robertogreco + corydoctorow   75

Paper Books Can’t Be Shut Off from Afar – Popula
[See also (referenced within):
"Microsoft is about to shut off its ebook DRM servers: "The books will stop working""
https://boingboing.net/2019/06/28/jun-17-2004.html ]

“Private ownership—in particular the private ownership of books, software, music and other cultural information—is the linchpin of a free society. Having many copies of works of art, music and literature distributed widely (e.g., many copies of the same book among many private owners, or many copies of the same audio files, torrents or blockchain ledger entries on many private computers) protects a culture against corruption and censorship. Decentralization strategies like these help to preserve press freedom, and individual freedom. The widespread private ownership of cultural artifacts guarantees civil liberties, and draws people into their culture immanently, persistently, giving it life and power.

Cory Doctorow’s comment on Friday at BoingBoing regarding private ownership of books is well worth reading; he wrote it because Microsoft is shutting down its e-books service, and all the DRM books people bought from them will thus vanish into thin air. Microsoft will provide refunds to those affected, but that isn’t remotely the point. The point is that all their users’ books are to be shut off with a single poof! on Microsoft’s say-so. That is a button that nobody, no corporation and no government agency, should be ever permitted to have.

“The idea that the books I buy can be relegated to some kind of fucking software license is the most grotesque and awful thing I can imagine,” Doctorow said.

At this very moment, governments are forbidding millions of people, Chinese people, Cubans, Belarusians and Egyptians and Hungarians and many, many others all over this world, from reading whatever they want.

So if there is to be a fear of the increasing adoption of e-books such as those offered by Microsoft, and to a far greater degree, Amazon, that’s by far the scariest thing about it. Because if you were to keep all your books in a remotely controlled place, some villain really could come along one day and pretty much flip the switch and take them all away — and not just yours but everyone’s, all at once. What if we had some species of Trump deciding to take action against the despicable, dangerous pointy-heads he is forever railing against?

Boom! Nothing left to read but The Art of the Deal.

I don’t intend on shutting up about this ever, and I’m sure Doctorow won’t either, bless him.”
mariabustillos  books  print  drm  decentralization  2019  microsoft  kindle  china  cuba  belarus  egypt  hungary  censorship  totalitarianism  georgeorwell  society  freedom  corporations  ip  intellectualproperty  ownership  ebooks  libery  power  culture  corydoctorow 
19 days ago by robertogreco
Noam Chomsky takes ten minutes to explain everything you need to know about the Republican Party in 2019 / Boing Boing
"Amy Goodman from Democracy Now interviewed linguist and political philosopher Noam Chomsky and asked him to explain Donald Trump; in a mere 10 minutes, Chomsky explains where Trump came from, what he says about the GOP, and what the best response to Russiagate is.

Chomsky lays out the history of the GOP from Nixon's Southern Strategy, when the party figured out that the way to large numbers of working people to vote for policies that made a tiny minority of rich people richer was to quietly support racism, which would fuse together a coalition of racists and the super-rich. By Reagan's time, the coalition was beefed up with throngs of religious fanatics, brought in by adopting brutal anti-abortion policies. Then the GOP recruited paranoid musketfuckers by adopting doctrinal opposition to any form of gun control. Constituency by constituency, the GOP became a big tent for deranged, paranoid, bigoted and misogynist elements, all reliably showing up to vote for policies that would send billions into the pockets of a tiny rump of wealthy people who represented the party's establishment.

That's why every time the GOP base fields a candidate, it's some self-parodying character out of a SNL sketch: Michele Bachmann, Herman Cain, Rick Santorum, etc. Every time, the GOP establishment had to sabotage the campaigns of the base's pick, until they couldn't -- Trump is just the candidate-from-the-base that the establishment couldn't suppress.

You can think of the Republican Party as a machine that does two things: enacting patriarchy and white supremacy (Trump) while delivering billions to oligarchs (McConnell, Paul Ryan, etc).

Then Chomsky moves onto Russiagate: Russian interference may have shifted the election outcome by a few critical points to get Trump elected, but it will be impossible to quantify the full extent and nature of interference and the issue will always be controversial, with room for doubt. But campaign contributions from the super-rich? They are undeniable and have a massive effect on US elections, vastly more than Russian interference ever will (as do election interventions of US allies: think of when Netanyahu went to Congress to attack Obama policies before a joint Congressional session right before a key election): "The real issues are different things. They’re things like climate change, like global warming, like the Nuclear Posture Review, deregulation. These are real issues. But the Democrats aren’t going after those."
Well, why did that happen? It happened because the Republicans face a difficult problem. They have a primary constituency, a real constituency: extreme wealth and corporate power. That’s who they have to serve. That’s their constituency. You can’t get votes that way, so you have to do something else to get votes. What do you do to get votes? This was begun by Richard Nixon with the Southern strategy: try to pick up racists in the South. The mid-1970s, Paul Weyrich, one of the Republican strategists, hit on a brilliant idea. Northern Catholics voted Democratic, tended to vote Democratic, a lot of them working-class. The Republicans could pick up that vote by pretending—crucially, “pretending”—to be opposed to abortion. By the same pretense, they could pick up the evangelical vote. Those are big votes—evangelicals, northern Catholics. Notice the word “pretense.” It’s crucial. You go back to the 1960s, every leading Republican figure was strongly, what we call now, pro-choice. The Republican Party position was—that’s Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, all the leadership—their position was: Abortion is not the government’s business; it’s private business—government has nothing to say about it. They turned almost on a dime in order to try to pick up a voting base on what are called cultural issues. Same with gun rights. Gun rights become a matter of holy writ because you can pick up part of the population that way. In fact, what they’ve done is put together a coalition of voters based on issues that are basically, you know, tolerable to the establishment, but they don’t like it. OK? And they’ve got to hold that, those two constituencies, together. The real constituency of wealth and corporate power, they’re taken care of by the actual legislation.

So, if you look at the legislation under Trump, it’s just lavish gifts to the wealth and the corporate sector—the tax bill, the deregulation, you know, every case in point. That’s kind of the job of Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, those guys. They serve the real constituency. Meanwhile, Trump has to maintain the voting constituency, with one outrageous position after another that appeals to some sector of the voting base. And he’s doing it very skillfully. As just as a political manipulation, it’s skillful. Work for the rich and the powerful, shaft everybody else, but get their votes—that’s not an easy trick. And he’s carrying it off."

[Full interview: https://truthout.org/video/chomsky-on-the-perils-of-depending-on-mueller-report-to-defeat-trump/
https://www.democracynow.org/2019/4/18/chomsky_by_focusing_on_russia_democrats
https://www.democracynow.org/shows/2019/4/18?autostart=true

"NOAM CHOMSKY: Well, Trump is—you know, I think there are a number of illusions about Trump. If you take a look at the Trump phenomenon, it’s not very surprising. Think back for the last 10 or 15 years over Republican Party primaries, and remember what happened during the primaries. Each primary, when some candidate rose from the base, they were so outlandish that the Republican establishment tried to crush them and succeeded in doing it—Michele Bachmann, Herman Cain, Rick Santorum. Anyone who was coming out of the base was totally unacceptable to the establishment. The change in 2016 is they couldn’t crush him.

But the interesting question is: Why was this happening? Why, in election after election, was the voting base producing a candidate utterly intolerable to the establishment? And the answer to that is—if you think about that, the answer is not very hard to discover. During the—since the 1970s, during this neoliberal period, both of the political parties have shifted to the right. The Democrats, by the 1970s, had pretty much abandoned the working class. I mean, the last gasp of more or less progressive Democratic Party legislative proposals was the Humphrey-Hawkins Full Employment Act in 1978, which Carter watered down so that it had no teeth, just became voluntary. But the Democrats had pretty much abandoned the working class. They became pretty much what used to be called moderate Republicans. Meanwhile, the Republicans shifted so far to the right that they went completely off the spectrum. Two of the leading political analysts of the American Enterprise Institute, Thomas Mann, Norman Ornstein, about five or 10 years ago, described the Republican Party as what they called a “radical insurgency” that has abandoned parliamentary politics.

Well, why did that happen? It happened because the Republicans face a difficult problem. They have a primary constituency, a real constituency: extreme wealth and corporate power. That’s who they have to serve. That’s their constituency. You can’t get votes that way, so you have to do something else to get votes. What do you do to get votes? This was begun by Richard Nixon with the Southern strategy: try to pick up racists in the South. The mid-1970s, Paul Weyrich, one of the Republican strategists, hit on a brilliant idea. Northern Catholics voted Democratic, tended to vote Democratic, a lot of them working-class. The Republicans could pick up that vote by pretending—crucially, “pretending”—to be opposed to abortion. By the same pretense, they could pick up the evangelical vote. Those are big votes—evangelicals, northern Catholics. Notice the word “pretense.” It’s crucial. You go back to the 1960s, every leading Republican figure was strongly, what we call now, pro-choice. The Republican Party position was—that’s Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, all the leadership—their position was: Abortion is not the government’s business; it’s private business—government has nothing to say about it. They turned almost on a dime in order to try to pick up a voting base on what are called cultural issues. Same with gun rights. Gun rights become a matter of holy writ because you can pick up part of the population that way. In fact, what they’ve done is put together a coalition of voters based on issues that are basically, you know, tolerable to the establishment, but they don’t like it. OK? And they’ve got to hold that, those two constituencies, together. The real constituency of wealth and corporate power, they’re taken care of by the actual legislation.

