robertogreco + browser   126

Whale
"Never been seen before, ‘Omnitasking’

Whale Space allows you to browse two windows in the same tab
and have different search results at the same time.

Simple way to sync between a desktop and a mobile You can import bookmarks as well as the web pages you have visited by syncing between a desktop and a mobile. What you need to do is just log in to Whale."



"New world
In the era of big data.
Everyone's goal nowadays is to explore the vast universe of information in a safe and secure way, without barriers.

Whale spaceship
“The spaceship looked like a huge whale” is a line from a science fiction that inspired us to name our browser. Like its name, we hope that Whale will become your spaceship sailing through the universe of information in the era of big data.

The start of a journey
We've been working on lowering the barriers so that everyone can easily use technologies in their daily lives and participate in improving the Whale browser.
Come along with us and join this journey to the new world."

[via: "South Korea's Newest Browser Is Beautifully Designed, But Will Anyone Use It?"
https://www.forbes.com/sites/elaineramirez/2017/06/11/naver-whale-line-south-koreas-newest-browser-is-beautifully-designed-but-will-anyone-use-it/#557f54e73411

"Arguably the coolest feature on Whale is “omnitasking” -- a split-screen feature that lets you browse two sites in the same tab, with an adjustable divider.

Koreans love Naver more than hipsters love Apple, but Whale is the latecomer to an already uphill battle."]
browsers  internet  online  web  browser  korea  windows  software  android  linux  ios  mac  osx  macos 
february 2019 by robertogreco
The Color Gradient Reader BeeLine Shows Promise for Speed and Attention in Reading - The Atlantic
"In the era of attention deficits, the new text will not be black and white."



"The colors in this text are rendered in a precise and strategic way, designed to help people read quickly and accurately.

The most important feature is that each line begins with a different color than the line above or below. As Matthew Schneps, director of the Laboratory for Visual Learning at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, explained it to me, the color gradients also pull our eyes long from one character to the next—and then from the end of one line to the beginning of the next, minimizing any chance of skipping lines or making anything less than an optimally efficient word-to-word or line-to-line transition.

Improving the ease and accuracy of the return sweep is a promising idea for readers of all skill levels. And yet it’s one that’s gone largely ignored in the milieu of media technologies. Today many of us read primarily on screens–and we have for years–yet most platforms have focused on using technology to attempt to recreate text as it appears in books (or in newspapers or magazines), instead of trying to create an optimal reading experience.

The format—black text on white lines of 12 to 15 words of equal size—is a relic of the way that books were most easily printed on early printing presses. It persists today out of tradition, not because of some innate tendency of the human brain to process information in this way.

Meanwhile, people who aren’t especially skilled at intake of text in the traditional format are systematically penalized. People who don’t read well in this one particular way tend to fall behind scholastically early in life. They might be told they’re not as bright as other people, or at least come to assume it. They might even be diagnosed with ADHD, dyslexia, or a learning disability, or overlooked as academically mediocre.

“The book format was effective, but not for everyone,” said Schneps. “This is not just technology that could help people who are struggling with reading; this is technology that could help a lot of people.”

* * *

Our minds are not as uniform as our text. We all take in information in different ways. Some people read more quickly and retain more information when lines are shorter, or when fonts are bolder, or in different colors. The color-gradient pattern above is rendered by a product called BeeLine, developed by armchair linguist Nick Lum. He got the idea after learning about the Stroop Effect, the famous phenomenon where it becomes difficult to read words like “yellow” and “red” when they are written in different colors. Lum thought, “What if instead of screwing people up, we tried to use color in a way that helps people?”

After he won the Stanford Social Entrepreneurship and Dell Education startup competitions with the idea in 2014, Lum took to developing the technology full time. So far, the response from people tends to be binary: for some it’s a shrug, but for others, particularly people with dyslexias, it’s like turning on a light bulb. As Lum describes it, people tell him “Holy cow, this is how everybody else reads.”

The idea has been well received by reading experts, too.

“Most of the academic research is figuring out entirely what your eyes are going to do on one line,” said psychologist and Microsoft researcher Kevin Larson. “That has been such a challenge that it's rare for anyone to pay much attention to what happens during that line return movement.”

At the University of Texas at Austin, Randolph Bias has studied the optimal length of lines of text for reading comprehension and speed. The two are generally at odds: Short lines make for a quick and accurate return (the movement is easier because it allows our eyes to take a greater downward angle than if the line were longer.) The downside is that because our brains process information during return sweeps, shorter lines don't afford us that time. We also don’t get to take full advantage of peripheral vision – which is key. (He cites this as the problem with Spritz, the reading technology where single words rapidly flash before a reader.)"



"The other big opportunity for the technology is in educational settings. Later this year, BeeLine will be rolling out in libraries across California, as part of a licensing partnership. This is how Lum sees the company growing. The basic Google Chrome extension and iPhone app are free. But large-scale licensing deals with platforms and institutions like school systems could be more lucrative—and make the option accessible to people who wouldn’t otherwise think to try reading in color.

In early experiments, some students do seem to benefit from the color gradients. Last year, first-grade students in two general-education classrooms in San Bernardino, California, tried out Beeline, and many did better with comprehension tests afterword. “Because of my background in visual processing, I immediately wanted to check it out,” said Michael Dominguez, an applied behavioral analyst who directs the San Bernardino school district’s special education program. “Based on everything I know, it should work great.”"

[See also (referenced in the article):
http://www.beelinereader.com/
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/ie/2014/03/04/introducing-reading-view-in-ie-11/ ]
howweread  reading  dyslexia  education  cyborgs  adhd  color  text  jameshamblin  kevinlarson  via:ayjay  michaeldominguez  beeline  chrome  browser  browsers  extensions  accessibility  assistivetechnology  microsoft  attention  technology  edtech  nicklum  linguistics  randolphbias  spritz  ereading  kindle  pdfs  epub  pdf 
july 2016 by robertogreco
The Future of Browser History — Free Code Camp
"Problem

I can search for the term in Google, but I’m not going to get a single result that answers my question. Rather, I’m going to get a lot of results, and all of those results will have bits and pieces of information that are relevant to me.

Then I’m going to go exploring through the internet, collecting lots of tabs along the way. Some of those tabs will be duds, so I close them.

Some of those tabs will be relevant and will have twenty more links, so I open them all, and in this way I keep crawling.

