robertogreco + buildings   41

Web design as architecture
“WEB DESIGN AS ARCHITECTURE

1. Websites are places. They provide services and social environments. Like architecture, they distribute access and atmospheric context to these resources: Watching a video on Nowness is different from watching a video on YouTube.

2. Websites are inherently public. Architecture is by nature a public discipline. Both buildings and websites are built realities. They are part of the fabric of societies that are now both physical and virtual.

3. Websites are inhabited. They become part of societies through the interactions they enable. They are homes to communities, to thoughts and approaches. They may be privately owned and operated, but inhabited and used by the public. As buildings, websites are where we spend our lives.

4. Websites are local, despite their distributed nature. Websites adhere to culturally established patterns, languages and user expectations in similar ways architecture does. Buying an onigiri from a 7-11 branch is different from buying a pretzel from a Bavarian bakery.

5. Websites are cultural artifacts. Like buildings, websites foster social discourses. They do so by establishing new ways of interaction or by asking new aesthetic questions.

6. Websites are constructed. Websites may use new technologies or existing technology to new effect. They may employ new ways of construction, or cite old ways of construction. Similarly, material and construction are defining characteristics of architectural work.

7. Websites age. As buildings, some get better with age. Some decay. Others get renovated or re-purposed.

8. Websites exist within frameworks. They negotiate contrasting requirements. Similarly, architecture deals with zoning and building regulations. Smart integration or avoidance of such requirements is a source for good and efficient design in both cases.

9. Websites are made by individuals, by collectives or by large-scale project groups, decisively influencing their aims, design quality and building process. Similar differences exist between private construction and large-scale urban projects. There is value in each scale.

10. Websites are inevitable. Applying Rem Koolhaas’ quip about buildings, a website has to happen in order for a service or content to exist in the digital realm.

The above aims to provide a starting point for a more expansive, and more critical discourse on website design. The engagement of liberal arts, humanities and engineering present in the architectural discourse is more timely than ever. Considering and expanding upon these aspects when building and critiquing websites may help us fulfilling our responsibility as contributors to the global digital infrastructure today.

This text uses the term Website to describe a markup document containing text and other media, served via a networked connection. For this definition, mobile apps and specialized hardware devices are interpreted as specific types of browsers serving websites in proprietary content formats.

ⓐThis text started as a tweet. ⓑ It was turned into a talk held on May 23rd 2019, in Oslo, Norway on invitation by Grafill. ⓒThere is an are.na channel that collects sources and collateral concerning the topic.



http://maltemueller.com
https://waf.gmbh
@electricgecko

This website is built as a single HTML document.
Set in Authentic Sans.”

[See also:
https://www.are.na/malte-muller/web-design-as-architecture ]
webdesign  webdev  architecture  manifestos  place  buildings  are.na  maltemüller 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
A Map of Every Building in America - The New York Times
"Most of the time, The New York Times asks you to read something. Today we are inviting you, simply, to look. On this page you will find maps showing almost every building in the United States.

Why did we make such a thing? We did it as an opportunity for you to connect with the country’s cities and explore them in detail. To find the familiar, and to discover the unfamiliar.

So … look. Every black speck on the map below is a building, reflecting the built legacy of the United States.

Use the search bar to find a place and explore the interactive map below."

[via: https://twitter.com/emilymbadger/status/1050739811911442433

"The NYT published the most beautiful thing today: a map of every building in America

I love how you can see the ridges of Appalachia as negative space in the built environment

Why do different communities just *feel* different when you visit them? These underlying patterns are a large part of the answer."]

[See also:
https://github.com/gboeing/ms-bldg-footprints ]
maps  mapping  us  buildings  cartography  2018 
october 2018 by robertogreco
San Francisco’s Skyline, Now Inexorably Transformed by Tech - The New York Times
[See also: "The Call Building: San Francisco's Forgotten Skyscaper
Historical Essay, by Ellen Klages excerpted from a longer article originally published in The Argonaut, Summer 1993, Volume 4, Number 1"
http://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=THE_CALL_BUILDING:_SAN_FRANCISCO%27S_FORGOTTEN_SKYSCRAPER ]
sanfrancisco  architecture  salesforcetower  classideas  cities  2017  skyscrapers  buildings  history 
december 2017 by robertogreco
The Future of Cities – Medium
[video (embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOOWk5yCMMs ]

"Organic Filmmaking and City Re-Imagining

What does “the future of cities” mean? To much of the developing world, it might be as simple as aspiring to having your own toilet, rather than sharing one with over 100 people. To a family in Detroit, it could mean having non-toxic drinking water. For planners and mayors, it’s about a lot of things — sustainability, economy, inclusivity, and resilience. Most of us can hope we can spend a little less time on our commutes to work and a little more time with our families. For a rich white dude up in a 50th floor penthouse, “the future of cities” might mean zipping around in a flying car while a robot jerks you off and a drone delivers your pizza. For many companies, the future of cities is simply about business and money, presented to us as buzzwords like “smart city” and “the city of tomorrow.”

