robertogreco + cafes   43

Aaron Bady on Twitter: "When you read about history of "The Coffee Shop," writers LOVE to gloss over the Middle-Eastern origin so they can get to the fun part where England invents The Public Sphere"
"When you read about history of "The Coffee Shop," writers LOVE to gloss over the Middle-Eastern origin so they can get to the fun part where England invents The Public Sphere

My man Ralph Hattox in 1985 seems to know what's up, tho https://archive.org/stream/CoffeeAndCoffeehouses/%5BRalph_S._Hattox%5D_Coffee_and_Coffeehouses_The_Ori%28BookZZ.org%29_djvu.txt

love "the near east"

"Once coffee had been taken out of the context of the Sufi dhikr and introduced into general consumption, it was embraced by an entirely different group of advocates, and with them the associations and images connected with the drink changed..."

"...While it remained one of the props of the nocturnal devotional services of the Sufis, others, perhaps less spiritually inclined, found it a pleasant stimulus to talk and sociability. From this the coffeehouse was born"

"If you draw the analogy between coffee and intoxicants you are drawing a false one . . . One drinks coffee with the name of the lord on his lips, and stays awake, while the person who seeks wanton delight in intoxicants disregards the Lord, and gets drunk""
aaronbady  coffeeshops  cafes  history  middleeast  coffee  neareast  2019  1985  ralphhattox 
april 2019 by robertogreco
9 Artist-Run Restaurants You Need to Know
"In the fall of 1971, the doors of a curious restaurant located at 127 Prince Street opened just south of New York’s Houston Street. Inside, if you were hungry, an artist might ladle you a steaming bowl of caldo gallego from one of three large cauldrons bubbling away over a low stove in the center of the room. Soup in hand, you’d make your way to a table where slices of bread were stacked around a huge heap of butter. Come another night and you might’ve been served the now-famous “bone dinner”—frogs’ legs and roasted marrow bones, among other skeletal dishes—then left with the remnants, rigorously cleaned and given a second life as wearable jewelry.

This was the restaurant and conceptual art project Food, run by artists Carol Goodden, Tina Girouard, and Gordon Matta-Clark, among others. Given a mini-retrospective at Frieze New York’s 2013 fair, involving several of the original chefs, the short-lived project has secured its place as one of the most iconic blurrings of the lines between art and food. The 1970s Soho establishment is far from the only artistic foray into the culinary realm, however, so we checked in on a handful that have been around for years, and a few others that are still taking shape.

Zagreus Projekt
ULRICH KRAUSS
BERLIN

“Food and art were the two elements in my life that were always there,” explains Ulrich Krauss, the founder of the Berlin food project space Zagreus Projekt. “I grew up in a butcher shop and I studied art.” He went on to apprentice as a chef, spending time cooking at a fancy hotel in southern Germany. “When you are in that world, it is so restricted, and you have rules for everything,” Krauss says. “It’s a very narrow world, so I got the feeling I had to escape from that.” Krauss left for Berlin, where he balanced artmaking—mostly performances—with cooking in restaurants. “I have to found a place where I bring things together,” he remembers thinking of his double life. Zagreus Projekt took shape.

Its first iteration found a home in the backroom of Galerie Markus Richter, a space for conceptual and minimal art that shuttered in 2005. Since then, Zagreus Projekt, which Krauss is careful to point out is not a gallery, has relocated to the elegant Mitte district. Artists bring ideas for exhibitions that in some way relate back to food, and a collaboration ensues to devise a menu that matches. FOOD ART, a collaboration that launches April 8th, pairs the talents of the artist-turned-chef with a Swiss-German artist couple, Hendrikje Kühne and Beat Klein, who make elaborate, three-dimensional collage sculptures, often including images of food and fragments of advertising and newspapers. “With every exhibition we do here, we have a different point of view on food or on the situation of eating, and that is the most important thing,” Krauss explains. But the demands of the project, 16 years on, are not without their toll. “I don’t see myself as an artist anymore,” says Krauss. “I see myself as a chef.”

Pharmacy 2
DAMIEN HIRST
NEWPORT STREET GALLERY, LONDON

Damien Hirst, dispenser of hand-painted pills and shark vitrines, blends two environments to unusual effect in his newest restaurant endeavor, Pharmacy 2, which opened at his Newport Street Gallery several weeks ago. After taking in vibrant work by John Hoyland, one of Britain’s key abstract painters, a Hirst devotee can round out the experience in the new spot. Uniquely crafted pills dot the marble floor, and a clinically cool neon sign that reads “prescriptions” hangs over the bar in view of works from Hirst’s “Medicine Cabinets” and “Kaleidescope paintings.”

Diners enjoy chef-collaborator Mark Hix’s cooking, which eschews pharmaceuticals for fresh ingredients and a British-inflected menu of European classics, including crispy squid with green chilis or Hix’s riff on the traditional German apples-and-potatoes side “Heaven and Earth.” “Damien designed a formaldehyde ‘Cock and Bull’ for my restaurant Tramshed, so it makes sense for me to exchange my skills,” the chef explains.