Tabs, tabs, tabs

Then after a while I have a cloud of pages in my head that I visited and the answer is more or less complete.

But if I try to revisit this later, it’s impossible. I can remember what I found, but it wasn’t a linear progression, therefore my browser history is useless.

Despite living in a data-driven society, as more and more databases are brought online, the complex and varied information available to be discovered is dependent on how well we can search.

In formal ways, we have transitioned from the Classic Retrieval Model, to what is called, Berrypicking Search.

The query is satisfied not by a single final retrieved set, but by a series of selections of individual references and bits of information at each stage of the ever-modifying search.

In other words, we do not usually search for something that leads to a single result that answers our question, rather we search for terms and then explore the internet, connecting bits and pieces of the answer as we read through the web of tabs that our search starts for us.

Our search needs, and in turn our browser history, are not being met with single query anymore. We move through a variety of sources with every new piece of information giving us new ideas and directions to follow. Without us ever knowing it, our search queries are constantly fluctuating.

Unfortunately, our current solution to finding a not-bookmarked webpage, is to retrace own steps through different links.

It demands that users have enough information to decipher the desired page from all others by recognizing headers, obscure URLs or timestamps.

Our browser’s history should reflect our behavior on the internet and help us understand the process behind it. It is crucial to actually understand and question the way we use the internet, and without the suitable tools, it is not possible.

Solution

I find answers in maps. …"
web  online  internet  search  browsers  browser  recall  history  tabs  cv  howwelean  howweread  linearity  maps  mapping  timelines  2016  patrykdaś  linear  nonlinear  non-linear  alinear 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Ōryōki
"Ōryōki [応量器] is a small web browser with a thin interface. This is an experimental project, currently in development."
browsers  software  browser 
june 2016 by robertogreco
BrowserFreedom - You don't have to choose a default browser
"BrowserFreedom sits in between your links and the web browsers installed on your Mac.

You can define rules to always open certain websites on a specific browser. Maybe you like to use Safari as your default browser but want YouTube to always open in Chrome. Or maybe you want to always open links clicked within an app on a specific browser, you can do that too.

With fast default browser switching, you can quickly switch your Mac’s default browser with a user-defined global shortcut. And if you see a link and want to choose the browser to open It, just option-click to pop up the browser selection menu."
browsers  mac  osx  browserfreedom  software  browser 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Brave Software | Building a Better Web
"We have a mission to save the web by increasing browsing speed and safety for users, while growing ad revenue share for content creators.

The web has become a different place. With the ad-tech ecosystem out of control, users have revolted and blocking ads has become the new weapon of choice. But this results in a race to the bottom where nobody wins. Without the ability for content creators to earn money for their efforts, they may need to shut down or find a new source of revenue. Users could be left with nowhere to browse, relegated to hand-picked content from controlled sources.

Brave is saving the web by building a new suite of cutting-edge web browsers that feature class leading speed, security and protection, plus a new ad revenue sharing solution to help keep publishers in business."
browsers  mac  osx  privacy  software  browser 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Project Naptha
"Project Naptha automatically applies state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms on every image you see while browsing the web. The result is a seamless and intuitive experience, where you can highlight as well as copy and paste and even edit and translate the text formerly trapped within an image.

Words on the web exist in two forms: there’s the text of articles, emails, tweets, chats and blogs— which can be copied, searched, translated, edited and selected— and then there’s the text which is shackled to images, found in comics, document scans, photographs, posters, charts, diagrams, screenshots and memes. Interaction with this second type of text has always been a second class experience, the only way to search or copy a sentence from an image would be to do as the ancient monks did, manually transcribing regions of interest.

This entire webpage is a live demo. You can watch as moving your cursor over a block of words changes it into the little I-beam. You can drag over a few lines and watch as a semitransparent blue box highlights the text, helping you keep track of where you are and what you’re reading. Hit Ctrl+C to copy the text, where you can paste it into a search bar, a Word document, an email or a chat window. Right-click and you can erase the words from an image, edit the words, or even translate it into a different language.

This was made by @antimatter15 (+KevinKwok on Google+), and Guillermo Webster."
chrome  extensions  ocr  text  browsers  projectnaptha  guillermowebster  kevinkwok  copypaste  browser 
july 2015 by robertogreco
What's Your Algorithmic Citizenship? | Citizen Ex
"Every time you connect to the internet, you pass through time, space, and law. Information is sent out from your computer all over the world, and sent back from there. This information is stored and tracked in multiple locations, and used to make decisions about you, and determine your rights. These decisions are made by people, companies, countries and machines, in many countries and legal jurisdictions. Citizen Ex shows you where those places are.

Your Algorithmic Citizenship is how you appear to the internet, as a collection of data extending across many nations, with a different citizenship and different rights in every place. One day perhaps we will all live like we do on the internet. Until then, there's Citizen Ex."

[http://citizen-ex.com/download

"Citizen Ex is a browser extension for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari, which shows you where on the web you really are, and what that means."]
geolocation  identity  immigration  jamesbridle  internet  web  privacy  law  time  space  data  location  legal  extensions  browsers  chrome  safari  firefox  citizenship  browser 
june 2015 by robertogreco
AdBlock Browser for iDevices - The leading AdBlock mobile app since 2012 on the App Store on iTunes
"In general, Safari on iOS does not support any third-adblock-party or adblock-plug-in. So here is my new custom AdBlock for iOS 8 web browser:
Over 1 Millionen users can not be wrong. From a just-for-fun independent app to the leading AdBlock for iOS 8 mobile app in AppStore."
adblock  ios  browsers  ios7  applications  browser 
may 2015 by robertogreco
MapTab: A Chrome extension for viewing beautiful maps | Mapbox
"I open new browser tabs every few minutes and didn’t want to look at a blank page anymore, so I built MapTab: a Chrome extension for viewing beautiful maps when opening a new tab.

MapTab is simple: every time you open a new tab, a random map and interesting location is loaded.

You can choose from Mapbox Satellite or some of our crazy designs, or even add your own map design.

The project is open source and leverages Mapbox.js and React behind the scenes. If you’d like to fork or contribute to the project, check it out on GitHub. Beta users are loving MapTab."

[Available here: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/maptab/dmabflbokojjfjicmbjjfnmodihciemo ]
extensions  chrome  maps  mapping  2015  mapbox  browsers  browser 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Hola - Free VPN - Secure Browsing - Unrestricted Access
"ACCESS ANY WEBSITE
Used by over 33 Million people around the world

Why use Hola?
Hola gives you the freedom to bypass internet censorship and restrictions, whilst keeping you safe and secure online. We protect your privacy by hiding your IP address, allowing you to remain anonymous from prying eyes.