I started shooting the “The Future of a Cities” as a collaboration with the The Nantucket Project, but it really took shape when hundreds of people around the world responded to a scrappy video I made asking for help.

Folks of all ages, from over 75 countries, volunteered their time, thoughts, work, and footage so that I could expand the scope of the piece and connect with more people in more cities. This strategy saved me time and money, but it also clarified the video’s purpose, which inspired me to put more energy into the project in order to get it right. I was reading Jan Gehl, Jane Jacobs, Edward Glaeser, etc. and getting excited about their ideas — after seeing what mattered to the people I met in person and watching contributions from those I didn’t, the video gained focus and perspective.

If I hired a production services outfit to help me film Mumbai, it would actually be a point of professional pride for the employees to deliver the Mumbai they think I want to see. If some young filmmakers offer to show me around their city and shoot with me for a day, we’re operating on another level, and a very different portrait of a city emerges. In the first scenario, my local collaborators get paid and I do my best to squeeze as much work out of the time period paid for as possible. In the second, the crew accepts more responsibility but gains ownership, hopefully leaving the experience feeling more empowered.

Architect and former mayor of Curitiba Jaime Lerner famously said “if you want creativity, take a zero off your budget. If you want sustainability, take off two zeros.” It’s been my experience that this sustainability often goes hand-in-hand with humanity, and part of what I love about working with less resources and money is that it forces you to treat people like human beings. Asking someone to work with less support or equipment, or to contribute more time for less money, requires a mutual understanding between two people. If each person can empathize for the other, it’s been my experience that we’ll feel it in the work — both in the process and on screen.

Organic filmmaking requires you to keep your crew small and your footprint light. You start filming with one idea in mind, but the idea changes each day as elements you could never have anticipated inform the bigger picture. You make adjustments and pursue new storylines. You edit a few scenes, see what’s working and what’s not, then write new scenes. Shoot those, cut them in, then go back and write more. Each part of the process talks to the other. The movie teaches itself to be a better movie. Because organic is complicated, it can be tricky to defend and difficult to scale up, but because it’s cheap and low-resource, it’s easier to experiment. Learning about the self-organizing, living cities that I did on this project informed how we made the video. And looking at poorly planned urban projects reminded me of the broken yet prevailing model for making independent film in the U.S., where so many films are bound to fail — often in a way a filmmaker doesn’t recover from — before they even begin.

Jane Jacobs said that “cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” I’ve worked on videos for companies, for the guy in the penthouse, for nobody in particular, in the developing world, with rich people and poor people, for me, for my friends, and for artists. I’m so thankful for everybody who allowed me to make this film the way we did, and I hope the parallels between filmmaking and city building — where the stakes are so much higher — aren’t lost on anyone trying to make their city a better place. We should all be involved. The most sustainable future is a future that includes us all.

“The Future of Cities” Reading List

(There’s a longer list I discovered recently from Planetizen HERE but these are the ones I got into on this project — I’m excited to read many more)

The Death and Life of American Cities by Jane Jacobs
The Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier by Edward Glaeser
Cities for People and Life Between Buildings by Jan Gehl
The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life by Jonathan Rose(just came out — incredible)
Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time by Jeff Speck
The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life by Carlo Ratti and Matthew Claudel
Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design by Charles Montgomery
Dream Cities: Seven Urban Ideas That Shape the World by Wade Graham
Connectography: Mapping The Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna
Delirious New York by Rem Koolhaas
Low Life and The Other Paris by Luc Sante
A History of Future Cities by Daniel Brook
Streetfight: Handbook for the Urban Revolution by Janette Sadik-Khan and Seth Solomonow
Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-Term Change by Mike Lydon & Anthony Garcia
Living In The Endless City, edited by Ricky Burdett and Deyan Sudjic