[restaurant not yet named]
RAPHAEL LYON
NEW YORK

“There is a long-running joke in the food industry that most artists are unrealized chefs,” the artist Raphael Lyon, who grows sculptures using geologic processes, tells me. “Which is just a way of saying that huge numbers of self-identified artists may have turned to art only because they wanted to be respected for working creatively with their hands, and that maybe they would have been more fulfilled in a kitchen rather than a studio.” Together with partner Arley Marks, Lyon is opening a restaurant off the Jefferson Street stop of New York City’s L train in the coming weeks. He also owns Enlightenment Wines, where he works as a “mazer,” fermenting honey and herbs into a wine-like beverage. “This will be something like a public home for that research,” he explains.

Lyon also hopes it will be “a place of sincere curiosity—whether it’s for a dry mead made out of Christmas trees and gold flake or just rethinking the pickled egg.” The artist’s deep knowledge of food and wine yields unusual revelations. “What interests me about winemaking, and more generally the American food scene writ large, is how until very recently discourse around it was obsessed with really awkward notions of authenticity,” Lyon observes. He suggests there’s a link between this approach to thinking about food and how people talked about European painting before Modernism. “A good part of the development of art in the last century was a move away from validity based on authentic regional expression to validity based on ideas,” he continues. “That’s happening in the food world, particularly in New York.”

ZAX Restaurant
WILL STEWART
BROOKLYN

“Generally, the stereotype of ‘starving artist’ isn’t far off the mark in New York,” says Will Stewart, an artist in the city whose work engages the environment and the architecture of space. “You’ve got people living in strange shared spaces, and everybody’s out running around every night doing something.” It’s a city that Stewart thinks “operates as a pressure cooker.” A year and a half ago, he started wondering about setting up a makeshift restaurant. “There’re how many hundreds of thousands of people?” Stewart says, retracing the thoughts that led him to set up ZAX—his fixed-price, vegetarian-only supper club in a vacant space adjacent to his studio. “There will always be at least 20 people who are going to want to come by and have dinner.”

ZAX’s December “Fertility Meal,” put together by artists/guest chefs Maia Ruth Lee and Violet Dennison, included “Estrogen Seeds” (an appetizer made with anise and sugar crystals) and “New Mother Nourishment Soup” (seaweed, daikon, enoki mushrooms, shishito peppers, miso, and fingerling potatoes), among other peculiar dishes and libations. For a few extra dollars, heat acupuncture was also part of the meal. Though Stewart has put his restaurant-in-a-studio on hold, he plans to bring it back in Greenpoint sometime in April.

Conflict Kitchen
DAWN WELESKI & JON RUBIN
PITTSBURGH

“What you choose to eat every day is a creative moment,” says Dawn Weleski, who, together with Jon Rubin, directs the Pittsburgh eatery Conflict Kitchen. “We provide an outlet for that creative expression.” The two artists work to address thorny social issues through food. “We were always thinking about how to re-envision the city, how to make it the city we wanted to live in,” Weleski, a Pittsburgh native, observes.

A simple but powerful premise guides their restaurant: Serve cuisines from countries with which the United States is in conflict. In its six years of operation, hungry residents who might not have given much thought to the social implications of U.S. foreign policy have filled up on Afghan, Cuban, Venezuelan, Palestinian, North Korean, and, most recently, Iranian cuisine. “We were trying to think of ways with which to engage the politics of the city, and to get people to have conversations in public spaces that weren’t typically had in Pittsburgh, let alone in the rest of America,” Weleski explains.

Currency Exchange Café
THEASTER GATES
CHICAGO

It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact moment at which Theaster Gates’s expansive approach to artmaking came to include food. One starting point was the artist’s frequent dinners, at which guests ate soul food while discussing its origins and cultural importance. Another was getting the Currency Exchange Café, decorated with materials salvaged from the currency exchange that used to occupy the space, off the ground serving breakfast and lunch to residents of Chicago’s south side Washington Park neighborhood (ample shelves stocked with books line the walls and there are plans for a 35mm slide collection). With projects like these as well as the establishment of his Rebuild Foundation behind him, Gates is at work on ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen, taking shape just across the border in Gary, Indiana.

The project joins the Gary barbecue-and-soul-food fixture Mama Pearl’s, which is and will remain in the space, as a tenant in a large building being transformed into a multi-use facility boasting a commercial kitchen for training, an incubator for culinary businesses, a pop-up café with a menu that changes based on input from incubator participants, and even an exhibition space for art. The ambitious project is sewing the first seeds of what the rustbelt city hopes will be a leap toward fostering a cultural district, bringing to its residents a place where they can come together over a meal and admire the many talents of their neighbors.

Thank You For Coming
LAURA NOGUERA, JONATHAN ROBERT, JENN SU TAOHAN, AND CYNTHIA SU TAOPIN
LOS ANGELES

Thank You For Coming is an experimental space that pairs a permanent restaurant serving simple weekend brunches with a series of creative residencies, as well as playing host… [more]
berlin  losangeles  sanfrancisco  art  artists  coffee  food  restaurants  gordonmatta-clark  2016  london  nyc  brooklyn  chicago  pittsburgh  brettwalker  lauranoguera  jonathanrobert  jennsutaohan  cynthiasutaopin  theastergates  dawnweleski  jonrubin  conflictkitchen  willstewart  raphaellyon  damienhirst  ulrichkrauss  127princestreet  carolgoodden  tinagirouard  cafes  openstudioproject  coffeeshops  matta-clark 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Halcyon Tea : Tea, Teaware, and Gifts, based in San Diego, CA
[Closed for about three years now, but pointing to the Wayback for future reference.]