Anytime, any place...
Our VPN service works on all your devices, you can even use it on multiple devices at the same time.
Get great features like data compression, hiding your IP address and encrypting all of your traffic.

What are you waiting for?
Over 33 Million users are currently enjoying the freedom of Hola, with the peace of mind that they are fully protected, safe and secure. Our VPN service is completely free, and will always stay that way. So give us a try, and enjoy the content you love."
anonymous  browsers  extensions  proxy  proxies  vpn  chome  firefox  internetexplorer  android  ios  windows  mac  osx  hola  browser 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Kenneth Goldsmith - Talks | Frieze Projects NY
[Direct link to .mp3: http://friezeprojectsny.org/uploads/files/talks/Kenneth_Goldsmith.mp3 ]

"‘I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody Has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered’

A keynote lecture by the poet Kenneth Goldsmith, whose writing has been described as ‘some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry’ (Publishers Weekly). Goldsmith is the author of eleven books of poetry and founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb. In 2013, he was named as the inaugural Poet Laureate of MoMA."
kennethgoldsmith  copying  uncreativewriting  mercecunningham  writing  internet  web  online  remixing  culture  art  poetry  originality  appropriation  quantity  quality  curiosity  harrypotter  poetics  digital  reproduction  translation  displacement  disjunction  corydoctorow  change  howwewrite  pointing  data  metadata  choice  authorship  versioning  misfiling  language  difference  meaning  ethics  morality  literature  twitter  artworld  marshallmcluhan  christianbök  plagiarism  charleseames  rules  notknowing  archiving  improvisation  text  bricolage  assemblage  cv  painting  technology  photography  readerships  thinkerships  thoughtobjects  reassembly  ubuweb  freeculture  moma  outreach  communityoutreach  nyc  copyright  ip  intellectualproperty  ideas  information  sfpc  vitoacconci  audience  accessibility  situationist  museums  markets  criticism  artcriticism  economics  money  browsers  citation  sampling  jonathanfranzen  internetasliterature  getrudestein  internetasfavoritebook  namjunepaik  johncage  misbehaving  andywarhol  bobdylan  barbarakruger  jkrowling  china  creati 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Disconnect | Online Privacy & Security
"Secure Wireless is a new, smarter VPN designed to stop wireless eavesdropping over Wi-Fi, 3G, and 4G networks."
browsers  privacy  security  via:maxfenton  extenstions  mobile  applications  ios  android  mac  osx  windows  browser 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Privacy Badger | Electronic Frontier Foundation
"Privacy Badger is a browser add-on that stops advertisers and other third-party trackers from secretly tracking where you go and what pages you look at on the web.  If an advertiser seems to be tracking you across multiple websites without your permission, Privacy Badger automatically blocks that advertiser from loading any more content in your browser.  To the advertiser, it's like you suddenly disappeared."
via:maxfenton  firefox  privacy  eff  chrome  extensions  browsers  browser 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Rethinking What We Mean by 'Mobile Web'
"We shouldn’t think of the “web” as only what renders inside a web browser. The web is HTTP, and the open Internet. What exactly are people doing with these mobile apps? Largely, using the same services, which, on the desktop, they use in a web browser. Plus, on mobile, the difference between “apps” and “the web” is easily conflated. When I’m using Tweetbot, for example, much of my time in the app is spent reading web pages rendered in a web browser. Surely that’s true of mobile Facebook users, as well. What should that count as, “app” or “web”?"



"It’s possible that the word “web” is too tightly associated with HTML/CSS/JavaScript content rendered in web browsers — that if I want to make a semantic argument, I should be saying it’s the internet that matters, not the web. But I like calling it the web, even as it expands outside the confines of HTML/CSS/JavaScript. The web has always been a nebulous concept, but at its center is the idea that everything can be linked. So when I open Tweetbot on my iPhone and tap a link that opens within the app as a web page, and from that web page tap a link that opens a video in the YouTube app — that to me feels very webby."



"Yes, Apple and Google (and Amazon, and Microsoft) control their respective app stores. But the difference from Dixon’s AOL analogy is that they don’t control the internet — and they don’t control each other. Apple doesn’t want cool new apps launching Android-only, and it surely bothers Google that so many cool new apps launch iOS-first. Apple’s stance on Bitcoin hasn’t exactly kept Bitcoin from growing explosively. App Stores are walled gardens, but the apps themselves are just clients to the open web/internet."



"The rise of mobile apps hasn’t taken anything away from the wide open world of web browsers and cross-platform HTML/CSS/JavaScript — other than supremacy. I think that bothers some, who saw the HTML/CSS/JavaScript browser-centric web’s decade-ago supremacy as the end point, the ultimate triumph of a truly open platform, rather than what it really was: just another milestone along the way of an industry that is always in flux, ever ebbing and flowing.

What we’ve gained, though, is a wide range of interaction capabilities that never could have existed in a web browser-centric world. That to me is cause for celebration."
mobile  internet  web  www  html  browsers  applications  johngruber  2014  walledgardens  http  browser 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Border Check
"What is Border Check?

Border Check (BC) is a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the internet’s infrastructure while you surf the web. It will show you through which countries and networks you surf to illustrate the physical and political realities of the internet’s infrastructure. using free software tools.
It maps the internet

Why is this relevant?

As one surfs the net, data packets are sent from the user’s computer to the target server. These data packets go on a journey hopping from server to server, potentially crossing multiple countries, until the packets reach the desired website. In each of the countries that are passed different laws and practices can apply to the data, influencing whether or not authorities can inspect, store or modify that data.

Who?

Border Check is a project by Roel Roscam Abbing. Programming by Lord Epsylon. Design by Bart Van Haren. BC was developed during Summer Sessions 2013 with with the support of V2_ Institute For The Unstable Media at Laboral Centro De Arte and the MP19 Openlab. It uses Python, OpenStreetMap, Leaflet and others."
data  borders  bordercheck  infrastructure  roelroscamabbing  lordepsylon  bartvanharen  openstreetmap  osm  python  firefox  chrome  safari  browsers  extensions  plugins  addons  browser 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Life Online: An Interview with Folkert Gorter and Jon-Kyle Mohr - Venue
"The scroll bar is a great device—I have always been most excited about it as my main user interface device. Way back, I started experimenting, along with a whole bunch of other people, with making scrolling interfaces. I would put up a ton of content, but you couldn’t see all of it. It was as if the browser was the viewfinder of a camera, and, instead of moving the viewfinder, you could just scroll the page."