“The Future of Cities” Select Interviewees:
David Hertz & Sky Source
Vicky Chan & Avoid Obvious Architects
Carlo Ratti: Director, MIT Senseable City Lab Founding Partner, Carlo Ratti Associati
Edward Glaeser: Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University Author of The Triumph of the City
Helle Søholt: Founding Parner & CEO, Gehl Architects
Ricky Burdett: Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age
Lauren Lockwood, Chief Digital Officer, City of Boston
Pablo Viejo: Smart Cities Expert & CTO V&V Innovations, Singapore
Matias Echanove & Urbz, Mumbai
Janette Sadik-Khan: Author, Advisor, & Former NYC DOT Commissioner
Abess Makki: CEO, City Insight
Dr. Parag Khanna: Author of Connectography
Stan Gale: CEO of Gale International, Developer of Songdo IBD
Dr. Jockin Arputham: President, Slum Dwellers International
Morton Kabell: Mayor for Technical & Environmental Affairs, Copenhagen
cities  urban  urbanplanning  urbanism  bikes  biking  cars  singapore  nyc  losangeles  janejacobs  jangehl  edwardglaeser  mumbai  tokyo  regulation  jaimelerner  curitiba  nantucketproject  carloratti  vickchan  davidhertz  hellesøholt  rickyburdett  laurenlockwood  pabloviejo  matiasechanove  urbz  janettesadik-khan  abessmakki  paragkhanna  stangale  jockinarputham  slumdwellersinternational  slums  mortonkabell  urbanization  future  planning  oscarboyson  mikelydon  anthonygarcia  danielbrook  lucsante  remkoolhaas  dayansudjic  rickyburdettsethsolomonow  wadegraham  charlesmontgomery  matthewclaudeljeffspeck  jonathanrose  transportation  publictransit  transit  housing  construction  development  local  small  grassroots  technology  internet  web  online  communications  infrastructure  services  copenhagen  sidewalks  pedestrians  sharing  filmmaking  film  video  taipei  seoul  santiago  aukland  songdo  sydney  london  nairobi  venice  shenzhen  2016  sustainability  environment  population  detroit  making  manufacturing  buildings  economics  commutes  commuting 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Go Back to School With Mike Kelley's "Educational Complex" | Art for Sale | Artspace
"Though he has been based in Los Angeles since 1976, Mike Kelley’s birthplace of Detroit has always been a locus of his practice, as has his working method of creating psychologically charged architecture—as scale models and as life size environments—for chaotic, often scatological accumulations of personal memories and cultural detritus. Examples include works in which an imagined territory gives structure to a larger narrative, as with the landscape photographs in Three Valleys (1980) or the drawings in Monkey Island (1982-83); sculptural landscapes composed of found children’s blankets and pathetic pre-owned dolls or pet toys, such as Mooner or Arena 5 (both 1990); and the sock monkeys and related stuffed animals grouped and organized on generic industrial work tables in Craft Morphology Flow Chart (1991).

Kelley’s integration of personal, architectural, and cultural memory reached its apotheosis in 1995 with Educational Complex. In American culture of the 1980s and 1990s, the suburban school became a territory heavily charged with symbolism in the wake of several high-profile school shootings and child-abuse cases. Locations such as Columbine, Colorado, and Manhattan Beach, California—home of the McMartin preschool, another subject of Kelley’s—are indelibly etched in the American psyche as painful examples of aggression or “repressed memory syndrome” incubated in neighborhoods that had once held promise for upwardly mobile families fleeing the inner city. In Kelley’s work, this dark and paranoid side of American culture is exploited and filtered through the artist’s own memories of his childhood experiences in Detroit, one of the most economically blighted cities in the United States. Like other American artists, such as Paul McCarthy, who mines the territory of his own Mormon upbringing, or Matthew Barney, who has used the American West as the cinematic backdrop for his epic films, Kelley is interested in icons of the benign relics of his own psyche—in his case, the wishing well, the office, the museum, the classroom.

In 1995, addressing what he calls his “bias against architecture” Kelley created Educational Complex, a tabletop model that delineates the psychogeography of his childhood by reconstructing from memory the schools he attended and the house in which he grew up. “Buildings that I had occupied almost every day for years could barely be recalled. The teachers, courses and activities held within them are a vast undifferentiated swamp.” Generated through a process of drawing and modeling, the complex of structures was a combination of excavation and spatialization of memory. Classrooms, hallways and offices were recalled, drawn, and then matched to actual floorplans. The resulting form became a conflation of the two.

The gaps in memory—the lapses and repressed moments—are represented by actual blanks in the architecture of the model, spaces filled in. Doors recalled as opening on the left are represented as doing so on the right, while other mistakes are left uncorrected, representing what Anthony Vidler has called “a nostalgia for the homely.” As Kelley has said, “In utopian projects, moral and aesthetic dimensions are presented, often openly and dramatically, as mirrors of each other. Of course, my project is a perversion of such an attitude: I present an obviously dystopian architecture, reflecting our true, chaotic social conditions, rather than some idealized dream of wholeness.”"

[See also: http://aaaaarg.fail/thing/55a76208334fe06cd8fdc2cd]]

