is the visitors to the park which create the bridge’s meaning. A good bridge supports many approaches, many views, many seasons, maybe many uses, and the meaning of that bridge will even evolve for the architect over time.

In the Garden, to ask what happened first is trivial at best. The question “Did the bridge come after these trees” in a well-designed garden is meaningless historical trivia. The bridge doesn’t reply to the trees or the trees to the bridge. They are related to one another in a relatively timeless way.

This is true of everything in the garden. Each flower, tree, and vine is seen in relation to the whole by the gardener so that the visitors can have unique yet coherent experiences as they find their own paths through the garden. We create the garden as a sort of experience generator, capable of infinite expression and meaning.

The Garden is what I was doing in the wiki as I added the Gun Control articles, building out a network of often conflicting information into a web that can generate insights, iterating it, allowing that to grow into something bigger than a single event, a single narrative, or single meaning.

The Stream is a newer metaphor with old roots. We can think of the”event stream” of programming, the “lifestream” proposed by researchers in the 1990s. More recently, the term stream has been applied to the never ending parade of twitter, news alerts, and Facebook feeds.

In the stream metaphor you don’t experience the Stream by walking around it and looking at it, or following it to its end. You jump in and let it flow past. You feel the force of it hit you as things float by.

It’s not that you are passive in the Stream. You can be active. But your actions in there — your blog posts, @ mentions, forum comments — exist in a context that is collapsed down to a simple timeline of events that together form a narrative.

In other words, the Stream replaces topology with serialization. Rather than imagine a timeless world of connection and multiple paths, the Stream presents us with a single, time ordered path with our experience (and only our experience) at the center.

In many ways the Stream is best seen through the lens of Bakhtin’s idea of the utterance. Bakhtin saw the utterance, the conversational turn of speech, as inextricably tied to context. To understand a statement you must go back to things before, you must find out what it was replying to, you must know the person who wrote it and their speech context. To understand your statement I must reconstruct your entire stream.

And of course since I can’t do that for random utterances, I mostly just stay in the streams I know. If the Garden is exposition, the stream is conversation and rhetoric, for better and worse.

You see this most clearly in things like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. But it’s also the notifications panel of your smartphone, it’s also email, it’s also to a large extent blogging. Frankly, it’s everything now.

Whereas the garden is integrative, the Stream is self-assertive. It’s persuasion, it’s argument, it’s advocacy. It’s personal and personalized and immediate. It’s invigorating. And as we may see in a minute it’s also profoundly unsuited to some of the uses we put it to.

The stream is what I do on Twitter and blogging platforms. I take a fact and project it out as another brick in an argument or narrative or persona that I build over time, and recapitulate instead of iterate."



"So what’s the big picture here? Why am I so obsessed with the integrative garden over the personal and self-assertive stream? Blogs killed hypertext — but who cares, Mike?

I think we’ve been stuck in some unuseful binaries over the past years. Or perhaps binaries that have outlived their use.

So what I’m asking you all to do is put aside your favorite binaries for a moment and try out the garden vs. the stream. All binaries are fictions of course, but I think you’ll find the garden vs. the stream is a particularly useful fiction for our present moment.

OER

Let’s start with OER. I’ve been involved with Open Educational Resources many years, and I have to say that I’m shocked and amazed that we still struggle to find materials.

We announced an open textbook initiative at my school the other day, and one of the first people to email me said she taught State and Local Government and she’d love to ditch the textbook.

So I go look for a textbook on State and Local Government. Doesn’t exist. So I grab the syllabus and look at what sorts of things need explaining.

It’s stuff like influence of local subsidies on development. Now if you Google that term, how many sites in the top 50 will you find just offering a clear and balanced treatment of what it is, what the recent trends are with it, and what seems to be driving the trends?

The answer is none. The closest you’ll find is an article from something called the Encyclopedia of Earth which talks about the environmental economics of local energy subsidies.

Everything else is either journal articles or blog posts making an argument about local subsidies. Replying to someone. Building rapport with their audience. Making a specific point about a specific policy. Embedded in specific conversations, specific contexts.

Everybody wants to play in the Stream, but no one wants to build the Garden.

Our traditional binary here is “open vs. closed”. But honestly that’s not the most interesting question to me anymore. I know why textbook companies are closed. They want to make money.

What is harder to understand is how in nearly 25 years of the web, when people have told us what they THINK about local subsidies approximately one kajillion times we can’t find one — ONE! — syllabus-ready treatment of the issue.

You want ethics of networked knowledge? Think about that for a minute — how much time we’ve all spent arguing, promoting our ideas, and how little time we’ve spent contributing to the general pool of knowledge.

Why? Because we’re infatuated with the stream, infatuated with our own voice, with the argument we’re in, the point we’re trying to make, the people in our circle we’re talking to.

People say, well yes, but Wikipedia! Look at Wikipedia!

Yes, let’s talk about Wikipedia. There’s a billion people posting what they think about crap on Facebook.

There’s about 31,000 active wikipedians that hold English Wikipedia together. That’s about the population of Stanford University, students, faculty and staff combined, for the entire English speaking world.

We should be ashamed. We really should."



"And so we come to the question of whether we are at a turning point. Do we see a rebirth of garden technologies in the present day? That’s always a tough call, asking an activist like me to provide a forecast of the future. But let me respond while trying not to slip into wishful analysis.

I think maybe we’re starting to see a shift. In 2015, out of nowhere, we saw web annotation break into the mainstream. This is a garden technology that has risen and fallen so many times, and suddenly people just get it. Suddenly web annotation, which used to be hard to explain, makes sense to people. When that sort of thing happens culturally it’s worth looking closely at.

Github has taught a generation of programmers that copies are good, not bad, and as we noted, it’s copies that are essential to the Garden.

The Wikimedia Education project has been convincing teachers there’s a life beyond student blogging.

David Wiley has outlined a scheme whereby students could create the textbooks of the future, and you can imagine that rather than create discrete textbooks we could engage students in building a grand web of knowledge that could, like Bush’s trails, be reconfigured and duplicated to serve specific classes … [more]
mikecaufield  federatedwiki  web  hypertext  oer  education  edtech  technology  learning  vannevarbush  katebowles  davecormier  wikipedia  memex  dynabook  davidwiley  textbooks  streams  gardens  internet  cv  curation  online  open  dlrn2015  canon  wikis  markbernstein  networks  collaboration  narrative  serialization  context  tumblr  facebook  twitter  pinboard  instagram  blogs  blogging  networkedknowledge  google  search  github  wardcunningham  mikhailbakhtin  ethics  bookmarks  bookmarking 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Random Institute
"Random Institute is a testing ground for new exhibition formats and random ideas"

"Random Institute is an extension of what a contemporary art institution can be, that is to say, truly unbothered by rules and bureaucracy. Ultimately, it brings together Sandino Scheidegger & Luca Müller curatorial and publishing activities.

We are happy to announce that as of March 2016, Random Institute will be running the curatorial program for Despacio in San Jose, Costa Rica.

The best color is transparency. [http://randominstitute.org/transparency/ ]
The best defense is a good offense. [http://randominstitute.org/game/ ]"

[Curating: http://randominstitute.org/art/curating
Publishing: http://randominstitute.org/art/publishing/ ]

[via: https://twitter.com/soulellis/status/719189530813800448 ]
art  bureaucracy  openstudioproject  lcproject  rules  curation  imagination  sandinoscheidegger  lucamüller  exhibitions  distributed  glvo  publishing  sfsh 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Tokyo Bookstore Only Stocks One Title at a Time
"Morioka Shoten in Ginza features a new solitary book every week, accompanied by related artworks and items

A new bookstore opened earlier this year in Ginza, Tokyo that takes the unique approach of only stocking one title at a time. A different book is featured every week at Morioka Shoten and it is accompanied by related items such as artworks and photographs.

This concept sets the store apart from others, offering a curated approach that combats decision fatigue and makes browsing a lot quicker by recommending a single title for customers to purchase and read.

The bookstore’s owner, Yoshiyuki Morioka, came up with the idea after organizing a series of popular readings and book signings for single publications at his other, traditional bookstore. He was inspired to open a dedicated space where a single book could take center stage. The second branch of Morioka Shoten was created by design and engineering firm Takram, who led the graphic design and copy writing for the Ginza store’s visual identity.

The book of the week is displayed on a table in the small boutique, along with Morioka’s personal work desk and a vintage chest of drawers that is used as the store’s counter. The minimalistic aesthetic of the space matches perfectly with its concept. There are no other items of furniture, and the concrete walls and ceiling are coated with white paint, while the concrete floor has been left bare.

Pieces of art that relate to the currently spotlighted book are displayed around the store for customers to enjoy, for example, ceramic jewellery and objects by Mayumi Kogoma were on show because they were inspired by Kenji Miyazawa’s novel Porano no hiroba."

[See also: http://www.takram.com/morioka-shoten-ginza-branch/

"Morioka Shoten Ginza Branch

takram worked on graphic design and copy writing for visual image of ‘Morioka Shoten Ginza Branch’

On May 5th, ‘Morioka Shoten Ginza Branch’ has opened in Ginza, Tokyo. With the concept of ‘a bookstore with a single book,’ the store is a second branch store for ‘Morioka Shoten.’ takram led the graphic design and copy writing for the new store’s visual identity."
books  bookstores  booksellers  publishing  retail  noticings  2015  yoshiyukimorioka  moriokashoten  curation  tokyo  japan  ginza  decisionmaking  minimalism  audiencesofone 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Visitor figures 2014: what do we want? Immersive installations by unfamiliar artists - The Art Newspaper
"US institutions think big names draw crowds, but the public is not as predictable as it seems"

"For a contemporary artist, there is no higher honour than to receive a solo exhibition at a major museum. Who is most likely to be given this coveted opportunity? An analysis of 590 solo exhibitions, held at 68 US museums between 2007 and 2013, reflects biases that many knew existed in the art world—but also reveals that audiences do not share the same prejudices.

Museums dedicated a disproportionate number of exhibitions to men, painters and artists represented by top commercial galleries. Of the 590 solo shows during this six-year period, 429—around 73%—featured male artists. The Pop artist Andy Warhol, the Minimalist painter Ellsworth Kelly and the painter and printmaker Jasper Johns had the most exposure: each had seven solo exhibitions during this period, more than any other artist. Male painters represented by top galleries were 7.3 times more likely to be given a solo exhibition than female painters represented by the same dealers (Gagosian Gallery, Hauser & Wirth, Marian Goodman Gallery, Pace and David Zwirner).

What motivates a museum to organise an exhibition is very different from what motivates the public to visit one. Museums’ preference for male painters with strong commercial support reflects the enormous pressure they face to produce rapid-fire exhibitions, draw big audiences, please powerful board members and attract corporate and private sponsorship. But if these statistics reflect museums’ assumptions about what audiences want to see, they may want to reconsider.

Painters were entirely absent from our list of the ten best-attended solo shows of the past six years, compiled from The Art Newspaper’s annual attendance surveys. The first painter comes in at number 15 on the list: the South African artist Marlene Dumas, whose retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York, in 2008 drew 4,873 visitors a day. Immersive, spectacular and event-driven projects dominated. Visitors were attracted to installations and bodies of work that defy genre, including Richard Serra’s enveloping sculptures at MoMA (first place, with 8,585 visitors a day), Olafur Eliasson’s indoor waterfalls, also at MoMA (fifth place, 6,135 visitors a day), and James Turrell’s perception-bending, luminous environments at New York’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (ninth place, 5,610 visitors a day).

Male or female? Crowds don’t care

Audiences did not discriminate based on gender. Marina Abramovic’s retrospective at MoMA in 2010, for which the artist sat motionless in the museum for three months, was the second best-attended solo show, drawing 7,120 visitors a day. Pipilotti Rist’s installation Pour Your Body Out, 2008, was the fourth most popular. The Swiss artist’s transformation of MoMA’s atrium into a madcap lounge filled with videos, music and custom-built furniture drew 6,186 visitors a day.

Conventional wisdom holds that museums must show big names to draw crowds. But our analysis proves that name recognition goes only so far—location carries the day. MoMA organised 17 of the 20 best-attended solo exhibitions (the Guggenheim and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art hosted the others). Most of these blockbusters were presented in the museum’s atrium, its largest and most accessible space. This fact is not lost on the institution, which is planning to add similar spaces as part of a future expansion. A glassed-in, high-ceilinged “art bay” visible from the street—and large enough to accommodate multiple works by Serra—will probably turn the museum into an even bigger magnet (although it is unlikely to appease those who resent the crowded nature of the galleries).

Occasionally, MoMA uses its atrium as a platform for lesser-known artists. A labyrinthine installation by the Brazilian Carlito Carvalhosa in 2011 was the eighth best-attended contemporary solo show during this six-year period. The subtle, monochrome work drew 5,615 visitors a day—400 more, on average, than the museum’s widely publicised Tim Burton exhibition on the top floor.

New York: capital of culture

Museums in New York and Los Angeles organised the most contemporary solo exhibitions: New York had 97, Los Angeles 95. But audiences turned out in higher numbers in New York. Museums in the city hosted 41 of the 50 best-attended contemporary solo shows between 2007 and 2013. In contrast, the first exhibition in Los Angeles on our list—the photographer Herb Ritts at the Getty Center in 2012—takes 57th place.

