robertogreco + cloudcomputing   40

The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library on Vimeo
[parts of the video (from the introduction): "1. Libraries existed to copy data. Libraries as warehouses was a recent idea and not a very good one 2. The online world used to be considered rhizomatic but recent events have proven that it is actually quite arboretic and precarious. 3. A method of sharing files using hard drives is slow, but it is extremely resilient. This reversalism is a radical tactic agains draconian proprietarianism. 4. There are forces and trends that are working against portable libraries."]

[Book is here:
http://networkcultures.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NN07_complete.pdf
http://networkcultures.org/blog/publication/no-07-radical-tactics-of-the-offline-library-henry-warwick/ ]

"The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library is based on the book "Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries"
By Henry Warwick

The Personal Portable Library in its most simple form is a hard drive or USB stick containing a large collection of e-books, curated and archived by an individual user. The flourishing of the offline digital library is a response to the fact that truly private sharing of knowledge in the online realm is increasingly made impossible. While P2P sharing sites and online libraries with downloadable e-books are precarious, people are naturally led to an atavistic and reversalist workaround. The radical tactics of the offline: abandoning the online for more secure offline transfer. Taking inspiration from ancient libraries as copying centers and Sneakernet, Henry Warwick describes the future of the library as digital and offline. Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries traces the history of the library and the importance of the Personal Portable Library in sharing knowledge and resisting proprietarian forces.

The library in Alexandria contained about 500,000 scrolls; the Library of Congress, the largest library in the history of civilization, contains about 35 million books. A digital version of it would fit on a 24 TB drive, which can be purchased for about $2000. Obviously, most people don’t need 35 million books. A small local library of 10,000 books could fit on a 64 GB thumb drive the size of a pack of chewing gum and costing perhaps $40. An astounding fact with immense implications. It is trivially simple to start collecting e-books, marshalling them into libraries on hard drives, and then to share the results. And it is much less trivially important. Sharing is caring. Societies where people share, especially ideas, are societies that will naturally flourish."
libraries  henrywarwick  archives  collection  digital  digitalmedia  ebooks  drm  documentary  librarians  alexandriaproject  copying  rhizomes  internet  online  sharing  files  p2p  proprietarianism  sneakernet  history  harddrives  learning  unschooling  property  deschooling  resistance  mesopotamia  egypt  alexandria  copies  decay  resilience  cv  projectideas  libraryofalexandria  books  scrolls  tablets  radicalism  literacy  printing  moveabletype  china  europe  publishing  2014  copyright  capitalism  canon  librarydevelopment  walterbenjamin  portability  andrewtanenbaum  portable  portablelibraries  félixguattari  cloudcomputing  politics  deleuze  deleuze&guattari  web  offline  riaa  greed  openstudioproject  lcproject 
november 2018 by robertogreco
The Website Obesity Crisis
"Let me start by saying that beautiful websites come in all sizes and page weights. I love big websites packed with images. I love high-resolution video. I love sprawling Javascript experiments or well-designed web apps.

This talk isn't about any of those. It's about mostly-text sites that, for unfathomable reasons, are growing bigger with every passing year.

While I'll be using examples to keep the talk from getting too abstract, I’m not here to shame anyone, except some companies (Medium) that should know better and are intentionally breaking the web.

The Crisis

What do I mean by a website obesity crisis?

Here’s an article on GigaOm from 2012 titled "The Growing Epidemic of Page Bloat". It warns that the average web page is over a megabyte in size.

The article itself is 1.8 megabytes long."


Here's an almost identical article from the same website two years later, called “The Overweight Web". This article warns that average page size is approaching 2 megabytes.

That article is 3 megabytes long.

If present trends continue, there is the real chance that articles warning about page bloat could exceed 5 megabytes in size by 2020.

The problem with picking any particular size as a threshold is that it encourages us to define deviancy down. Today’s egregiously bloated site becomes tomorrow’s typical page, and next year’s elegantly slim design.

I would like to anchor the discussion in something more timeless.

To repeat a suggestion I made on Twitter, I contend that text-based websites should not exceed in size the major works of Russian literature.

This is a generous yardstick. I could have picked French literature, full of slim little books, but I intentionally went with Russian novels and their reputation for ponderousness.

In Goncharov's Oblomov, for example, the title character spends the first hundred pages just getting out of bed.