"Gorter: I think the way we get around this is that we try to not make a specific interface. Instead, we always use the content as the interface. This is how we always design. In Cargo, there’s no design, there’s just content. You click on a thumbnail, but the thumbnail is just a smaller representation of the project.

Essentially the browser is the canvas—it is the design—whereas, with a lot of web design, you see people making designs inside the browser, like a box inside a box, and then shading here, adding a bar there.

But we don’t do that. We try to disappear.

Twilley: You’ve described Cargo as not social but rather collaborative. That difference between closed and open, complete and unfinished, is really interesting. There are actually not a lot of middle spaces on the Internet that manage to straddle that division, whereas Cargo is populated by user content but still feels aesthetically coherent.

Gorter: I think, again, that’s because the design is the way the interface works, rather than being some kind of overlay.

Even if you completely disassociate your personal site from the platform, the brand is the interface. We care so much about the feel and the behavior of the interface—when you click something, something happens to bridge the waiting time between the click and the response, and the typography is always properly in proportion—that it still feels like Cargo, at the end of the day, no matter what it looks like.

You’re in a structure, but the only things you see are content. "



"Manaugh: Our final question, just to bring it full circle, is about the process of working on the Venue website, and whether that allowed you to explore any new territory. Perhaps it did, perhaps it didn’t.

Mohr: The integration with Google Maps for Venue was really fun. I had never used their API. We’re actually starting to work on an API for Cargo, and working with Google Maps’ API for Venue really influenced how I’m approaching that.

It was also really fun to play with spatiality. Google Maps is already interesting in terms of its Z-space functionality—the way that you can zoom in and out in satellite view—and we spent a long time playing around to find a comfortable zoom level for Venue, and so on.

Gorter: It was a great project for us, I think, because we’re always looking for excuses to extend Cargo’s functionality. The only reason we make new stuff for Cargo is in response to a specific request. We never say, “Hypothetically, people would love such-and-such new feature—let’s make it!”

And, because we don’t design websites—we don’t make layouts, we just put content in—the Google Maps integration is not simply decoration. It’s actually integral to how the site works. What I really love about what we accomplished was that we put the Google Maps in there, but we imposed the Venue aesthetic over top of it.

We’ve done projects with Flash before where we work the same way. The problem with Flash is that it’s like an aquarium—all the content sits behind a thick layer of glass. You can’t touch it; you can only look at it. It’s imprisoned. What we've done is use Flash in a new kind of way, as a background environment, and then put a flat HTML layer over top of it so that you can interact with as if you were interacting with any website."

[See also: http://www.laimyours.com/7398/thinking-in-the-future-tense-an-interview-with-folkert-gorter/ ]
folkertgorter  jon-kylemohr  2013  design  cargo  butdoesitfloat  spacecollective  venue  geoffmanaugh  nicolatwilley  scrollbars  web  internet  online  multimedia  ux  ix  interface  browsers  content  browser 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Twipster
"Twipster is a Safari & Chrome extension that applies styles to twitter.com. Inspired by and based on Craig Mod's Minimal Twitter."
browser  chrome  extension  twitter  safari  twipster  browsers 
march 2013 by robertogreco
App Store - openWeb - Dyslexia friendly web browser
"Your default Safari web browser is not customizable. And when you want to use a font or style designed for accessibility, this creates a problem.

The openWeb Browser is a browser that helps solve that problem by giving the internet a more readable style on your iPhone and iPad.

• The default font is OpenDyslexic: a free open-source font designed to be easy to read, especially for dyslexic readers. This font looks great on retina displays.

• The colors have slightly less contrast to help prevent glare.

• Symbols are bolder, and darker, to help detect sentences and phrases.

• NEW! Reading mode on iPhone/iPod Touch lets you read the page formatted for the screen size, and with less distraction!

You can full-screen the browser at any time to remove distractions by tapping & holding. Return to the default view by tapping and holding again.

Search using DuckDuckGo! Enter a search term instead of an address into the address bar to search the web using DuckDuckGo

openWeb is free…"
openweb  free  browsers  ios  applications  dyslexia  browser 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Open Dyslexic - Dyslexia Fonts
"Open-Dyslexic is a new open sourced font created to increase readability for readers with dyslexia. The typefaces includes regular, bold, italic and bold-italic styles. It is being updated continually and improved based on input from dyslexic users. There are no restrictions on using OpenDyslexic outside of attribution.

Download the newest package, and additional dyslexia typefaces in the downloads section."

[It's here too: http://www.dafont.com/open-dyslexic.font ]

[Download page, with extensions for Safar and Chrome: http://dyslexicfonts.com/downloads.php ]

[iOS browser: http://itunes.apple.com/app/openweb-dyslexia-friendly/id519348697?mt=8 ]

[via: http://blog.instapaper.com/post/31834532875 ]
browsers  free  opensource  opendyslexic  webdesign  typography  accessibility  usability  dyslexia  fonts  browser  webdev 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Savory | The new platform for digital publishing
"NOW writers, editors, and publishers have a new tool to design and publish narrative content on the web.

Savory™ provides app-like designs for publications, and an on-line content management system to build them.

Powered by Treesaver®, the adaptive HTML technology, Savory lays out content onto pages that fit any size screen. Desktops, laptops, tablets and phone. Any device that has a browser.

Savory is an upgrade from blog hosting services. It's made for multiple stories or chapters. And publishers can produce editions whenever they want—and add updates any time.