So, if you look at the legislation under Trump, it’s just lavish gifts to the wealth and the corporate sector—the tax bill, the deregulation, you know, every case in point. That’s kind of the job of Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, those guys. They serve the real constituency. Meanwhile, Trump has to maintain the voting constituency, with one outrageous position after another that appeals to some sector of the voting base. And he’s doing it very skillfully. As just as a political manipulation, it’s skillful. Work for the rich and the powerful, shaft everybody else, but get their votes—that’s not an easy trick. And he’s carrying it off.

And, I should say, the Democrats are helping him. They are. Take the focus on Russiagate. What’s that all about? I mean, it was pretty obvious at the beginning that you’re not going to find anything very serious about Russian interference in elections. I mean, for one thing, it’s undetectable. I mean, in the 2016 election, the Senate and the House went the same way as the executive, but nobody claims there was Russian interference there. In fact, you know, Russian interference in the election, if it existed, was very slight, much less, say, than interference by, say, Israel. Israel… [more]
amygoodman  noamchomsky  corydoctorow  donaldtrump  republicans  us  politics  extremism  billionaires  inequality  campaignfinance  money  power  policy  mitchmcconnell  paulryan  abortion  nra  guns  evangelicals  richardnixon  ronaldreagan  georgehwbush  govenment  corporatism  corruption  russiagate  legislation  wealth  oligarchy  plutocracy  paulweyrich  southernstrategy  racism  race  gop  guncontrol  bigotry  misogyny  establishment  michelebachman  hermancain  ricksantoram  patriarchy  whitesupremacy  netanyahu  barackobama  congress  climatechange  canon  democrats  democracy  insurgency  radicalism  right  labor  corporations  catholics  2019  israel  elections  influence 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Poverty is a tax on cognition - Boing Boing
[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6_scuce5TA ]

"In an outstanding lecture at the London School of Economics, Macarthur "genius award" recipient Sendhil Mullainathan explains his research on the psychology of scarcity, a subject that he's also written an excellent book about.

Mullainathan begins by establishing the idea that your cognition is limited -- you can only think about a limited number of things at one time, and when the number of things you have to pay attention to goes beyond a certain threshold, you start making errors. Then he explains how poor people have a lot more things they have to pay attention to. In the UK, we make fun of politicians for being so out of touch that they don't know the price of a pint of milk -- but poor people have to keep track of the price of everything they require. There's no room for error. Spend too much on the milk and you can't afford the bread.

That's just one of the many taxes on the cognitive load of poor people. David Graeber's Utopia of Rules details another: figuring out what rich people are thinking. Poor people who piss off rich people face reprisals far beyond those that rich people can expect from each other or from poor people.

This isn't unique to cash-poverty. Mullainathan asks his audience to recall what life is like when they're "time poor" -- on a deadline or otherwise overburdened. This scarcity can focus your attention, yes: we've all had miraculous work-sprints to meet a deadline. But it does so at the expense of thoughtful attention to longer-term (but equally important) priorities: that's why we stress-eat, skip the gym when our workload is spiking, and miss our kids' sports' games when the pressure is on at work.

The experimental literature shows startling parallels between the two conditions: time scarcity and cash scarcity. This leads to a series of policy proscriptions that are brilliant (for example, when we create means-tested benefits that require poor people to go through difficult bureaucratic processes, we're taxing their scarcest and most precious resource). He also recounts how this parallel is useful in creating an empathic link between rich and powerful people like hedge fund managers and the poorest people alive.

Why does poverty persist? Why do successful people get things done at the last minute? A single psychology--the psychology of scarcity--connects these seemingly unconnected questions. The research in our book shows how scarcity creates its own mindset. Understanding this mindset sheds light on our personal problems as well as the broader social problem of poverty and what we can do about it."
corydoctorow  equality  poverty  sendhilmullainathan  cognition  attention  davidgraeber  economics  decisionmaking  time  money  debttraps  scarcity  allnighters  timescarcity  moneyscarcity  tunneling 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Creative License: how the hell did sampling get so screwed up and what the hell do we do about it? - Boing Boing
"Kembrew McLeod and Peter DiCola's Creative License: The Law and Culture of Digital Sampling is a fantastic and deep look at the business, art, culture, ethics, history and future of musical sampling. The authors -- respected academics/writers/filmmakers -- undertook to interview a really amazingly wide spectrum of people involved in music production, and what emerges is a clear picture of how legal rulings, historical accidents, musical history, good intentions, naked greed, and conflicts of all kind came to produce our current, very broken system for musical sampling.
The interview subjects in Creative License include all manner of business people (managers, industry lawyers, execs, lobbyists, producers), musicians who want to sample but can't legally do so, musicians who got away with it before the law caught up with them, musicians who benefit from sampling licenses, musicians who've lost big due to licensing fees and lawsuits, musicians who think that sampling is a legitimate form of creativity, musicians who think it's a lazy way of making art; musicians who think that they should have the power to decide who might sample them and musicians who think that's absurd. They also talk to musicologists, lawyers (academic and commercial), economists, and so on -- producing a remarkable, in-the-round picture of the state of things as they stand.

A few clear truths emerge. When sampling works, it produces works that lots of musicians and fans love -- art that is both critically and commercially successful. The early days of sampling -- when the law wasn't very developed and no one was sure what was and wasn't legal -- yielded extraordinary albums that can't be produced legally today (the authors make a pretty compelling case that an artist would have to be insane to produce a song with more than one or two samples in it). When the market for commercial sample licensing is working -- when it's not being hijacked by lawyers and labels -- it can produce real commercial benefit for poor artists and their descendants, and these are often Black artists who got screwed by their labels when their music was originally recorded. Finally, all music is and always has been derivative, and there's no special creativity or lack thereof inherent to using or not using samples.

How screwed up are things? The best example of this is a back-of-the-envelope calculation of the cost to clear the samples on two of the best-loved, uncleared albums of all times: the Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique and Public Enemy's Fear of a Black Planet, both of which typify the kind of album that couldn't possibly be made today. By the authors' math, Black Planet would lose $6.8 million in sampling fees on 1.5 million sales; Paul's Boutique would lose an eye-popping $19.8M on its sales of 2.5m. (Kembrew and his publisher were kind enough to supply the chapter in question, along with the notes).

The authors conclude Creative License with a fairly depressing look at solutions -- voluntary, technical, legislative, artistic -- to the sampling deadlock. None of these are very convincing, but practically any of them would be preferable to the status quo.

Books about copyright usually focus on either art or law or business, but it's a rare book that manages to equally weight all three considerations -- Creative License gets it right. It's a fascinating and important read."
sampling  beastieboys  publicenemy  paul'sboutique  fearofablackplanet  copyright  music  corydoctorow  kembrewmcleod  peterdicola  licensing 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Grandma Got STEM | Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (+more!).
[via: https://twitter.com/junerubis/status/578840871992496128 ]

"Perhaps, like me, you are tired of hearing people say “how would you explain that to your grandmother?” when they probably mean something like “How would you explain the idea in a clear, compelling way so that people without a technical background can understand you?” In other words, “How would you explain that to a novice?”

You may also have heard the saying “That’s so easy, my grandmother could understand it.”

I would like to counter the implication that grannies (gender + maternity + age) might not easily pick up on technical/theoretical ideas. As a start, I’m planning public awareness / art projects using grandmothers’ pictures+names+connections to STEM. This blog is where I’ll collect the info.

Let me emphasize that I do not think that people who use the phrases above are doing so out of malice. For example, in response to Cory Doctorow’s provocative comment on boingboing, “I’ve never understood why geeks hold their grandmothers in such contempt,” one reader responded:

[image]

I’m glad that Grandma got STEM is helping people reconsider their language and attitudes toward senior women.

I’d also like to note that there are many ways to make contributions in the world — one is through the STEM fields. My goal is to celebrate women’s work in STEM, not to diminish the contributions of anyone else.

The project has sparked new conversations. Some readers have said, “I think my Mother/Grandmother did something with STEM, but I never really talked with her about it. I’ll get in touch with her and get back to you.” I’ve also heard from a number of enthusiastic grandmothers (STEM-mas) directly.

Many people have asked… My grandmother did “X” does that count? My answer so far has been… Certainly!!! I intend to be very inclusive with a broad definition of STEM. Senior women who are not grandmothers have also been included.

A buddy also said “Don’t forget the arts! STEAM!” But people rarely are skeptical of women’s critical involvement in fields related to arts and humanities. So for now, I’m gonna stick with STEM.

I hope you will consider responding to the call for submissions below. The project is ongoing – no deadline.