If you open that tweet in a browser, you'll see the page is 900 KB big.
That's almost 100 KB more than the full text of The Master and Margarita, Bulgakov’s funny and enigmatic novel about the Devil visiting Moscow with his retinue (complete with a giant cat!) during the Great Purge of 1937, intercut with an odd vision of the life of Pontius Pilate, Jesus Christ, and the devoted but unreliable apostle Matthew.

For a single tweet.

Or consider this 400-word-long Medium article on bloat, which includes the sentence:

"Teams that don’t understand who they’re building for, and why, are prone to make bloated products."

The Medium team has somehow made this nugget of thought require 1.2 megabytes.

That's longer than Crime and Punishment, Dostoyevsky’s psychological thriller about an impoverished student who fills his head with thoughts of Napoleon and talks himself into murdering an elderly money lender.
Racked by guilt, so rattled by his crime that he even forgets to grab the money, Raskolnikov finds himself pursued in a cat-and-mouse game by a clever prosecutor and finds redemption in the unlikely love of a saintly prostitute.

Dostoevski wrote this all by hand, by candlelight, with a goddamned feather."



"Everyone admits there’s a problem. These pages are bad enough on a laptop (my fan spun for the entire three weeks I was preparing this talk), but they are hell on mobile devices. So publishers are taking action.

In May 2015, Facebook introduced ‘Instant Articles’, a special format for news stories designed to appear within the Facebook site, and to load nearly instantly.

Facebook made the announcement on a 6.8 megabyte webpage dominated by a giant headshot of some dude. He doesn’t even work for Facebook, he’s just the National Geographic photo editor.

Further down the page, you'll find a 41 megabyte video, the only way to find out more about the project. In the video, this editor rhapsodizes about exciting misfeatures of the new instant format like tilt-to-pan images, which means if you don't hold your phone steady, the photos will drift around like a Ken Burns documentary.

Facebook has also launched internet.org, an effort to expand Internet access. The stirring homepage includes stories of people from across the developing world, and what getting Internet access has meant for them.
You know what’s coming next. When I left the internet.org homepage open in Chrome over lunch, I came back to find it had transferred over a quarter gigabyte of data.

Surely, you'll say, there's no way the globe in the background of a page about providing universal web access could be a giant video file?

But I am here to tell you, oh yes it is. They load a huge movie just so the globe can spin.

This is Facebook's message to the world: "The internet is slow. Sit and spin."

And it's not like bad connectivity is a problem unique to the Third World! I've traveled enough here in Australia to know that in rural places in Tasmania and Queensland, vendors treat WiFi like hundred-year-old brandy.

You're welcome to buy as much of it as you want, but it costs a fortune and comes in tiny portions. And after the third or fourth purchase, people start to look at you funny.

Even in well-connected places like Sydney, we've all had the experience of having a poor connection, and almost no battery, while waiting for some huge production of a site to load so we can extract a morsel of information like a restaurant address.

The designers of pointless wank like that Facebook page deserve the ultimate penalty.
They should be forced to use the Apple hockey puck mouse for the remainder of their professional lives. [shouts of horror from the audience]

Google has rolled out a competitor to Instant Articles, which it calls Accelerated Mobile Pages. AMP is a special subset of HTML designed to be fast on mobile devices.

Why not just serve regular HTML without stuffing it full of useless crap? The question is left unanswered.

The AMP project is ostentatiously open source, and all kinds of publishers have signed on. Out of an abundance of love for the mobile web, Google has volunteered to run the infrastructure, especially the user tracking parts of it.

Jeremy Keith pointed out to me that the page describing AMP is technically infinite in size. If you open it in Chrome, it will keep downloading the same 3.4 megabyte carousel video forever.
If you open it in Safari, where the carousel is broken, the page still manages to fill 4 megabytes.

These comically huge homepages for projects designed to make the web faster are the equivalent of watching a fitness video where the presenter is just standing there, eating pizza and cookies.

The world's greatest tech companies can't even make these tiny text sites, describing their flagship projects to reduce page bloat, lightweight and fast on mobile.

I can't think of a more complete admission of defeat."



"The other vision is of the web as Call of Duty—an exquisitely produced, kind-of-but-not-really-participatory guided experience with breathtaking effects and lots of opportunities to make in-game purchases.