"One of the most influential artists of our time, Mike Kelley (1954--2012) produced a body of innovative work mining American popular culture as well as modernist and postmodernist art -- relentless examinations of subjectivity and of society that are both sinister and ecstatic. With a wide range of media, Kelley's work explores themes as varied as post-punk politics, religious systems, social class, and repressed memory. Using architectural models to represent schools he attended, his 1995 work, Educational Complex, presents forgotten spaces as frames for private trauma, real or imagined. The work's implications are at once miniature and massive. In this book, John Miller offers an illustrated examination of this milestone work that marked a significant change in Kelley's practice. A "complex" can mean an architectural configuration, a psychological syndrome, or a political apparatus, and Miller approaches Educational Complex through corresponding lines of inquiry, considering the making of the work, examining it in terms of education and trauma (sexual or otherwise), and investigating how it tests the ideological horizon of art as an institution. Miller shows that in Educational Complex, Kelley expands his political and aesthetic focus, including not only such artifacts as generic forms of architecture but (inspired by the infamous McMartin Preschool case) popular fantasies associated with ritual sex abuse and false memory syndrome. Through this archaeology of the contemporary, Miller argues, Kelley examines the mandate for education and the liberal democratic premises underpinning it."]
mikekelley  art  architecture  childhood  schools  memory  1995  psychogeography  detroit  2015  buildings 
september 2015 by robertogreco
HPLA v1.0 [HistoricPlacesLA]
"HistoricPlacesLA is the first online information and management system specifically created to inventory, map and help protect the City of Los Angeles’ significant historic resources. It showcases the city's diversity of historic resources, including architecturally significant buildings and places of social importance, as well as historic districts, bridges, parks, and streetscapes."

[via: http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/historicplacesla-los-angeles-history.html ]
losangeles  history  architecture  place  bridges  parks  buildings 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Continuous City by Brian Foo — Kickstarter
"An illustrated book exploring imagined landscapes and topographies for New York City, told through conversations and paintings"



"It made me think of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities (a persistent inspiration for my recent creative projects). A city can be something very different depending on who you ask, as each person perceives their own version of their city.

Our relationships with the places we live in are as complex as our relationships with ourselves and other people. Continuous City ended up being a composite of those different relationships and feelings towards the places we live in. Some are like love letters, some are like formal complaints, some are like letters of regret to a city in which we live or left behind."
nyc  buildings  art  books  2013  brianfoo  italocalvino  invisiblecities  kickstarter 
june 2013 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Spacesuit: An Interview with Nicholas de Monchaux
"I was looking for a way to discuss the essential lessons of complexity and emergence—which, even in 2003, were pretty unfamiliar words in the context of design—and I hit upon this research on the spacesuit as the one thing I’d done that could encapsulate the potential lessons of those ideas, both for scientists and for designers. The book really was a melding of these two things."

"But then the actual spacesuit—this 21-layered messy assemblage made by a bra company, using hand-stitched couture techniques—is kind of an anti-hero. It’s much more embarrassing, of course—it’s made by people who make women’s underwear—but, then, it’s also much more urbane. It’s a complex, multilayered assemblage that actually recapitulates the messy logic of our own bodies, rather than present us with the singular ideal of a cyborg or the hard, one-piece, military-industrial suits against which the Playtex suit was always competing.

The spacesuit, in the end, is an object that crystallizes a lot of ideas about who we are and what the nature of the human body may be—but, then, crucially, it’s also an object in which many centuries of ideas about the relationship of our bodies to technology are reflected."

"The same individuals and organizations who were presuming to engineer the internal climate of the body and create the figure of the cyborg were the same institutions who, in the same context of the 1960s, were proposing major efforts in climate-modification.

Embedded in both of those ideas is the notion that we can reduce a complex, emergent system—whether it’s the body or the planet or something closer to the scale of the city—to a series of cybernetically inflected inputs, outputs, and controls. As Edward Teller remarked in the context of his own climate-engineering proposals, “to give the earth a thermostat.”"

"most attempts to cybernetically optimize urban systems were spectacular failures, from which very few lessons seem to have been learned"

"architecture can be informed by technology and, at the same time, avoid what I view as the dead-end of an algorithmically inflected formalism from which many of the, to my mind, less convincing examples of contemporary practice have emerged"

"connections…between the early writing of Jane Jacobs…and the early research done in the 1950s and 60s on complexity and emergence under the aegis of the Rockefeller Foundation"

"Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt—who have gone a long way in showing that, not only should cities be viewed through the analogical lens of complex natural systems, but, in fact, some of the mathematics—in particular, to do with scaling laws, the consumption of resources, and the production of innovation by cities—proves itself far more susceptible to analyses that have come out of biology than, say, conventional economics."
militaryindustrialcomplex  tools  cad  gis  luisbettencourt  janejacobs  meatropolis  manhattan  meat  property  fakestates  alancolquhoun  lizdiller  cyberneticurbanism  glenswanson  parametricarchitecture  parametricurbanism  interstitialspaces  urbanism  urban  bernardshriever  simonramo  neilsheehan  jayforrester  housing  hud  huberthumphrey  vitruvius  naca  smartcities  nyc  joeflood  husseinchalayan  cushicle  michaelwebb  spacerace  buildings  scuba  diving  1960s  fantasticvoyage  adromedastrain  quarantine  systemsthinking  matta-clark  edwardteller  climatecontrol  earth  exploration  spacetravel  terraforming  humanbody  bodies  cyborgs  travel  mongolfier  wileypost  management  planning  robertmoses  cybernetics  materials  fabric  2003  stewartbrand  jamescrick  apollo  complexitytheory  complexity  studioone  geoffreywest  cities  research  clothing  glvo  wearables  christiandior  playtex  interviews  technology  history  design  science  fashion  nasa  books  spacesuits  architecture  space  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  2012  nicholasdemonchaux  wearable  elizabethdiller  interstitial  bod  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Why Cooper Union can’t be trusted | Felix Salmon
"I can’t help but think this building exists for the same reason as the war in Iraq or Netflix streaming. Somebody with clout got enamoured with the idea, and pointing out its flaws became career-limiting. Like most boondoggles, the idea was grand, inspiring, and financially unrealistic.