Thanks for your help.
Rachel Levy, Harvey Mudd College Mathematics

Call for submissions

Call for submissions – Grandma got STEM. Are you a senior woman working in a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) – related field? Know any geeky grannies? Email name+pic+story/remembrance to Rachel Levy: ggstem (at) hmc (dot) edu. Follow on Twitter: @mathcirque #ggstem Project site: https://ggstem.wordpress.com "
stem  science  mathematics  engineering  women  age  ageism  gender  rachellevy  maternity  mothers  motherhood  corydoctorow  steam  math  technology 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft — Backchannel — Medium
"I’d periodically played with Linux and other alternatives on my PC over the years, but always found the exercise tedious and, in the end, unworkable. But I never stopped paying attention to what brilliant people like Richard Stallman and Cory Doctorow and others were saying, namely that we were leading, and being led, down a dangerous path. In a conversation with Cory one day, I asked him about his use of Linux as his main PC operating system. He said it was important to do what he believed in—and, by the way, it worked fine.

Could I do less, especially given that I’d been public in my worries about the trends?

So about three years ago, I installed the Ubuntu variant — among the most popular and well-supported — on a Lenovo ThinkPad laptop, and began using it as my main system. For a month or so, I was at sea, making keystroke errors and missing a few Mac applications on which I’d come to rely. But I found Linux software that worked at least well enough, and sometimes better than its Mac and Windows counterparts.

And one day I realized that my fingers and brain had fully adjusted to the new system. Now, when I used a Mac, I was a bit confused."



"As mobile computing has become more dominant, I’ve had to rethink everything on that platform, too. I still consider the iPhone the best combination of software and hardware any company has offered, but Apple’s control-freakery made it a nonstarter. I settled on Android, which was much more open and readily modified.

But Google’s power and influence worry me, too, even though I still trust it more than many other tech companies. Google’s own Android is excellent, but the company has made surveillance utterly integral to the use of its software. And app developers take disgusting liberties, collecting data by the petabyte and doing god-knows-what with it. (Security experts I trust say the iPhone is more secure by design than most Android devices.) How could I walk my talk in the mobile age?"



"So I keep looking for ways to further reduce my dependence on the central powers. One of my devices, an older tablet running Cyanogenmod, is a test bed for an even more Google-free existence.

It’s good enough for use at home, and getting better as I find more free software — most of it via the “F-Droid” download library — that handles what I need. I’ve even installed a version of Ubuntu’s new tablet OS, but it’s not ready, as the cliche goes, for prime time. Maybe the Firefox OS will be a player.

But I’ve given up the idea that free software and open hardware will become the norm for consumers anytime soon, if ever—even though free and open-source software is at the heart of the Internet’s back end.

If too few people are willing to try, though, the default will win. And the defaults are Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Our economic system is adapting to community-based solutions, slowly but surely. But let’s face it: we collectively seem to prefer convenience to control, at least for the moment. I’m convinced more and more people are learning about the drawbacks of the bargain we’ve made, wittingly or not, and someday we may collectively call it Faustian.

I keep hoping more hardware vendors will see the benefit of helping their customers free themselves of proprietary control. This is why I was so glad to see Dell, a company once joined at the hip with Microsoft, offer a Linux laptop. If the smaller players in the industry don’t themselves enjoy being pawns of software companies and mobile carriers, they have options, too. They can help us make better choices.

Meanwhile, I’ll keep encouraging as many people as possible to find ways to take control for themselves. Liberty takes some work, but it’s worth the effort. I hope you’ll consider embarking on this journey with me."
apple  google  microsoft  dangilmour  linux  opensource  2015  community  hardware  dell  cyanogenmod  ios  android  windows  mac  osx  f-droid  ubuntu  firefoxos  firefox  os  mozilla  lenovo  richardstallman  corydoctorow  libreoffice 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Bruce Sterling's The Caryatids, my pick for best book of 2009, a novel of clear-eyed hope for the future - Boing Boing
"In The Caryatids, global warming has melted practically every government in the world (except China) -- leaving behind a slurry of refugees, rising seas, and inconceivable misery. But there are two stable monoliths sticking out of the chaos, a pair of "civil society groups" that embody the two major schools of smart green thought today: the Dispensation are Al Gore green capitalists based out of California who understand that glamor and profits, properly aimed, achieve more than any amount of stern determination and chaste conservation; their rivals are the Aquis, mostly European anarcho-techno-geeks who have abandoned money in favor of technologically mediated communal life where giant, powerful, barely controlled machines are deployed to save the refugees and heal the Earth.

The titular Caryatids are the seven clone-sisters of a Balkan war criminal (who is hiding out in orbit in a junk satellite), raised as part of a terrible fin-de-siecle plan to create a cadre of superwoman generals who would lead a militarized guerrilla force after the environmental catastrophe reached scale. Now they are scattered to the winds and divided among the world's superpowers, and the only thing they hate more than their "mother" is each other.

And the story unfolds, taking us on a tour of a 2060 Earth where the worst imaginable things have happened and yet humanity has survived. Is thriving. Not a perfect utopia, but not a tormented post-apocalyptic chaos either. Sterling's future is one in which the human race's best and most important and most deadly machine -- civilization -- survives its own meltdown.

More importantly, the future of The Caryatids is one in which human beings confront the terrible reality that technology favors attackers -- favors those who would disrupt the status quo because it gives them force-multiplier power, and undermines defenders because the complexity of a technological society always creates potential fault-lines that attackers can exploit. And in that society, Sterling's civil society types -- who care about saving the planet, even though they disagree about the best way to do this -- do their damnedest to build stable technological societies. Because in Earth's future -- and in Sterling's -- there's no going back to the land for us. Not because the land is too poisoned, but because billions of charcoal-burning hunter-gatherers are far more hazardous to the planet than a neatly ordered world of cities in which technology is used to minimize our footprints by giving us smarter handprints.

Most importantly, the future of The Caryatids is one in which there is hope. Not naive, wishful thinking hope. Hard-nosed, utterly plausible hope, for a future in which the human race outthinks its worse impulses and survives despite all the odds."
climatechange  brucesterling  hope  future  2009  corydoctorow  technology  technosolutionism  environmentalism  sustainability  novels  globalwarming  disruption  society  civilization  collapse  2060 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Kenneth Goldsmith - Talks | Frieze Projects NY
[Direct link to .mp3: http://friezeprojectsny.org/uploads/files/talks/Kenneth_Goldsmith.mp3 ]

"‘I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody Has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered’

A keynote lecture by the poet Kenneth Goldsmith, whose writing has been described as ‘some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry’ (Publishers Weekly). Goldsmith is the author of eleven books of poetry and founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb. In 2013, he was named as the inaugural Poet Laureate of MoMA."
kennethgoldsmith  copying  uncreativewriting  mercecunningham  writing  internet  web  online  remixing  culture  art  poetry  originality  appropriation  quantity  quality  curiosity  harrypotter  poetics  digital  reproduction  translation  displacement  disjunction  corydoctorow  change  howwewrite  pointing  data  metadata  choice  authorship  versioning  misfiling  language  difference  meaning  ethics  morality  literature  twitter  artworld  marshallmcluhan  christianbök  plagiarism  charleseames  rules  notknowing  archiving  improvisation  text  bricolage  assemblage  cv  painting  technology  photography  readerships  thinkerships  thoughtobjects  reassembly  ubuweb  freeculture  moma  outreach  communityoutreach  nyc  copyright  ip  intellectualproperty  ideas  information  sfpc  vitoacconci  audience  accessibility  situationist  museums  markets  criticism  artcriticism  economics  money  browsers  citation  sampling  jonathanfranzen  internetasliterature  getrudestein  internetasfavoritebook  namjunepaik  johncage  misbehaving  andywarhol  bobdylan  barbarakruger  jkrowling  china  creati 
august 2014 by robertogreco
3-D print your way to freedom and prosperity | Al Jazeera America
"The appeal of this movement is readily apparent. What’s not to like with a revolution that — according to tech gurus, media and politicians alike — is seemingly so democratizing, empowering and profitable?

But there’s a downside, too. The maker movement is born out of, and contributes to, the individualistic, market-based society that has become dominant in our time. More specifically, the movement fits well into what, nearly 20 years ago, the media theorists Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron called “the Californian Ideology.” According to this view, new technologies promise to create a class of high-tech entrepreneurs thanks to their ability to “empower the individual, enhance personal freedom and radically reduce the power of the nation-state.” All while allowing them to ignore or simply design their own way around the established political, economic and legal system. And thus clearing the way for the “unfettered interactions between autonomous individuals and their software” that perpetuate, rather than disrupt, that very system.

Makers and takers

The maker movement doesn’t, on the surface, appear to be particularly ideological. For those who lean to the right, the movement is representative of good old-fashioned economic values and entrepreneurial individualism. “Love the ‘makers,’ deride the ‘takers,’” goes their refrain. For progressives, the maker movement and its “hackerspaces” and “makerspaces” — workshops with tools and space for engaging in making — give an aura of grassroots community building and self-empowerment, from bowling alone (as political scientist Robert D. Putnam characterized our turn-of-the-century decline of social involvement) to making together. For libertarians, the maker movement fits into the common narrative of the “self-made man” who wields market power; only now self-making takes on a more literal meaning.

We’re not saying these elements don’t have kernels of truth to them. But this has led the maker movement to embrace a kind of naively apolitical, techno-economic, capitalist utopia that thrives on individualistic values and discounts the very public contributions to science, infrastructure and society that enable them to do what they do.