Visitors’ motivations for attending exhibitions are just beginning to come into focus. A study released in January by the National Endowment for the Arts found that only 6% of people went to see work by a specific artist (in contrast with two-thirds of those attending performances). The majority of visual art audiences (88% of those surveyed) had a far simpler goal: to gain knowledge. As museums plan their exhibition schedules, perhaps curators—and board members—will be inspired to look beyond the usual suspects and give the people what they want."
museums  art  artmuseums  2015  juliahalperin  nilkanthpatel  gender  exhibitions  diversity  location  curation 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit
"The MOCAD Teen Council is a select group of young creatives from metro Detroit and the surrounding areas. These teens come together to plan, and with the help of museum professionals, produce programming for youth and adults here at the MOCAD."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjmdkxT1vSc ]

[via: https://medium.com/why-2015-wont-suck/2-you-will-summer-in-detroit-91e6f0e0cb96

"But more than brick and mortar, what makes Detroit’s creative atmosphere special are programs truly investing in the city, like MOCAD’s Teen Council. Select high school students win yearlong mentorships with contemporary art pros and, as a group, they design and produce museum programming of their choice. No doubt, these are America’s coolest docents."]
mocad  detroit  art  museums  museumeducation  curation  curating  teens  youth 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Alexandra Lange on the problems with the museums experience
"This is Mexico's most visited museum, frequented, on the day I was there, by tourists from many countries – Mexicans, families, old, young, rambunctious, quiet. There was space for them all and there was time for them all. You did not have to read a word (I don't speak Spanish) to feel that you had learned something. All you had to do was walk and look, and the alternation of indoor and outdoor spaces meant that you tired less easily. The oscillation between small and large meant that you had to adjust your eyes more often and look again. It felt like a walk in the park, but it was a museum. And we need more museums that let us relax into knowledge, showing, not telling us everything by audioguide.

In New York, at least, the friction of timed tickets, crowds and lines are now baked in to many big museum experiences: one can rarely expect to be able to just walk in, buy a ticket, see a show. Lines for the Museum of Modern Art-hosted Rain Room this summer stretched past the four-hour mark – and that's a separate line from the one for tickets that forms along 53rd Street.

My experience at the MNA caused me to think back on other museum discussions and visits of the past year, big and small: the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, stunts like the Rain Room or James Turrell at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Donald Judd’s House at 101 Spring Street in SoHo. Art may be more delicate than Aztec heads, but there isn't only one way to show it. Thinking about each of these visits as variations on a theme, I have found what I crave is not more access but less: a discrete, informal, and time-limited chance to look at work in peace. To wander rather than move in lock-step. To walk in the front door, look at art or artifacts for as long as I want, and leave."
museums  museumeducation  education  art  experience  2014  alexandralange  exploration  curating  curation  showing  telling  exposing  exposition  exhibitiondesign  design  exhibits  exhibitions  guides  wandering  time  space  attention  learning  howwelearn  informal  informality  artifacts 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Opinion: Alexandra Lange on how architects should use social media
"It’s easy to make fun of Bjarke Ingels on Instagram. Selfie, LEGO selfie, girlfriend (I hope), Gaga, monograph, fog, fox socks. His Instagram has a lot to do with the architecture of self-promotion, but little to do with actual building. The same goes for many architects' Twitter feeds: lecture, lecture, award, positive review, lecture. You could say that's just business today. But social media can do more for architecture than showcase pretty faces and soundbites. Architects need to start thinking of social media as the first draft of history.

There's an unofficial rule of thumb that you should only tweet about yourself 30 percent of the time. That's a rule many architects break over and over again. They treat Twitter and Instagram as extensions of their marketing strategy, another way to let people know where their partners are speaking, that their projects are being built, and that the critics like them. Happy happy happy. Busy busy busy. Me me me. In real life, most architects aren't quite as monomaniacal as their feeds. (There are exceptions.) They read reviews written about others. They look at buildings built by others. Heck, they even spend some time not making architecture. That balance, between the high and the low, the specific and the general, the obvious and the obscure makes life, not to mention design, much more interesting.

That unselfish reading, writing, seeing and drawing form part of the larger cloud of association that, one day, critics will use to assess and locate the architecture of today. A more flexible, critical and conversational use of social media could suggest interpretations before the concrete is dry. As an example, consider Philip Johnson, perhaps the most networked architect of his day. Philip Johnson would have been really good at social media. He understood, better than most, that interest is created by association. That was the principle of his salons, drawing the latest and greatest from a variety of cultural realms. Those young artists and architects helped him stay young and current, he helped them by offering literal or metaphorical institutional support.

Isn't that how these platforms work too? I look better when I spread the word about everyone's good work, not just my own. And seeing others' projects gives me new ideas. Johnson was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art, but he was also a "curator" in contemporary parlance, collecting and distributing people and objects and styles.

That's why his physical library at his Glass House in New Canaan, CT remains of interest: the shelves reveal what he thought worth reading and keeping. Outside, its form reveals the same: the work of architect Michael Graves, promoted and digested. Even earlier, in the September 1950 issue of Architectural Review, Johnson set out the inspirations – possibly decoys – for that same Glass House. There's Mies, of course, but there are also the less expected references to Suprematist painter Kasimir Malevich and eighteenth century architect Claude Nicolas Ledoux. There's an image showing the Brick House, the almost windowless box set behind the Glass House where he actually slept, a building often eliminated from later photography of the site. There are many readings of this combination of text and images, few of them straightforward. But I'll take false fronts and red herrings over pure self-promotion any day. Trails of breadcrumbs like this are catnip for critics then and now. Johnson used a prestigious journal to try out his version of the Glass House genealogy. You architects could be doing this every day.

Instagram is popularly characterised as a more perfect version of everyday life: the artfully mismatched tablescape, the colour-balanced Christmas tree, the accessorised child. But it doesn't have to be that way. We get enough better-than-reality images of buildings on sites like Dezeen. I’ve started Instagramming my visits to exhibitions and buildings, as a way of sharing the first cut, taking visual notes, and focusing on details and moments that didn't make the press packet. We so often see the same images of a building, over and over. What about the rest of it? My unprofessional photographs pick up on different things. At Herzog & de Meuron's Parrish Art Museum, for example, I snapped the sign required to point you to the "Main Entrance." And the ten-foot, blackened, windowless doors that could flatten a five-year-old. These images can be critical in a different way - fleeter, funnier, like popcorn - from the endangered building review. Could architects point out their own mistakes? Or – with love, of course – those of their colleagues? Of their heroes?

At a higher artistic level, there's the example of the Instagram of architectural photographer Iwan Baan. His Instagram reveals that he has seen more contemporary architecture (and more of it from helicopters) than anyone. I find something aggrandising, even aggressive, about the relentlessness of his travel and the harsh aerial views. There's also something humanising about his Instagram as a series of outtakes, capturing the surround for the more perfect images that end up on the websites of the architects. We see the faces of people, the buildings imperfectly lit or weathered. The heroic and the ordinary combine in this extra work, and will ultimately contribute to the way we look at the official pictures too. It would be even better if the architects were right there beside him, taking pictures of what else they see. I know architects make design pilgrimages. Why not take us there?"



"Social media can make criticism, interpretation, dialogue and history part of daily life. Don’t leave it to the critics.

In a more recent example, the announcement that the American Institute of Architects would award its first Gold Medal to a woman to Julia Morgan, dead these 56 years, was announced, praised, dissected, and reconsidered, all in a matter of hours on Twitter. Dezeen's own post on the matter quoted me from Twitter; Architect Magazine created a reaction story to its own story by Storifying a discussion between several architecture critics (and didn’t have to pay us a dime). What do architects think of her work? What woman would you have nominated? It shouldn’t just be critics in on that discussion.

Architects sometimes forget what other people don’t know – or forget to share the positive assets of the past before, during and after they are threatened. Social media collects in real time. You can hashtag your firm. You can collate your campus work. You can geolocate your project. You can tip your hat to a colleague. You can tell us what you're reading. In doing so architects contribute to a broader dialogue about what makes a good experience. What social media can do for architects is make criticism, interpretation, dialogue and history part of daily life. Don't leave it to the critics. Don't farm it out to your communications staff. That's boring. Surely you don’t want to be boring? I'd be surprised if one social media platform or another weren't part of most designers' daily practice (at least those under 50). Let the rest of us in, so it doesn't take bankruptcy, demolition or obituary to get people talking about architecture."
2014  instagram  alexandralange  process  iwanbaan  bjarkeingels  socialmedia  howto  curating  curation  design  architecture  architects  context  communication  sharing  conversation  criticism  critique  interpretation  dialog  history  juliamorgan  philipjohnson  twitter  #daydetroit  #folkmoma  archives  tumblr  glasshouse 
december 2014 by robertogreco
What's a Curator? | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios - YouTube
"PBS Digital Studio's The Art Assignment asks what the title "curator" really means, both traditionally and as it is used today. Can you be a curator of vintage sneakers? Let's talk about it in the comments."
curating  curation  via:anterobot  art  museums  2014  curators 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Champion of Art Consumption
"Is Hans Ulrich Obrist full of shit? This week, the New Yorker published a 10,000 word resumé spilling even more verbiage about Obrist’s curatorial style of vacuuming information and returning marathonic shows in an on-the-go 24-hour art viewing lifestyle.

Just a preview from the piece:
The story of how he discovered Instagram is typical. During a breakfast in 2012 with Ryan Trecartin, the video artist downloaded the app onto Obrist’s phone (without asking). Next, Trecartin posted to his Instagram followers that H.U.O. had signed up. Obrist was curious, but he wondered what to do with the new tool. Inspiration was sparked by other well-known friends. On a visit to Normandy, he went for a walk with Etel Adnan, the Lebanese artist. During a rainstorm, they stopped at a café, and she wrote him a poem, by hand. This made Obrist remember Umberto Eco’s comments on how handwriting was vanishing; he also thought of marvellous faxes he had received, all handwritten, from J. G. Ballard, when he interviewed him, in 2003. Adnan’s handwritten poem became one of Obrist’s first Instagram posts. Soon afterward, he remembered that another friend, the artist Joseph Grigely, who is deaf, uses Post-It notes to communicate; they are often incorporated into his art. H.U.O. began asking dozens of artists to write something on a Post-It.


The rest of is basically more of this, in a nutshell, what capitalism looks like in curating: move as much product as possible, while reenforcing the quality with a sprinkling of references to somebody else who had an idea.

The piece also mentions a couple of personal facts, few of which are news if you’ve been reading the dozens of interviews over the years:

• He sleeps four hours a night.
• He maintains an apartment to house 10,000 books.
• He liberally uses the word Gesamtkunstwerk.
• He feels we ought to “create a continuum with history”.
• His official nickname is H.U.O.
• He’s been described as “off-putting”. The Guardian’s Adrian Searle has called his curating style “deeply irritating” (no further explanation mentioned).
• He congratulates everybody on everything. (To John Baldessari: “Congratulations…None of this work was here six months ago!”)
• H.U.O. references a total of 32 names in the piece.
Obrist is to the arts, what Zoolander’s Hansel is to modelling.

In the words of Hansel:
Sting is a hero. The music he’s created over the years, I don’t really listen to it, but the fact that he’s making it, I respect that."
handulrichobrist  capitalism  art  mone  markets  consumption  artconsumption  2014  curation 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Art and Archive | The Evergreen State College
"We are living in the archive. The 21st century, age of the digital and of infinite information horizons, offers particularly fertile conditions for future artists, writers, curators, and educators to meet, collaborate, and reinvent their identities as cultural workers, memory agents, and experimental pedagogues. This program is designed to support students in the arts and humanities who are interested in forging a practice that combines creative and critical engagement with questions of memory, the writing of history, the document and the object, the history of exhibition and display, the gallery, museum, and archive.

We will investigate the ways that cultural institutions, including museums, ethnographic films, and documentary photography have written "official" histories; our own creative experiments will be directed toward critiquing and intervening in these visual narratives by working closely with archival materials. Our studios and laboratories will often be museums and archives; we will visit museums in Seattle and Portland, and we will spend time almost every week in a local archive, getting to know the Washington State Archives here in Olympia as artist-researchers.

This is an advanced program for students who are looking to develop their own research-based artistic practice and who want to pursue small-scale individual or collaborative projects within the context of a program structured around supporting that work through lecture/screenings, presentations, weekly writing workshop and project critique, and seminars on common readings. Students will plan independent work for the quarter under faculty guidance. Students will also share in leading class sessions that may include regular work-in-progress presentations, seminar facilitation, and other presentations of research related to program themes. Projects supported: critical/creative writing (we will do our best to blur the line between these), non-traditional writing for the moving image and performance, video and film, photography, and other visual arts."
art  arthistory  history  mediaarts  visualarts  writing  juliazay  evergreenstatecollege  coursedescriptions  programdescriptions  2014  archives  museums  museumstudies  libraries  curation 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Can Algorithms Replace Your English Professor? — Who’s Afraid of Online Education? — Medium
"Algorithms are quickly becoming our new tastemakers and gatekeepers. Social media feeds are increasingly the most immediate source of news for many people, which means we are becoming more and more beholden to algorithms. Social media algorithms have been a popular topic of discussion lately, with people undertaking experiments on what happens when you “like” everything on Facebook, or when you refrain from “liking” anything. The Facebook algorithm is being held up as the primary reason why the #Ferguson protests are not showing up on user’s Facebook feeds, in comparison to Twitter, which is the only network that shows you what you choose to follow, rather than what its algorithm thinks you should. (Note that this may also be changing.)