Creating this kind of Web requires a large team of specialists. No one person can understand the whole pipeline, nor is anyone expected to. Even if someone could master all the technologies in play, the production costs would be prohibitive.

The user experience in this kind of Web is that of being carried along, with the illusion of agency, within fairly strict limits. There's an obvious path you're supposed to follow, and disincentives to keep you straying from it. As a bonus, the game encodes a whole problematic political agenda. The only way to reject it is not to play.

Despite the lavish production values, there's a strange sameness to everything. You're always in the same brown war zone.

With great effort and skill, you might be able make minor modifications to this game world. But most people will end up playing exactly the way the publishers intend. It's passive entertainment with occasional button-mashing.

Everything we do to make it harder to create a website or edit a web page, and harder to learn to code by viewing source, promotes that consumerist vision of the web.

Pretending that one needs a team of professionals to put simple articles online will become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Overcomplicating the web means lifting up the ladder that used to make it possible for people to teach themselves and surprise everyone with unexpected new ideas

Here's the hortatory part of the talk:

Let’s preserve the web as the hypertext medium it is, the only thing of its kind in the world, and not turn it into another medium for consumption, like we have so many examples of already.

Let’s commit to the idea that as computers get faster, and as networks get faster, the web should also get faster.

Let’s not allow the panicked dinosaurs of online publishing to trample us as they stampede away from the meteor. Instead, let's hide in our holes and watch nature take its beautiful course.

Most importantly, let’s break the back of the online surveillance establishment that threatens not just our livelihood, but our liberty. Not only here in Australia, but in America, Europe, the UK—in every free country where the idea of permanent, total surveillance sounded like bad science fiction even ten years ago.

The way to keep giant companies from sterilizing the Internet is to make their sites irrelevant. If all the cool stuff happens elsewhere, people will follow. We did this with AOL and Prodigy, and we can do it again.

For this to happen, it's vital that the web stay participatory. That means not just making sites small enough so the whole world can visit them, but small enough so that people can learn to build their own, by example.

I don't care about bloat because it's inefficient. I care about it because it makes the web inaccessible.

Keeping the Web simple keeps it awesome."
pagebloat  webdesign  maciejceglowski  2015  webdev  participatory  openweb  internet  web  online  minecraft  accessibility  efficiency  aesthetics  cloud  cloudcomputing  amazonwebservices  backend  paypal  google  docker  websites  wired  theverge  medium  javascript  advertising  ads  acceleratedmobilepages  mobile  html  facebook  freebasics  jeremykeith  timkadlec  internet.org  facebookinstantarticles  maciejcegłowski 
january 2016 by robertogreco
The Internet of Things You Don’t Really Need - The Atlantic
"We already chose to forego a future of unconnected software. All of your devices talk constantly to servers, and your data lives in the Cloud because there’s increasingly no other choice. Eventually, we won’t have unconnected things, either. We’ve made that choice too, we just don’t know it yet. For the moment, you can still buy toasters and refrigerators and thermostats that don’t talk to the Internet, but try to find a new television that doesn’t do so. All new TVs are smart TVs, asking you to agree to murky terms and conditions in the process of connecting to Netflix or Hulu. Soon enough, everything will be like Nest. If the last decade was one of making software require connectivity, the next will be one of making everything else require it. Why? For Silicon Valley, the answer is clear: to turn every industry into the computer industry. To make things talk to the computers in giant, secured, air-conditioned warehouses owned by (or hoping to be owned by) a handful of big technology companies.

But at what cost? What improvements to our lives do we not get because we focused on “smart” things? Writing in The Baffler last year, David Graeber asked where the flying cars, force fields, teleportation pods, space colonies, and all the other dreams of the recent past’s future have gone. His answer: Technological development was re-focused so that it wouldn’t threaten existing seats of power and authority. The Internet of Things exists to build a market around new data about your toasting and grilling and refrigeration habits, while duping you into thinking smart devices are making your lives better than you could have made them otherwise, with materials other than computers. Innovation and disruption are foils meant to distract you from the fact that the present is remarkably similar to the past, with you working even harder for it.