It’s not hard to see why so many different ideologies can incorporate the maker movement into their politics: It has one hell of a branding and marketing team. Maker Media — a spinoff company of O’Reilly Media, the technology publishing and conference empire — launched a widely circulated magazine, Make, produces the conference Maker Faire, and “also develops ‘getting started’ kits and books that are sold in its Maker Shed store as well as in retail channels.” All of this is in addition to glowing profiles in major outlets like BBC News."



"Maker technologies obscure the real labor and costs that are globally embedded in them. Today a small contingent experiences new opportunities to express itself creatively. But what emerges if this becomes the basis for a new economic development program? A society of makers would be one in which each worker internalizes the failings of the economic system by believing he or she is not sufficiently creative and ingenious. Others who fail can be assigned to this new class of noncreatives — again, “takers” instead of “makers.” And this is just for those with the privilege to try and claim a seat at the manufacturing table. What of the service workers today? Can maker ideology help, say, the hotel workers who struggle to keep their jobs? More likely, it becomes further cause for brushing aside labor issues, both domestic and abroad."



"There’s real collective democratic freedom to be gained from the maker movement. But it needs to shake off simplistic economic individualism and hypercapitalistic politics if makers want to represent a disruption of the existing economy. The interest by the White House illustrates how the maker community is less disruptive and more likely a new vein of social life to be incorporated in existing economic expansion. What the maker movement needs is to embrace more social views of the technologies’ potential — views oriented toward helping people do more than just play with tools and make personalized schlock."
3dprinting  culture  technology  ideology  californianideology  individualism  economics  society  2014  jathansadowski  paulmanson  policy  politics  markets  idealism  robertputman  sharonzukin  chrisanderson  corydoctorow  makers  makermovement  hackerspaces  makerspaces 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Locus Online Perspectives » Cory Doctorow: Cheap Writing Tricks
"So my favorite, foolproof way to start a story is with a person in a place with a problem, preferably in the first sentence. A named person in a defined setting is a signal to the reader’s human-being-simulator to get started assembling a skeletal frame upon which to hang future details about this ‘‘person.’’"

[via: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2014/02/first-sentence-problems.html ]
fiction  writing  corydoctorow  howwewrite  advice  firstsentences  setting  characters 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: I think the big mistake in schools is trying to...
""I think the big mistake in schools is trying to teach children anything, and by using fear as the basic motivation. Fear of getting failing grades, fear of not staying with your class, etc. Interest can produce learning on a scale compared to fear as a nuclear explosion to a firecracker."


Stanley Kubrick

==

Preach it, Stan!

From Cory: What’s more, the emphasis on standardized testing and synchronized learning means that if a kid walks into a grade one classroom on fire about some book he’s read — as I did, when I first picked up ALICE IN WONDERLAND and was whisked away by it — the teacher *must* say, “Sorry, as much as you’re enjoying your first passionate love-affair with a book, as much as you’ve just had a conversion experience to being a reader, as much as you have reached a point where you are synthesizing all the stuff we’ve taught you thus far, IT’S TIME TO STOP. Now is the time when we do subtraction, not reading. If you haven’t learned your subtraction by the time the standardized test rolls around, you might flunk out, I might have my pay cut, and the school might lose its funding."


A large slice of a teacher’s real job is to watch students for their moments of satori, their moments of synthesis, and then LEAVE THEM THE FUCK ALONE. Get out of the way.

But the relentless, blind, idiotic market logic of education — schools as factories whose product is educated children; parents as customers; teachers as employees; governments as management; taxpayers as shareholders — produces a system where any real learning — synthesis, deep knowledge acquisition — is accidental and must squeeze through the cracks left in the relentless pursuit of good quarterly numbers to report to the shareholders.

I despair for the future, some days."
learning  teaching  education  factoryschools  2013  corydoctorow  satori  synthesis  children  numbers  testing  standardizedtesting  business  schoolasbusiness  unschooling  deschooling  stanleykubrick 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Just because something has value doesn't mean it has a price | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"The reasoning for DRM goes like this: "I sold you this [ebook/game/video] for the following uses. If you figure out a way to get any more value out of it, it belongs to me, and you can't have it, until and unless I decide to sell it to you.""

"If every shred needs to be accounted for and paid for, then the harvest won't happen. Paying for every link you make, or every link you count, or every document you analyse is a losing game. Forget payment: the process of figuring out who to pay and how much is owed would totally swamp the expected return from whatever it is you're planning on making out of all those unloved scraps.

In other words, if all latent value from our activity has a price-tag attached to it, it won't get us all paid – instead, it will just stop other people from making cool, useful, interesting and valuable things out of our waste-product."
positiveexternalities  drm  jaronlanier  culturalproduction  facebook  google  search  networkeffect  corporatism  commoditization  leisurearts  creativity  music  2013  externalities  economics  corydoctorow  behavior  artleisure  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
The American Crawl : Rhizomatic Listening: On Shuffling Audiobooks
"And this is what I’ve been thinking about: the shift in narrative as a result of audio shuffle…

Cortazar’s Hopscotch supposedly works in random-ish order.

I think a more controlled chaos could also work. I think of the three parts of Skippy Dies and, considering Paul Murray tells you exactly what happens by the end of the book in the title, wonder how my experience would be altered if I shuffled the three parts of the books. Ditto the five parts (and three bound volumes) of Bolano’s 2666.

I think of Deleuze and Guittari’s notion of the rhizome. A model for looking at research and culture, the notion of the rhizome differs significantly from traditional tree-like hierarchies. Seeing multiple points of entry and exploration, they write that “any point of a rhizome can be connected to anything other, and must be.” The world is shuffled. We curate rhizomatic experience everytime we create a playlist – a digital piñata of randomly falling sonic riches."
harukimurakami  skippydies  theunfortunates  bsjohnson  paulmurray  forthewin  corydoctorow  playlists  ipod  nicholasjaar  gabrielgarcíamárquez  rhizome  2666  robertobolaño  rayuela  hopscotch  randomization  machinemixing  remixing  listening  deleuze&guattari;  shuffling  audiobooks  juliocortázar  shuffle  2012  anterogarcia  remixculture  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
Venture Ethnography 1: a bi(bli)ography « Justin Pickard
"Project Cascadia is the test-case for a cluster of ideas I’ve been playing with for the best part of five years. A chance to break out my signature obsessions …

Hauntings, world expos, gonzo journalism, science fiction, systems, geopolitics, utopianism, virtuality, globalisation, the sublime, resilience, collapsonomics, aesthetics, architecture, environmentalism, infrastructure, design, futures studies, sovereignty, atemporality, risk, the nation-state, the uncanny, Americana, technoscience, cyberpunk, multispecies ethnography, fiction, capitalism, the human senses, counterfactual history, media and cyborgs (and media cyborgs)

… and nail them to the mast of a weird and interstitial sort of boat; a soupy, hybrid writing practice that would combine the best of ethnography, journalism and science fiction.

In lieu of a biography, then, I’m offering a bibliography. Five years of my brain, in books, articles, essays, and blog posts…"
urbanism  jgballard  richardbarbrook  marcaugé  warrenellis  jenniferegan  bradleygarrett  donnaharaway  naomiklein  brunolatour  ursulaleguin  ianmacdonald  suketumehta  chinamieville  jimrossignol  michaeltaussig  huntersthompson  adamgreenfield  brucesterling  thomaspynchon  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  cityofsound  danhill  davidgraeber  matthewgandy  williamgibson  corydoctorow  douglascoupland  michaelchabon  jamaiscascio  laurenbeukes  journalism  mediacyborgs  cyborgs  geopolitics  aesthetics  utopianism  risk  atemporality  sovereignty  sciencefiction  cyberpunk  technoscience  ethnography  capitalism  globalization  collapsonomics  resilience  writing  projectcascadia  bibliographies  2011  justinpickard  bibliography  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: The Coming Century of War Against Your Computer - The Long Now
"Recognizing that we are necessarily transitory Users of many systems, such as everything involving Cloud computing or storage, Doctorow favors keeping your own box with its own processors and storage. He strongly favors the democratization and wide distribution of expertise. As a Fellow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (who co-sponsored the talk) he supports public defense of freedom in every sort of digital rights issue.

"The potential for abuse in the computer world is large," Doctorow concluded. "It will keep getting larger.""
storage  propertyrights  rights  content  property  cloudcomputing  cloud  internet  computing  web  ownership  2012  corydoctorow  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Seattle library hides 1,000 books around town for young people to find - Boing Boing
"The Seattle Public Library system's annual Summer Reading Program is called Century 22: Read the Future, and is tied in with the 50th anniversary of the Seattle World's Fair. Young people are encouraged to scour the city's landmarks for 1,000 books hidden throughout town, and then to re-hide them for other kids to find. Among the books in this summer's program is my own YA novel Little Brother, which is a source of utter delight for me."
libraries  seattle  books  seattlepubliclibrary  cascadia  2012  readthefuture  littlebrother  corydoctorow  play  games  reading  summerreading  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
A Whip to Beat Us With
"For too long, publishers have been worrying about the wrong thing, chasing pie-in-the-sky DRM that has never worked at stopping piracy, and will never work. In the process, they’ve fashioned a scourge for their own industry—a multimillion-dollar liability that their customers will have to absorb in order for publishers to get back any leverage at the bargaining table. And every book you allow a tech company to sell with DRM only increases that liability."
1998  dmca  jimhines  technology  ebooks  books  apple  kindle  publishers  2012  corydoctorow  amazon  publishing  copyright  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
28c3: The coming war on general computation - YouTube
"The upshot: a world of ubiquitous malware, where everything we do to make things better only makes it worse, where the tools of liberation become tools of oppression.
Our duty and challenge is to devise systems for mitigating the harm of general purpose computing without recourse to spyware, first to keep ourselves safe, and second to keep computers safe from the regulatory impulse."