[See also: http://www.yelp.com/biz/halcyon-tea-san-diego ]
tea  teashops  coffeeshops  southpark  sandiego  cafes 
april 2015 by robertogreco
In nerdhaven — The Message — Medium
"The roster of Essential Social Spaces includes, among others: the library, the union hall, the community garden, the coffee shop. To that list, we must add the nerdhaven. The question, though: Is it on its way out — winding down as nerds go digital? Or is it here to stay, a humble fixture wherever there exist enough nerds to muster a Magic tournament? (These shops support a $700 million market, according to an industry website, but I can’t decide whether that’s big or small. I think it be might be small.)

I hope they’re here to stay. At the shop in Gaylord I made my circuit of the nerdly Stations of the Cross and walked out with ten antique D&D books, three comics, two vintage sci-fi novels, and a board game."
robinsloan  nerhaven  libraries  thirdspaces  coffeshops  cafes  communitygardens  unionhalls  comics  boardgames  games  gaming  nerds  roleplayinggames  dungeonsanddragons  magicthegathering 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Video: Izu Book Cafe / Atelier Bow-Wow | ArchDaily
"Two Izu retirees hired architects Yoshiharu Tsukamoto and Momoyo Kaijima to design them a home equipped with a neighborhood bookshop and cafe. The Japanese practice stepped up to the challenge and constructed an elegant, curved structure whose white walls and wooden ceiling hug the hundred degree undulating street on which its located and embraces the wooded forest it backs to. The home – which features two bedrooms, a kitchen, cafe, bookshop and atelier – is accessed beneath a bridged part of the structure and organized as a sequence. Take a tour through this interesting space with this short video made by JA+U Magazine."

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/57525543 ]
cafes  yoshiharutsukamoto  momoyokaijima  livework  bookshops  homes  japan  architecture  design  atelierbow-wow  2013  bookstores 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Japanese Beachfront Cafe is Made From Shipping Pallets - Adaptive Reuse - Curbed National
"We've seen the shipping pallet used in micro homes and imagined coverings for Paris, and now, Tokyo-based designer David Guarino has retired this most hardworking of transport platforms to a breezy, sun-soaked existence on Japan's Morito Beach. Caban, as Guarino calls it, is an entire beachfront cafe built from wooden pallets, along with a few other materials sourced from the region. Built for Japanese clothing company Tomorrowland, this open-air lounge was made in collaboration with local artisans, and also includes a book store and a James Perse shop. Who would've thought that, after a life devoted to the bottom-line efficiencies of global commerce, the humble pallet would begin to serve capitalism's stylistic needs? Or that it would make such a good wall planter?"
pallets  architecture  cafes  2012  davidguarino  japan 
november 2013 by robertogreco
When Tokyo Was a Slum – The Informal City Dialogues
"Alongside the futuristic visage of skyscraper Tokyo, a human-scale city lies along rambling roads, where mom-and-pop stores sell soap and sandals, and private homes double as independent shops engaged in local trades like printmaking and woodworking.

This is incremental Tokyo, the foundation upon which the world’s most modern city is built.

Like much of the city, these small hamlets were smoldering ash pits 70 years ago, reduced to rubble by the bombs of Allied forces during World War II. When the war ended, Tokyo’s municipal government, bankrupt and in crisis mode, was in no condition to launch a citywide reconstruction effort. So, without ever stating it explicitly, it nevertheless made one thing clear: The citizens would rebuild the city. Government would provide the infrastructure, but beyond that, the residents would be free to build what they needed on the footprint of the city that once was, neighborhood by neighborhood."



"These mixed-use habitats and low-rise, high-density neighborhoods emerged by default, not design. But though the city didn’t plan them, it considered them legitimate and supported them. Sewage systems, water, electricity and roads were later infused into all parts of Tokyo, leaving no neighborhood behind, regardless of how slummy or messy it looked. Even the traditionally discriminated-against Burakumin areas were eventually provided access to state-of-the-art public services and amenities.

The notion that infrastructure must be adapted to the built environment, rather than the other way around, is a simple yet revolutionary idea. The Tokyo model, combining housing development by local actors and infrastructure from various agencies, explains why that city has some of the best infrastructure in the world today, not to mention a housing stock of great variety and bustling mixed-use neighborhoods.

The House Is a Tool

The relationship between the city’s urban form and its vibrant economy is best illustrated by the idea of homes as tools of production. Many of the houses built in the postwar period in Tokyo were based on the template of the traditional Japanese house, in which a single structure can serve as a shop, workshop, dormitory or family house — and possibly all of those things at once. Official statistics illustrate the scale of the home-based economy. As late as the 1970s, factories employing fewer than 20 employees accounted for 20 percent of the workers and 12.6 percent of the national output in Japan. In Tokyo alone, 99.5 percent of factories had fewer than 300 workers and employed 74 percent of all factory workers, according to economist Takeshi Hayashi. What these numbers tell us is that the Japanese miracle was built not only by large-scale factories, but also relied on a vast web of small producers that often worked from their neighborhoods and their homes."



"For the people who live in Dharavi, this is not only the best possible outcome, it’s their only option. Most residents of Dharavi cannot possibly afford to move to other parts of Mumbai. Their futures will rise or fall with the fate of their neighborhood, which is why the Tokyo model, which values and cultivates neighborhoods like theirs, is probably their best hope for economic and social advancement.