Algorithms are becoming our curators. They show us—based on a secret, proprietary formula—what they think we want to see. In this experiment, Tim Herrara demonstrates that Facebook’s algorithm prefers to show its users older, more popular content than new content that has not been engaged with. Despite him trying to consume his entire Facebook feed for an entire day, he realized that he only saw 29% of new content produced by his network—and that for most users, that percentage is probably a lot lower. On Facebook there isn’t a way to bypass this algorithm, even if you select“most recent” posts rather than “most popular” posts in your setting (interestingly enough, I’ve heard reports that Facebook tends to secretly reset your settings back to “most popular” no matter what you do).

There’s a lot of controversy over the power that we are giving algorithms to display and represent our world to us. But these critiques miss an important point: we’ve never not had curators and filters. Before we had algorithms, we had “experts”, “authorities”, tastemakers—we had (or have)professors and academics, we had (have) institutions that studied things and told us what was important or unimportant about the world, we had (have) editors and publishers who decided what was “good” enough to be shared with the world. But the importance and reliabilty of these authorities and tastemakers is coming under serious fire because of the impact of some social media; for example in the reporting on Ferguson on major news networks versus Twitter. Furthermore, if you take the work of postcolonial studies critics like Edward Said seriously, much of our humanistic and scientific forms of research inquiry are hardly free of cultural prejudice, and are in fact informed and dictated by these modes of thinking.

Given all of this, I have two thoughts:

One. How is algorithmic selection actually similar to older modes of tastemaking and gatekeeping (i.e. experts and authorities who tell us what to value and what not to)? How is it different? Does either mode entertain the feedback of those who they serve (i.e., can you help train an algorithm to show you more of what you want, or can you have impact on your “experts” in having them study what you think is important?)

Two. A great deal of virtual ink has been spilled on whether educators are going to be replaced by online courses such as MOOCs. Less has been said, however, about the replacement of the tastemaking function of educators/researchers—especially in the humanities, our goal has been to train students to find value in what they otherwise might not, to make legible to our students modes of seeing and doing which depart from their own. Can an algorithm replace that tastemaking function? Put another way: instead of having the “best” news and information filtered to you by “experts” (your teachers, your professors, editors and publishers etc.), what happens when an algorithm starts taking over this process? Is this necessarily good, bad, or neither? And how similar is this filtering of information to previous modes of filtering? In other words—can an algorithm become smart enough to replace your English literature professor? And what would be the result of such a scenario?"

[via (great thread follows): https://twitter.com/Jessifer/status/502632112261169152 ]
adelinekoh  2014  algorithms  facebook  twitter  education  curation  curators  gatekeepers  tastemakers  trendsetters  mooc  moocs  tastemaking  experts  authority  authorities  humanism  humanities  power  control  academia  highereducation  highered  feeds  filters 
august 2014 by robertogreco
ICA’s Excursus: Interview with Alex Klein and Mark Owens — The Gradient — Walker Art Center
"Emmet Byrne: What is Excursus and how did it come about?

Alex Klein and Mark Owens: Excursus was a two-year, four-part initiative at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia positioned at the intersection of art and design, programs and exhibitions, and the archive and the museum. It took the form of a rotating installation on the ICA mezzanine, a curated series of intimate events, and an online residency on the Excursus website, which also acted as a form of real-time documentation. Each of the four invited participants— Reference Library, East of Borneo, Ooga Booga, and Primary Information—work in a space between artistic domains that don’t always have a comfortable place within a traditional gallery setting, such as publication, distribution, archival research, and programming.

Alex was hired in 2011 as ICA’s newly-created program curator, and Excursus was a way to explore and activate the “discursive space” of the museum as it approached it’s 50th anniversary and to challenge the notion of how a program could function and how we might gauge its success. ICA is a non-collecting institution with a long history of ground-breaking exhibitions—Andy Warhol, Paul Thek, and Martin Kippenberger each had their first U.S. solo museum shows at ICA, for example—and thus ICA’s extensive archive is in a very real sense its collection. Each of the participants was thus invited to delve into the ICA archive and to make connections both with their own concerns and the exhibitions currently on view in the main galleries.

An “excursus” is a literary term describing a digression or supplement to a primary text, and the project was conceived very much in that spirit, with every element, from the installation to the programming, emerging from these conceptual and material connections. The aim was to provide a platform that could be responsive and flexible–both in terms of form and authorship–and that could could bridge the gap between extra-institutional and institutional activities while still maintaining a strong framework and a grounding in the physical space of the ICA.

EB: The project has a very strong design sensibility, from the participants selected, to the design of the space, to the design of the ephemera, and of course the catalogue. Was there a philosophy at work behind the design of the whole program?

AK & MO: Certain binaries seemed to anchor each season of the project: East Coast vs. West Coast, black-and-white vs. color, social vs. contemplative, etc. Although each iteration of the project revolved around a kind of kit of parts–a flexible space for discussion, a display system for the event broadsides, a set of flat file drawers to display archival material, an auratic object of some kind, and a projection in the lobby–each of the invited participants contributed a strong visual aesthetic that was linked to the thematic of each of their installations. Thus, the form of each installation, from the materials used to the seating and furniture, reflected a distinct sensibility that changed radically from project to project and sat apart from the rest of the museum identity and the exhibitions in the main galleries. For example, Reference Library’s Andy Beach used custom-designed furniture in unpainted wood in combination with Martino Gamper’s bright plastic Arnold Circus stools in shades of blue and a Wharton Esherick Hammer Handle Chair on loan from the Hedgerow Theater in nearby Rose Valley. This then gave way to East of Borneo‘s exploration of California arts pedagogy circa 1970 with seminar tables, vintage David Rowland 40/4 chairs in period colors, and an actual Metamorphokit table, designed by Peter de Bretteville and Toby Cowan, shipped directly from the CalArts library. For her installation Ooga Booga’s Wendy Yao recreated the unmistakable look and feel of her two Los Angeles stores, complete with a hammock, bookshelves, and a custom table and benches designed by Manuel Raeder, which are now installed at her Mission Road space. Finally, Primary Information drew inspiration from ICA’s seminal 1975 Video Art exhibition with a more spare, conceptualist, black-and-white aesthetic, punctuated by Sarah Crowner’s dramatic Vidas Perfectas curtain (2011), originally produced for a Robert Ashley performance, which created a literal backdrop for the activities that ensued. In this way, the design of the projects themselves marked out a distinct physical space that was at once rich with material and metaphor, but also flexible and open."
alexklein  markowens  oogabooga  referencelibrary  andybeach  walkerartcenter  2014  excursus  ica  design  publishing  books  art  artbooks  artistsbooks  curation  interviews  primaryinformation  eastofborneo  commonpress  othermeans  museums  events  residencies  onlineresidencies  discursivespace  authorship 
august 2014 by robertogreco
#captureParklandia: A Dive into Social Media & Place-Based Digital Engagement | Art Museum Teaching
"#captureParklandia is the Portland Art Museum’s most recent dive into a large-scale social media project. Created in tandem with the special exhibition The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Gardens, Portland Parks and Recreation, and the Portland Parks Foundation, #captureParklandia is both an online and in-gallery experience. #captureParklandia’s pie-in-the-sky goal is to get Portlanders to play with the museum and connect in new ways.  Through this playful interaction, Portlanders will begin to think of PAM as their museum, not just a museum."

[See also: "Have museums always been “authoritative?”"
http://kovenjsmith.com/archives/1426

and "Parklandia: Stretching, Striving To What End?"
http://www.artsjournal.com/realcleararts/2014/07/parklandia-stretching-striving-to-what-end.html ]

[via: https://plus.google.com/u/0/112045150389781152468/posts/RJXhYxZshbK ]
portland  oregon  art  education  arteducation  museums  mikemurawski  krisinbayans  socialmedia  participatory  parklandia  captureparklandia  parks  engagement  audienceparticipation  2014  judithdobrzynski  instagram  hashtags  curation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Mark Allen Artist Lecture on Vimeo
"The LA Times writes that Mark Allen is “Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of ‘The Anarchist Cookbook.’” Come hear a talk by Machine Project founder Mark Allen at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry: Step right up!

Mark Allen is an artist, educator and curator based in Los Angeles. He is the founder and executive director of Machine Project, a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, literature, and food in an informal storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Machine Project also operates as a loose confederacy of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under his direction Machine has produced shows with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, the Contemporary Art Museum St Louis, and the Walker Museum in Minneapolis. He has produced over 500 events in Los Angeles at the Machine Project storefront space, and recently concluded a year long artist residency addressing topics of public engagement at the Hammer Museum.

Machine Project events emphasize intersections between fields and practices, particularly where the arts and sciences meet. In a 2006 LA Weekly article, writer Gendy Alimurung described Machine Project as, “Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of ‘The Anarchist Cookbook.’ “[2] Machine Project facilitates conversations between poets, technicians, artists, scientists, and obscure hobbyists and supports work that arises out of unusual combinations of interests. Past activities have included urban plant foraging and needlepoint therapy based on classic oil paintings. Machine Project prioritizes accessibility, explicitly courting amateur practitioners and curious locals. Workshops are regularly offered in sewing electronics, soldering, Arduino and Processing for artists.

In addition to weekly events held in the storefront gallery space in Echo Park, Machine Project operates as a gathering place for local and visiting artists to produce shows at various cultural institutions and events in Los Angeles. Frequent collaborators include Brody Condon, Liz Glynn, Kamau Patton, Corey Fogel, Jason Torchinsky, Chris Kallmyer, and Adam Overton. Machine Project has curated performances at the Glow Festival at Santa Monica Pier and at several art museums. Through their Artist in Residence program, Machine Project invites previous collaborators to develop larger projects that generally include a pedagogical element in addition to performances and exhibitions.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the CMU School of Art."
markallen  collaboration  participatoryart  2013  poetry  art  lcproject  openstudioproject  capitalism  machineproject  events  learning  education  museums  howwelearn  arts  audience  process  howwework  experimentation  gender  curiosity  identity  titles  ambiguity  adaptability  makerspaces  hackerspaces  community  communitycenters  collectives  horizontality  organizations  flexibility  accessibility  humor  riskaversion  risk  institutions  failure  risktaking  curation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Mapping a Museum’s Collection with Memory
"Hughen/Starkweather’s project, “Re:depiction,” was the latest in a public programming series at the AAM called the Artists Drawing Club. Organized by Marc Mayer, the institution’s educator for public programs, the series commissions Bay Area artists to create a new project in response to the AAM’s collection, exhibitions, location, and/or architecture. “Re:depiction” was an audio and visual intervention in the collection, for which Hughen and Starkweather asked staff to recall from memory works on display that they felt particularly connected to. Using those memories as inspiration, the duo created large, semiabstract works on paper, which were hung like scrolls in the museum’s main staircase for one night only (May 22). Along the handrails small audio players and headphones were set up that allowed visitors to listen to the original interviews while admiring the work — hence the opportunity to hear the director speak so frankly about a camo-wearing rhino.

Upon arriving at the museum on May 22, guests received a map connecting the contemporary drawings and interviews with their corresponding works on display in the permanent collection. Walking through the museum with these multiple layers of meaning and interpretation at hand — the original object, a staff memory, and the subsequent painting — showcased the fresh manner of looking that the Artists Drawing Club is aiming for.

Too often, museums offer only precise and manicured wall text to guide the audience. Maybe that’s okay, but there are so many ways of experiencing and engaging with artwork; featuring only one, as museums tend to do, misses something fundamental about how humans really engage with art. The Artists Drawing Club — somewhat like other intervention series at institutions around the country, such as the Museum of Modern Art’s Artist’s Choice series and the Jewish Museum’s recent Barbara Bloom show — asks how artists can provide us with new means of experiencing work. This may mean approaches that a museum hasn’t considered or provided before, including sight, smell, audio, movement, and more. One of the benefits of contemporary art is that it offers a space in which alternative, creative, and maybe even absurd perspectives are taken seriously; in this way “Re:depiction” became as much a reimagining of the AAM’s collection as it was a showcase of Hughen/Starkweather’s work.

Accompanying the map was a paper with a few questions, inviting the viewer to continue the kind of engagement the artists had started with AAM’s staff. “An Invitation … ,” as it was called, asked four simple questions about an important artwork in our lives, and visitors could submit their answers to be featured on the museum’s website. Like the map, which turned the museum visit into an act of searching and comparison, the questionnaire placed our personal experiences with artwork at the foreground — experiences usually ignored in favor of the “professional” insights of the curator, director, or artist.

How does memory make an artwork? How do our relationships with certain pieces define our perceptions of them? Do any two people actually see and feel the same way before the same work of art? These are the important questions that “Re:depiction” both raised and complicated. We tend think of artworks as static and finite objects, especially in historical and encyclopedic institutions like the AAM. The Artists Drawing Club proves that notion wrong, and seeks instead to reinvigorate the collection with a new sense of curiosity and exploration."
museusm  curation  maps  mapping  memory  art  2014  benvalentine  amandahughen  jenniferstarkweather  jayxu  drawing  exhibitions  exhibitiondesign  exploration  Re:depiction  perception 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Eye Magazine | Blog | An end to the curatocracy?
"The most unusual thing about the London conference ‘Chaos at the Museum’ was that it was devoted to design, writes Nick Bell.