[Transcript: http://boingboing.net/2012/01/10/lockdown.html ]
society  anarchy  anarchism  2011  technology  law  anonymous  lulz  security  drm  future  occupywallstreet  ows  corydoctorow  computers  generalcomputation  copyright 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Don't Go Back to School: A handbook for learning anything by Kio Stark — Kickstarter
"Don’t Go Back to School  is a handbook for independent learning that shows you how to learn almost anything without school. If you’re thinking about going back to school or about the possibility of self-taught learning, read this book first! Don’t Go Back to School will help you figure out if you can do it on your own—and it’ll show you how. It might just save you a gazillion dollars in tuition fees, and spare you the yoke of student loans for years to come."
kiostark  unschooling  deschooling  learning  books  kickstarter  2011  danielsinker  corydoctorow  quinnnorton  selfeducated  self-directedlearning  autodidactism  autodidacts  brepettis  skillshare  dropouts  education  cv  autodidacticism  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Uncreative Writing - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"W/ an unprecedented amount of available text, our problem is not needing to write more of it; instead, we must learn to negotiate vast quantity that exists. How I make my way through this thicket of info—how I manage it, parse it, organize & distribute it—is what distinguishes my writing from yours.

…Marjorie Perloff has recently begun using the term "unoriginal genius" to describe this tendency emerging in literature. Her idea is that, because of changes brought on by technology & Internet, our notion of genius—a romantic, isolated figure—is outdated…updated notion of genius would have to center around one's mastery of information & its dissemination. Perloff…coined another term, "moving information," to signify both the act of pushing language around as well as the act of being emotionally moved by that process…posits that today's writer resembles more a programmer than tortured genius, brilliantly conceptualizing, constructing, executing, & maintaining a writing machine."



"For the past several years, I've taught a class at the University of Pennsylvania called "Uncreative Writing." In it, students are penalized for showing any shred of originality and creativity. Instead they are rewarded for plagiarism, identity theft, repurposing papers, patchwriting, sampling, plundering, and stealing. Not surprisingly, they thrive. Suddenly what they've surreptitiously become expert at is brought out into the open and explored in a safe environment, reframed in terms of responsibility instead of recklessness.

We retype documents and transcribe audio clips. We make small changes to Wikipedia pages (changing an "a" to "an" or inserting an extra space between words). We hold classes in chat rooms, and entire semesters are spent exclusively in Second Life. Each semester, for their final paper, I have them purchase a term paper from an online paper mill and sign their name to it, surely the most forbidden action in all of academia. Students then must get up and present the paper to the class as if they wrote it themselves, defending it from attacks by the other students. What paper did they choose? Is it possible to defend something you didn't write? Something, perhaps, you don't agree with? Convince us.

All this, of course, is technology-driven. When the students arrive in class, they are told that they must have their laptops open and connected. And so we have a glimpse into the future. And after seeing what the spectacular results of this are, how completely engaged and democratic the classroom is, I am more convinced that I can never go back to a traditional classroom pedagogy. I learn more from the students than they can ever learn from me. The role of the professor now is part party host, part traffic cop, full-time enabler.

The secret: the suppression of self-expression is impossible. Even when we do something as seemingly "uncreative" as retyping a few pages, we express ourselves in a variety of ways. The act of choosing and reframing tells us as much about ourselves as our story about our mother's cancer operation. It's just that we've never been taught to value such choices."
technology  writing  creativity  research  literature  marjorieperloff  internet  information  genius  2011  plagiarism  digitalage  poetry  classideas  marcelduchamp  readymade  remix  remixing  remixculture  briongysin  art  1959  christianbök  machines  machinegeneratedliterature  automation  democracy  coding  computing  wikipedia  academia  gertrudestein  andywarhol  matthewbarney  walterbenjamin  jeffkoons  williamsburroughs  detournement  replication  namjunepaik  sollewitt  jackkerouac  corydoctorow  muddywaters  raymondqueneau  oulipo  identityciphering  intensiveprogramming  jonathanswift  johncage  kennethgoldsmith  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
LITTLE BROTHER LIVE
"I am adapting and directing Cory Doctorow’s novel Little Brother for Custom Made Theatre Company, opening January 2012 in San Francisco. I’ll be blogging about the process here. Blog posts will include insights into the process of adapting the novel for the stage, changes that our production will make (spoilers!), and the process of staging the play. Single tickets aren’t on sale yet, but you can purchase a subscription to Custom Made’s full 2011-12 Season on their website. Want to get involved? Check back soon for information about auditions, design positions, and how you can support the production."
littlebrother  sanfrancisco  theater  custommade  2012  books  adaptation  corydoctorow  blogs  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow’s craphound.com » TEDxObserver talk on kids and privacy
"Here's a video of my talk on kids, privacy and social media ("A Skinner box that trains you to under-value your privacy: how do we make kids care about online privacy?") at last month's TEDxObserver event in London. It was a great day and there were a ton of interesting talks (the set is here)."
corydoctorow  youth  teens  privacy  cyberoptimism  parenting  teaching  technology  socialmedia  safety  facebook  tedxobserver  socialnetworking  bfskinner  psychology  tcsnmy  toshare  classideas  todiscuss  behavior  2011  anonymity  social  freedom  networkeducation  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Twitter Revolution Must Die
"My sarcasm is, of course, a thinly veiled attempt to point out how absurd it is to refer to events in Iran, Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere as the Twitter Revolution, the Facebook Revolution, and so on. What we call things, the names we use to identify them, has incredible symbolic power, and I, for one, refuse to associate corporate brands with struggles for human dignity."
twitter  facebook  politics  egypt  tunisia  ulisesmejias  ethanzuckerman  malcolmgladwell  clayshirky  corydoctorow  democracy  terminology  socialnetworking  2011  revolution  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
mini. Quiet Babylon | In Defence (but not Praise) of Fans
"I don’t remember where but I remember reading that pretty much everyone thinks of high school as being a place that was full of cliques but thinks as themselves as someone who kind of floated between them without really belonging to any one in particular…

The kind of people Cory celebrates here will always be my people. I will always have a soft spot for them, especially for the younger ones, constructing shells to keep the hateful, hateful world out. But there comes a point of growing, a point where you can look back at your own Martian’s distance from a Martian’s distance and you recognize that there too, there were empty habits or worse."
timmaly  corydoctorow  cliques  cosmopolitanism  opinions  selfimage  identity  normal  whatisnormal  adolescence  superiority  difference  pretension  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Steven Johnson's Where Good Ideas Come From: multidisciplinary hymn to diversity, openness and creativity - Boing Boing
"if you want to be innovative, you need to put yourself into innovative environments: places where lots of contradictory ideas from many disciplines are crossing paths, where institutions and governments don't over-regulate or conspire to crush new ideas; where existing platforms stand ready to have new platforms built atop them, as TCP/IP, SGML and various noodling experiments over many decades let Tim Berners-Lee invent the Web (itself a platform that many others invent atop of).