It’s just a guess, but that’s a pattern I’ve seen over and over."

[From a comment pointed out by Casey (http://reading.am/CaseyG/comments/6495 ) who adds… ]

"Reminds me of Dan Hill: "Even a Pritzker prize-winning architect such as Richard Rogers cannot, for example, challenge the basic premises of the Barangaroo urban development in Sydney. The combination of masterplan, financial model, political context, local history and local cultures created a tight frame within which the architectural design work must occur. Many of the architects and other designers within the project team knew that the way the question was being framed was fundamentally flawed, but from their relatively lowly position…"
danhill  blingpursuits  onetrackminds  organizations  institutions  trust  buildings  tcsnmy  beenthere  transparency  caseygollan  cooperunion  cooper  2012  felixsalmon  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Luke Johnson: Mysteries and Curiosities Map of JPL: How can design influence an established culture?
"It was during this walk that I first realized JPL was a lot like the television show Lost."

"The map functions as a tool to orient new employees, encourage Lab explorationg for current employees, and to put a human face on JPL for the outside public."

"Armed with a GPS tracknig device, camera, and a trusty pair of shoes, I walked to every buidling on Lab in numerical order. What I thought would take a Saturday afternoon took 22 hours over the span of four days at a walking distance of 52.2 miles."

"The map itself is divided into two sections. The front is an Insider's Guide containing information I wish someone had explained to me when I began working at the Lab. The back provides several Walking Tours. A Welcome Pack and Website/Smartphone App were recently funded."

"The creation of a new design practice requires a certain entrepreneurial spirit and chutzpah"

[via: https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/267163844512714752 ]
wayfinding  nasa  california  exploration  cartography  mapping  maps  buildings  numbering  numbers  lost  alexandersmith  davidmikula  juliatsao  christianeholzheid  erinellis  pasadena  jpl  lukejohnson  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
ON THE QUICKENING OF HISTORY
"Writer and urbanist Brendan Crain writes about the role of new digital tools in preservation efforts. In the existing conflict between preserving buildings to slow the process of loss and the dynamic nature of people, digital layers can maintain a sense of urgency around long-passed events that lend the built environment much of its import."
2012  yelp  placemaking  place  london  nyc  digitalanthropology  geolocation  geotagging  streetmuseum  museumwithoutwalls  historypin  cultureNOW  junaio  layar  digitallayers  digital  socialmedia  history  curation  atemporality  storytelling  architecture  now  urbanism  urban  buildings  preservation  brendancrain  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Three Cups of BS - By Alanna Shaikh | Foreign Policy
"While much of uproar has been over lies Mortenson peddled, I can't help wondering: Why, exactly, did we ever think his model for education, exemplified in Central Asia Institute, was going to work? Its focus was on building schools—that's it. Not a thought was spared for education quality, access, or sustainability. But building schools has never been the answer to improving education. If it were, then the millions of dollars poured into international education over last half-century would have already solved Afghanistan's—and the rest of the world's—education deficit by now.

Over last 50yrs of studying international development, scholars have built large body of research & theory on how to improve education in developing world. None of it has recommended providing more school buildings, because according to decades of research, buildings aren't what matter. Teachers matter. Curriculum matters. Funding for education matters. Where classes actually take place? Not really."
gregmortenson  schooldesign  developingworld  education  policy  teaching  curriculum  whatmatters  funding  CAI  centralasiainstitute  sustainability  accessibility  international  global  buildings  2011  toldyaso  missedopportunities  tcsnmy  lcproject  pop-upeducation  schools  schooling  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Ivory Towers of Debt | varnelis.net
"It's a giant ponzi scheme with little of value for students and, as Harper's described in a notorious graphic about the consequeneces of overbuilding in Brandeis (Brandeis has threatened a lawsuit and has accused Harper's of slander and libel over this piece), can collapse precipitously during times of economic crisis. But while bonds were hot, Wall Street couldn't have enough of them, so universities eagerly complied."
tcsnmy  fundraising  bonds  endowment  universities  highered  money  economics  recession  priorities  shortterm  longterm  kazysvarnelis  javierarbona  cities  architecture  buildings  finance  leadership  administration  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
2009/10/03 - The Minister's Tree House - a set on Flickr
"I had about half a day to adventure. Alexis and I drove out Calfkiller highway to check potential places for a cleanup. The road was narrow, winding and without a shoulder. It was also relatively clean. Probably not the best place to adopt.