Sign up for for the Charter Rate, only $49 (€49) a month."
browser  browsers  savory  newspapers  magazines  books  html  adaptivehtml  web  copenhagen  epublishing  epub3  epub  design  publishing  html5  digitalpublishing  epubs  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
Above the Silos: Social Reading in the Age of Mechanical Barriers (Travis Alber & Aaron Miller) | Book: A Futurist's Manifesto
[See also: http://book.pressbooks.com/table-of-contents ]

"A book and its patterns, and the place we sit reading it, and the person we fall in love with, can become forever tied together. It is at this level that reading interests and addicts us. We think of it as a solitary act, but it’s often the connections we make back to the real world that make it so rewarding. These connections are sometimes even more interesting when made across larger gulfs. Fake worlds, or extinct ones, can interest us more than the one we live in. We’re fascinated by fictional characters when they mimic or reflect real personalities. Even the most outlandish science fiction can be interesting in this way, because of the allegory, or the grand sense of scale that crisply dramatizes contemporary issues, or the parallels we can make between even the most alien worlds and our own. It’s these very large, meaningful connections that are the ultimate goal of reading. It’s the understanding we gain, or at least feel we gain, about the world we live in, and the people…"
bookfuturism  books  oreilly  o'reillymedia  2012  readsocial.net  readsocial  socialreading  ebooks  bookglutton  groupreading  browsers  bookgluttony  howweread  networks  connections  via:litherland  social  reading  aaronmiller  travisalber  browser  from delicious
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Setup / Jason Kottke
"Three browsers running all the time on OS X. Safari is my blogging browser, Firefox is my development browser, and Chrome is my fun browser. No, I'm serious!"

"I'm a slow typer so I'd like something to help me go faster without having to quit working for two months while Mavis Beacon fixes all my bad habits. But mostly I'm a fish in water… my setup is all I know so it suits me well."
cv  slowtypers  typing  mavisbeacon  browsers  2012  jasonkottke  thesetup  browser  usesthis  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
iExplorer - Formerly iPhone Explorer, is an iPhone browser for Mac and PC
"iExplorer, formerly called iPhone Explorer, lets you use an iPhone or iPad in disk mode, like a flash drive. iExplorer is an iPhone browser or iPad file explorer that runs on Mac & PC that lets you browse the files and folders on your iPhone as if it were a normal USB flash drive or pen drive. You can use the easy drag-and-drop methods to add or remove files and folders from the iPhone."
ipod  utilities  windows  software  browser  freeware  mac  iexplorer  ipad  ios  iphone  browsers  from delicious
january 2012 by robertogreco
Raven: A new beautiful new browser for the Mac
"Despite plenty of competition in the market, Web browsers tend to look and act pretty much the same. Raven is a new contender out today for OS X which takes a fresh approach.

Raven’s key unique offering is that it offers customised interfaces for a wide range of popular websites. Visiting its built-in Web App Shop allows you to access dedicated ‘apps’ for the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, LinkedIn and even The Next Web."
osx  mac  applications  browsers  raven  browser  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
A Whole Lotta Nothing: SendTab: a great simple app for managing screens
"Sendtab is a pretty simple thing, you just click a bookmarklet or copy a URL to an iOS app and you can save a URL to your pile to view later on other devices… Why is this useful? For me, I can move anything interesting from my iPhone to my desktop computer and view it hours later. I've also got a GoogleTV attached to my living room TV so when someone points out an hour long lecture worth watching or a hilarious YouTube video I want to show my family, I save those to SendTab as well, pulling them up on my TV via GoogleTV's home screen bookmarks.

I know Instapaper is a good app for tracking articles among many devices, and Boxee enables you to "watch later" any video you find online, but I find SendTab is a nice simple silo for tossing everything interesting I want to check out on some other device. It's also handy for "I'm going out the door to the airport and want to keep reading that NYT article I'm halfway through" by letting you send links to specific named devices."
matthaughey  sendtab  ios  iphone  applications  bookmarks  syncing  bookmarking  extensions  plugins  browsers  watchlater  readlater  seelater  bookmarklets  browser  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
Page One: Banish Multi-Page Articles (Global Moxie)
"I DESPISE MULTI-PAGE ARTICLES WITH THE HEAT OF A MILLION SUNS. The Page One extension for Safari and Chrome fixes them, automatically displaying the single-page version of articles for several popular news sites. Install the extension now:"
tools  productivity  news  safari  chrome  googlechrome  extensions  browsers  plugins  singlepage  nytimes  newyorker  theatlantic  slate  wired  vanityfair  gq  lapham'squarterly  newrepublic  rollingstone  villagevoice  washingtonpost  thenation  businessweek  browser  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Khoi Vinh: Publishers Should Be Developing for the Mobile Web Instead of Making Replica Apps | Betabeat — News, gossip and intel from Silicon Alley 2.0.
"For this week’s cover story about Condé Nast’s struggle developing for the iPad, Betabeat had the opportunity to talk to Khoi Vinh…On his widely-read design blog, Subtraction, Mr. Vinh has repeatedly expressed his skepticism toward publishers like Condé Nast and Hearst and software companies like Adobe for thinking that what iPad readers want is a magazine replica app that takes a print-centric approach to tablet design. But we didn’t get the chance to include some really interesting predictions Mr. Vinh made about the direction he thinks consuming content on the iPad is heading (in short: back to the browser) and what readers really want.

Mr. Vinh, who recently released a book on web design, seem to have contracted that start-up fever making its way around the city and is currently working in stealth mode on an app of his own. He compared the bells-and-whistles of the current magazine app rush to the CD-ROM bubble and advised publishers to think more like Netflix."
khoivinh  mobile  ipad  mobileweb  webbapps  content  2011  html5  browser  apps  applications  browsers  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
best websites for kindle - kinstant
"The Kindle includes a built-in web browser, but most websites are not easily viewed on the Kindle's grayscale e-Ink screen. Kinstant helps Kindle owners get more mileage out of their devices: by connecting them to Kindle-compatible websites, and by filtering sites to achieve faster download speeds."
kindle  browser  internet  online  books  web  mobile  2011  kinstant  optimization  via:preoccupations  browsers  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Spinning Beach Ball of Death
"The spinning wait cursor or spinning disc pointer — where your mouse pointer becomes the rotating color wheel or "spinning beach ball" seen above — generally indicates that your Mac® is engaged in a processor-intensive activity. For example, applying a Gaussian blur to an image in Adobe® Photoshop® is a processor-intensive activity.<br />
In most cases, the "beach ball" disappears within several seconds. However, there are cases when the "beach ball" spins protractedly, a condition colloquially known as "The Spinning Beach Ball of Death" (SBBOD).<br />
This FAQ — derived from a corresponding chapter in our Troubleshooting Mac OS X e-book— discusses solving common SBBOD problems, both generally and in Web browsers."
mac  osx  applications  management  software  troubleshooting  browser  safari  performance  browsers  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Pinboard Safari extensions: save tabs
"This Safari extension lets you quickly save all your open tabs to Pinboard for later viewing.