This is stirring stuff: a strong defense of open networks, shared ideas, serendipity (he even cites Boing Boing as a counter to doomsayers who say that the net's directed search creates a serendipity-free echo chamber) and minimal control over ideas so that they can migrate to those who would use them in ways their "creators" can't conceive of. These are axioms for many of us who grew up with the Internet and the Web…"
innovation  ideas  stevenjohnson  corydoctorow  invention  crosspollination  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  web  internet  boingboing  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Some vaguely consistent threads around education in my morning procrastination break. - bengoldacre
"we're living through a technological revolution, which creates changes in what can be cognitively outsourced & what's worth learning, & where some people can press ahead by leaving out the pointless stuff…this stuff about local people setting up education academies is all very well, but what I’d like to see is a visionary nerd school, like a geeky version of Summerhill but set up by, I don’t know, Tim O’Reilly, Suw Charman, Cory Doctorow, Bruce Schneier, Petra Boynton, Vaughan Bell & others. But the inevitable reality is that a lot of individuals will be way ahead on this, educating themselves & cracking on, before institutions can have a hope of catching up. This might have implications for our hopes of living in a meritocracy, or at least it might in certain fields, and in certain countries. And then again it might not. But aren’t you glad to be alive? Normally living through “interesting times” somewhere means war and misery. For now, these changes really are just interesting."
summerhill  via:preoccupations  timoreilly  schools  ict  teaching  education  learning  uk  corydoctorow  meritocracy  bruceschneier  petraboyton  vaughanbell  suwcharman  bengoldacre  technology  change  gamechanging  autodidacts  unschooling  deschooling  democratic  science  medicine  tcsnmy  curriculum  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Why Robin Sloan is the Future of Publishing (and Science Fiction) | Wet Asphalt [Gets right to the heart of (a) why I love Robin's brand of science fiction; and (b) how the content is also related to the process of its creation.]
"While Bruce Sterling & Cory Doctorow & Vernor Vinge fantasize about Singularity or augmented reality or 3D printers that can reproduce themselves (which, incidentally, all appeal heavily to juvenile power fantasies), Sloan is writing a fiction that speaks to a world in which we find ourselves not exactly emancipated by technology but simply hyper-connected by it, our identities as people redefined by the media we share, media which we embrace & deeply care about even when it leaves us bewildered, co-opted, & reduced in a thousand ways to algorithms. It isn't "hard" Science Fiction, not by a long shot, but most "hard" SF long ago stopped being able to figure out how to be relevant to most readers (as can be seen by their sales figures), with its greatest practitioners, William Gibson & Neal Stephenson, turning instead to the present day, on the one hand, & history & alternate history, on the other. Sloan, however, has found an entirely different & exciting avenue of attack."
robinsloan  sciencefiction  scifi  writing  publishing  social  socialmedia  kickstarter  via:robinsloan  future  present  quantumcomputing  corydoctorow  singularity  williamgibson  brucesterling  vernorvinge 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow’s craphound.com >> Blog Archive » Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom: Utopianism and the problems with Whuffie [via: http://www.tuttlesvc.org/2010/04/cory-doctorow-on-utopianism.html]
"in general we have a pathological response to anything we measure. We tend not to measure the thing we care about; we tend to measure something that indicates its presence. It’s often very hard to measure the thing that you’re hoping for. You don’t actually care about how calories you eat; you care about how much weight you’re going to gain from the calories you eat. But as soon as we go, oh, well, calories are a pretty good proxy for weight gain, we start to come up with foods that are incredibly unhealthy but nevertheless have very few calories in them. In the same way, Google doesn’t really care about inbound links because inbound links are good per se; Google cares about inbound links because inbound links are a good proxy for “someone likes this page; someone thinks this page is a useful place to be, is a good place to be.” But as soon as Google starts counting that, people start finding ways to make links that don’t actually serve as a proxy for that conclusion at all.""
corydoctorow  future  whuffie  scifi  theory  measurement  testing  standardizedtesting  tcsnmy  schools  policy  observereffect  politics  economics  google  search  calories  dieting  food 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow, You Are a Consumer, Too - Freedom - Gizmodo
"I'm glad Apple ][+ came w/ schematics for circuit boards. I'm glad it encouraged generation of kids to tinker & explore. I'm also glad that I don't live in 70s & have to type in programs from a magazine anymore.
corydoctorow  ipad  hardware  ebooks  drm 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Why I won't buy an iPad (and think you shouldn't, either) - Boing Boing
"If you want to live in the creative universe where anyone with a cool idea can make it and give it to you to run on your hardware, the iPad isn't for you.
corydoctorow  freedom  hardware  opinion  publishing  journalism  ipad  consumption  comics  closed  business  boingboing  apple  drm  culture  ebooks  internet  technology  open  media 
april 2010 by robertogreco
An Open Letter to Cory Doctorow in Defence of My Mom - Quiet Babylonian
"When people talk about making a computer that their mom can use it's because for a long time NO ONE HAS. My mom doesn't want to tinker with her computer (neither does my dad), she wants to use that time to send emails and photos and maintain the complex network of relationships that is the focus of her time online. She wants to tinker with family while I want to tinker with web pages. For her, the iPad might be perfect."
timmaly  corydoctorow  ipad  technology  open  hacking  simplicity  tinkering 
april 2010 by robertogreco
How to say stupid things about social media | Cory Doctorow | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"Here are some suggested things to say if you want to sound like an idiot when you talk about social media: [1] It's inconsequential – most of the verbiage on Twitter, Facebook & the like is banal blather...Criticizing the "banality" of Facebook conversation is as trite and ignorant as criticising people who talk about the weather. ... [2] It is ugly – MySpace is a graphic designer's worst nightmare. The word you're looking for isn't "ugly", it's "vernacular"...[3] It is ephemeral – Facebook will blow over in a year & something else will be along. Totally correct, but this is a feature, not a bug...There are plenty of things to worry about when it comes to social media. They are Skinner boxes designed to condition us to undervalue our privacy and to disclose personal information. They have opaque governance structures. They are walled gardens that violate the innovative spirit of the internet. But to deride them for being social, experimental & personal is to sound like a total fool."
corydoctorow  facebook  twitter  behavior  socialnetworking  myspace  criticism  design  culture  newmedia  internet  socialmedia  social  media  socialsoftware  critique  trends  web2.0  phatic  communication 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Small talk (phatic communication) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Small talk is conversation for its own sake, or "…comments on what is perfectly obvious." It is an informal type of discourse that does not cover any functional topics of conversation or any transactions that need to be addressed. The phenomenon of small talk was initially studied in 1923 by Bronisław Malinowski, who coined the term phatic communion to describe it. The ability to conduct small talk is a social skill."

[Referenced here: http://plsj.tumblr.com/post/331838144/criticising-the-banality-of-facebook regarding: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2010/jan/05/social-media-cory-doctorow ]
corydoctorow  cv  communication  phaticcommunication  phatic  smalltalk  socialskills  etiquette  informal  informality  conversation 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Locus Online Perspectives: Cory Doctorow: Close Enough for Rock 'n' Roll
"This is the pattern: doing something x percent as well with less-than-x percent of the resources. A blog may be 10 percent as good at covering the local news as the old, local paper was, but it costs less than 1 percent of what that old local paper cost to put out. A home recording studio and self-promotion may get your album into 30 percent as many hands, but it does so at five percent of what it costs a record label to put out the same recording. What does this mean? Cheaper experimentation, cheaper failure, broader participation. Which means more diversity, more discovery, more good stuff that could never surface when the startup costs were so high that no one wanted to take any risks."
corydoctorow  internet  culture  media  literacy  power  technology  journalism  music  creation  failure  risk  diversity  disruption  discovery  cost  participatory  participation  experimentation 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The WELL: Bruce Sterling: State of the World 2010
"you've treated your future as an "unpredictable lurching thing" & now you're all morose about that...your generation CREATED that situation! Ever heard of "disruptive innovation," "disintermediation," "offshoring," "small pieces loosely joined," "de-monetization," "plug & play," "the network as a platform"?...Guys w/ stacks of gold bars & working oil wells don't have stability! Much less guys like you...want some security? Demand government housing subsidies & guaranteed minimum income! They bailed out every broke mogul...might as well bail out civil population...You're Canadian always in Cali married to Briton always in Japan...you're not gonna "end up" anywhere. Forget about that...you have made your mobile bed...lie in it."..."coherent picture of your future."...imagine you're 3yo. You want to give your Dad, back in 1974, a coherent picture of 2010...something very actionable, lucid & practical...tell me what you oughta tell him about 2010, back in 1974. Use words of 1 syllable"
brucesterling  corydoctorow  2010  futurology  futurism  future  politics  business  media  environment  predictions  china  brasil  nomads  neo-nomads  technology  society  culture  commentary  google  world  life  intelligence  fear  pessimism  optimism  jonlebkowsky  jamaiscascio  brazil 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Your local stationers’ shop « Snarkmarket
"key point seems to be that book­store patrons today are kind of like Repub­li­can Party — almost every­one who hasn’t given up on the project alto­gether is a zealot. To stay alive, book­stores need to fos­ter their com­mu­ni­ties & har­ness that zealotry, mak­ing sure that they don’t lose a gen­er­a­tion of future zealots sim­ply because they didn’t show up. I like Doctorow’s for­mu­la­tion: “In that world, book­sellers become a lot more like blog­gers who spe­cial­ize in all things book­ish — wun­derkam­mer­ers who stock exactly the right book for the right peo­ple in the right neighborhood.” Now this actu­ally loses book­stores the pure democ­racy argu­ment. It will no longer be the case that book­stores are the only places offer­ing sal­va­tio — er, I mean, books. Book­stores might not be Catholic churches, where every­one is wel­come — but could be our hard, thrifty Puri­tan churches, whose mem­bers go out into world & demon­strate their sal­va­tion through their worldly works."
books  future  timcarmody  booksellers  business  clayshirky  change  corydoctorow  thebookworks  bookfuturism  bookservatives  technofuturism 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Robin writes a book (and you get a copy) » The Moving Monks, a mysterious package, and a contribution to the commons — Kickstarter
"What's an interesting remix opportunity for the text and illustrations from a short book, in part or in whole? Not just redistribution—that's easy—but something transformative. Any examples you can think of? Any new ideas—things you'd like to see?" [see comments]
creativecommons  copyright  remixin  books  writing  robinsloan  transformation  corydoctorow  publishing 
october 2009 by robertogreco
The package deal « Snarkmarket
"I’m going to put a marker down on this. In this tran­si­tional period, the most valu­able and suc­cess­ful exper­i­ments will come from peo­ple who find new ways to give read­ers BOTH dig­i­tal and print books — who in fact cre­ate incen­tives to encour­age BOTH kinds of read­ing — and that in turn value their read­ers as mem­bers of an inter­lock­ing com­mu­nity, not (just) iso­lated buy­ers at dif­fer­ent price points. And that means align­ing read­ers’ inter­ests and offer­ing them MORE than they might think they’d want."
books  robinsloan  snarkmarket  corydoctorow  ebooks  future  nearfuture  transitions  digital  analog  coaxing 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Tor.com / Science fiction and fantasy - Cory Doctorow's Makers
via: http://io9.com/5311990/how-to-survive-the-next-depression-with-cory-doctorow "it's a fun, smart thought experiment that basically asks the question: What if the people who read MAKE: magazine became activists who wanted to subvert more than licensing agreements? In a near future of economic collapse, unemployed hardware hackers start setting up guerrilla amusement park rides and making the good kind of trouble that earns people a little more freedom. And of course, sinister representatives from major entertainment corporations are hot on their tails . . ."
makers  corydoctorow  books  sciencefiction  tinkering  engineering  fiction  future  recession  greatdepression  diy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Pinkwater's EDUCATION OF ROBERT NIFKIN: zany and inspiring tale of taking charge of your own education - Boing Boing
"The first half of Robert Nifkin is your everyday Pinkwater: convulsively funny, zany, biting. There's plenty of biting, zany and funny in the second half, too, but what distinguishes it is the slow, delightful realization on Nifkin's part that learning -- especially eclectic, self-directed learning undertaken with your peers and with engaged teachers -- is incredibly fun.