From there we headed east to Cumberland County and found our way to the tree house. And since we were right there we went to Stonehaus and enjoyed a free wine tasting. It was a nice morning. :-)"
tennessee  treehouses  homes  buildings  wood  assemblage  glvo  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Visitors « Flickr Blog
"They are among us! Need more "proof"? Check out the tag search results for alien architecture."
architecture  sciencefiction  scifi  photography  flickr  aliens  spaceships  buildings  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Archigram Archival Project
"The Archigram Archival Project makes the work of the seminal architectural group Archigram available free online for public viewing and academic study. The project was run by EXP, an architectural research group at the University of Westminster. It was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and made possible by the members of Archigram and their heirs, who retain copyright of all images"
archigram  architecture  archive  buildings  creativity  portfolio  projects  uk  design  drawing  1960s  history  experimental  architects 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - Shake, Rattle, Seattle - NYTimes.com
"It is only a matter of time before a quake like the one in 1700 happens again in the Pacific Northwest — perhaps tomorrow, or not for 20, 50, 100 years. We do not know that precisely. But we do know that the earthquake will happen. Are we ready? No, we are not. Not in California, and definitely not in the Pacific Northwest."
chile  earthquakes  2010  seattle  cascadia  california  buildings 
march 2010 by robertogreco
felipe campolina: portable housing
"brazilian architect felipe campolina has developed 'portable housing', a skyscraper design that is composed of hundred of mobile units. currently, the need to inhabit the
planet sustainably is an increasing concern for the future. thus, the concept of portable
housing was created with a construction system that deals with both, environmental and
social issues. these individual living units start from a modular system scaled from
the standard OSB plate (oriented strand board) of 1,22m x 2,44m."
design  architecture  buildings  prefab  neo-nomads  nomads  mobility  felipecampolina 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Why Not Print Buildings? — The Pop-Up City
"During our explorations in fresh developments in architecture we already found plenty of nifty projects, ideas and concepts that have the potential to totally reframe the production of the physical environment. Think of the facade printer, an invention that enables graphic designers to become architects. Or the rise of sustainable plastic as a structural building material. Via Blueprint Magazine we found out about the birth of a machine that is able to print entire buildings. The monster is located near Pisa, Italy, and its father is Enrico Dini, an engineer with a background in offline programming systems for six-axis robots."
enricodini  construction  architecture  buildings  fabbing  printing 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - Santiago Stands Firm - NYTimes.com [see also: http://www.salon.com/tech/htww/2010/03/03/chicago_boys_and_the_chilean_earthquake_2/index.html]
"Saddened as I am by the loss of life and landmarks, I am scandalized by the few modern structures that crumbled, those spectacular exceptions you keep seeing on the TV news. The economic bonanza and development frenzy of the last decades have clearly allowed a degree of relaxation of the proud building standards of this country. That’s likely why some new urban highway overpasses, built by private companies with government concessions, are now rubble. It’s a sobering lesson for the neoliberalism favored for the past 35 years, and a huge economic and cultural setback for the country.
chile  architecture  sebastiangray  construction  integrity  2010  earthquakes  history  neoliberalism  economics  booms  buildings  buildingstandards  infrastructure 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Artificial Owl
"Welcome to the Artificial Owl, a site dedicated to provide a selection of the most fascinating abandoned man-made creations. While adding new content to the site, I try to follow as much as possible these simple rules :
urbanexploration  ruins  landscape  retro  design  culture  architecture  art  history  photography  urban  travel  buildings  abandoned  decay 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Weird California - Villa Montezuma Mansion
"So regardless of if strange spiritual activity occurs around and in the Villa Montezuma, regardless of if has at least two ghosts reside in the house, regardless of if there is buried treasure, regardless of it the ghosts of countless séances still pass through the property, and regardless of if a curse lies on the occupants of the house causing them to fall into financial ruin, the stately Villa Montezuma still stands proud in San Diego, overlooking the coastline. Weird but proud."

[more "Weird San Diego": http://www.weirdca.com/search2.php?city=San%20Diego ]
sandiego  myths  myth  legend  stories  buildings  architecture 
january 2010 by robertogreco
National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities
"Created in 1997 by the U.S. Department of Education and managed by the National Institute of Building Sciences, the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF) provides information on planning, designing, funding, building, improving, and maintaining safe, healthy, high performance schools."
education  design  schools  schooldesign  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  government  classroom  buildings  architecture  ncef  classrooms 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Omnivoracious: Building The BLDGBLOG Book: Questions for Geoff Manaugh
"Manaugh: One way to look at this touches on why I like Los Angeles so much: the thing with L.A. is that almost literally no one thinks it actually works. Almost no one will tell you that L.A. is a well-designed city or that it can’t possibly be improved upon because it’s already so perfect.