The extension adds a single button to your toolbar:

Clicking the button will take you to a Pinboard page where you can save all your open tabs for later viewing:

Once you've saved a tab set, you'll see a 'tabs' link on your user page.

You can save multiple tab sets, and open them anytime in any browser by visiting your tabs page on Pinboard."
safari  extensions  pinboard  bookmarks  bookmarking  tools  tabs  browsers  browser  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Am I Violating The DMCA By Visiting The NYTimes With NoScript Enabled? | Techdirt
"As we continue to explore the NY Times' bizarrely pointless paywall, it comes as no surprise that the wall itself is barely any wall at all. It's not even a fence. It's basically a bunch of fence posts, and someone screaming: "Pay no attention to your own eyes. There is a fence here, and you should go round the front & pay at the entrance... unless someone sent you here. Then walk on through."…But it gets even more bizarre when you discover that the "paywall" itself has apparently been written in javascript, meaning that when you do hit the wall, the full article you want to read actually loads in the HTML, it's just then blocked by some script asking you to pay up. That means it's even easier to remove than many had predicted (no need to even delete cookies or any such nonsense). In fact, that link above points people to NYTClean, a 4-line javascript bookmarklet, that makes it easy to remove the paywall w/ (literally) the click of a button, should you actually encounter it."
drm  paywall  nytimes  2011  javascript  html  workarounds  nytclean  dmca  addons  firefox  browser  browsers  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Switch | The multi-user web browser for iPad
"Switch lets different people browse the web on a single iPad while keeping their own history, bookmarks and tabs.<br />
<br />
1. Share an iPad between the family without getting in each other’s way<br />
2. Use a single password to protect your email, facebook and other websites<br />
3. Keep your own tabs and bookmarks for faster browsing"
ipad  application  sharing  browser  browsers  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Masquerading as Mobile Safari to Get Websites to Serve HTML5 Video to Safari on Mac OS X
"whenever you run into a video player that claims to require Flash Player, invoke the Develop → User Agent → Mobile Safari 3.2.2 — iPad command. This reloads the current page, but with Safari claiming to be Mobile Safari running on the iPad. It does not change the way that Safari renders the page — i.e., it doesn’t make the desktop Safari render pages with zooming or layout differences to mimic the way Mobile Safari renders pages on the iPad. All it does is tell Safari to identify itself as Mobile Safari to the server. The result is that if the server does any sort of user-agent detection to figure out whether to serve video using Flash or HTML5, you’ll get the HTML5 version.

This trick makes video work in Safari on Mac OS X — with no Flash — from Flickr, Vimeo embeds, TED, MSNBC, and probably any other site that offers video that works on the iPad. This doesn’t work for all video, but it should work for any video that works on the iPad."
macosx  osx  safari  howto  html5  video  mac  browsers  flash  hacks  daringfireball  browser  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Memento: Adding Time to the Web
"Memento wants to make it as straightforward to access the Web of the past as it is to access the current Web.

If you know the URI of a Web resource, the technical framework proposed by Memento allows you to see a version of that resource as it existed at some date in the past, by entering that URI in your browser like you always do and by specifying the desired date in a browser plug-in. Or you can actually browse the Web of the past by selecting a date and clicking away. Whatever you land upon will be versions of Web resources as they were around the selected date. Obviously, this will only work if previous versions are available somewhere on the Web. But if they are, and if they are on servers that support the Memento framework, you will get to them."
internet  archives  time  firefox  browser  extensions  atemporality  preservation  archiving  browsers  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Yiibu - About this site...
"The site is designed using the ‘mobile first’ principle. Also incorporated are elements of responsive design.

The base content and default presentation are mobile, and optimized for the very simplest devices first. We've defined this as 'basic' support.

Devices with small screens and media query support are served an enhanced layout—and occasionally—more complex content. We've called this 'mobile'.

Finally, the layout and content are enhanced to reflect the 'desktop' context.

On the first visit, the server checks for a 'properties' cookie containing specific browser 'feature support' results (obtained from tests carried out by a little bit of JavaScript). Devices that don't supply a 'properties' cookie, or have JavaScript disabled are always served the basic version of the site."

[See also http://www.slideshare.net/bryanrieger/rethinking-the-mobile-web-by-yiibu AND http://www.metaltoad.com/blog/stop-you-are-doing-mobile-wrong AND http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?933 ]
mediaqueries  mobilefirst  responsive  webdesign  web  mobile  html5  standards  browsers  adaptive  yiibu  mobileweb  webdev  via:preoccupations  development  design  usability  ux  progressiveenhancement  browser  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Get 25 great Safari extensions | Browsers & Add-Ons | MacUser | Macworld
"If you haven't yet used Safari 5's new extensions feature, we've covered the ins and outs. But which extensions are worth installing and which are better left alone? In the process of writing that article, I tested innumerable extensions from Apple's Safari Extensions Gallery, the Safari Extensions blog, and around the Web, and came up with a list of 25 that I found to be especially useful—or, in some cases, informative or entertaining. (I haven't included extensions that, while useful, do things you can approximate using Safari's own features.) Chances are you'll find more than a few that will make Safari a better browser for you."
extensions  macosx  osx  safari  browsers  safari5extensions  safari5  addons  mac  browser  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
InvisibleHand
"InvisibleHand Add-on Always Gets You the Lowest Price

InvisibleHand shows a discreet notification when the product you're browsing can be bought for a lower price elsewhere. It gives you a link directly to the product page at the competing retailer."

[via: http://scudmissile.tumblr.com/post/956734600/my-new-favorite-browser-extension ]
extensions  comparison  ecommerce  firefox  safari  chrome  browser  amazon  addons  extension  prices  pricing  shopping  shop  plugins  price  money  online  invisiblehand  browsers  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Echofon
"Never Read a Tweet Twice: Echofon automatically keeps unread tweets in sync between your computer, your iPhone and your iPad.

Media Made Easy: Our apps make viewing and sharing photos, videos, locations, and links and more super simple!