This section sings. It vividly recalls my own alternative school history, which consisted of a fairly long period of horsing around and goofing off, followed by an equally long period of dedicated, intense, serious study inspired by all the exciting things I learned by horsing around."
danielpinkwater  novels  books  corydoctorow  reviews  unschooling  deschooling  homeschool  alternative  education  tcsnmy  learning  geek  nerd  passion  lcproject  self-directedlearning  self-directed  autodidacts 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: When love is harder to show than hate | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"one of the most perverse elements of copyright law: the reality that loving something doesn't confer any right to make it a part of your creative life. The damage here is twofold: first, this privileges creativity that knocks things down over things that build things up. ... Second, this perverse system acts as a censor of genuine upwellings of creativity that are worthy in their own right, merely because they are inspired by another work. ... This isn't a plea for unlimited licence to commercially exploit the creations of others. ... it's a vision of copyright that says that fannish celebration – the noncommercial, cultural realm of expression and creativity that has always accompanied commercial art, but only lately attained easy visibility thanks to the internet – should get protection, too. That once an artist has put their works in our head, made them part of our lives, we should be able to live those lives."
art  law  copyright  opinion  corydoctorow  fanfiction  creativity  via:preoccupations 
may 2009 by robertogreco
The High Priests of IT — And the Heretics - Now, New, Next - HarvardBusiness.org
"The dirty secret of corporate IT is that its primary mission is to serve yesterday's technology needs, even if that means strangling tomorrow's technology solutions. The myth of corporate IT is that it alone possesses the wisdom to decide which technologies will allow the workers on the front line to work better, faster and smarter... The fact is that the most dreadful violators of corporate policy — the ones getting that critical file to a supplier using Gmail because the corporate mail won't allow the attachment, the ones using IM to contact a vacationing colleague to find out how to handle a sticky situation, the incorrigible Twitterer who wants to sign up all his colleagues as followers through the work day — are also the most enthusiastic users of technology, the ones most apt to come up with the next out-of-left-field efficiency for the firm.
corydoctorow  productivity  it  technology  business  future  culture  innovation  change  corporations  creativity 
march 2009 by robertogreco
How are you coping with collapse-anxiety? - Boing Boing
"Like everyone, I'm starting to freak out a little about the state of the economy. Many of my good friends are out of work -- and some of them have been out of work for a longer period than I would have thought possible. It seems like every day, I pass another closed store or cafe on my way to the office. And of course, the suggestion file here at Boing Boing is full of stories of the collapsing property bubble in Dubai, the implosion of the South Chinese manufacturing cities, and a million indicators, large and small, of a crisis that is global, deep and worsening.
2009  economics  collapse  crisis  dystopia  banking  finance  corydoctorow  discussion  boingboing  fear  anxiety  society  optimism  pessimism 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Mobiles versus Laptops at Many Possibilities
"To argue that laptops are a solution as opposed to mobiles reinforces a dichotomy between mobile networks and the Internet that frankly should not exist." ... "The future is not mobile or laptops. It’s an unpredictable mash-up of phones, computers, and innovative connectivity solutions. The single most important thing that needs to happen is to lower the network charges and get mobile phones and networks running over IP so that the networked innovation that we beginning to see in the developing world can really take off."

[via: http://www.experientia.com/blog/the-olpc-versus-the-mobile-phone-a-false-dichotomy/ ]
olpc  mobile  phones  laptops  netbooks  future  connectivity  africa  corydoctorow 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The OLPC versus the Mobile Phone - A False Dichotomy | MobileActive.org
"Song is right when he says that "the future is not mobile or laptops. It’s an unpredictable mash-up of phones, computers, and innovative connectivity solutions." With definite trends towards greater openness in the mobile walled garden, it is a matter of time and pressure to achieve lower communication costs, IP-connectivity, open systems and standards, and bottom-up innovations develivered over a variety of devices. Mobile phones are an integral part of the equation because of their prevalence and ease of use for people all over the world. It is undeniable that there is much work to be done for the potential of mobile phones for social and economic evelopment to be realized, but leaving mobiles out of the universe of networked innovation is foolish. All Doctorow has to do is look around in every community in the world and he would not, in Steve Song's words, "underestimate what people with achieve with a tiny piece of screen real-estate as long as it's connected.""

[via: http://www.experientia.com/blog/the-olpc-versus-the-mobile-phone-a-false-dichotomy/ ]
olpc  phones  mobile  laptops  netbooks  corydoctorow  connectivity  africa 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: One Laptop Per Child - what went wrong? | Technology | guardian.co.uk
“Mobile phones are necessarily an interim step. Adding software...difficult or impossible without permission of a central carrier...very hard for local technologists who have a very particular, local itch that needs scratching ...Mobile phone use is always metered, limiting their use and exacting a toll on people who can least afford to pay it. Worst of all, the centralised nature of mobile networks means that in times of extremis, governments and natural disasters will wreak havoc on our systems, just as we need them most.
olpc  corydoctorow  technology  mobile  phones  education  digitaldivide  laptops  development  it  africa  future 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Locus Online Features: Cory Doctorow: Writing in the Age of Distraction
"Short, regular work schedule (20 minutes per day) + Leave yourself a rough edge (stop in the middle of a sentence leaving something to continue next time) + Don't research (save that for later) + Don't be ceremonious (there's no perfect work environment, don't bother trying) + Kill your word-processor (use a text editor) + Realtime communications tools are deadly (IM, email alerts, etc.)"
via:preoccupations  corydoctorow  writing  distraction  productivity  attention  psychology  srg 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: willing science fiction into fact | Books | guardian.co.uk
""I'm a presentist," he says, smiling broadly as he leans back in his chair. "All science fiction writers, whether they admit it or not, are writing metaphorically about the present. To extrapolate the future is really to comment on the now." ... "The job of a science fiction writer, historically, has been to understand how technology and social factors interact," he says, "how technology is changing society. An activist's job is to try to direct that change."
corydoctorow  sciencefiction  scifi  activism  littlebrother  privacy  howwework  identity  futurism  fiction  security  technology  future 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Viridianism's last note: surround yourself with beautiful, excellent things and get rid of all else - Boing Boing
See some of the comments like: "He wants to help the environment, yet his lifestyle involves numerous airplane flights. If his location on the planet is completely arbitrary, why doesn't he pick one place and stay put? It's obvious that Sterling's philosophy is still determined by his personal preferences, rather than an objective philosophy." AND "This sounds a lot like 'Consume as much as you like, just don't keep the evidence.' I don't mind it as an aesthetic but I don't think it's a useful way to live if you are trying to address or even helpfully acknowledge global warming. You're kidding yourself.