But that’s why I love living there: every time someone with no connection at all to architecture gets stuck in a traffic jam, they’ll start thinking about alternatives: you know, “if there was a highway here, all of us wouldn’t be stuck at this intersection,” or “if these buildings could be moved over there then we could all just drive straight through and there’d be no more traffic”--and so on...everyday people tend to be almost constantly imagining alternatives: alternative ways of building the city, alternative ways of getting to work, alternative ways of designing houses, etc. L.A. all but requires you to imagine alternatives--and so everybody in L.A. is a kind of proto-urban designer."
geoffmanaugh  bldgblog  interviews  losangeles  design  urban  urbanism  planning  scifi  architecture  sciencefiction  cities  books  buildings  fantasy  ideas 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Ruins of the Present | Beyond The Beyond
"*We’ve long had a term of art for old buildings that are ruined...“ruins.” *However, we lack a term of art for “ruins” that are actually buildings never completed. Sometimes they’re completed buildings that are never sold...start falling over before they were ever inhabited...*Another version is the abandoned, incomplete high-rise...In Brazil a skeleton framework of this kind is called a “squelette.” *Occasionally squatters move into “squelettes” & bring in some breeze-block, corrugated tin and plastic hoses, transforming squelettes into high-rise favelas. This doesn’t work very well because it’s tough to manage the utilities, especially the water...*It bothers me to use clumsy circumlocutions like “unfinished ruins” or “partially built, yet abandoned structures” or “stillborn highrises” for a phenomenon that is so common and so obvious to billions of urban people, so henceforth I am going to call them “squelettes.” They don’t have to be Brazilian, French, or 80 stories tall, either."
brucesterling  neologisms  language  ruins  squellettes  culture  architecture  crisis  abandoned  abandonment  decay  squatting  unfinished  cutshort  structures  buildings  wabi-sabi 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Historic St. Louis Schools Face Uncertain Future : NPR
"The city of St. Louis is trying to decide what will become of many of its historic school buildings and the neighborhoods that they anchor.
stlouis  schools  buildings  realestate  history 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Engaging Places
"Engaging Places will champion teaching and learning through the whole built environment, from grand historic buildings to the streets and neighbourhoods where we live. It includes the launch of a major new online teaching resource, www.engagingplaces.org.uk. This will be the most comprehensive guide ever created to help schools teach by using the buildings and places around them. Research has shown that teachers view buildings and spaces as an important educational resource, and want better access, information and support to exploit it. Schools will be able to use Engaging Places to access a nationwide directory of organisations and venues, including architecture centres, museums and historic buildings. They will be able to search for high quality resources and materials by curriculum theme or whole school issues. And they can access case studies from fellow teachers."

[http://www.cabe.org.uk/default.aspx?contentitemid=2956 ]
teaching  learning  place  uk  classroom  schools  tcsnmy  lcproject  urban  urbanism  architecture  engagingplaces  design  education  landscape  buildings  cities  curriculum  places  heritage  urbanexploration  classideas  classrooms 
january 2009 by robertogreco
How Buildings Learn by Stewart Brand (Phil Gyford’s website)
"It’s taken me years to get round to buying and reading this book (and months to type the notes up), but it was worth the wait. It made me look at buildings and the building process differently, and I’ve had to re-evaluate what I think of as good design when it comes to architecture. The pictures (one or more on almost every page) are invaluable. Go read it."

[See also the videos: http://smashingtelly.com/2008/08/04/how-buildings-learn-uploaded-by-stewart-brand-himself/ (alternate link in the comments of Gyford's post) ]
stewartbrand  books  architecture  urbanism  planning  design  summary  buildings  community  place  workspace  offices  construction  schooldesign  philgyford  howbuildingslearn  2004  workspaces 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Archinect : School Blog Project : UCLA (Scott) : Los Angeles Under Construction
"After one of the last meetings of the pre-semester rhino modeling course I’m doing, I went downtown and decided to check out some of the big construction projects going on. I figured it would be nice to check in with the city before the semester starts and I have to hang out in Westwood all night and day (a soul-crushing thought, ha ha). I visited four downtown projects last week, and checked out a smaller fifth one today."
losangeles  architecture  design  archinect  coophimmelblau  schools  schooldesign  buildings  downtown 
september 2008 by robertogreco
things magazine: the 'tomason', or 'useless, abandoned leftovers' of urban architecture
"A concept we were unaware of: the 'tomason', or 'useless, abandoned leftovers' of urban architecture, according to Greg.org. There's a thomason flickr pool (the alternative spelling hints at the term's origins, which we won't spell out here, but it's something to do with Japanese baseball). City of Sound locates an Australian example. See also the flickr groups on building remnants, ghost buildings and the unconscious art of demolition. The term for the latter is Medianeras, from the Spanish meaning a wall that separates two buildings (via Blue Tea and me-fi)."
tomason  buildings  architecture  change  medianeras  remnants  design 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Forgotten Detroit
"Detroit is known for one of the most stunning collections of pre-depression architecture in the world. The past two decades have seen several of these treasures sit vacant, waiting for economic revival. On these pages you will find information about the past, present, and future situations of a few of these landmarks. It is my hope that this information helps you gain an appreciation for the importance of both the history and continued survival of these buildings."
urban  cities  detroit  urbandecay  photography  buildings  architecture  history  urbanexploration  demolition  ruins 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: World System A and World System B
"While cleaning my office I came across my cache of obscure xeroxed essays not available elsewhere and thought I'd type up an excerpt or two.