Notifications when Needed: Echofon apps can notify you of mentions and messages. Duplicate alerts are avoided and you can set a sleep period."
echofon  iphone  ipod  twittertools  twitter  freeware  applications  osx  mac  browser  socialmedia  software  facebook  firefox  extension  plugin  communication  tools  ios  browsers 
july 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Your Bookmarklets, On Steroids – Quix
"Quix is an extensible bookmarklet, that allows you to easily access all your bookmarks and bookmarklets, across all your browsers, while maintaining them in only one spot. All you have to do is remember the shortcut for the bookmarklet, so, basically, it’s like a command line for your browser!
bookmarks  bookmarking  browser  bookmarklets  onlinetoolkit  browsers 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The Daily Maverick :: YouTube turns five, hyperspaces interweb into the future
"Google, which bought Youtube less than two years after it was founded for what was then considered outrageously expensive $1.65 billion, does not want Microsoft or Apple (or anybody else) to own the dominant video format. So it has become the biggest early tester of HTML5. Your browser doesn't support HTML5? Google launches its own browser, Chrome. Need to use Internet Explorer at work because that's all your IT department supports? Google launches a Chrome framework that effectively subverts IE and makes it HTML5-compatible. The final blow will be the day that YouTube switches off Flash and starts streaming only to HTML5 browsers. On that day all browsers will be HTML5 compatible or they will perish in the flames of user outrage."
youtube  google  html5  strategy  technology  design  culture  internet  future  history  web  video  business  crossmedia  flash  2010  browser  browsers 
february 2010 by robertogreco
BashFlash - A different kind of Flash blocker for Snow Leopard
"BashFlash lets you stop the Flash plug-in dead in its tracks, letting your new-fangled Mac cool down, use less power, and give you more time to do whatever it is you do. Probably blog or tweet or something. How does it work? On 64-bit Macs running Snow Leopard, Safari pushes the Flash plug-in off into its own process. BashFlash lives as a tiny menu app, monitoring this process and warns you (by turning red) if Flash is using a relatively significant amount of processor cycles. You can then use its menu to kill the Flash plug-in. That's hot. Any running Flash content is replaced with the broken plugin icon. Want to get Flash working again? Simply reload the page, or go to a new one. The next time Flash is needed, it'll come back to life."
flash  osx  mac  free  utility  applications  safari  plugins  software  freeware  browser  battery  chrome  plugin  macosx  bashflash  browsers 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Mozilla Jetpack for Learning Design Challenge
"Send us your ideas for Firefox add-ons, preferably ones created with Jetpack, that can turn the web-browser into a platform for rich personal learning. You are not restricted to work on any particular type of application. Here are a few examples to get you started:
design  education  learning  firefox  browser  elearning  competition  mozilla  jetpack  extensions  e-learning  addons  development  personallearning  browsers 
november 2009 by robertogreco
ClickToFlash
"Ever wanted to get rid of the scourge of the web that is Adobe Flash, but still retain the ability to view Flash whenever you want? With ClickToFlash, you can! Using ClickToFlash, all of those icky Flash bits that have infected most webpages on the internets are replaced with a nice, smooth gradient and the word "Flash" set in a nice, pleasing font. When you want to view the Flash, just click on it!"
internet  web  flash  browser  plugin  plugins  safari  macosx  youtube  clicktoflash  mac  osx  adobe  utility  webkit  opensource  extension  browsers 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Creating Ogg Theora Files on Mac OS X With ffmpeg2theora
"ffmpeg2theora is the one tool I found that simply just works for transcoding to Ogg Theora. The downside to ffmpeg2theora is that it’s only available as a command-line tool."