Most discussion of museum practice is dominated by curators – whether at conferences or in the media. So it was not surprising that the designers attending ‘Chaos at the Museum’ (26-27 April 2014) could barely suppress their excitement all day. I’ve never seen so many smiles since, well, the Martin Creed exhibition at the Hayward. We were like children let out to play at this two-day programme about museums and exhibitions drawn up by designers.

‘Chaos’ was an event that burned brightly with feral visual intellects drawing deeply on a rare opportunity to share experiences, be outspoken and distil their vision for the future of visitor engagement and participation in the public spaces we call museums.

Why is it we behave like we do in museums and why must this behaviour be unlearned? How do we best organise museums to be engaging and why is it not really about narrative? Why is it not even about objects? Might visitors be the ones that finally undermine the authority of the curator? This was the dirt being kicked up at ‘Chaos’."



"Evidence presented by Mario Schulze (University of Zurich) would, like Francis’s, indicate that the distinction we make between museums (not like shops) and shops (not like museums) is outdated. Schulze said that the first department stores that appeared in the 1850s took inspiration from the great museums. Through his comparison between the Berlin interiors of the Museum of Things at the Werkbund Archive and the Andreas Murkudis’ concept store of ‘curated’ design objects, Schulze concluded that the museum is by its nature consumerist. Like shops, museums are about the display of desirable objects and hence the commodification of desire. (Commodification would be agonised over in later presentations, too).

Schulze quoted the Australian sociologist Tony Bennett in calling this ‘the exhibitionary complex’ – a way of seeing the museum as part of the world instead of treating it as a monolithic archive with no category in which to place itself. My heart sank when Schulze signed off his paper with ‘what you’ve learned in the museum, you can test out in the shop,’ but it was good to hear potentially false oppositions conflated and have my ingrained twentieth-century prejudices scrutinised.

In her paper, ‘The Exhibition as Experience’, Donna Loveday was the curator who in avoiding one trap promptly fell into another. Loveday’s current and popular ‘Hello, My Name is Paul Smith’ exhibition at London’s Design Museum should be applauded for not further infecting the Design Museum with antiseptic commodification-of-desire type design moves. Loveday introduced a healthy dose of messy, human informality by choosing to present a singular creative mind with the warmth and chaos of all its motley inspirational sources rather than fetishising a few items from the Paul Smith back catalogue.

However delegates wondered (in the canteen at break time) why Loveday had assembled a design team without any critical distance from her subject? And why Paul Smith himself was allowed so much curatorial control? What kind of deal had the Design Museum entered into here? In trying to make sure the exhibition wasn’t a shop, Loveday succeeded in creating a pastiche of another reality – the Paul Smith studio. As Herman Kossmann of Dutch design studio Kossmann.dejong declared in his talk the next day, ‘Don’t copy reality – instead make another one.’"
museums  curation  narrative  chaos  design  experience  2014  nickbell  objects  retail  donnaloveday  tonybennett  marioschulze  museumofthings  andreasmurkdis  hermankossmann  paulsmith 
may 2014 by robertogreco
this is tomorrow - A Small Hiccup
"If you have ever spent any time considering how language mutates, from marvelling at how swiftly neologisms like ‘omnishambles’ enter the dictionary to bemoaning how IAU (incessant acronym use) is degrading the English language, then maybe it will not be too great a leap for you to imagine a world in which language itself has become diseased. ‘Pontypool’ (2008), a low budget horror film, which does what ambitious low budget horror should by working within its limited means to convey a disturbing but compelling idea, introduces a new form of viral infection: a linguistic disease spread through speech.

George Vasey takes inspiration from ‘Pontypool’ in curating ‘A Small Hiccup’, a travelling exhibition, events programme, publication and online commission exploring ‘diseased language’. This multi-format approach allows for an impressive number of manifestations of such a disease to be pursued, moving across page, screen, airwaves, internet and beyond to ask, ‘Is it always good to talk?’

The exhibition, which launched at Grand Union in Birmingham and will travel on to The Newbridge Project in Newcastle, and later in event-form to Limoncello, London, features newly commissioned works by Jeremy Hutchison, Leah Lovett, Fay Nicolson & Oliver Smith, Siôn Parkinson, Erica Scourti, Simon Senn, Holly Pester and Charlie Woolley, who variously take on the idea of compromised speech. The artists instigate and investigate moments within which the instability of language is demonstrated; its quirks, limitations and failings, the moments when the ‘small hiccup’ disrupts the flow and leaves the meaning obscured.

For a show about communication the gallery is strangely hushed, the works holding a polite distance from each other and often requiring a careful approach and examination to discern that anything is being said to you at all. Erica Scourti’s ‘Unsent Letters’ are like magic eye puzzles, for which the viewer must relax into a hazy half-focus in order to receive their corrupted message; as what has been written becomes clear it remains ambiguous as to whether the words have been degraded by force of emotion or encrypted against detection.

Every five minutes Holly Pester’s ‘News Piece’ murmurs into life from a pair of speakers, delivering a short sing-song cut-up of this week’s affairs, the words washing over you until a fragment of a recognisable news item emerges from the fog. Similarly riffing on the media, Fay Nicholson and Oliver Smith crunch the news down to symbols printed in punkt pro, a coded font, on a series of tabloid newsprint posters, paring down the already absurdly succinct headlines of the red tops to a series of icons: a Newspeak for the emoticon generation.

The publication, designed by An Endless Supply and printed in newspaper format, extends out the pool of contributors to take in further artists alongside writers and curators. In this format Vasey poses two questions: ‘What does it mean to miscommunicate?’ and ‘Can mistranslation be a productive situation?’ with the ‘answers’ across the subsequent pages building up a dense and intermittently incomprehensible visual babble of cartoon sketches, screen grabs and ventriloquism.

While some areas of the project seem to be bursting at the seams, the central exhibition is more sparing and maintains a varied pace, landing a few heavy hitting one-liners but for the most part allowing for a slower unveiling of meaning, requiring an in-depth reading rather than a skim across the surface. The newspaper, along with the project’s Tumblr blog of extra-curricular materials, feel entirely necessary to hold the curator’s expansive research, which develops the themes of the exhibition even as it pulls them loose into all sorts of tangential directions. This is a highly engaging project for the most part due to its velocity; the huge enthusiasm that the curator shows to keep piling in and travelling on, creates a feeling of near infinite possibility, the elasticity of language being its only potential limitation."
newspaperclub  jeremyhutchison  leahlovett  faynicolson  oliversmith  siônparkinson  ericascourti  simonsenn  hollypester  charliewoolley  georgevasey  art  exhibitions  communication  language  text  neologisms  deathoflanguage  anendlesssupply  elasticity  newmedia  glvo  projectideas  tumblr  curation 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Telling the Story of Our Cultural Neighbors Through a Mobile Museum | Creativity on GOOD
"Phil and I brought together our skills as a graphic and industrial designer respectively. We were interested in re-designing a museum, in a portable, and temporary way. It felt appropriate to create something that had a relevance to travel, as a counterpoint to the pop-up cafés, boutiques and bookstores that were starting to show up everywhere at the time.

Our intention was to celebrate small gestures through curating temporary shows that were light on resources and brought culture to places that a traditional museum could not. Unlike a conventional museum, the collection is always changing, with every new location dictating a different curatorial theme. Since it’s humble origins in April, 2011 the Mobile Museum has popped up in Milan, London, Brussels, Helsinki, Luxembourg, Beijing, and Hong Kong."

[More at: http://www.themobilemuseum.net/ ]
pop-ups  pop-upmuseums  museums  mobile  nomadism  fabrica  2013  dean  brown  themobilemuseum  lcproject  openstudioproject  glvo  curation  curating  nomads 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Subject, Theory, Practice: An Architecture of Creative Engagement on Vimeo
“Tell me to what you pay attention and I will tell you who you are.” José Ortega y Gasset

A 'manifesto' for the curious architect/designer/artist in search of depth, but in love with plenty, in the saturated world of the 21st Century.

"In a world where grazing is the norm, in which the bitesize is the ideal that conflates ease of consumption with value, where yoghurts are increased in sales price by being reduced in size and packaged like medicines, downed in one gulp; in a world where choice is a democratic obligation that obliterates enjoyment, forced on consumers through the constant tasting, buying and trying of ever more gadgets; a world in which thoughts, concepts -entire lives- are fragmented into the instantaneous nothings of tweets and profile updates; it is in this world, where students of architecture graze Dezeen dot com and ArchDaily, hoovering up images in random succession with no method of differentiation or judgement, where architects -like everyone else- follow the dictum ‘what does not fit on the screen, won’t be seen’, where attentions rarely span longer than a minute, and architectural theory online has found the same formula as Danone’s Actimel (concepts downed in one gulp, delivered in no longer than 300 words!), conflating relevance with ease of consumption; it is in this world of exponentially multiplying inputs that we find ourselves looking at our work and asking ‘what is theory, and what is practice?’, and finding that whilst we yearn for the Modernist certainties of a body of work, of a lifelong ‘project’ in the context of a broader epoch-long ‘shared project’ on the one hand, and the ideas against which these projects can be critically tested on the other; we are actually embedded in an era in which any such oppositions, any such certainties have collapsed, and in which it is our duty –without nostalgia, but with bright eyes and bushy tails untainted by irony- to look for new relationships that can generate meaning, in a substantial manner, over the course of a professional life.

This film is a short section through this process from May 2012."

This montage film is based on a lecture delivered by Madam Studio in May of 2012 at Gent Sint-Lucas Hogeschool Voor Wetenschap & Kunst.

A Madam Studio Production by Adam Nathaniel Furman and Marco Ginex

[via: https://twitter.com/a_small_lab/status/310914404038348800 ]
via:chrisberthelsen  joséortegaygasset  theory  architecture  cv  media  dezeen  archdaily  practice  nostalgia  actimel  marcoginex  2013  tcsnmy  understanding  iteration  darkmatter  certainty  postmodernism  modernism  philosophy  relationships  context  meaningmaking  meaning  lifelongproject  lcproject  openstudioproject  relevance  consumption  canon  streams  internet  filtering  audiencesofone  film  adamnathanielfurman  creativity  bricolage  consumerism  unschooling  deschooling  education  lifelonglearning  curation  curating  blogs  discourse  thinking  soundbites  eyecandy  order  chaos  messiness  ephemerality  ephemeral  grandnarratives  storytelling  hierarchies  hierarchy  authority  rebellion  criticism  frameofdebate  robertventuri  taste  aura  highbrow  lowbrow  waywards  narrative  anarchism  anarchy  feedback  feedbackloops  substance  values  self  thewho  thewhat  authenticity  fiction  discussion  openended  openendedstories  process  open-ended 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Granary Books - Publisher of Artist's Books
"For nearly thirty years, Granary Books has brought together writers, artists, and bookmakers to investigate verbal/visual relations in the time-honored spirit of independent publishing. Granary's mission—to produce, promote, document, and theorize new works exploring the intersection of word, image, and page—has earned the Press a reputation as one of the most unique and significant small publishers operating today.


Our project has been strengthened by a growing involvement in the organization, preservation, and sale of archives, manuscripts, and rare books by important contemporary writers and artists. While publishing remains central to Granary's purpose, we are also deeply involved with a widespread and local community of writers, poets, and artists. For years Granary occupied a gallery space in Soho, hosting countless public events, lectures, and readings while curating exhibits related to books, book art, poetry, and writing. We believe that Granary's publishing, preservation, and community outreach has significant long-term implications for the fields of writing and book art. Since the mid-nineties Granary has sought to produce, promote, and contextualize scholarship investigating an emerging history of small press publishing, poetry, and artists' books. Many of the books we have produced in this vein, including Johanna Drucker's essential The Century of Artists' Books, Jerome Rothenberg and Steve Clay's A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing, and Steve Clay and Rodney Phillips's A Secret Location on the Lower East Side are now being used as textbooks at the college level, further opening and legitimizing the field for a new generation of scholars and practitioners.

Granary Books remains committed to publishing innovative written and visual work, observing progressive scholarship, and supporting adventurous bookmaking while exploring the relationships between seeing and reading, reading and seeking."
books  publishers  publishing  nyc  bookmaking  art  visual  progressivescholarship  granary  granarybooks  poetry  poets  artists  events  curation  curating  johannadrucker  jeromerothenberg  steveclay  rodenyphillips  artistsbooks  artbooks 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Meg Cranston - Hammer Museum Made in LA 2012
"With levity and a great deal of wit, Meg Cranston (b. 1960 Baldwin, New York) has for many years investigated the intersections between individual and shared experience and how imagery and objects acquire meaning in our culture. With an eye equally enamored of color theory, design, fashion, and supermarket advertising, she makes energetic collages pairing found imagery with monochromatic abstract forms. Having moved to Los Angeles in the 1980s, she has become conversant with the city’s history and finds much inspiration in its cultural life. While oftentimes taking personal attributes or historical events as a jumping-off point, Cranston’s work is ultimately concerned with the formal language of art and the role the artist plays in helping us see the world in new ways. An iconic blond California girl greets visitors from the east wall in Cranston’s California (Full Size) (2012). A playful nod to the notion of the artist as seer or mystic, Cranston’s Fireplace 12 (2012) on the north wall borrows its colors from a spring–summer 2012 color forecast for fashion and home design. Symbols of the fire that they produce, the larger-than-life lighters conjure everything from rock concerts to religious rituals."