But it sure feels like it makes things easier, doesn’t it? The automated bike locks and thermostats all doing your bidding so you can finally be free to get things done. But what will you do, exactly, once you can monitor your propane tank level from the comfort of the toilet or the garage or the liquor store? Check your Gmail, probably, or type into a Google Doc on your smartphone, maybe. Or perhaps, if you’re really lucky, tap some ideas into Evernote for your Internet of Things startup’s crowdfunding campaign. “It’s gonna be huge,” you’ll tell your cookout guests as you saw into a freshly grilled steak in the cool comfort of your Nest-controlled dining room. “This is the future.”"
2015  ianbogost  iot  internetofthings  design  davidgraeber  labor  siliconvalley  technology  power  authority  innovation  disruption  work  future  past  present  marketing  propaganda  google  cloud  cloudcomputing  computers  code  googledocs  ubicomp  ubiquitouscomputing  everyware  adamgreenfield  amazon  dropbox  kickstarter 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: The Coming Century of War Against Your Computer - The Long Now
"Recognizing that we are necessarily transitory Users of many systems, such as everything involving Cloud computing or storage, Doctorow favors keeping your own box with its own processors and storage. He strongly favors the democratization and wide distribution of expertise. As a Fellow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (who co-sponsored the talk) he supports public defense of freedom in every sort of digital rights issue.

"The potential for abuse in the computer world is large," Doctorow concluded. "It will keep getting larger.""
storage  propertyrights  rights  content  property  cloudcomputing  cloud  internet  computing  web  ownership  2012  corydoctorow  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Talking to the Future Humans - The Future of Pointless Things | VICE
"Provocations are good for the soul. They force one to look at the world a bit differently. We’re largely conservative beings – change is hard to imagine and even harder to suffer through. It disrupts our routines. Provocations are like lenses that turn the world upside down, if only for a moment, in order to see what could be, or how things could be different. … I’d say that storytellers are the gatekeepers of innovation, even if I’m not entirely sure what innovation is. If you can tell a big enough story with a compelling plot line you can entice people with what could be and you may even entice them enough to get them to get excited and make things and self-assuredly valuate themselves as worthy of billions of dollars. … Cloud computing has a story. It’s not an especially great one, but it got out there enough that people got hopped up and started making everything cloud-enabled. It’s a shoddy story full of holes and an incredibly high chance of becoming an epic, systemic fail, but people got excited because a story was told that normally reasonable people believed. … If cloud computing or augmented reality are examples of what you mean by innovation, I’d take innovation in whoopee cushions over that stuff any old day. … the influence is arbitrarily predetermined by saying there is some clear distinction between fact and fiction. It’s like apologising for a great sci-fi film because it’s not real. You just don’t do that. You accept things as they are and you let them shape and influence and inform how and what you think about. That’s it. It’s that simple. We shouldn’t pretend to know fact from fiction – embrace them both as ways of trying to explain the world we are in and the world we want in the future. … Technology is a reification of culture—it’s a materialization of our rituals, practices and aspirations. It’s not so much a tool or something purely instrumental as it is itself culture. We make it not to do things but as an expression of culture—it just happens to be expressed in things that take batteries or have a screen or require technical specifications, industry standards, FCC approvals and tooling to manufacture. … you have to get a bit messy and figure out how you might make the thing beyond specifying it. In that process of making the thing—and it could be a little film or a bit of code or hardware or all of those things—all these questions are forced upon you. Responding to those questions by iterate and refining, that’s the soul of design"
julianbleecker  interview  2011  design  future  change  cloudcomputing  designfiction  sf  technology  culture  making  matter  via:Preoccupations 
january 2012 by robertogreco
History, our future - Preoccupations [Thoughtful, link-and-quote-rich post by David Smith on cloud computing and digital archiving]
"I’m no programmer, though decades ago I learned to use Fortran, writing my own program for an A level Biology project, and played with BASIC. Now, I’m playing with a Mac Mini server and a Pegasus R6. I want to know that we can hand on certain things … music, audio, photos, text and, increasingly important, video. History for the future.<br />
<br />
Last Christmas, I was hoping we’d see some development in 2011 around the Mac Mini, though I suspected the game plan was more likely to be centred on the ecosystem that individuals, families and groups weave around multiple Apple devices. There’s room for both and it seems that Apple thinks so, too. I use cloud services a great deal, and this won’t stop as I play with creating our own, centralised repository of music, audio, photos, text and videos. I want our own backup and personally maintained server and store, but I know the cloud offers us so much, too."
cloud  cloudcomputing  icloud  future  history  archives  archiving  computers  digital  2011  davidsmith  memory  persistence  privacy  socialsoftware  mobility  digitallife  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Coming Cloud Wars: Google+ vs Microsoft (plus Facebook) | Epicenter | Wired.com
"Right now, it’s easy to share links, pictures, location and videos on Google+. Soon, it’ll be equally easy to share maps, office documents, news and shopping deals.