[another conversion tool here: http://systemsboy.com/2009/07/ogg-theora-converter.html ]
ogg  ffmpeg2theora  conversion  osx  mac  converter  software  howto  firefox  browser  codecs  quicktime  tutorial  macosx  browsers 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Google Chrome OS and GooOS
"the browser is increasingly the sole point of interface for our interaction with computers. In a way, real operating systems are becoming irrelevant. Google's got it exactly right with Google Chrome OS: a browser sitting on top of a lightweight Unix layer that acts as the engine that the user doesn't need to know a whole lot about with the browser as the application layer. OS X might be the last important traditional desktop operating system, if only because it runs on desktops, laptops, the iPhone, and the inevitable Apple netbook/tablet thingie. But even OS X (and Windows and Google Chrome OS and Gnome and etc.) will lose marketshare to the WebOS...as long as users can run Firefox, Safari, or Chrome on whatever hardware they own, no one cares what flavor of Unix or tricked-out DOS that browser runs on."
kottke  technology  internet  google  os  gooos  googlechrome  googlechromeos  browsers  browser 
july 2009 by robertogreco
DeliciousSafari
"Use and create Delicious bookmarks from the Safari web browser"
via:preoccupations  safari  bookmarks  bookmarking  del.icio.us  extension  browser  browsers  macosx  extensions  mac  osx  freeware  plugin 
june 2009 by robertogreco
arc90 lab : experiments : Readability
"Reading anything on the Internet has become a full-on nightmare. As media outlets attempt to eke out as much advertising revenue as possible, we’re left trying to put blinders on to mask away all the insanity that surrounds the content we’re trying to read.
readability  plugin  bookmarklets  browsers  reading  distraction  attention  online  web  javascript  bookmarklet  plugins  usability  onlinetoolkit  clutter  filter  browser 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Add-Art
"Add-Art is a free FireFox add-on which replaces advertising on websites with curated art images. The art shows are updated every two weeks and feature contemporary artists and curators."
firefox  extensions  advertising  art  netart  activism  browser  addons  browsers 
february 2009 by robertogreco
clicktoflash - Google Code
"WebKit plug-in to prevent automatic loading of Adobe Flash content"
macosx  adobeflash  plugins  osx  webkit  extension  safari  browsers  mac  browser 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Choosy - A smarter default browser for Mac OS X
"Forget the “default browser”, Choosy lets you open links in the browser you want. Just set up a few simple options and Choosy will do the right thing, whether that's opening a browser or letting you pick from some or all of the browsers on your system."
mac  osx  browsers  utilities  software  freeware  productivity  browser 
november 2008 by robertogreco
SpinSpotter, A New Browser Plugin To Help Spot Media Bias - ReadWriteWeb
"With so many Americans getting their news online instead of in a daily newspaper, SpinSpotter decided to use the power of the web and all its many users to combat the growing trend of media bias. How? Simple: by making you the editor. With the new browser plugin from SpinSpotter, you can edit and share any sign of bias on the web."
media  mediabias  bias  online  browser  extension  plugins  spinspotter  collaborative  firefox  browsers 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Google on Google Chrome - comic book
Meant to post this the other day. Whatever your opinions about Chrome or even the storyline of the comics, you gotta admit that using a comic to introduce a new product is smart considering the audience AND Scott McCloud is a perfect choice for teaching/delivering technical details via comics.
scottmccloud  googlechrome  google  browsers  webkit  browser 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Google Chrome and Gears - Unweary
"Google isn't interested at all in "being a citizen" or part of a platform, they are interested in being the platform. If you look at the way Chrome is designed, it's not so much designed to be a good browser, as much as it is a good operating system for web applications. Google's desire is very much the same as Microsoft's, except abstracted a little higher up the stack. They want to own the platform upon which web applications are built, just like Microsoft wants to own the platform upon which desktop applications are built. This game of disintermediation seems to never end, but this time, what can Microsoft do? Or anyone else for that matter?"
googlechrome  browsers  google  browser 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Google to Offer its Own Browser: Chrome - ReadWriteWeb
"built on Webkit ... faster ... Smarter memory management ... Crash-free app browsing ... Tabs on the top ... Quick navigation ... Gears integration
google  googlechrome  browsers  opensource  browser 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Google OS Is Actually a Browser: Google Chrome
"Google Blogoscoped posts an interesting comic book created by Scott McCloud that illustrates the features of Google Chrome, an open source browser based on WebKit. As usually, all the rumors related to Google are true and "Google Browser" is no exception."
webkit  google  browsers  googlechrome  browser 
september 2008 by robertogreco
The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Programming on the Web
"The goal of this guide is to be the funnest and easiest way for a beginner to get started programming. To this end, we have made 3 innovations that set this guide apart from all others: 1. Program right now in your browser: You can edit and run any of the examples directly in your browser. No downloads or software installs, ever. 2. Learn JavaScript: It's the most useful language to know, and this guide lets you write entire web apps using it. 3. Build and share your own apps: This guide will teach you how to publish web apps at your own domain name for others to use."
beginner  learning  programming  coding  browser  tutorials  howto  classideas  tcsnmy  education  webdesign  webdev  tutorial  lessons  html  browsers 
august 2008 by robertogreco
adaptive path » aurora concept video
"This is Part 1 of Aurora, a concept video created by Adaptive Path in partnership with Mozilla Labs. With Aurora, we set out to define a plausible vision of how technology, the browser, and the Web might evolve in the future by depicting that experience in a variety of real-world contexts."
adaptivepath  aurora  browsers  usability  webdesign  ux  future  internet  ui  interactiondesign  visualization  interaction  interface  mozilla  prototype  design  browser  webdev 
august 2008 by robertogreco
anonymizer.nntime.com home page
"The Change IP Country (cIPC) is our anonymizer program which acts as an HTTP or FTP proxy. Through it, you can can retrieve any resource that is accessible from the server this runs on. This is useful when your own access is limited, but you can reach a
travel  onlinetoolkit  anonymizer  anonymous  privacy  browser  security  proxy  browsers 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Featured Firefox Extension: Quartz PDF Displays Inline PDFs in Firefox 3
"Firefox extension Quartz PDF enables inline viewing of PDFs in Firefox 3 for the Mac. Just install, and next time you follow a link to a PDF, it quickly loads the PDF directly inline."
firefox  mac  osx  extensions  addons  pdf  browser  browsers 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Peers -- The Missing Search for Firefox
"Peers provides realtime search previews for your searchbar. It makes your web experience much more comfy."
firefox  extensions  search  browser  addons  realtime  browsers 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Mobile Internet - O'Reilly Radar
"(1) mobile is huge, (2) iPhone is worth developing for, (3) here's why other platforms' mobile experience sucks, and (4) what you can do to fix it. The two slides that really stood out were on points 1 and 2."
mobile  iphone  trends  internet  web  phones  optimization  oreilly  css  browser  statistics  webdesign  webdev  browsers 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Performance Research, Part 5: iPhone Cacheability - Making it Stick » Yahoo! User Interface Blog
"This article, co-written by Wayne Shea, is the fifth in a series of articles describing experiments conducted to learn more about optimizing web page performance."
iphone  browser  browsing  webapp  webdesign  webdev  performance  mobile  phones  programming  caching  optimization  browsers 
april 2008 by robertogreco
iPhone JavaScript Character Counts
"Now, I don't have an iPhone, but I do have the SDK. Typing with a mouse in the iPhone simulator, I found the interval pattern to be the most responsive. Of the 4 techniques, only the instant updating one failed to provide an accurate count (it was always
iphone  javascript  keyboard  typing  performance  code  browser  browsers 
april 2008 by robertogreco
I have seen the future of online education and it is PMOG at EdTechPost
"What’s new is that all of this context (and all of the people) can be brought back to the very thing being described, in place, enriching the experience, and in the example of PMOG, tied together with a narrative thrust."
pmog  elearning  education  learning  online  internet  mmog  simulations  play  games  gaming  web2.0  hypertext  browser  lifeasgame  arg  browsers 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Aviary - Creation on the fly / blog / Aviary, Photoshop Express and other image editors compared
"pictures are worth one thousand words, so we asked Aviary superstar Meowza to do an actual comparison against some of the more well known Flash web apps (Photoshop Express, Picnik, Splashup, Fotoflexer and Aviary) to see whether or not he could recreate
browser  photography  photoshop  web2.0  editing  images  internet  webapp  graphics  software  browsers 
march 2008 by robertogreco
cabel.name: Japan: URL's Are Totally Out
"No more printed URL's. The replacement? Search boxes! With recommended search terms! It makes sense, right? All the good domain names are gone. Getting people to a specific page in a big site is difficult"
japan  trends  advertising  urls  search  browser  metadata  usability  browsers 
march 2008 by robertogreco
the Awesome Highlighter - be nice, highlight
"The Awesome Highlighter lets you highlight text on web pages and then gives you a link to the highlighted page."
highlighter  web2.0  sharing  collaboration  web  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  bookmarking  browser  blogging  services  webservice  socialbookmarking  annotation  browsers 
march 2008 by robertogreco
A New Type of Game Turns Web Surfing Into All-Out Information Warfare
"Can't devote 30 hours a week to World of Warcraft? Try racking up experience points and slaying enemies in the course of your mundane daily browsing instead. That's the thinking behind PMOGs — passively multiplayer online games."
pmog  games  gaming  entertainment  browser  online  internet  web  lifeasgame  socialmedia  mmog  arg  browsers 
march 2008 by robertogreco
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