[Same here: http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/detail/exhibition_id/222 ]

[Otis interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H8UrVaq_38 ]

["An an ongoing series frieze asks curators, artists and writers to list the books that have influenced them" http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/meg_cranston/ ]

[Posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/42633481565/california-meg-cranston-2006-via-24700-via-made ]
megcranston  art  losangeles  artists  collections  books  booklists  curation  curating  california 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Why Vimeo Is the Web Video Platform to Watch (in Full-Screen HD!) - Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg - The Atlantic
" Even as the web video space gets more crowded, Vimeo continues to be the destination for content creators and viewers looking for cutting-edge videos, beautiful playback, and a remarkably positive community. A world away from cat virals, Vimeo is winning by nurturing the next generation of filmmakers (well, videomakers) and promoting their most innovative work. Their festival last week provided a fascinating look at how they're doing it."
curation  community  advertising  creativity  faketv  kasiacieplak-mayrvonbaldegg  2012  vimeo  youtube  video  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
Big Red & Shiny: Did someone say 'Adhocracy'? An interview with Ethel Baraona Pohl
"…how are you working with Joseph Grima…around the idea of 'adhocracy', something that "captures opportunities, self-organizes and develops new and unexpected methods of production. ""

"…the concept of adhocracy is almost inherent in design. Work tools, new technologies and forms of communication, and strategies that facilitate self-organization—like DIY projects—are readily developable, urban actions that have a real impact on our environment."

"…there was some confusion on the part of the participants on the topic 'imperfection'—the overall theme of the Biennial—and the concept of adhocracy was brought up as a response to the proposals."

"…Peter Gadanho…recently said…"curating is the new criticism""

"…the most beautiful aspect of our times (and this is also related to the adhocracy), is that there is room and respect for all."

"multi-connected society can be very saturating for some people, but it also allows them, from their loneliness and isolation, to find what they need…"
ebooks  print  kindle  bottomup  bottom-up  hierarchy  tumblr  paufaus  laciudadjubilada  wikitankers  mascontext  quaderns  postopolisdf  postopolis  openconversation  conversation  stories  dpr-barcelona  anamaríaleón  klaus  tiagomotasaravia  nereacalvillo  claranubiola  amazon  booki  github  publishing  epub  domus  léopoldlambert  aurasma  communication  online  internet  digital  books  crowdfunding  douglascoupland  linkedin  pinterest  vimeo  twitter  youtube  facebook  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  socialmedia  society  networkedsociety  networks  web  loneliness  cv  isolation  shumonbasar  markusmiessen  opencalls  collaboration  curating  curation  diy  participation  petergadanho  josephgrima  ethelbaraona  2012  istanbulbiennial  istanbul  adhocracy  adhoc  epubs  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis on futurism, the New Aesthetic, and why social media isn't killing our children | The Verge
"Futurism's gotten harder to write, because the future arrives so quickly — even a few years ago, I was having to rewrite comics on the fly because the future had caught up to their speculation before the damn book had been drawn — but it's too much fun to drop for long."

"The New Aesthetic is an act of noticing, as much as anything: we are already in a machine-vision world, we are already in a world where the digital is erupting into the physical, and we just didn't really notice it, in the entire breadth of its creeping wave, until now."

"It could become an artistic movement. But, to me, the New Aesthetic is about the sighting of the New Normal."

"I think blogging is a muscle that most people wear out. Also, Twitter's taken over the curational role in large part, so that the interesting weird stuff comes to me rather than me having to seek it out and paste it on my blog so I don't lose it. Tumblr's my visual notebook, these days."
curation  curating  thenewnormal  blogging  twitter  socialmedia  howwework  workflow  tumblr  future  society  technology  sciencefictioncon  sciencefictioncondition  noticing  newaesthetic  2012  warrenellis  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] aren't callback numbers just links? [Too much to quote. GOOD: See these. BETTER: see also those in the Tumblr link. BEST: read it all.]
"I did a paper about Galleries, in 2010, talking about the larger trend of people not only discovering but starting to flex what I called a curatorial muscle.

I talked about how there was a still nascent but very confusing smushing up of the roles and distinctions happening between traditional critics, experts (or curators) and docents. This felt like a similar blurring that had been going on for a while between art and craft and design."

"The economics around production and distribution that have, until now, buttressed the distinctions between art and craft and design have all but bottomed out today…

As a result one measure of confidence in our ability to judge things has gotten completely messed up and we are still trying to find new bearings.

"the distinction between museums and archives (and by extension libraries) is collapsing in most people's minds. Assuming it ever existed, in the first place."

[Tumbled here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/35249075133/ ]
galleries  flickr  change  digital  design  craft  art  curating  curation  access  distribution  production  texture  service  open  trust  smithsonian  cooper-hewitt  otaku  collections  libraries  archives  museums  2012  aaronstraupcope 
november 2012 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] the status of truth
If you, as curators and archivists and generally anyone involved in the preservation of promotion of cultural heritage, think that the authority record is the pinnacle of your careers – that is, the most important thing you will leave behind – then you are about to be eaten by robots.
I am here to suggest that this the work we need to face in the years to come because the unit of measure for whether or not something is important is no longer dictated by the cost of inclusion.
Google has never wavered from their goal of being an information retrieval company because “information retrieval” is just a benign way of saying “everything”. If every natural language researcher on the planet uses Wikipedia as its training set Google was clever enough to realize that they could do what Facebook is trying to do by building a suite of tools – often very good tools – and treat the entire Internet as their training set for teaching robots how to interpret meaning and assign value.
Dispute is notoriously difficult to codify, especially in a database, but one of its most important functions is to shine a light on two or more opposing views so that might better see the context in which those ideas exist. I am not suggesting that we do away with structured metadata but this is not necessarily where all of your time is most needed today. You have the gift of magic that no robot will ever have: We call it language and story-telling and these are the things that you are good at.
I am saying that by encouraging documentary efforts outside the scope of the contemporary zeitgeist we create a zone of safekeeping for historical records and their stories for a time when we are ready to reconsider them.
I am saying that all those works not yet deemed worthy of a scholar’s attention still have value to people and their inclusion within a larger body of work is an important and powerful gesture for encouraging participation. Consider the authority record as a kind of gateway drug to scholarship.
internet  data  curation  waggledance  digitalhumanities  aaronstraupcope  glvo  cv  storytelling  human  humans  art  archives  search  google  metadata  language  robots  whatmatters  choices  via:tealtan 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The New Administration of a Fine Arts Education
"…a conversation series with leading individuals in contemporary art, culture & education who engage in multiple & overlapping artistic & pedagogic practices. Their exhibitions, actions, writing & artworks are at times seamless integrations of cultural production, lifestyle, studio & teaching. Some of them operate from inside or in coordination with art education institutions, challenging tradition from within. Others combine education & creative economic strategies to sustain practices in the realm of contemporary art & beyond & to realize new institutions. In all cases they are dismantling, intentionally or not, rigid definitions of what it means to be an artist, curator and educator today."

"What exactly is a cultural producer? How has the portrait of the solitary artist working in the studio been reshaped as the artist simultaneously making objects, writing, curating and teaching? What are the challenges posed by these interchangeable and expanding identities and platforms?"
pedagogy  teaching  curation  curating  lcproject  deschooling  unschooling  culturalproduction  highereducation  highered  education  art  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Edicola, a New Kind of Newsstand, Opens on Market Street: Visual Arts | KQED Public Media for Northern CA
"Upon learning of the Edicola newsstand in San Francisco, started by the artists Luca Antonucci and Carissa Potter, I was impressed; it is one of those rare projects that is not only inspired and original, but has been successfully realized.

Antonucci and Potter met when they were graduate students at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2008. Potter, feeling a certain affinity for her classmate, approached him with a proposition. "I had this crazy idea to ask him to be in a video with me where I told him that I liked him without knowing anything about him," she said. The video didn't turn out too well, but the two have been friends ever since. Together they launched both Colpa Press and Edicola, a newsstand that sells a curated selection of artists' books, newspapers and prints. That's not the only thing that makes the newsstand unique: the store is run out of a formerly closed San Francisco Chronicle kiosk on Market Street in bustling downtown San Francisco…"
tovisit  prints  retail  art  curation  newspapers  books  sfai  2008  carissapotter  lucaantonucci  newsstands  sanfrancisco  edicola  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
You Are Not a Curator, You Are Actually Just a Filthy Blogger | The Awl
"Anyway, replace "curator" with "people who are really picky with what they share on Facebook" and maybe Joe Hill will be right on the money! Although I suspect that in the 16th century, if not "painter," then actually the "patron" was the "artist-king." (Commissioning is an art! Ask Pope Julius II!) And then that "editors" were the dominant influence in the 19th. And "studios" in the 20th. So I guess now either "ad sales people" or "web engineers" are at the top of the artistic food chain? Oh dear."
culture  curation  internet  blogging  art  choiresicha  2012  curating 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Curated Thoughts on Curation • Quisby
It’s clear to me (with a few years under my belt of posting to The Feature) that the simple act of passing along a link or nugget of information really isn’t particularly valuable. Someone that’s good at it can gain a reputation and a substantial following, as Popova has, but the discrete acts that contribute to that reputation aren’t that valuable on their own. Whenever I’ve seen something that literally adds value to its source material by transforming it in someway before passing it along (be it an essay, a mashup, a piece of art, or, sure, a gif) it seems to me that its creative forefathers are consistently well-credited. Is it maybe the case that just passing it on isn’t an act loaded with creative authorship at all?
internet  curation  information  quisby  web  blogging  linkblogs  attribition  choiresicha  via:tealtan  2012  curating 
june 2012 by robertogreco
The Public Domain Review |
"The Public Domain Review aspires to become a bounteous gateway into this whopping plenitude that is the public domain, helping our readers to explore this rich terrain by surfacing unusual and obscure works, and offering fresh reflections and unfamiliar angles on material which is more well known.

With our curated collection of exotic scraps and marvellous rarities and comprehensively linking to freely distributable copies of works in online archives and from far flung corners of the web, we hope to encourage readers to further utilise and explore public domain works by themselves. To this end we have also put together a “Guide to Finding Interesting Public Domain Works Online”.

We also hope to act as a platform to writers and scholars to write about more unusual and obscure works which they might not get a chance to do elsewhere."
publicdomainreview  curation  archives  art  free  history  publicdomain  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
ON THE QUICKENING OF HISTORY
"Writer and urbanist Brendan Crain writes about the role of new digital tools in preservation efforts. In the existing conflict between preserving buildings to slow the process of loss and the dynamic nature of people, digital layers can maintain a sense of urgency around long-passed events that lend the built environment much of its import."
2012  yelp  placemaking  place  london  nyc  digitalanthropology  geolocation  geotagging  streetmuseum  museumwithoutwalls  historypin  cultureNOW  junaio  layar  digitallayers  digital  socialmedia  history  curation  atemporality  storytelling  architecture  now  urbanism  urban  buildings  preservation  brendancrain  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
David Skok: Aggregation is deep in journalism’s DNA » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Henry Luce’s Time started as a full-fledged aggregator almost 89 years ago.

A quick visit to the library confirmed his statements. Sure enough, all 29 pages of the black and white weekly — its signature red-border cover not yet developed — were packed with advertisements and aggregation. This wasn’t just rewrites of the week’s news; it was rip-and-read copy from the day’s major publications — The Atlantic Monthly, The Christian Science Monitor, and the New York World, to name a few."

"Because new-market disruptions initially attract those that aren’t traditional consumers of The New York Times or the Wall Street Journal, these incumbent organizations feel little pain or threat. So they stay the course on content, competing on “quality” against these new-market disruptors."

"We’ve been here before. The question is not, how aggregation is ruining journalism, but how traditional journalism will respond to the aggregation."
via:allentan  nothingnewunderthesun  newmedia  magazines  news  huffingtonpost  buzzfeed  1923  davidskok  disruption  history  timemagazine  2012  florilegium  curation  journalism  aggregation  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
5 provocative ideas sparked by women in media | Poynter.
"From the many, many ideas Popova has sparked in my brain, one has stuck more stubbornly than any other: We need to start treating discovery, connection and sharing as creative acts."

"Why do these heady observations on nostalgia matter for busy media professionals? Because I’d argue there’s real opportunity in our affinity for nostalgia. Think of Instagram: I’d argue it’s taken off partly because its filters lend an artificial veneer of nostalgia to those in-the-moment digital photos; they instantly make a moment seem more distant or unrecoverable."

[via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/16433811360 ]
humor  comedy  longform  homicidewatch  discovery  connections  curation  instagram  2012  nostalgia  connection  sharing  cv  media  journalism  mariapopova  mattthompson  creativity  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Bidoun Library | Bidoun Magazine
"The Bidoun Library had its first outing at Abu Dhabi Art (November 2009) as a collection of books, catalogs, journals, and ephemera that trace contemporary art practices as well as the evolution of the various art scenes of the Middle East. This peripatetic resource then travelled to Art Dubai (March 2010) and 98 Weeks in Beirut (April – May, 2010) before landing in the New Museum in New York (August – September, 2010).