Also, encouraging people to live globally - as in, actually physically moving between countries frequently - is crazy consumptive and isn't going to be a sustainable activity any time soon. Don't pretend you aren't vastly over consuming your share of our natural resources."
materialism  consumption  conservation  economics  sustainability  minimalism  nomads  brucesterling  corydoctorow  green  technology  culture  philosophy  viridianism  globalwarming 
november 2008 by robertogreco
How Children Fail: angry lessons from failures to teach - Boing Boing [Cory Doctorow reads John Holt, Round 2]
""How Children Learn" was, most of all, an exuberant book, a celebration of the a-ha moments that Holt had been privileged to witness first hand and the lessons he'd learned about teaching. Even though it sometimes slipped into anger as Holt decried his own conceit and those of his peers in failing to get out of the way when kids want to learn, Learn is, first and foremost, a happy book.
corydoctorow  education  children  johnholt  books  howchildrenfail  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  learning  psychology  teaching 
september 2008 by robertogreco
How Children Learn: classic of human, kid-centered learning - Boing Boing [Cory Doctorow discovers John Holt, Mark Frauenfelder mentions new book project in the comments which are worth reading too.]
"As I worked my way through the book, I found myself scowling, nodding, smiling, even laughing aloud at the wonderful inventiveness of the kids in Holt's life, including supposedly incorrigible or dumb kids -- kids who learned so much on their own, taking the grownups along for the ride, but firmly steering the course of their learning from the earliest ages. I was struck by three passages in particular (reproduced below). I think I'll stick them on the fridge to remind me of how to be a great dad and a great partner in adventure."
johnholt  unschooling  boingboing  corydoctorow  children  teaching  homeschool  education  learning  parenting  deschooling  society  schools  lcproject  books  howchildrenlearn 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Children's Books - Book Review - 'Little Brother,' by Cory Doctorow - Review - NYTimes.com
"It's a stirring call to arms when Doctorow writes: "Even if you only write code for one day, one afternoon, you have to do it. Computers can control you or they can lighten your work — if you want to be in charge of your machines, you have to learn to write code." The framers of the American Constitution were in a sense a bunch of political science nerds too, pulling all-nighters to hack together the code for a government without tyranny. "Little Brother" argues that unless you're passably technically literate, you're not fully in command of those constitutionally guaranteed freedoms — that in fact it’s your patriotic duty as an American to be a little more nerdy. "
corydoctorow  littlebrother  reviews  books  tcsnmy 
september 2008 by robertogreco
School of Everything: eBay for knowledge - Boing Boing
"this is the kind of thing I mean when I give lectures about "profiting from the information economy." Historically, the "information economy" has been assumed to be about reducing the supply of information so that only paying customers get it, and only on the terms that they pay for -- for example, the record companies would like an Internet where the only music that's available costs money, and once you buy the music, you can't sell it again or give it away... But SoE turns this on its head. The economic proposition is simple: you know something I want you to show me, and SoE will make it easy for us to meet and transact commerce to make this happen. It doesn't depend on no one else being willing to do this for free, nor does it control what you do with the information once you learn it. Indeed, this is a service that benefits from the wider spreading of information"
learning  education  internet  schools  deschooling  unschooling  teaching  socialnetworking  boingboing  corydoctorow  schoolofeverything  homeschool  distributed  lcproject 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Hypertext - The wide world of the web | Chicago Tribune | Blog
"We have the capacity to surveil and control adolescents ion a way we’ve never done before. We chase them indoors and then we tell them that all the virtual places they might gather, we need to surveil them because of the ever-present threat of pedophiles and because of the ever-present need to market to them. We've really hemmed in adolescence in a way we never have before."
corydoctorow  littlebrother  surveillance  privacy  children  adolescence  youth  freedom  childhood  society  parenting  interviews  books  opensource  security  boingboing  sciencefiction  design  obsolescence  apple  technology  creativecommons  blogging  writing  copyright  piracy  law  generations  optimism  rss  rfid  making  hacking  diy  internet 
august 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: The Outquisition
"What would it be like, we wondered, if folks who knew tools and innovation left the comfy bright green cities and traveled to the dead mall suburban slums, rustbelt browntowns and climate-smacked farm communities and started helping the locals get the to
alexsteffen  survival  survivalism  corydoctorow  distopia  future  leadership  innovation  collapse  society  classideas  cities  suburbs  crisis  peakoil  community  sustainability  environment  economics  worldchanging  planning  politics  freedom  food  local  futurism  green 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Locus Online Features: Cory Doctorow: Nature's Daredevils: Writing for Young Audiences
"the frightened and easily offended are doing a better job than they ever have of collapsing the horizons of young people...Literature may be the last escape available to young people today. It's an honor to be writing for them. "
corydoctorow  littlebrother  society  children  youth  teens  books  writing  subversion  control 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: Adopting (and Defending) Little Brother
"I don't know of another book which provides so much detailed information on how to transform its alternative visions into realities. And as such, this may be the most subversive book aimed at young readers in the past decade. I fear that in the current p
politics  privacy  corydoctorow  henryjenkins  subversion  books  littlebrother  policy  technology  security 
july 2008 by robertogreco
New Media Exemplar Library Overview
"We invite you to browse our New Media Exemplar Library entries, listed above. Each exemplar features a series of video interviews with a professional media maker, organized by chapter."
media  newmedia  pedagogy  informationliteracy  biggames  nickbertozzi  corydoctorow  matthewlamb  streetart  radio  blogging  education  sciencefiction  comics  vlogging  janemcgonigal  games  gamedesign  arg  mattiaromeo  ianbogost  djspooky  music  dj  videos  creativity  teaching  literacy  medialiteracy 
june 2008 by robertogreco
ParanoidLinux.org [making the OS from Cory Doctorow's Little Brother a reality]
"When those words were written, ParanoidLinux was just a fiction. It is our goal to make this a reality. The project officially started on May 14th, and has been growing ever since. We welcome your ideas, contributions, designs, or code. You can find us o
linux  privacy  security  opensource  littlebrother  paranoia  activism  corydoctorow  hacking  hacks  software  development  arg 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: How to stop your inbox exploding | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"1. Sort your inbox by subject 2. Colour-code messages from known senders 3. Kill people who make you crazy 4. Half-resign from mailing lists 5. Keep a pending list"
lifehacks  productivity  internet  tips  organization  gtd  overload  howto  corydoctorow  email 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Internet Evolution - Cory Doctorow - The Pleasures of Uninterrupted Communication
"You'd think that I ran some kind of IM in the background, and picked up the phone a dozen times a day to chat...You'd be wrong. But once you add an interruptive medium like IM, unscheduled calls, or pop-up notifiers of mail, flow turns into chop."
attention  communication  email  internet  overload  productivity  emailapnea  continuouspartialattention  alwayson  flow  technology  GTD  corydoctorow  online  writing  multitasking  im  addiction  culture  information  mobile  work  web 
march 2008 by robertogreco
17 Tips For Getting Bloggers To Write About You -- Cory Doctorow -- InformationWeek
amen to "Flash sites stink. Designers, architects and artists, this means you: putting your whole site into a giant Flash blob with no internal links, no way to copy a representative bit of text into a post or e-mail, and no way to point to a specific pag
boingboing  blogs  blogging  advice  memetics  publishing  web  online  internet  howto  corydoctorow  design 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Locus Online Features: Cory Doctorow: Put Not Your Faith In Ebook Readers
"When Nintendo can't get line-time for the Wii, what hope does a niche item like an e-book reader have?...[until we're all desktop fabberrs] put not your faith in hardware readers — take the easy way out and hack bits, not atoms."
kindle  ebooks  technology  manufacturing  nintendo  wii  literature  reading  corydoctorow  books 
march 2008 by robertogreco
"Intellectual property" is a silly euphemism | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"I argue that although knowledge is important and valuable, it's not property, and when we treat it as such, it makes us do dumb things."
corydoctorow  culture  copyright  content  property  rights  ip  knowledge  larrylessig  legal  law  language  technology  philosophy 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: why personal data is like nuclear waste | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"We should treat personal electronic data with the same care and respect as weapons-grade plutonium - it is dangerous, long-lasting and once it has leaked there's no getting it back"
corydoctorow  data  democracy  government  information  privacy  politics  law  technology  security  database  rights  tracking  future  uk 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Neil Gaiman - Neil Gaiman's Journal: Changing planes.
"Cory is one of the Explainers. The people who see what's going on, or what they perceive to be going on, and then turn around and tell everyone else, and once you've heard it their way you can't ever see it the old way again."
corydoctorow  fiction  sciencefiction  scifi  books  neilgaiman  liberty  freedom  writing  reviews  malcolmgladwell  music  williamgibson  brucesterling  douglasadams 
december 2007 by robertogreco
How Your Creepy Ex-Co-Workers Will Kill Facebook -- Facebook -- InformationWeek
"Columnist Cory Doctorow describes how Facebook and other social networks have built-in self-destructs: They make it easy for you to be found by the people you're looking to avoid."
corydoctorow  facebook  social  danahboyd  frinedster  myspace  socialgraph  socialnetworking  opensocial  networks  etiquette  evite  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  walledgardens  attention  blogs  convergence  networking  society  identity  privacy  culture  sociology  socialmedia  communication  aol  email  life  work  coworkers  history  trends 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow (kottke.org)
"There's nothing else that's going to make copying harder from now on...if your business model and your aesthetic effect in your literature and your work is intended not to be copied, you're fundamentally not making art for the 21st century."
blogging  media  copyright  corydoctorow  publishing  gamechanging  future  nytimes  andrewkeen  culture  web  internet  computers  online  ebooks  books  writing  blogs  boingboing  influence  ethics  plagiarism  larrylessig  ip  cc  art 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Internet Evolution - Cory Doctorow - The Future of Ignoring Things
"The network won't ever become more tractable. There will never be fewer things vying for our online attention. The only answer is better ways and new technology to ignore stuff -- a field that's just being born, with plenty of room to grow."
attention  continuouspartialattention  informationmanagement  software  information  spam  email  filters  productivity  rss  future  corydoctorow  internet  web  trends  technology  memory  overload 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Snitchtown - Forbes.com
"universal surveillance is seen as the universal solution to all urban ills. But the truth is that ubiquitous cameras only serve to violate the social contract that makes cities work."
surveillance  sou  sousveillance  security  rfid  privacy  politics  panopticon  urbanism  urban  future  design  cities  cctv  corydoctorow  london  us  history  public  citizenship  space  uk 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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