That prosperity, however, depends on the local authorities heeding the lessons of Tokyo. Neighborhoods like Dharavi are already served by various NGOs and foundations. The residents are doing their part. The only missing piece is the support of city authorities, whose attitude toward such settlements sets back the city of Mumbai as a whole.

What’s more, the Tokyo model is simply an elegant one that follows the path of least resistance, allowing order and mess to naturally combine as they would without top-down intervention. It’s hard to imagine a better example of “development” in its most holistic dimension: Houses, neighborhoods, economies and communities all rising in concert with one another. The environment is deeply connected to processes of collective growth, because people, objects and lived spaces are all knit together by the impulse to constantly improve and transform. Through this process, with very little capital, we see how user-generated neighborhoods invest in the idea of growth and mobility, where self-interest and successful urbanism are one and the same."

[Tagging this with Teddy Cruz because it reminds me of his study of Tijuana and his recommendation that we learn from patterns of growth and development there.]
postwar  mixeduse  lowrise  density  mimbai  takeshihayashi  cities  organic  organicism  home-basedeconomy  production  manufacturing  factories  openstudioproject  cafes  homeoffice  homefactory  homeworkshop  homes  infrastructure  redevelopment  development  dharavi  slums  mobility  economics  middleclass  collectivism  technology  neighborhoods  asia  informality  informal  cottageindustries  2013  urban  urbanism  growth  change  government  tokyo  japan  history 
july 2013 by robertogreco
What #isamuseum | Sam Durant
"Is a museum a school?
Is a museum political?
Is a museum truthful?
Is a museum fun?
Is a museum for everyone?

Sam Durant, the 2013 Getty Artists Program invitee, is a multimedia artist whose work explores the relationships between politics and culture. His socially engaged practice addresses subjects as diverse as the civil rights movement, Southern rock music, and modernism.

For his project, What #isamuseum?, Durant continues to investigate these ideas by engaging Museum visitors and staff in an exploration of the roles and functions of a museum. Through a call-and-response format, visitors discover a series of artist-designed questions placed in unexpected locations throughout the Getty Center. With these questions, Durant invites reflections on and responses to the expectations and preconceptions of what a museum is. Individual responses can be shared on www.isamuseum.org, and visitors can input their answers at an iPad hub site located in the Museum Entrance Hall. Social-media outlets, such as Twitter, Facebook, and the Getty Voices project, also serve as channels to discuss the questions and broaden the discourse.

According to Durant, "By expanding the conversation and encouraging different forms of response, participants can become active within the project and even change the debate around the initial issue.”"

[See also (tags here are for that too): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQoEP3pPPjg ]
[Via: http://nomadicity.tumblr.com/post/52793583244/http-isamuseum-org-what-isamuseum-hes-asked ]

[Mentioned in the video: Caroline Woolard's Exchange Cafe at MoMA http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1364

here too
http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/sam-durant-social-media-getty-what-isamuseum.html ]
museums  samdurant  art  politics  culture  education  #isamuseum  getty  purpose  2013  googleartproject  pablohelguera  robertsain  lacmalab  sandiego  google  ncm  gettyartistsprogram  tobytannenbaum  jessicacusick  moma  centerforlivingarts  glvo  cv  why  learning  artists  chrisburden  engagement  community  children  children'smuseums  public  exchangecafe  institutions  openstudioproject  lcproject  participation  cocreation  collaboration  participatory  metrics  outcomes  success  civics  schools  future  candychang  civicengagement  law  legal  carolinewoolard  cafes  ncmideas  participatoryart 
june 2013 by robertogreco
B&B: Good drinks and good reads in Shimokitazawa | PingMag : Art, Design, Life – from Japan
[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20151028003033/http://pingmag.jp/2013/04/22/bandb/ ]

"Times are changing for publishing. E-books are here to stay and publishers are trying out a range of digital strategies to entice new customers. The music industry was one step ahead and the large retailers like Tower Records and HMV have all felt the pain of declining business, replaced by iTunes and Amazon. Bookstores are likewise looking at an uncertain future.

Well, one answer to how bookstores can continue to bring in readers to shop may lie in a new type of bookseller that has opened in Shimokitazawa, the laid-back Tokyo neighborhood just west of Shibuya.

The formula is visible in the name: B&B. British readers might be forgiven for thinking the shop is actually a cheap form of accommodation (bed and breakfast), but the two b’s are even better than that — “Book & Beer”, two things we at PingMag certainly love. Having coffee and tea for sale in bookstores has been the norm in other parts of the world for years now, but B&B has opted for a more alcoholic version. There is a proper bar with beer on tap, meaning customers can browse while sipping a chilled bevy or read a purchase with a beer in hand.

But this isn’t just about drinking (there are countless bars in Shimokitazawa, after all!). The books are also highly curated, selected per theme and genre by the staff to match the concept of the store. In other words, the entire place is like a magazine.

We sat down with B&B owner Shintaro Uchinuma to chat about the Shimokita’s latest hangout."
bookstores  books  cafes  2013  pingmag  tokyo  japan  openstudioproject  booksellers  shimokitazawa  bookshops  retail  bookfuturism  b&b  publishing  ebooks 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Mapping the World's Most Seductive Shrines to Coffee - Claire Cottrell - The Atlantic
"We've rounded up some of the most beautiful purveyors of coffee around the world in virtual guide form, meaning not only have we included the eye candy you know and love, but we've also added addresses and handy links to Google Maps."