The project space allowed visitors to explore, research, and create wide-ranging connections through materials that are generally unavailable commercially. The focus was on materials created by and for artists, as well as those published by independent organizations based in the Middle East…"

[See also: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/tehranbureau/2010/09/-arts-book-smart-by.html AND http://www.newmuseum.org/exhibitions/426/museum_as_hub_the_bidoun_library_project AND http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/the-bidoun-library/ ]
nomadicschool  curation  collections  art  glvo  lcproject  education  books  middleeast  museums  itinerantlibraries  temporary  mobile  libraries  pop-ups  museum  museumashub  popup  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
The American Crawl : Wonderstruck – A Kids Book About Curation (and Other Stuff)
"Currently, I’ve been working on a chapter of my dissertation that, in part, looks at youth as curators and the transformative possibilities of this role. By taking ownership, labeling, collecting, and displaying ephemera within their communities, my students help guide a collective consciousness for their peers that establish opportunities for social improvement. The act of curation is a liberatory one. Or at least that’s what I’m arguing so far.

Wonderstruck finds its protagonist desperately holding onto the artifacts that make up an unclear past in search of meaning amongst them. Selznick’s narrative illuminates the personal power of curation and imbues it with the same sense of wonder that I attempted to achieve in the ARG I created. The book opens up paths of discussion that I’d love to someday host with students."
anterogarcia  brianselznick  curating  curation  curatedlearning  learning  labeling  collections  collecting  2011  teaching  wonderstruck  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
The Never-Ending Story | design mind
Harris: "I think that’s something stories can do—prepare their way of finding meaning in this madness and bringing some order to the chaos.

…creating a space that’s more about slowing down and contemplating and being introspective is a prerequisite for getting people to tell stories that have impact.

…Cow Bird is basically a storytelling platform that people can use to tell stories online using photos, sound maps, timelines, videos, and casts of characters. It’s geared towards long-form narrative…when many different people tell stories, the system automatically finds connections between them and weaves them together into a kind of meta-story…The platform automatically analyzes all the text in your memory, figures out your cast of characters, and connects it to previous stories.

…one of the pieces of this system I’ve been building is that to tell the story you have to dedicate it to somebody, which creates a gift economy of stories."

[via http://twitter.com/frogdesign/status/105785778331852800 via @bobulate]
design  art  writing  storytelling  jonathanharris  cowbird  slow  slowness  multimedia  thisishuge  gamechanging  2011  interviews  classideas  curating  curation  twitter  facebook  longform  meaning  meaningmaking  meaningfulness  self-expression  internet  web  stories  social  socialsoftware  metastory  relationships  connectivism  narrative  memory  memories  soundscapes  soundmaps  timelines  video  gifteconomy  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Accessibility vs. access: How the rhetoric of “rare” is changing in the age of information abundance » Nieman Journalism Lab
"…digital archivists solve the barrier of accessibility, by making content previously tucked away in analog archives available to the world wide web…

What great curators do is reverse-engineer this dynamic, framing cultural importance first to magnify our motivation to engage with information…shares that manuscript in the context of how it relates to today’s ideals and challenges of publishing, to our shared understanding of creative labor and the changing value systems of authorship, will help integrate this archival item with your existing knowledge and interests, bridging your curiosity with your motivations to truly engage with the content.

Because in a culture where abundance has replaced scarcity as our era’s greatest information problem, without these human sensemakers and curiosity sherpas, even the most abundant and accessible information can remain tragically “rare.”"

[There's more to this. Better to read the entire thing.]
history  photography  information  archives  accessibility  mariapopova  curation  curating  curatorialteaching  curiosity  context  storytelling  relevance  flickrcommons  2011  digitalhumanities  classideas  cv  digitalcurators  infocus  openculture  dancolman  andybaio  metafilter  brainpickings  aaronswartz  filterbubble  elipariser  jamesgleick  abundance  scarcity  obscurity  infooverload  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero’s Blog - Sorting a Mass
"Right now, chronological ordering is the default way to arrange content online, & I wonder how that blanket presumption affects curation on the web. Does it make sense, because people check in frequently, or is it odd, like sorting a stack of photographs alphabetically by who is in them? There are indeed instances where sorting by time is the correct path, but it will be exciting over the next few months and years to see what happens to the web as we recognize the instances where the newest thing is not necessarily the most important thing. (And, as always, the additional problem on top of this: can this sorting process be automated?)

But can you curate on the web? Most curation comes to a point through narrative, and is narrative possible on the web? Stories require a certain amount of linearity, and we all know how the web disrupts that. Maybe it is the same problem that video games have, where interactivity subverts storytelling…"

[This article is now here: http://frankchimero.com/writing/2011/sorting-a-mass/ ]
web  curation  collecting  curating  sorting  frankchimero  storytelling  scrolling  2011  collections  bookmarks  bookmarking  flickr  interactivity  location  alphabet  hierarchy  categorization  time  chronology  chronoogical  pagination  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
No Longer Empty
"NLE embraces a fresh perspective on creating, presenting & experiencing art.

…works w/ internationally recognized curators to feature established artists alongside lesser known or new artists, using limited resources w/out sacrificing quality. The synthesis of area & site research drives each curatorial theme & selection of artists. The curatorial premise & physical realities of location provide artists w/ alternative to today’s art world status quo allowing them to expand their practice thru site commissioned work.

…presents art in environments that are free & accessible to all. Our multi-locational exhibitions engage directly w/ each community drawing on resources & connections of community groups to provide meaningful programming. Utilizing vacated spaces in urban context, we act as a catalyst for revitalization & economic opportunity for local business thru increased flow of visitors…

At the heart of the experience is community engagement & benefit."
design  art  culture  urban  social  glvo  urbanism  vacatedspaces  space  place  experience  nolongerempty  situationist  phantomgalleries  curation  community  the2837university  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Maria Popova: In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
" If information discovery plays such a central role in how we make sense of the world in this new media landscape, then it is a form of creative labor in and of itself. And yet our current normative models for crediting this kind of labor are completely inadequate, if they exist at all."

"Finding a way to acknowledge content curation and information discovery (or, better, the new term we invent for these fluffy placeholders) as a form of creative labor, and to codify this acknowledgement, is the next frontier in how we think about “intellectual property” in the information age."

"Ultimately, I see Twitter neither as a medium of broadcast, the way text is, nor as one of conversation, the way speech is, but rather as a medium of conversational direction and a discovery platform for the text and conversations that matter."
education  writing  media  socialmedia  twitter  curation  curating  mariapopova  information  discovery  labor  contentcuration  ip  text  conversation  future  web  online  internet  broadcast  authorship  abundance  2011  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Text Patterns: curators and imitators
"So I’d suggest this as the beginnings of a taxonomy:

1) The Linker: That’s what most of us are. We just link to things we’re interested in, without any particular agenda or system at work…my Pinboard page…page of links.

2) The Coolhunter: People who strive to find the unusual, the striking, the amazing — the very, very cool, often within certain topical boundaries, but widely & loosely defined ones…Kottke & Maria Popova…

3) The Curator: There are some. Not many…tends to have a clear & strict focus…some particular area of interest…finds things that other people can’t find…easily…having access to stuff that is not fully public…putting stuff online for the first time…having a unique take on public material…Bibliodyssey is a genuinely curated site; also, just because of its highly distinctive sensibility, Things magazine.

…not saying that one of these categories is superior to the others. They’re just all different, and the difference is worth noting."
alanjacobs  via:lukeneff  curation  curating  online  web  blogging  kottke  mariapopova  taxonomy  links  bookmarks  del.icio.us  pinboard  blogs  tumblr  bibliodyssey  coolhunters  2011  language  sharing  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
On firehoses and filters: Part 1 – confused of calcutta
"Ever since then, I’ve been spending time thinking about the hows and whys of filtering information, and have arrived “provisionally” at the following conclusions, my three laws of information filtering:

1. Where possible, avoid filtering “on the way in”; let the brain work out what is valuable and what is not.

2. Always filter “on the way out”: think hard about what you say or write for public consumption: why you share what you share.

3. If you must filter “on the way in”, then make sure the filter is at the edge, the consumer, the receiver, the subscriber, and not at the source or publisher."
jprangaswami  filtering  internet  clayshirky  georgeorwell  aldoushuxley  bravenewworld  1984  jonathanzittrain  elipariser  input  output  flow  socialsoftware  curation  curating  sharing  information  2011  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Leigh Blackall: Situated art, situated learning - En Route by One Step At A Time Like This
"I think the artistic intent of these concepts could be enhanced with study of Joseph Beuys' work, particularly the Free International University, as well as Situationist International and their desire to create environments for discovering and appreciating the true value of things rather than their staged value.

All of this makes for excellent examples to add to my essay in progress on Ubiquitous Learning - a critique, where I'm trying to argue that the words ubiquity and learning have nothing inherently to do with technology, and are instead words of ethical dimension, so the phrase ubiquitous learning should become one more to do with an ethical approach or framework to learning, and not one suggesting a technological determination of it."
context  situated  situationist  leighblackall  comments  josephbeuys  newpublicthinkers  technology  art  situatedlearning  ubiquitouslearning  2837university  agitpropproject  agitprop  williamhanks  randallszott  colinward  learning  unschooling  deschooling  education  messiness  ethics  georgesiemens  curation  curating  curatorialteaching  connectivism  space  place  explodingschool  adamgreenfield  guydebord  enroute  street  urban  urbanism  cities  cityasclassroom  thecityishereforyoutouse  cv  lcproject  psychogeography  urbanscale  salrandolph  situatedart  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
InCUBATE [Quotes from the 'about' page]
"InCUBATE is a research group dedicated to exploring new approaches to arts administration and arts funding. We at InCUBATE act as curators, researchers and co-producers of artists projects. These activities have manifested in a series traveling exhibitions called Other Options, an artist residency program, and various other projects such as Sunday Soup (a monthly meal that generates funding for a creative project grant). We don’t have non-profit status, instead we are interested in what kinds of organizational strategies could provide more direct support to critical and socially-engaged art and culture beyond for-profit or non-profit structures. Our core organizational principle is to treat art administration as a creative practice. By doing so, we hope to generate and share a new vocabulary of practical solutions to the everyday problems of producing under-the-radar culture. Currently we do not have a physical location and we work together on an ongoing project basis."

"Finally, it is worth noting how various models such as a labor unions, community centers, block-clubs, or religious institutions seem to resolve some of the key problems facing our concept of the slow build. Consider how these institutions provide space and resources, exert political influence, and allow for the participation of wider demographics. Our task for the future is to produce these effects without instituting a rigid hierarchy or overtly moralizing and dogmatic system in order to affect a more equitable, participatory, and democratic future."
art  economics  social  community  collaboration  anarchism  incubate  randallszott  lcproject  openstudio  curation  curating  hierarchy  flatness  slow  chicago  democracy  culture  culturehacking  activism  administration  engagement  organizations  organization  equity  participatory  residencies  pop-upculture  exhibitions  projects  horizontality  horizontalidad  ncm  participatoryart  everyday  amateurs  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
FT.com / Arts / Film & Television - Joking apart
"…few years ago, I received an unsolicited e-mail asking me if I was interested in “submitting content”…Eventually it transpired that content-seeker wanted to know if I had any jokes that could be sold to be viewed on mobile phones…my material is written to be performed as part of a whole in particular sorts of places, & I have given a great deal of thought to how the acceptability and impact of ideas is affected by pacing, context and their position as part of a whole…didn’t want it being chopped up, miniaturised, de-contextualised…

"Next month I am curating a weekend of comedy and music at the Southbank Centre, London. I am a curator. What a dead word. It sounds like someone stirring turds in a toilet bowl with a stick. If something is being curated it already seems fixed and decayed – bands recreating their classic albums in their entirety, seasons of film screenings working towards a pre-ordained conclusion. To that end, I’ve tried to schedule events that are unrepeatable."
stewartlee  curation  curating  albums  johncage  indeterminacy  slow  simplicity  twitter  mobile  phones  speed  content  context  pacing  2011  events  uniqueness  reproduction 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Sad, Beautiful Fact That We're All Going To Miss Almost Everything : Monkey See : NPR
"Culling is easy; it implies a huge amount of control & mastery. Surrender, on the other hand, is a little sad. That's the moment you realize you're separated from so much. That's your moment of understanding that you'll miss most of the music, dancing, books & films that there have ever been & ever will be, & right now, there's something being performed somewhere in the world that you're not seeing that you would love.

It's sad, but it's also ... great, really. Imagine if you'd seen everything good, or if you knew about everything good. Imagine if you really got to all the recordings & books and movies you're "supposed to see."…That would imply that all the cultural value the world has managed to produce since a glob of primordial ooze…can [be] gobble[d up]…in one lifetime…

If "well-read" means "not missing anything," then nobody has a chance. If "well-read" means "making a genuine effort to explore thoughtfully," then yes, we can all be well-read…"
culture  books  history  future  npr  music  films  cantkeepup  needfrequentremindersofthis  content  flow  control  culling  curation  curating  lindaholmes  rogerebert  humans  life  lifetime  reading  listening  watching  hearing  literature  science  fiction  nonfiction  beingwell-read  takethatedhirsch  culturalliteracy  beauty  insignificance  love  happiness  wisdom  thesumofhumanproduction  numbers  tv  television  art  cv  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter / @Downes: Why is curation wrong? Bec ...
"Why is curation wrong? Because it's not subtractive. Learning is not about filtering and organizing resources, it's about tearing them apart"
stephendownes  learning  curating  curation  resources  deconstruction  organization  subtractive  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
The myth of objectivity « Re-educate Seattle
"This attitude is part of the myth of objectivity that pervades traditional schooling. The curriculum is presented as objective, comprehensive, and factual. Sit in the chair, follow directions, and you will receive an objective, comprehensive, and factual education…

Education is a highly personal process. Every decision that teachers make, whether we’re conscious that we’re making it or not, is loaded with bias. History, for example, contains a seemingly infinite set of people, events, and stories; the bias comes not necessarily in how the teacher presents selected events, but in the process of selecting which stories to tell.