Here's Christopher Alexander's explanation of the two ways of looking at the world and building in it from his quixotic article "BATTLE: The history of a Crucial Clash between World-System A and World-System B: Construction of the New Eishin Campus," from Japan Architect 8508:
System A is what we might call "The ordinary way". This is Hosoi's name for it. It is the way of building in which people who use buildings take part in creating them. They take part in laying them out. Money is used and allocated, according to the needs of the project, and according to the wishes of the people who use the buildings. The construction is managed directly, under a system of control which is close to the users. While the buildings are being built, they are adapted gradually. What turns out to be better slowly replaces what is less good. The architect or person in charge of building, is truly in charge of "building", not of paper. Things are done according to the dictates of the human heart. All in all, it is the system of common sense.

Oddly enough, this is not the system of construction which we know today.

System B is a system controlled by images. It is a system in which control of the system is extremely indirect. It is a system in which the users rarely, if at all, have any measure of control over the actual layout or design of buildings. It is a system in which big money, loanes and mortgages control the process. The dictates of big money, of permission, and of profit, create conditions in which the quality that is obtained is defined solely by images, not by real human feelings. The architects who produce these images are concerned mainly with the images they create, not with the buildings themselves. The success or failure of these images is defined by photographs in glossy magazines, not by heartfelt approval of the users. In fact the users rarely express their approval or disapproval of the projects they inhabit, except in so far that they themselves become part and parcel of the system of images, and then feel honored because the images have been made to seem important to them. Common sense is not a part of system B.

Oddly enough, this is the sytem which is in widespread use today. Its use is so widespread, and its existence so widely accepted, that most people assume that it is the correct and only way to build. They have forgotten, or most often do not know, that any other system ever existed.
"
christopheralexander  architecture  design  buildings  schooldesign  process  collaboration  collaborative  japan  lcproject  space  place  participatory 
july 2008 by robertogreco
David Byrne’s New Band - Lyricism in Girders, Harmony in Rusty Pipess - NYTimes.com
“not suggesting people abandon musical instruments & start playing their cars & apartments, but do think reign of music as commodity made only by professionals might be winding down” + http://www.creativetime.org/programs/archive/2008/byrne/project.ht
davidbyrne  art  music  nyc  installation  architecture  buildings 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Shedworking
"Shedworking is the only daily updated guide to the lifestyles of shedworkers and those who work in shedlike atmospheres."
architecture  design  sheds  homes  housing  simplicity  prefab  diy  workplace  work  workspace  structures  buildings  workspaces 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Our Local Correspondents: Up and Then Down: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
"Elevator design is rooted in deception—to disguise not only the bare fact of the box hanging by ropes but also the tethering of tenants to a system over which they have no command"
elevators  newyorker  psychology  engineering  technology  society  architecture  skyscrapers  ubicomp  buildings  infrastructure 
april 2008 by robertogreco
EveryScape
"EveryScape isn't an online world, it's the world online. EveryScape takes you from the streets to the sidewalks and through the doors of the world's cities and tours. Letting businesses organizations and consumers build and share their world the way they
maps  mapping  photography  virtualworlds  virtual  urbanism  travel  tourism  visualization  visual  geotagging  collaborative  location  locative  local  navigation  360  3d  buildings  cities  collaboration  internet  online  webapps 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Research Stations: New South Pole Station Self-Elevates with Hydraulics
"aerodynamic exterior blows gale-force winds under station, not right at it, pushing accumulating snow to backside instead of...accumulate underneath...When snow does eventually make its way up to the building hydraulic jacks will raise tit up even furthe
antarctica  design  buildings  architecture  snow  wind  antarctic 
january 2008 by robertogreco
cityofsound: The Personal Well-Tempered Environment
"real-time dashboard for buildings/neighbourhoods/city focused on conveying energy flow in/out of spaces, centred around behaviour of individuals/groups within buildings...real-time & longitudinal info needed to change behaviour"
architecture  behavior  cityofsound  danhill  datavisualization  sustainability  socialnetworking  environment  green  information  design  computing  cities  energy  homes  buildings  analysis  lastfm  flickr  buglabs  electricity  postoccupancy  wattson  water  usage  ubicomp  spimes  everyware  ubiquitous  gamechanging  visualization  monitoring  efficiency  community  consumption  conservation  games  statistics  surveillance  dashboard  interaction  last.fm 
january 2008 by robertogreco

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