[Little Nap Coffee Stand - Tokyo, Japan]
2012  toronto  switzerland  basel  porto  portugal  silverlake  hungary  busapest  brooklyn  bluebottlecoffee  sanfrancisco  oregon  portland  tokyo  sweden  denmark  telaviv  paris  poland  nyc  losangeles  us  japan  architecture  design  intreriors  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  coffee  cafes  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Honor and Folly
"A small-scale, design-focused Detroit inn, Honor & Folly is reminiscent of the way folks used to travel: a few beds above the village pub or restaurant with a hearty breakfast. You'll be immersed in the oldest neighborhood of Detroit - smack in the middle of one of the most thriving blocks in the city. You'll sit next to locals at the bar downstairs—or the coffee shop—and learn about the city from people who live here. Detroiters are a pretty friendly lot.

There's plenty to absorb inside, too. Decorated with Detroit and Midwest-made goods (much of which is also for sale), the space tells a story about the designers, artists and artisans who helped bring it to life."
history  interiors  materials  travel  lcproject  honorandfolley  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  detroit  lodging  hotels  cafes  via:robinsloan  b&b  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
UMAMI MART OPEN « Umami Mart
"We did it! With the loving support from our friends, family, and community, Yoko and I have opened Umami Mart, a retail shop in Oakland, CA, specializing in kitchen + barware from Japan.

The idea for starting a brick-and-mortar shop really derived from necessity. We had been running our online shop for nearly two years, and the inventory was eating up Yoko’s apartment, ie her life. I’d walk into her place and there were boxes everywhere, packaging products, human-size rolls of bubble wrap — the entire online shop resided in every nook and cranny of her apartment. She was about to lose it (Skylar style). It was time for some breathing room."

"For Umami Mart, he [Anders Arhøj] envisioned a bright space where Shinto meets Scandinavian minimalism. He designed all the furniture, logos, graphics — everything."

"We created this space on a shoe-string budget of $10k, using mostly birch plywood."
joeperez-green  devinfarrell  manuallabor  hamaya  andersarhøj  popuphood  japan  kitchen  design  art  food  japanese  bayarea  oakland  cafes  openstudioproject  interiors  plywood  lcproject  glvo  srg  retailspace  retail  2012  umamimart  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
A Vision for Talkable Brand: J.C. Penney - Digital Influence Mapping Project
"Ron Johnson, now CEO of J.C. Penney…ran the Apple stores before…his first few months at the historic department store have been challenged by Wall Street who only see short term revenue problems and subsequent stock dips.

…With so much abundance via the Internet, the store is there to inspire. He has plenty of other innovations up his sleeve from activities in-store (cooking classes?) to iPad-toting staff, to magic dressing rooms that somehow connect online with in-store…

I hope his vision gets realized and it pans out in a timely fashion. It stands to make J.C. Penney and those that chase after its vision into places we talk about and, in his words, “belong.”

[Article referenced within: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-08-09/ron-johnson-on-the-progress-of-his-j-dot-c-dot-penney-remake
]

[More J.C. Penney: https://twitter.com/rogre/status/223316958416875520 ]
jcpenney  cafes  openstudioproject  lcproject  social  2012  experience  apple  retail  ronjohnson  via:russelldavies 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Setup / Rhys Newman
"A wall & a desk. I love studios & desks that reflect designers projects & priorities, & the connections & conflicts that may bring. I call them messy…Julian Bleecker calls them curated. A project should feel palpable in a studio, out & up, not just on screen… a huge wall where one can pin up, work on, layer, tear down, & build back up again is essential for me to work in a studio, & essential for good projects. If creativity is about connecting ideas & things that are not seemingly connected, a wall & curated desks can facilitate this creativity… we have those powered desks that allow you to stand or sit, or hove…"

"My preference would be to start with a small studio, with a great big wall, a large kitchen table, a small kitchen. Lots of light, a modelshop and protolab next door. Good creative people, no dickheads, lots of good conversation, laughter and music, and a good few bicycles by the door. A few big projects, lots of small personal projects that blur the boundaries."
furniture  creativity  openstudioproject  cafes  lcproject  design  walls  howwework  standingdesks  desks  2012  thesetup  rhysnewman  usesthis  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Courier Coffee Roasters
"Our bar is arguably a lot of work. We bake scratch on bar, make ice cubes, offer any one we think is thirsty a mason jar of water (even if they are getting coffee to go), melt chocolate for drinks, make vanilla syrup, handwrite menus and business cards, and painstakingly make every cup of drip individually (while pre-rinsing to go cups, and getting cream and sugar for everyone (instead of leaving it out). And we handwash all dishware, while actively keeping track of our record player. Working bar is a dance. Enter Niko, our newest member, who came along with good words from former Little Red Bike Cafe worker.

With a flat of strawberries we ride Farmers Market to bar. With fifty burlap coffee bags we stack high on our porteur racks and deliver to friends for their projects. Hundreds of pounds we are moving in a day by bicycle. Pouring rain keeps us wet and tired, yet still everything is pretty awesome."