I don’t believe there’s anything wrong with being biased as a teacher. In fact, I don’t think there’s any way to teach authentically without bias. It’s when we surrender to the myth of objectivity that we do students a disservice."
stevemiranda  education  objectivity  teaching  schools  schooling  compliance  facts  traditionalschools  curating  curation  cv  bias  authenticity  2011  philosophy  pedagogy  truth  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Technium: The Satisfaction Paradox
"Let's say that after all is said and done, in the history of the world there are 2,000 theatrical movies, 500 documentaries, 200 TV shows, 100,000 songs, and 10,000 books that I would be crazy about. I don't have enough time to absorb them all, even if I were a full time fan. But what if our tools could deliver to me only those items to choose from? How would I -- or you -- choose from those select choices?"
kevinkelly  serendipity  choice  paradox  paradoxofchoice  satisfaction  satisfactionparadox  netflix  amazon  scarcity  abundance  google  spotify  music  film  curation  filters  filtering  discovery  recommendations  psychology  economics  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
CCK11: Educurator? « Connexions
"As a teacher/tutor, I will…create the space where learning can happen…create conditions that highlight know-how and “know-where.”…welcome learner interests…curate materials that learners may not know…model and demonstrate particular skills or approaches…enable learners to reflect and practice those skills or approaches…allow learners to teach each other (and me)…am extremely busy being present (an attentiveness to the network itself )."
connectivism  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  stephendownes  sugatamitra  via:steelemaley  curation  curating  learning  schools  presence  cv  studentdirected  interestdriven  modeling  accessibility  sharing  community  howwelearn  howwework  educurator  generalists  reflection  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
A VC: Falling In Love With Twitter All Over Again
"I was in a rut with Twitter for much of the past year. I'd tweet out my blog post every day and not a lot more. I'd check my @mentions and a search on fred wilson a few times a day. It was a routine. Work.

But in the past few weeks, I've found myself reading tweets a lot more. I'm replying to tweets a bit more (something I've never loved to do for some reason). I'm retweeting more.

I just spent 20 minutes reading my timeline from this morning back to yesterday morning. I have built an amazing set of people I follow, 564 of them, all curated one by one over the past four years. The timeline is so rich, so full of different things from different people. Tech, sports, politics, music, family stuff, humor, and way more.

Twitter's mission is to instantly connect you to the things that are most important to you. It does that so well. It's love all over again."
fredwilson  twitter  curation  curating  flow  information  2011  people  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Film History 101 (via Netflix Watch Instantly) « Snarkmarket
"Robin is absolutely right: I like lists, I remember everything I’ve ever seen or read, and I’ve been making course syllabi for over a decade, so I’m often finding myself saying “If you really want to understand [topic], these are the [number of objects] you need to check out.” Half the fun is the constraint of it, especially since we all now know (or should know) that constraints = creativity."

[See also Matt Penniman's "Sci-fi Film History 101" list: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6492 ]
film  netflix  history  cinema  movies  timcarmody  snarkmarket  teaching  curation  curating  constraints  lists  creativity  forbeginners  thecanon  pairing  sharing  expertise  experience  education  learning  online  2010  frankchimero  surveycourses  surveys  web  internet  perspective  organization  succinct  focus  design  the101  robinsloan  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  reference  pacing  goldcoins  surveycasts  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
The 101 « Snarkmarket
"Some of the teachers I remember most from college are the ones who would say something like: “Listen. There are only two movies you need to understand to understand [whole giant big cinematic movement X]. Those two movies are [A] and [B]. And we’re gonna watch ‘em.” (I feel like this is something Tim is extremely good at, actually.) It’s a step above curation, right? Context matters here; so does sequence. So we’re talking about some sort of super-sharp, web-powered, media-rich syllabus. I always liked syllabi, actually. They seem to make such an alluring promise, you know? Something like:

Go through this with me, and you will be a novice no more."
curation  curating  robinsloan  frankchimero  lists  organization  experience  expertise  teaching  learning  online  web  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  forbeginners  reference  2010  pacing  goldcoins  surveys  surveycourses  the101  education  internet  perspective  succinct  focus  design  history  constraints  creativity  thecanon  pairing  sharing  surveycasts  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - The Two Best Things on the Web 2010
"My top two choices, however, stood tall as perhaps the best stock I’ve had the pleasure of reading on the web, both in terms of their scope, but more interestingly about how they treated their content and audience. There’s a pattern here that I enjoy. I’d like to introduce you to them, and hopefully in the process make a bit of a point about the direction I want the web to take in the next year."

"I suppose I’m hungry for curated educational materials online. These are more than lists of books to read: they’re organized, edited, and have a clear point of view about the content they are presenting, and subvert the typical scatter-shot approach of half the web (like Wikipedia), or the hyper-linear, storyless other half that obsesses over lists. And that’s the frustrating thing about trying to teach yourself things online: you’re new, so you don’t know what’s important, but everything is spread so thin and all over the place, so it’s difficult to make meaningful connections."
education  learning  online  lists  2010  frankchimero  surveycourses  surveys  teaching  forbeginners  web  internet  curating  curation  perspective  organization  succinct  focus  design  history  constraints  creativity  thecanon  pairing  sharing  expertise  experience  the101  robinsloan  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  reference  pacing  goldcoins  surveycasts  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Delicious's Data Policy is Like Setting a Museum on Fire
"Yahoo! is going to shutter its social bookmarking service Delicious, the web learned today, and with it will sink an incredibly valuable source of collectively curated knowledge. You can easily export your own bookmarks (no verdict yet where we should all meet up to import them to) but what if you want to export other peoples'? That's at least half the value of the service, socially curated discovery."
del.icio.us  yahoo  data  history  curation  curating  tags  tagging  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  2010  archives  loc  web2.0  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Picture Show: Museology Revisited - - GOOD
"Whether disappearance of environments and dioramas reflects a change in how we learn or evolving curator tastes is unclear, but the shift is both noteworthy and something of a shame. Though it has motivated Ross to take his camera back into museums. "In the future, the whole concept of textbook learning may change so drastically that the need for an individual diorama that captures a moment of space, time, and environment may not be there any more," says Ross. "We're not there yet, though. Right now, we're in a transit, and the dioramas have distinctly changed.""
richardross  evolution  animals  photography  museums  history  exhibits  nature  learning  curation  textbooks  dioramas  change  gamechanging  art  books  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Are Distractible People More Creative? | Wired Science | Wired.com
"not enough to simply pay attention to everything—such a deluge of sensation can quickly get confusing. (Kierkegaard referred to this mental state as “drowning in possibility”. Some scientists believe that schizophrenia is characterized by extremely low latent inhibition coupled w/ severe working memory deficits…leads to a mind constantly hijacked by minor distractions.)…We need to let more info in, but we also need to be ruthless about throwing out useless stuff.

People bemoan infinite distractions of web, way we’re constantly being seduced by hyperlinks, unexpected search results, arcane Wikipedia entries. & yes, that’s all true—I just wasted 30 minutes searching for that Kierkegaard quote. (I ended up on a Danish culture website, which led me to a photography collection of Danish modern furniture…) But the problem isn’t distractibility per se—it's distractibility coupled w/ failure to curate our thoughts, to monitor relevancy of whatever is loitering in working memory."
jonahlehrer  neuroscience  attention  distraction  psychology  creativity  research  brain  behavior  intelligence  imaginzation  schizophrenia  memory  internet  online  cv  curation  curating  filtering  forgetting  focus  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
How TED Connects the Idea-Hungry Elite | Fast Company
"if you were starting a top university today, what would it look like? You would start by gathering very best minds from around world, from every discipline. Since we're living in an age of abundant, not scarce, information, you'd curate lectures carefully, with focus on new & original, rather than offer a course on every possible topic. You'd create a sustainable economic model by focusing on technological rather than physical infrastructure, & by getting people of means to pay for a specialized experience. You'd also construct a robust network so people could access resources whenever & from wherever they like, & you'd give them the tools to collaborate beyond the lecture hall. Why not fulfill the university's millennium-old mission by sharing ideas as freely and as widely as possible?

If you did all that, well, you'd have TED. …

unlike fearful old-school colleges, TED is finding that the more open it is, the more it becomes the global education brand of the 21st century"
chrisanderson  ted  tedx  conferences  education  creativity  learning  sharing  open  elite  ideas  curation  networks  colleges  universities  media  harvard  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Your blog sucks. And your work. And probably mine too.
"we “visual” people need to get off of our asses & write. Sounds painful, but I’m not talking about standardized-test/public-school, 5-paragraph-format, “This-leads-me-to-conclude” writing. I’m talking about real writing that communicates. Intended outcomes are labeled, process is documented, & you say why something was made into being. Tell me why.

I want more writing like Liz Danzico’s or Jason Santa Maria’s. I want thoughtful documentation of what it’s like to make stuff. Marco Arment, developer of Tumblr & Instapaper, does that exceedingly well. He lets us into the process, explains decisions & keeps us posted on his thoughts about his work & the things corollary to his development concerns. So, based on that, I ask you this: are we trying to keep design a mysterious black box? Because if that’s what you want, you’re doing a damn good job of it…

To do meaningful curation, it requires knowledge in multiple areas…Great designers are prone to have a wide base of knowledge."
frankchimero  writing  classideas  communication  process  criticism  curation  blogs  blogging  design  glvo  generalists  knowledge  bandwagons  enthusiasm  marcoarment  lizdanzico  jasonsantamaria  realwriting  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  thewhy  thinking  sharing  value  curating  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Doors of Perception weblog: Traditional knowledge: the dilemmas of sharing
"traditional and tacit knowledge does not lend itself to being codified, organized by knowledge managers, and put into an encyclopedia. It is is socially-owned and used. Like flowers that wilt when cut and put in a vase, indigenous knowledge tends to degrade quickly when removed from its context...
johnthackara  curation  knowledge  libraries  skills  context  knowledgeecologies  taxonomy  categorization  expertise  sharing 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Zara Gonzalez Hoang : Sketchbook : Saying goodbye to badly curated content.
"There are a few that are staying, ones that do a great job of selectively curating content and are not just me-tooing what everyone else is posting. But the rest, the ones that constantly post things that I see ricocheting across the blogosphere, those are out.
curation  curating  content  stockandflow  attention  branding  zaragonzalezhong  infooverload  me-tooing  originality  valueadded  meaning  purpose 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Editor and the Curator (Or the Context Analyst and the Media Synesthete) | Tomorrow Museum
"Also implied by the word curator is an intuitive sense of pattern recognition and glyphs. More visual than a mere editor, the Internet requires a sense of the relationships between words, images, space, and shapes. The reason we call web content “content” is because every kind of it — be it text or game or photograph — communicates differently on the net. Online, art is no longer just an image, it becomes a collage that you made. I used to know someone who worked as a sound designer and I was constantly fascinated when he would do something like rub his hand across his collar and say “that’s a character moving in a space suit.” The media application of this is writing text and knowing exactly how to visually represent it. This is more than just photo editing, it is multi-platform mediamaking... Like remix culture, having a collage mind is essential in making something standout on the web."
medialiteracy  curating  curation  culture  art  criticism  journalism  media  editing  editors  internet  technology  mediamaking  mediainvention  remixculture  multimedia  tcsnmy  generalists  collageminfd  cv  patternrecognition  sensemaking  glyphs  relationships  content  remixing 
july 2010 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