That’s where things really get interesting — particularly if Google can turn its identity system into the kind of purchasing system that Apple and Amazon have, pairing it with its advertising power and ever-present mobile phones to create a virtual mobile wallet.

If Silicon Valley were hosting a basketball tournament for consumer money and mindshare in the cloud, right now we’d be looking at a Final Four of Google, Apple (plus Twitter), Microsoft (plus Facebook) and Amazon (especially if they can make a compelling tablet). Apple just had its earnings call; Microsoft’s is tomorrow.

The stakes are high, the players are ready. It’s a fun time to be a fan."
timcarmody  google+  google  amazon  apple  facebook  microsoft  skype  twitter  social  cloud  cloudcomputing  identity  sharing  notification  communication  bing  search  spotify  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Cutting That Cord
"The announcement many people seem to be waiting for is for Apple to tell iOS users they no longer need iTunes on the Mac or Windows. The announcement I’d like to see is for iOS users to no longer need to pay for MobileMe to wirelessly sync calendars, contacts — and any other small bits of data from apps from the App Store…

And those third-party iOS developers that are depending upon Dropbox…have a far better syncing experience than Apple’s own creative apps.…Google Docs has none of the UI panache, but the syncing is invisible. You just open Google Docs, and there are your files. Doesn’t matter which machine you used to edit or create them, or which machine you’re using now, they’re all just there. That’s part of the overall experience.

That’s where Apple is behind."
apple  cloud  ipad  ios  google  daringfireball  2011  cloudcomputing  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Preoccupations's Wikileaks Bookmarks on Pinboard
Through his bookmarks on Delicious, David Smith is building a valuable reference on the topic of Wikileaks surrounding Cablegate. See also his bookmarks for Julian Assange: http://pinboard.in/u:preoccupations/t:Julian_Assange
wikileaks  2010  davidsmith  julianassange  privacy  us  security  amazon  espionage  paypal  search  hosting  internet  web  information  dns  freespeech  sweden  france  cloud  cloudcomputing  censorship  democracy  policy  politics  whistleblowing  secrecy  government  activism  journalism  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Clerk, your hotel in the cloud
"Clerk is the perfect administration tool designed to fit your needs as an Hotel Manager."
cloudcomputing  hotels  platforms  twitter  web  applications  chile  startups  webapps  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Dawn of a New Day « Ray Ozzie
"to cope with the inherent complexity of a world of devices, a world of websites, and a world of apps & personal data that is spread across myriad devices & websites, a simple conceptual model is taking shape that brings it all together. We’re moving toward a world of 1) cloud-based continuous services that connect us all and do our bidding, and 2) appliance-like connected devices enabling us to interact with those cloud-based services."
rayozzie  cloudcomputing  2010  2005  1939  mobile  technology  microsoft  computing  future  complexity  trends  cloud  connecteddevices  continuousservices  ubicomp  networkedurbanism  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Paperworks / Padworks | the human network
"We know that children learn by exploration – that’s the foundation of Constructivism – but we forget that we ourselves also learn by exploration. The joy we feel when we play with our new toy is the feeling a child has when he confronts a box of LEGOs, or new video game – it’s the joy of exploration, the joy of learning. That joy is foundational to us. If we didn’t love learning, we wouldn’t be running things around here. We’d still be in the trees."
education  future  ipad  paper  sharing  technology  web  markpesce  gmail  google  cloudcomputing  computing  play  constructivism  twitter  facebook  dropbox  paperless  learning  unschooling  deschooling  2010  schools  tcsnmy  curriculum  wikipedia  cloud  lego  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Universal acid « Snarkmarket
"The philoso­pher Dan Den­nett, in his ter­rific book Darwin’s Dan­ger­ous Idea, coined a phrase that’s echoed in my head ever since I first read it years ago. The phrase is uni­ver­sal acid, and Den­nett used it to char­ac­ter­ize nat­ural selection—an idea so potent that it eats right through other estab­lished ideas and (maybe more impor­tantly) institutions—things like reli­gion. It also resists con­tain­ment; try to say “well yes, but, that’s just over there” and nat­ural selec­tion burns right through your “yes, but.”"
robinsloan  snarkmarket  danieldennett  evolution  religion  capitalism  globish  english  computing  cloudcomputing  cloud  comments  naturalselection  universalacid  understanding  creativity  whoah  gamechanging  conciousness 
june 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
rc3.org - Is the iPad the harbinger of doom for personal computing?
"What bothers me is that in terms of openness, the iPad is the same as the iPhone, but in terms of form factor, the iPad is essentially a general purpose computer. So it strikes me as a sort of Trojan horse that acculturates users to closed platforms as a viable alternative to open platforms, and not just when it comes to phones … The question we must ask ourselves as computer users is whether the tradeoff in freedom we make to enjoy Apple’s superior user experience is worth it. … If Apple is really successful, it’s likely that other companies will be more emboldened to forsake openness as well. … The other question that arises for me is whether, in the the long term, the computer you hold in your hand really matters. … A future where applications and data in the cloud are more our own than the computers on our desks seems bizarre, but I can see things playing out that way."
via:preoccupations  ipad  apple  open  cloudcomputing  cloud  decentralization  mac  freedom  computers  applications  iphone  creativity  computing  hardware  technology  future  closed  ios 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Safari Books Online 6.0: A Cloud Library as an alternate model for ebooks - O'Reilly Radar
"Here’s the rub: most people thinking about ebooks are focused on creating an electronic recreation of print books, complete with downloadable files and devices that look and feel like books. This is a bit like pointing a camera at a stage play and concluding that was the essence of filmmaking!"
publishing  libraries  ebooks  database  oreilly  media  cloudcomputing  online  mobile  books  web  cloud  future  ui 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Google Apps scores in LA, with assist from Microsoft - cloud computing, Google, google apps, GovCloud - CIO
"Los Angeles City Council approved a $US7.25 million five-year deal Tuesday in which the city will adopt Gmail and other Google Apps.

Google is touting the deal as a major endorsement of its cloud-based approach to computing, but it turns out that some of the funding is indirectly coming from an unlikely source: Microsoft.

According to Los Angeles City Council minutes (PDF), just over $US1.5 million for the project will come from the payout of a 2006 class action lawsuit between the City and Microsoft."
google  losangeles  cloudcomputing  googleapps  microsoft 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Official Google Docs Blog: Day in the Life of a Docs Student
"The Google Docs team is getting ready for back to school. We've been doing our homework this summer to make your school year go a little smoother. Today we're launching a handful of features that will benefit both students and teachers. Speaking from experience, as students ourselves, we know that these features will come in handy on any given day. Check out the schedule below to see how."
spanish  googledocs  tcsnmy  cloudcomputing  education  learning  technology  teaching  google  edtech  writing  footnotes  googleapps  examples  students  scheduling  googlesites 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Official Google Blog: Back to school with Google Docs
"As interns on the Google Docs team this past summer, we were excited to be able to work on making Google Docs that much more useful for students like us. We've now added a bunch of back to school features which should help our fellow students make the transition from summer to school that much easier — and we hope they'll be useful to you non-students as well!"
googledocs  schools  education  learning  technology  math  chemistry  equations  edtech  cloudcomputing  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life - Asking "should we trust the cloud" is like asking "should we trust horseless carriages"
"First of all, it doesn't really matter if people trust the cloud or not. What matters is whether they use it or not. ... These days, I just put all the files and photos I'm sure I'd miss on SkyDrive and treat any file not worth uploading the cloud as being transient anyway. It is actually somewhat liberating since I no longer feel like I'm owned by all my digital stuff I have to catalog, manage and archive. ... progress will march on despite our Luddite concerns because the genie is already out of the bottle. For most people the benefits of anywhere access to their data from virtually any device and being able to share their content with people on the Web far outweighs the costs of not being in complete control of the data. ... The cloud Web is already here and it is here to stay. It's about time we stopped questioning it and got used to the idea."
via:preoccupations  cloud  risk  trust  computing  backup  technology  cloudcomputing  internet  luddism  luddites 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Jolicloud
"We love netbooks: they are cheap, compact, light and always connected via 3G.
netbooks  linux  ubuntu  cloudcomputing  hardware  eeepc  operatingsystem  jolicloud  computing  netvibes 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: cheer up it's Archigram
"I’ve been particularly taken with the Botteries: The World’s Last Hardware Event by David Greene & Mike Myers ... a vision of returning to the English countryside, with everything you require brought by bots of all sorts: communication, rooms, walls, even pets. ... we’ve actually reached a place very similar ... rapidly seeing a world of use as needed, rather than purchase & storage. Blu-Ray is the world’s last media hardware event, it’s download from now on. Netflix & Lovefilm ... Spotify ... We’re starting to live in a world that would have been unimaginable 5 years ago, where ownership is severely debased as a good quality. We’re even seeing the world’s last physical retailers disappear. ... Russell ... was talking about how everyone has a junk room. What if you could ship that to Amazon or someone & pull bits back as you need them? We don’t want cloud computing, we want Big Yellow Internet Storage. & then you could have a smaller house or flat. It struck me as very Archigram-ish."
archigram  chrisheathcote  storage  postmaterialism  netflix  cloudcomputing  amazon  postownership  ownership  stuff  things  gamechanging  spotify  delivery  architecture  books 
january 2009 by robertogreco
d::gen - Gavin Starks » Can't everyone define the future?
"looming potential self-destruction - our "Resource Crisis" now encapsulates Climate Change & Peak Oil, Energy, Water & Landfill shortages, the depletion of raw materials, globalisation...we’re in a space where we are starting to seriously address the combination of cloud, grid and edge, open APIs, open data, openID and oAuth - watching the unfurling of everybody, unpacking system that “dump excess energy in the form of structure” [Burke] and scratching the surfaces of digital identity management...All these are arriving, coincidentally, at exactly the time we need them - not just in a technological sense, but driven by a global consciousness that we all know: that, really, we need to do this to address sustainable living....that re-engineering will, most likely, come from unexpected places."
via:preoccupations  change  politics  peakoil  covergence  society  gamechanging  cloudcomputing  climatechange  energy  environment 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly on the next 5,000 days of the web | Video on TED.com
"At the 2007 EG conference, Kevin Kelly shares a fun stat: The World Wide Web, as we know it, is only 5,000 days old. Now, Kelly asks, how can we predict what's coming in the next 5,000 days?"
onemachine  kevinkelly  via:grahamje  spimes  ubicomp  internet  ubiquitous  cloudcomputing  cloud  brain  convergence  digital  ai  semanticweb  future  futurism  predictions  technology  ted  statistics  data  email  communication  computing  computers  trends  media  web  networks 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Infoporn: Tap Into the 12-Million-Teraflop Handheld Megacomputer
"next stage in technological evolution is...the One Machine...hardware is assembled from our myriad devices, its software is written by our collective online behavior...the Machine also includes us. After all, our brains are programming & underpinning it"
computing  wired  cloud  kevinkelly  cloudcomputing  evolution  singularity  science  innovation  infodesign  collectiveintelligence  intelligence  computers  human  networks  mobile  mind  visualization  internet  future  brain  crowdsourcing  ai  data  it  learning2.0  trends  storage 
july 2008 by robertogreco
The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete
"Sensors everywhere. Infinite storage. Clouds of processors. Our ability to capture, warehouse, and understand massive amounts of data is changing science, medicine, business, and technology. As our collection of facts and figures grows, so will the oppor
science  statistics  data  google  theory  philosophy  technology  future  database  cloudcomputing  datamining  collaboration  complexity  chrisanderson  visualization  perception  math  information  economics  computing  computers  brain  psychology 
june 2008 by robertogreco
CherryPal announces two-watt, Freescale-based cloud computer - Engadget
"It looks like the current ranks of green PCs are soon going to have some pretty daunting competition for the low-power throne, with upstart CherryPal announcing that it's about to bust out a cloud computer that'll consume a mere two watts of power."
computers  hardware  cloudcomputing  affordability  energy  efficiency  green 
june 2008 by robertogreco
lonelysandwich - Why Me?
"Think about this for a second. Apple is removing the Mac from the Apple computer experience and laying the foundation for a browser-based OS, the thing that Google has been threatening all this time. Of course, it’s not a new idea...But it’s never be
apple  mobileme  cloud  cloudcomputing  web  internet  trends  marketing  mac  iphone  socialgraphy  communication  conversation  identity  language  psychology  mobility  calendar  contacts 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: The clowd
"PS your privacy is fairly shot...clowd also knows where you are, camera or no camera..This is going to happen. The only question is whether you are one of the people who will make it happen. I guess there's an even bigger question: will we do it right?"
cloud  cloudcomputing  computing  crowdsourcing  datamining  future  gps  privacy  phones  mobile  sethgodin  socialmedia 
june 2008 by robertogreco
I.T. 2.0 - ReadWriteWeb
"With all these changes, the new I.T. person will be very different than they are today. Those that have the skills of an engineer and the knowledge needed to run I.T. 2.0 are going to be superstars, but they also might be rare."
business  technology  enterprise2.0  it  ict  readwriteweb  mobile  internet  enterprise  trends  cloud  mobility  work  cloudcomputing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Bezos On Innovation
"I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out...Those things didn't require big budgets. They required thoughtfulness and focus on the customer."
amazon  jeffbezos  creativity  innovation  frugality  business  cloudcomputing  books  entrepreneurship  management  leadership  problemsolving 
may 2008 by robertogreco
AppEngine - Web Hypercard, finally (Skrentablog)
"It feels like the web has been trying to claw its way back to the simple utility of Hypercard ever since Mosaic. GeoCities was the first massive-uptake anyone-can-build-here website haven. But it was all static html."
amazon  cloudcomputing  google  online  hypercard  ning  via:migurski  programming  platform  web  appengine 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Pew Research Center: Seeding The Cloud: What Mobile Access Means for Usage Patterns and Online Content
"move to cloud computing...shifts power to users as they create & share digital content...Groups that have in past trailed in "traditional" internet access are in better position to shape cyberspace as internet becomes more accessible using wireless devic
cloud  computing  cloudcomputing  games  gaming  internet  trends  mobile  phones  future  pew  research  access  wireless 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Annotation (Harper's Magazine): Keyword: Evil: Google's addiction to cheap energy
Annotated blueprint of Google's The Dalles, Oregon data center and discussion of the concessions, handouts received, influence wielded, energy consumption, etc.
cloud  cloudcomputing  google  datacenters  oregon  energy  environment  power  servers  sustainability  green  technology  infrastructure  trends  internet  information  data  politics  electricity  networks  web  capitalism  influence  government 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The MacBook Air could easily be the only machine - (37signals)
"I think we’ve reached the point where the computational firepower for laptops is simply Good Enough in the Innovator’s Dilemma sense of the term. Meaning that the puck is going to go somewhere else. That we’ll start caring about other things now."
computers  computing  laptops  mac  macbookair  future  power  cloud  cloudcomputing  trends 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Stephen Fry » Blog Archive » Deliver us from Microsoft
"2 great pillars of Open Source are GNU project & Linux. I shan’t burden you with too much detail, just make outrageous claim that your computer will be running some descendant of 2 within next 5 years & that your life will be better & happier as result
cloudbook  cloud  cloudcomputing  Linux  gnu  eeepc  technology  future  via:preoccupations 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Twitter killed the Status Star | Mike Butcher - mbites
"The key difference is that people who say "take this conversation over into IM" don't get it. IM can't do what Twitter does. You can't instant message into "the cloud". With Twitter you can...Of course, the problem comes when people abuse this."
twitter  socialsoftware  communication  cloud  cloudcomputing  broadcasting  im  messaging  via:hrheingold 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Q&A: Author Nicholas Carr on the Terrifying Future of Computing
"What's amazing is that this shift from private to public software has happened without us even noticing it." "We're transferring our intelligence into the machine, and the machine is transferring its way of thinking into us."
interviews  nicholascarr  cloud  computing  internet  futurism  future  newmedia  networks  convergence  computers  cloudcomputing  privacy  technology  predictions 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Computing Heads for the Clouds
"IBM, Yahoo!, and Google are all putting the power of cloud computing to work. Here's a short primer on how the new technology works"
cloud  computing  internet  networking  collaboration  ibm  yahoo  google  cloudcomputing 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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