[Also: http://couriercoffeeroasters.com/ http://couriercoffeeroasters/wordpress ]
howwework  2012  couriercoffeeroasters  oregon  portland  coffee  handmade  glvo  srg  cafes  openstudioproject  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
[SHANGHAI] Plum Gallery | Sugared & Spiced
"Opened by a Taiwanese music video director, Plum is a small gallery inside Jing’an Villa (靜安別墅) dedicated to exhibiting offbeat and unique art. Also serves coffee, tea, plum soda, and wine. A cute place worth visiting!

The exhibition theme changes every 1 or 2 months. Currently, Plum is having an exhibition titled “Post-Ready-Made”, which showcases works from Japanese and Taiwanese contemporary furniture designers Noriko Daishima, Mercy Yeh and Nicole Teng.

Plum serves coffee, tea, plum soda, and wine. If you do choose to have a drink here, you can sit on any of the chairs/sofas/stools displayed in the gallery, all of which you can purchase and take home.

A small corner with various items for sale – cards, book covers, notebooks, art books, etc.

Plum is worth a visit if you are in the Nanjing West Road area, and while you are here, also drop by other quirky spots in Jing’an Villa like Hypo and GZ cafe."
lepetitxiaoxiao  shanghai  lcproject  srg  galleries  nicoleteng  mercyyeh  norikodaishima  cafes  plumgallery  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Cooking with Noriko at Shanghai showroom | Taste Bites
"Noriko and I cooked together last weekend in her little showroom. The kitchen faces south, so the winter sun shone all the way inside to keep us warm and brightly lit. Her kerosene heater did the rest of the heating work in the main area of Shanghai Showroom, the creative project she spearheads along with Beijing designer, Nicole Teng. It’s a quiet and welcoming place filled with gorgeous furniture, textiles, ceramics, lamps, all hand made or designed by Noriko or Nicole.

I’ve known Noriko Daishima since my Shaoxing Lu days, back when she ran underground cafe Le Petit Xiao Xiao and I was in the early throes of romancing the city. At Xiao Xiao her menu was short, simple and often surprising in the way she used fresh market ingredients to come up with unexpected combinations, such as cucumber and tofu salad. Her approach to food is all about celebrating the natural flavours of produce. Speaking about her inspiration to cook the way she does, Noriko explained how important it is to…"
2012  leisurearts  making  gnocchi  cafes  srg  cooking  lepetitxiaoxiao  shanghaishowroom  norikodaishima  nicoleteng  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  artleisure 
july 2012 by robertogreco
showroom 展示室
“showroom 展示室” is a small creative space in Shanghai, run and owned by two creative design projects BRUT CAKE and xiaoxiao, to presents their design works and share creative ideas."
shanghaishowroom  cafes  galleries  design  art  lepetitxiaoxiao  brutcake  shanghai  showroom  norikodaishima  nicoleteng  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Sugared & Spiced
":What is Sugared & Spiced?
A food + travel blog based in Shanghai.

When and why did it get started?
August 2010. For the love of eating, photographing, and sharing.

What camera do you use?
Ricoh GRD4.

What’s your favorite restaurant in Shanghai?
Hard to say, but you can check my list of “favorites” to get some ideas.

How do you eat so much?
One simply does not resist good food.

Are you fat?
Plump like a watermelon.

Do you get paid to eat?
Nope, but I do get invited to taste, and if that’s the case I always put a note upfront in red for your information.

How should I navigate this blog?
For restaurants in Shanghai, use archives by cuisine, by time of day, by location, and by price. For restaurants and travel entries outside of Shanghai, click on any of the city names on the righthand column under “travels”."
lcproject  cafes  bali  beijing  hongkong  tokyo  seoul  taipei  srg  blogs  china  food  asia  shanghai  travel  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Setup / Julian Bleecker
[Julian reads my mind.]

"The dream setup is a studio that's a short bike's ride from home. In front would be a cafe that the studio would run in a haphazard way — sometimes someone from the studio might pop around and decide to make coffee for patrons. Sometimes you'd just have to turn people away. But the cafe would also be a bit of a literati cafe, so people would come by and read and write and talk and use as a meeting place and to teach little "Public School" style classes on anything and everything. There'd be books and a bit of a lending library. The only thing between the cafe and the studio behind it would be a bit of glass wall and a door. The studio would have a proper cooking kitchen (no microwave and robot coffee — real cooking) and a long family style table to accommodate 15 or so — that's what experience tells me is the maximum compliment for a well-oiled, creative, functioning team of designers/makers/builders.

In back would be a 40 foot x 40 foot pitch of back garden with a fire pit, outdoor kitchen and a wall where we could show movies all year round in the California evenings. Attached and visible through a wall of sound muffling glass would be the shop. A big shop with CNC machines, clean room, electronics assembly and fabrication, hand tools, finishing tools, cutters both material and laser and a 3D printer that wouldn't be fetishized but used to compliment proper designing and making."
coffee  thesetup  california  design  making  edg  srg  kitchens  reading  books  publicschool  thirdplaces  cafes  libraries  groupsize  cv  glvo  studios  lcproject  2012  julianbleecker  thirdspaces  openstudioproject  usesthis 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Speculist » Blog Archive » In the Future Everything Will Be A Coffee Shop
"Eventually you could have local campuses becoming places where MITx students seek tutoring, network, & socialize—reclaiming some of the college experience they’d otherwise have lost.

Phil thought this sounded like college as a giant coffee shop. I agree. Every education would be ad hoc. It would be student-directed toward the job market she’s aiming for.

This trend toward…coffeeshopification…is changing more than just colleges:

Book Stores Will Shrink to Coffee Shops…

The Coffee Shop Will Displace Most Retail Shops…

Offices Become Coffee Shops…Again…

What Doesn’t Become a Coffee Shop?…

…houses of worship…

What will remain other than coffee shops? Upscale retail will remain…[for] experience…Restaurants remain. Grocery stores remain.

Brick and mortar retail stores will be converted to public spaces. Multi-use space will be in increasing demand as connectivity tools allow easy coordination of impromptu events…"
restaurants  multipurpose  multi-usespace  impromptuevents  events  coffeeshopification  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  howwelearn  howwework  work  enlightenment  stevenjohnson  amazonprime  amazon  shopping  espressobookmachine  coffeehouses  coffeeshops  coffee  on-demandprinting  highereducation  higheredbubble  highered  information  reading  ebooks  stephengordon  future  retail  deschooling  unschooling  sociallearning  self-directedlearning  mitx  mit  learning  srg  glvo  2011  universities  colleges  education  opencoffeeclubdresden  3dprinting  ondemand  ondemandprinting  bookfuturism  books  cafes  openstudioproject 
february 2012 by robertogreco
The Healing Powers of a Pie Shop - NYTimes.com
"PieLab opened in a makeshift space…Project M team members…at the invitation of the Hale Empowerment & Revitalization Organization (HERO), a housing-advocacy nonprofit, which also sponsored community-minded local initiatives. The Project M team conceived of their pie shop as a pop-up — a temporary cafe — describing it as a “negative-energy inverter, fueled by pie.”…
PieLab = a neutral place + a slice of pie.A neutral place + a slice of pie = conversation.
Conversation = ideas + design.Ideas + design = positive change.

…operated out of temporary quarters for four months…Within a few months of opening…PieLab-inspired efforts popped up in [other] cities…"

[Article also outlines misteps.]

"All the attention buoyed the PieLab collaborators. But it also created problems. When Project M first arrived in Greensboro, some folk bristled at the language it employed."

[Slide show: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/10/10/magazine/pielab.html?ref=magazine ]

[See also http://mmm.pielab.org/ (nice touch on the URL) AND http://vimeo.com/9386150 ]
alabama  greensboro  popuprestaurants  pop-uprestaurants  lcproject  community  humanitariandesign  designimperialism  projectm  amandabuck  food  glvo  srg  pielab  halecounty  conversation  problemsolving  designbasedsolutions  nonprofit  cultureclash  language  blackbelt  us  change  ideageneration  studios  popup  pop-ups  thirdspaces  cafes  openstudioproject  nonprofits 
august 2011 by robertogreco
seesaw
"We're a one-of-a-kind studio + café inspiring curiosity, creativity, and connection.

Studio: education and support for children & adults.
• friendship skills
• structured play groups
• language immersion
• workshops

Café: eat. drink. play.
• Four Barrel coffee
• tasty Danish and Korean snacks
• family-friendly vibe
• art shows and private events

Private Events: Seesaw is a great place to have your next birthday party, baby shower or private event. We offer a variety of packages. Call or e-mail us and we'll give you the low down."

[via: http://twitter.com/dcinc66/status/88450490043613184 ]
sanfrancisco  lcproject  education  learning  parenting  children  glvo  cafes  studios  curiosity  creativity  social  food  tovisit  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
OK Do | Small, small, small – Noriko Daishima’s home in Shanghai is also a café and a shop
"Designer Noriko Daishima runs a small shop, café and creative studio in her home in Shanghai. Located in the French Concession, on Xingguo Lu, she calls her place Le Petit Xiaoxiao (small, small, small) and keeps it open for friends and their friends during the weekends. Last Saturday, we visited Noriko for a chat and green tea."

"Like us, many people found their way to Noriko’s through a friend’s recommendation. We heard about the place from Satoko and Kok-Meng, a Shanghai-based couple who met each other at Le Petit Xiaoxiao and later founded KUU design office together. “I wanted to create a small creative community by making my home a meeting place,” Noriko tells us about her activities resonating Chinese communality. “I have made many new friends at my place.”"

[Update 18 July 2012: Sad to see this post is gone and not available in the Wayback Machine.]

[Some related links:
http://lepetit-xiaoxiao.eco.to/ (Noriko Daishima's website)
http://lepetit-xiaoxiao.eco.to/weblog/ (Noriko Daishima's blog)
http://lepetitxiao.jugem.jp/ (Noriko Daishima's other blog)
http://showroom-shanghai.net/ (collaboration with Nicole Teng of But Cake)
http://www.sugarednspiced.com/plum-gallery/ (Plum Gallery has shown Noriko Daishima's work)
http://www.tastebites.net/cooking-with-noriko/ (cooking with Noriko Daishima)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/yanbing/529552230/ (a photo at Le Petit Xiaoxiao)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/reelene/505347206/ (a photo at Le Petit Xiaoxiao)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/reelene/504656722/ (a photo at Le Petit Xiaoxiao)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepetit-xiaoxiao/ (Le Perit Xiaoxiao's Flickr account?)

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g308272-d969465-Reviews-Le_petit_xiao_xiao-Shanghai.html (Le Petit Xiaoxiao on Trip Advisor) ]
norikodaishima  lcproject  community  social  meetingplace  creativity  make  making  art  design  schooldesign  shanghai  thirdplaces  homes  fabrication  handmade  openstudio  work  workspace  cafes  lepetitxiaoxiao  thirdspaces  openstudioproject  workspaces  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Open social scene: Coffeesmith, Garosu-gil | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"I thought this was just an exemplary platform for conviviality.

Coffeesmith's multiple zones readily support:
- prospect and refuge;
- solitary drinking/reading/studying/people-watching;
- socialization at a variety of scales, from couples to mid-sized groups;
- a range of options for lighting and ventilation."
lcproject  space  conviviality  thirdplaces  design  architecture  environmentaldesign  lighting  ventilation  seoul  korea  socialization  adamgreenfield  experience  coffeehouses  work  workplace  workspace  cafes  classroomdesigns  thirdspaces  openstudioproject  workspaces  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Art - The Daily Grind - NYTimes.com
"In New York City, where the unemployment rate remains at 10.3 percent, the jobless have started leaning hard on coffee shops and bookstores to get out of their tiny one-bedrooms and away from their annoying roommates. In these harsh, career-vanishing times, the members of this laptop brigade do everything they can to re-create the office environment they no longer have to complain about."
unemployment  mobile  office  work  thirdplaces  neo-nomads  nomads  laptops  thirdspaces  cafes  openstudioproject 
november 2009 by robertogreco
cabel.name: Kashiwa Mystery Cafe
"At this cafe, you get what the person before you ordered. The next person gets what you ordered. Welcome to the Ogori cafe! ... For the record, here are the rules of the Ogori cafe: 1. Let's treat the next person. What to treat them with? It's your choice. 2. Even if it's a group of friends or a family, please form a single-file line. Also, you can't buy twice in a row. 3. Please enjoy what you get, even if you hate it. (If you really, really hate it, let's quietly give it to another while saying, "It's my treat…") 4. Let's say "Thank You! (Gochihosama)" if you find the person with your Ogori cafe card. 5. We can't issue a receipt."
japan  cafes  travel  society  community  mystery  business  fun  food  restaurants  culture  japanese  drink  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Eduardo Galeano Contemplates History’s Paradoxes
"I found the context of this radio interview intriguing for a number of reasons. The setting of a cafe as a place to think and plot and plan future worlds — of course this is resonant to me. The right cafes are peerless as places to think, observe, meet people, write, sketch, ponder. Much, much better than just about any of the social settings available in digital environments. I mean, really — Facebook is an obscure diacritic in the language of human social practices as far as my experience suggests."
eduardogaleano  thinking  facebook  writing  thirdplaces  julianbleecker  djangoreinhardt  jazz  cafes  music  books  latinamerica  uruguay  writers  thirdspaces  openstudioproject 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Eduardo Galeano Contemplates History's Paradoxes : NPR
"Now 68, the Uruguayan author spends most days at his favorite cafe in Montevideo, Uruguay, where fans phone to ask if he is there or when he's expected. Sometimes they leave letters and books for him to sign. Galeano says he was formed in this cafe and others like it:

"These were my universities. Here in cafes is where I learned the art of storytelling — great anonymous storytellers that taught me how to do it," he says. "I love these places where we may have time to lose time. It is a luxury in this world." ... When it's time to leave the cafe, a friend appears outside to give him a lift. Galeano doesn't drive, nor does he use his cell phone much. He suspects his computer — and all computers — drink whiskey at night when nobody's watching.

"And that's why next day they do some enigmatic things that nobody can understand," he says."

[via: http://www.nearfuturelaboratory.com/2009/08/26/eduardo-galeano-contemplates-historys-paradoxes/ ]
eduardogaleano  writing  thinking  technology  mobile  phones  computers  myth  storytelling  history  thirdplaces  paradox  jazz  djangoreinhardt  music  books  writers  latinamerica  uruguay  cafes  thirdspaces  openstudioproject 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Coworking wiki - To establish a collaboration space fo...
"Coworking is cafe-like community/collaboration space for developers, writers and independents. Or, it's like this: start with a shared office and add cafe culture."
coworking  cooperation  cooperative  collaborative  collaboration  community  cohousing  alternative  entrepreneurship  openspace  office  networking  spaces  space  work  workplace  sanfrancisco  management  business  wiki  meatspace  environment  cafes  freelancing  workspace  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  workspaces 
october 2007 by robertogreco
:: Escola São Paulo >> Uma iniciativa inovadora!
"sala de aula, biblioteca, videoteca, cdteca, dvdteca, exposições, café, restaurante, loja. pessoas e empresas, brasileiras e estrangeiras, participam do projeto por ser a escola um espaço de estudos e pesquisa. acesso gratuito a atividades. desenvolv
lcproject  schools  schooldesign  brasil  sãopaulo  design  education  alternative  culture  art  place  theater  food  dance  cafes  architecture  events  meetings  classes  space  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  brazil 
april 2007 by robertogreco
brand promotion = hangout place on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"never thought toyota as a brand that would provide a cafe for young people. here, it is."
toyota  brands  cars  marketing  youth  cafes  $100  olpc  laptops  lcproject  schooldesign  alternative  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
march 2007 by robertogreco

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