#daydetroit  #folkmoma  21stcentury  21stcenturylearning  21stcenturyskills  2837university  aaronstraupcope  aaronswartz  abstract  abundance  academia  access  accessibility  acoustics  actimel  activism  adamgreenfield  adamnathanielfurman  adaptability  add  adelegoldberg  adelinekoh  adhoc  adhocracy  administration  adrianheathfield  advertising  advice  aggregation  aggregator  agitprop  agitpropproject  alanjacobs  alankay  albums  aldoushuxley  alexandralange  alexklein  algorithms  alphabet  amandahughen  amateurs  amazon  ambiguity  amplifying  analog  anamaríaleón  anarchism  anarchy  andreasmurkdis  andreazittel  andrewnormanwilson  andybaio  andybeach  anendlesssupply  animals  anna-sophiespringer  anterogarcia  anthropology  applications  apprenticeships  archdaily  architects  architecture  archive  archives  arrangementcollage  art  artbooks  artconsumption  arteducation  arthistory  artifacts  artinstituteofchicago  artists  artistsbooks  artmuseums  arts  artseducation  association  atemporality  attention  attribition  audience  audienceparticipation  audiencesofone  audio  aura  aurasma  authenticity  authorities  authority  authorship  autoethnography  awareness  bandwagons  bardcollege  beauty  beginner  behavior  beingwell-read  benvalentine  bhqfu  bias  bibliodyssey  bibliographies  bilingualism  bioart  bjarkeingels  blackmountaincollege  blisssearch  blogging  blogs  bmc  bobgill  bookfuturism  booki  booklists  bookmaking  bookmarking  bookmarks  books  booksellers  bookshops  bookstores  bottom-up  bottomup  brain  brainpickings  branding  brasil  bravenewworld  brazil  brendancrain  brianselznick  bricolage  broadcast  brown  buildings  bureaucracy  buzzfeed  california  canon  cantkeepup  capitalism  capsula  captureparklandia  carissapotter  carlrogers  categorization  certainty  change  chaos  charlesstankievech  charliewoolley  chicago  childhood  chile  choice  choices  choiresicha  chrisanderson  christaflores  chronology  chronoogical  cinema  cities  cityasclassroom  claranubiola  classes  classideas  clayshirky  cloud  coherence  colinward  collaboration  collaborative  collageminfd  collecting  collections  collective  collectives  collectivism  colleges  colonialism  colpa  comedy  commenting  comments  commonpress  commons  communication  communications  communities  community  communitycenters  compliance  composition  computing  conferences  connection  connections  connectivism  constraints  consumerism  consumption  content  contentcreation  contentcuration  context  control  convergence  conversation  coolhunters  cooper-hewitt  cooperhewitt  coreyoberlander  coursedescriptions  cowbird  coworking  craft  crapdetection  creating  creation  creativity  criticism  critique  crosspollination  crowdfunding  culling  culturalliteracy  culturalproduction  culture  culturehacking  cultureNOW  curatedlearning  curating  curation  curatorialteaching  curators  curiosity  cv  danahboyd  dancolman  danmeyer  daringfireball  darkmatter  data  davecormier  davidkasprzak  davidsasaki  davidskok  davidwiley  deafness  dean  deathoflanguage  decisionmaking  decluttering  decolonization  decomposition  deconstruction  del.icio.us  delight  delivery  democracy  democratization  deschooling  design  detroit  dezeen  dialog  digg  digital  digitalanthropology  digitalcurators  digitalfacelifts  digitalhumanities  digitallayers  dioramas  disciplines  discourse  discovery  discursivespace  discussion  disruption  distraction  distributed  distribution  diversity  diy  dlrn2015  dom  domus  donnaloveday  douglascoupland  dpr-barcelona  drawing  dreamschool  driftdeck  droomschool  dynabook  e-learning  eastofborneo  ebay  ebooks  ecology  ecommerce  economics  edhirsch  edicola  editing  editors  edtech  education  educurator  edupunk  ego  elasticity  elation  elearning  elipariser  elisaoukalmino  elite  ellenlupton  email  encyclopedia  engagement  enroute  enthusiasm  ephemeral  ephemerality  epub  epubs  equity  ericascourti  ericschmidt  erinkissane  essays  ethanzuckerman  ethelbaraona  ethics  etienneturpin  events  evergreenstatecollege  everyday  evolution  excursus  excuses  exhibitiondesign  exhibitions  exhibits  experience  experimentation  expertise  experts  explodingschool  exploration  exposing  exposition  eyecandy  fabrica  facebook  facts  failure  faketv  faynicolson  fear  federatedwiki  feedback  feedbackloops  feeds  ffffound  fiction  film  filmmaking  films  filterbubble  filtering  filters  finance  finite  finland  flatness  flexibility  flickr  flickrcommons  flocks  florilegium  flow  focus  food  forbeginners  forgetting  form  format  frameofdebate  frankchimero  fredwilson  free  fun  furnishings  furniture  future  gabrielorozco  galleries  gamechanging  gardens  gardnercampbell  gatekeepers  gathering  gdp  GDPbias  gender  generalists  generator  gentrification  geolocation  georgeorwell  georgesiemens  georgevasey  geotagging  gifteconomy  ginza  github  glasshouse  global  globalism  globalization  globalvillage  globalvoices  glvo  glyphs  goldcoins  google  googlechrome  googlereader  granary  granarybooks  grandnarratives  grantmccracken  greggbordowitz  gregorybateson  growth  guidance  guides  guydebord  hackerspaces  hammadnasar  handulrichobrist  happiness  haptics  harvard  hashtags  hearing  helenmolesworth  hermankossmann  hierarchies  hierarchy  highbrow  highered  highereducation  hillbrookschool  history  historypin  hollypester  homicidewatch  horizontalidad  horizontality  hospitality  howeteach  howto  howwelearn  howweteach  howwework  html  huffingtonpost  human  humanism  humanities  humans  humor  hyperlinks  hypertext  ica  ideas  identity  ikea  imagery  images  imaginarycosmipolitans  imagination  imaginzation  inclusion  inclusivity  incubate  indeterminacy  indices  individual  infocus  infooverload  informal  informality  information  infrastructure  input  inquiry  insignificance  instagram  institutions  instruction  intelligence  interaction  interactivity  interdisciplinarity  interdisciplinary  interest  interestdriven  interested  interestedness  interesting  interestingness  interiors  internet  interpretation  interviews  intuition  ios  ip  ipad  iphone  iraglass  iritrogoff  isolation  istanbul  istanbulbiennial  iteration  itinerantlibraries  iwanbaan  jacobsam-larose  jamesgleick  japan  jasonsantamaria  jayrosen  jayxu  jeffjarvis  jenniferraab  jenniferstarkweather  jeremyhutchison  jeromebruner  jeromerothenberg  jimgroom  joannazylinska  joelspolsky  johannadrucker  johnberger  johncage  johnmilton  johnmoravec  johnthackara  jonahlehrer  jonathanharris  jonathanzittrain  jonudell  josefalbers  josephbeuys  josephgrima  joséortegaygasset  journalism  journey  jprangaswami  judithdobrzynski  juliahalperin  juliamorgan  juliarubin  juliazay  junaio  justinsaunders  juxtaposition  kaderatta  kasiacieplak-mayrvonbaldegg  katebowles  katharinatauer  katieday  katiepaterson  kenrobinson  kevinkelly  kindle  klaus  knowledge  knowledgeecologies  kottke  krisinbayans  labeling  labor  laciudadjubilada  lagunitas  landscape  language  languages  layar  lcproject  leahlovett  leahtriplettharrington  leapbeforeyoulook  learning  leighblackall  liberalarts  libraries  life  lifelonglearning  lifelongproject  lifestreaming  lifetime  light  lindaholmes  lindseystapleton  linkblogs  linkedin  links  lirongino  listening  lists  literacy  literature  lizdanzico  lms  loc  location  location-based  london  loneliness  longform  longtail  losangeles  lostimagedesk  louismoreno  love  lowbrow  lowresidencymfas  lucaantonucci  lucamüller  lukaswinklerprins  léopoldlambert  machineproject  magazines  make  makerspaces  making  mapping  maps  marcelkampman  marcoarment  marcoginex  mariapopova  mariekondo  marioschulze  markallen  markbernstein  markdion  marketing  markets  markowens  markusmiessen  marshallmcluhan  mascontext  masses  massimilianomollona  materialism  materials  matthewculnane  mattthompson  me-tooing  meaning  meaningfulness  meaningmaking  media  mediaarts  mediainvention  medialiteracy  mediamaking  meganshawprelinger  megcranston  memex  memories  memory  mercecunningham  merlinmann  messiness  metacognition  metadata  metafilter  metastory  methods  mexico  michellequreshi  middleeast  mikecaufield  mikemurawski  mikhailbakhtin  mimicry  minimalism  mobile  mocad  modeling  modernism  mone  mooc  moocs  moodmail  moon  moriokashoten  mountainschoolofarts  movement  movies  multimedia  multisensory  museum  museumashub  museumeducation  museumofthings  museums  museumstudies  museumwithoutwalls  museusm  music  narration  narrative  nasa  nature  nazca  ncm  needfrequentremindersofthis  neo-nomads  neologisms  nereacalvillo  netflix  netherlands  networkedknowledge  networkedlearning  networkedsociety  networking  networks  neuroscience  newaesthetic  newmedia  newpublicthinkers  news  newscoverage  newspaperclub  newspapers  newsstands  newutilitybelt  nicholasnegroponte  nickbell  nicolelavelle  nilkanthpatel  noahdavis  nolongerempty  nomadicschool  nomadism  nomads  nonfiction  norastenfeld  nostalgia  nothingnewunderthesun  noticing  noticings  now  npr  numbers  nyc  oberlincollege  objectivity  objects  obscurity  observation  oer  oldenburg  oliversmith  online  onlineresidencies  onlinetoolkit  oogabooga  open  open-ended  opencalls  openconversation  openculture  openeducation  openended  openendedstories  opensource  openstudio  openstudioproject  order  oregon  organization  organizations  originality  otaku  othermeans  output  overload  pacing  pagination  pairing  paper  paradiselost  paradox  paradoxofchoice  parklandia  parks  participation  participatory  participatoryart  passion  patternrecognition  paufaus  paulsilviapsychology  paulsmith  pedagogy  people  perception  performance  perspective  peterbuwert  petergadanho  phantomgalleries  philadelphia  philipjohnson  philosophy  phones  photography  physical  pinboard  pinterest  place  placemaking  planning  playlists  pln  poetry  poets  politics  pop-upculture  pop-upmuseums  pop-ups  popup  portland  postmodernism  postopolis  postopolisdf  power  practice  prediction  prelingerlibrary  presence  presentations  preservation  primaryinformation  print  printing  prints  process  production  professionaldevelopment  programdescriptions  progressive  progressiveeducation  progressivescholarship  projectideas  projects  psychogeography  psychology  publicdomain  publicdomainreview  publishers  publishing  purpose  quaderns  quisby  radio  randallszott  randomizer  ranzheng  rauschenberg  Re:depiction  reading  realtime  realwriting  rebellion  reblogging  rebuildfoundation  recommendations  recursion  reddit  reference  referencelibrary  reflection  reggioemilia  relationships  relevance  remixculture  remixing  reproduction  research  residencies  resources  retail  revolution  rhizomaticlearning  richardross  rickprelinger  risk  riskaversion  risktaking  robertventuri  robinsloan  robots  rodenyphillips  rodneygraham  rogerebert  rss  rules  russia  ruthasawa  sales  salrandolph  sandiego  sandinoscheidegger  sanfrancisco  satisfaction  satisfactionparadox  scaffolding  scalability  scale  scaling  scarcity  schizophrenia  school  schooldesign  schooling  schools  science  sciencefictioncon  sciencefictioncondition  scrolling  search  secondrenaissance  seeing  self  self-discovery  self-expression  self-surprise  sensemaking  senses  sensing  serendipity  serialization  service  sethprice  sfai  sfsh  shareddiscovery  sharing  sherryturkle  shopping  showing  shumonbasar  simonsenn  simplicity  situated  situatedart  situatedlearning  situationist  siônparkinson  skills  slow  slowness  small  smell  smithsonian  snark  snarkmarket  social  socialbookmarking  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialreciprocity  socialsoftware  society  sociology  software  sorting  sound  soundbites  soundmaps  sounds  soundscapes  space  specialists  specialization  speech  speed  spiraling  spirallearning  spotify  srg  stamen  stefanoharney  stephendownes  steveclay  stevemiranda  stewartlee  stimulation  stipulation  stockandflow  stores  stories  storytelling  streams  street  streetmuseum  structure  studentdirected  substance  subtractive  succinct  sugatamitra  sun  surprise  surveycasts  surveycourses  surveys  sustainability  tactile  tagging  tags  takethatedhirsch  tangible  tarsiladoamaral  taste  tastemakers  tastemaking  taxonomy  tcsnmy  teacherasmasterlearner  teaching  technology  ted  tedglobal  tednelson  tedx  teens  television  telling  tempo  temporary  temptation  text  textbooks  texture  the101  the2837university  theastergates  thecanon  thecityishereforyoutouse  themobilemuseum  thenewnormal  theory  thesumofhumanproduction  thewhat  thewho  thewhy  thingsmagazine  thinking  thisishuge  tiagomotasaravia  tijuana  timcarmody  time  timelines  timemagazine  timespaceawareness  titles  todo  tokyo  tonybennett  tools  topost  toread  toshare  touch  tovisit  traditionalschools  transdisciplinary  transformation  translation  transparency  travel  trendsetters  trust  truth  tumblr  tutorials  tv  twitter  ubiquitouslearning  ullataipale  umbertoeco  undergroundmuseum  understanding  uniqueness  universities  unschooling  urban  urbanism  urbanscale  us  vacatedspaces  value  valueadded  values  vannevarbush  vermontcollege  veronikaspierenburg  via:ablerism  via:allentan  via:anterobot  via:cervus  via:chrisberthelsen  via:grahamje  via:jarrettfuller  via:lukeneff  via:preoccupations  via:steelemaley  via:tealtan  vibeat  video  vimeo  visual  visualarts  voice  wafaabilal  waggledance  walkerartcenter  wandering  wardcunningham  warhol  warrenellis  watching  wayfinding  waysofseeing  waywards  wcydwt  weather  web  web2.0  webdesign  webdev  webnative  webpublishing  whatmatters  wikipedia  wikis  wikitankers  williamhanks  wisdom  wmmna  wonderstruck  workflow  workshops  world  writers  writing  xenophiles  xenophily  xhtml  xml  yahoo  yelp  yoshiyukimorioka  youth  youtube  zaragonzalezhong 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: