robertogreco + brooklyn   117

Brooklyn Bugs
"Brooklyn Bugs' mission is to raise appreciation and awareness of edible insects through delicious, fun, and creative programming. After producing NYC’s first festival dedicated to edible insects over Labor Day Weekend in 2017, Brooklyn Bugs received notable press that shared its interest in promoting the gastronomical, sustainable and ecologically friendly aspects of entomophagy or the human consumption of insects.  

We are committed to educate and encourage people that this is not a food trend, but a movement that will continue to grow worldwide."
bugs  insects  food  nyc  brooklyn 
may 2018 by robertogreco
After Authenticity
"Meanwhile, years of semantic slippage had happened without me noticing. Suddenly the surging interest in fashion, the dad hats, the stupid pin companies, the lack of sellouts, it all made sense. Authenticity has expanded to the point that people don’t even believe in it anymore. And why should we? Our friends work at SSENSE, they work at Need Supply. They are starting dystopian lifestyle brands. Should we judge them for just getting by? A Generation-Z-focused trend report I read last year clumsily posed that “the concept of authenticity is increasingly deemed inauthentic.” It goes further than that. What we are witnessing is the disappearance of authenticity as a cultural need altogether.

Under authenticity, the value of a thing decreases as the number of people to whom it is meaningful increases. This is clearly no longer the case. Take memes for example. “Meme” circa 2005 meant lolcats, the Y U NO guy and grimy neckbeards on 4chan. Within 10 years “meme” transitioned from this one specific subculture to a generic medium in which collective participation is seen as amplifying rather than detracting from value.

In a strange turn of events, the mass media technologies built out during the heady authenticity days have had a huge part in facilitating this new mass media culture. The hashtag, like, upvote, and retweet are UX patterns that systematize endorsement and quantify shared value. The meme stock market jokers are more right than they know; memes are information commodities. But unlike indie music 10 years ago the value of a meme is based on its publicly shared recognition. From mix CDs to nationwide Spotify playlists. With information effortlessly transferable at zero marginal cost and social platforms that blast content to the top of everyone’s feed, it’s difficult to for an ethics based on scarcity to sustain itself.

K-HOLE and Box1824 captured the new landscape in their breakthrough 2014 report “Youth Mode.” They described an era of “mass indie” where the search for meaning is premised on differentiation and uniqueness, and proposed a solution in “Normcore.” Humorously, nearly everyone mistook Normcore for being about bland fashion choices rather than the greater cultural shift toward accepting shared meanings. It turns out that the aesthetics of authenticity-less culture are less about acting basic and more about playing up the genericness of the commodity as an aesthetic category. LOT2046’s delightfully industrial-supply-chain-default aesthetics are the most beautiful and powerful rendering of this. But almost everyone is capitalizing on the same basic trend, from Vetements and Virgil Abloh (enormous logos placed for visibility in Instagram photos are now the norm in fashion) to the horribly corporate Brandless. Even the names of boring basics companies like “Common Threads” and “Universal Standard” reflect the the popularity of genericness, writes Alanna Okunn at Racked. Put it this way: Supreme bricks can only sell in an era where it’s totally fine to like commodities.

Crucially, this doesn’t mean that people don’t continue to seek individuation. As I’ve argued elsewhere exclusivity is fundamental to any meaning-amplifying strategy. Nor is this to delegitimize some of the recognizable advancements popularized alongside the first wave of mass authenticity aesthetics. Farmer’s markets, the permaculture movement, and the trend of supporting local businesses are valuable cultural innovations and are here to stay.

Nevertheless, now that authenticity is obsolete it’s become difficult to remember why we were suspicious of brands and commodities to begin with. Maintaining criticality is a fundamental challenge in this new era of trust. Unfortunately, much of what we know about being critical is based on authenticity ethics. Carles blamed the Contemporary Conformist phenomenon on a culture industry hard-set on mining “youth culture dollars.” This very common yet extraordinarily reductive argument, which makes out commodity capitalism to be an all-powerful, intrinsically evil force, is typical of authenticity believers. It assumes a one-way influence of a brand’s actions on consumers, as do the field of semiotics and the hopeless, authenticity-craving philosophies of Baudrillard and Debord.

Yet now, as Dena Yago says, “you can like both Dimes and Doritos, sincerely and without irony.” If we no longer see brands and commodity capitalism as something to be resisted, we need more nuanced forms of critique that address how brands participate in society as creators and collaborators with real agency. Interest in working with brands, creating brands, and being brands is at an all-time high. Brands and commodities therefore need to be considered and critiqued on the basis of the specific cultural and economic contributions they make to society. People co-create their identities with brands just as they do with religions, communities, and other other systems of meaning. This constructivist view is incompatible with popular forms of postmodern critique but it also opens up new critical opportunities. We live in a time where brands are expected to not just reflect our values but act on them. Trust in business can no longer be based on visual signals of authenticity, only on proof of work."
tobyshorin  2018  authenticity  culture  anthropology  hispters  sellouts  sellingout  commercialism  kanyewest  yeezy  yeezysupply  consumerism  commercialization  commodification  personalbranding  branding  capitalism  shepardfairey  obeygiant  tourism  sarahperry  identity  critique  ethics  mainstream  rjaymagill  popculture  aesthetics  commentary  conformism  scale  scalability  venkateshrao  premiummediocre  brooklyn  airbnb  wework  local  handmade  artisinal  economics  toms  redwings  davidmuggleton  josephpine  jamesgilmore  exclusivity  denayago  systems  sytemsofmeaning  meaning  commodities  k-hole 
april 2018 by robertogreco
9 Artist-Run Restaurants You Need to Know
"In the fall of 1971, the doors of a curious restaurant located at 127 Prince Street opened just south of New York’s Houston Street. Inside, if you were hungry, an artist might ladle you a steaming bowl of caldo gallego from one of three large cauldrons bubbling away over a low stove in the center of the room. Soup in hand, you’d make your way to a table where slices of bread were stacked around a huge heap of butter. Come another night and you might’ve been served the now-famous “bone dinner”—frogs’ legs and roasted marrow bones, among other skeletal dishes—then left with the remnants, rigorously cleaned and given a second life as wearable jewelry.

This was the restaurant and conceptual art project Food, run by artists Carol Goodden, Tina Girouard, and Gordon Matta-Clark, among others. Given a mini-retrospective at Frieze New York’s 2013 fair, involving several of the original chefs, the short-lived project has secured its place as one of the most iconic blurrings of the lines between art and food. The 1970s Soho establishment is far from the only artistic foray into the culinary realm, however, so we checked in on a handful that have been around for years, and a few others that are still taking shape.

Zagreus Projekt
ULRICH KRAUSS
BERLIN

“Food and art were the two elements in my life that were always there,” explains Ulrich Krauss, the founder of the Berlin food project space Zagreus Projekt. “I grew up in a butcher shop and I studied art.” He went on to apprentice as a chef, spending time cooking at a fancy hotel in southern Germany. “When you are in that world, it is so restricted, and you have rules for everything,” Krauss says. “It’s a very narrow world, so I got the feeling I had to escape from that.” Krauss left for Berlin, where he balanced artmaking—mostly performances—with cooking in restaurants. “I have to found a place where I bring things together,” he remembers thinking of his double life. Zagreus Projekt took shape.

Its first iteration found a home in the backroom of Galerie Markus Richter, a space for conceptual and minimal art that shuttered in 2005. Since then, Zagreus Projekt, which Krauss is careful to point out is not a gallery, has relocated to the elegant Mitte district. Artists bring ideas for exhibitions that in some way relate back to food, and a collaboration ensues to devise a menu that matches. FOOD ART, a collaboration that launches April 8th, pairs the talents of the artist-turned-chef with a Swiss-German artist couple, Hendrikje Kühne and Beat Klein, who make elaborate, three-dimensional collage sculptures, often including images of food and fragments of advertising and newspapers. “With every exhibition we do here, we have a different point of view on food or on the situation of eating, and that is the most important thing,” Krauss explains. But the demands of the project, 16 years on, are not without their toll. “I don’t see myself as an artist anymore,” says Krauss. “I see myself as a chef.”

Pharmacy 2
DAMIEN HIRST
NEWPORT STREET GALLERY, LONDON

Damien Hirst, dispenser of hand-painted pills and shark vitrines, blends two environments to unusual effect in his newest restaurant endeavor, Pharmacy 2, which opened at his Newport Street Gallery several weeks ago. After taking in vibrant work by John Hoyland, one of Britain’s key abstract painters, a Hirst devotee can round out the experience in the new spot. Uniquely crafted pills dot the marble floor, and a clinically cool neon sign that reads “prescriptions” hangs over the bar in view of works from Hirst’s “Medicine Cabinets” and “Kaleidescope paintings.”

Diners enjoy chef-collaborator Mark Hix’s cooking, which eschews pharmaceuticals for fresh ingredients and a British-inflected menu of European classics, including crispy squid with green chilis or Hix’s riff on the traditional German apples-and-potatoes side “Heaven and Earth.” “Damien designed a formaldehyde ‘Cock and Bull’ for my restaurant Tramshed, so it makes sense for me to exchange my skills,” the chef explains.

[restaurant not yet named]
RAPHAEL LYON
NEW YORK

“There is a long-running joke in the food industry that most artists are unrealized chefs,” the artist Raphael Lyon, who grows sculptures using geologic processes, tells me. “Which is just a way of saying that huge numbers of self-identified artists may have turned to art only because they wanted to be respected for working creatively with their hands, and that maybe they would have been more fulfilled in a kitchen rather than a studio.” Together with partner Arley Marks, Lyon is opening a restaurant off the Jefferson Street stop of New York City’s L train in the coming weeks. He also owns Enlightenment Wines, where he works as a “mazer,” fermenting honey and herbs into a wine-like beverage. “This will be something like a public home for that research,” he explains.

Lyon also hopes it will be “a place of sincere curiosity—whether it’s for a dry mead made out of Christmas trees and gold flake or just rethinking the pickled egg.” The artist’s deep knowledge of food and wine yields unusual revelations. “What interests me about winemaking, and more generally the American food scene writ large, is how until very recently discourse around it was obsessed with really awkward notions of authenticity,” Lyon observes. He suggests there’s a link between this approach to thinking about food and how people talked about European painting before Modernism. “A good part of the development of art in the last century was a move away from validity based on authentic regional expression to validity based on ideas,” he continues. “That’s happening in the food world, particularly in New York.”

ZAX Restaurant
WILL STEWART
BROOKLYN

“Generally, the stereotype of ‘starving artist’ isn’t far off the mark in New York,” says Will Stewart, an artist in the city whose work engages the environment and the architecture of space. “You’ve got people living in strange shared spaces, and everybody’s out running around every night doing something.” It’s a city that Stewart thinks “operates as a pressure cooker.” A year and a half ago, he started wondering about setting up a makeshift restaurant. “There’re how many hundreds of thousands of people?” Stewart says, retracing the thoughts that led him to set up ZAX—his fixed-price, vegetarian-only supper club in a vacant space adjacent to his studio. “There will always be at least 20 people who are going to want to come by and have dinner.”

ZAX’s December “Fertility Meal,” put together by artists/guest chefs Maia Ruth Lee and Violet Dennison, included “Estrogen Seeds” (an appetizer made with anise and sugar crystals) and “New Mother Nourishment Soup” (seaweed, daikon, enoki mushrooms, shishito peppers, miso, and fingerling potatoes), among other peculiar dishes and libations. For a few extra dollars, heat acupuncture was also part of the meal. Though Stewart has put his restaurant-in-a-studio on hold, he plans to bring it back in Greenpoint sometime in April.

Conflict Kitchen
DAWN WELESKI & JON RUBIN
PITTSBURGH

“What you choose to eat every day is a creative moment,” says Dawn Weleski, who, together with Jon Rubin, directs the Pittsburgh eatery Conflict Kitchen. “We provide an outlet for that creative expression.” The two artists work to address thorny social issues through food. “We were always thinking about how to re-envision the city, how to make it the city we wanted to live in,” Weleski, a Pittsburgh native, observes.

A simple but powerful premise guides their restaurant: Serve cuisines from countries with which the United States is in conflict. In its six years of operation, hungry residents who might not have given much thought to the social implications of U.S. foreign policy have filled up on Afghan, Cuban, Venezuelan, Palestinian, North Korean, and, most recently, Iranian cuisine. “We were trying to think of ways with which to engage the politics of the city, and to get people to have conversations in public spaces that weren’t typically had in Pittsburgh, let alone in the rest of America,” Weleski explains.

Currency Exchange Café
THEASTER GATES
CHICAGO

It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact moment at which Theaster Gates’s expansive approach to artmaking came to include food. One starting point was the artist’s frequent dinners, at which guests ate soul food while discussing its origins and cultural importance. Another was getting the Currency Exchange Café, decorated with materials salvaged from the currency exchange that used to occupy the space, off the ground serving breakfast and lunch to residents of Chicago’s south side Washington Park neighborhood (ample shelves stocked with books line the walls and there are plans for a 35mm slide collection). With projects like these as well as the establishment of his Rebuild Foundation behind him, Gates is at work on ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen, taking shape just across the border in Gary, Indiana.

The project joins the Gary barbecue-and-soul-food fixture Mama Pearl’s, which is and will remain in the space, as a tenant in a large building being transformed into a multi-use facility boasting a commercial kitchen for training, an incubator for culinary businesses, a pop-up café with a menu that changes based on input from incubator participants, and even an exhibition space for art. The ambitious project is sewing the first seeds of what the rustbelt city hopes will be a leap toward fostering a cultural district, bringing to its residents a place where they can come together over a meal and admire the many talents of their neighbors.

Thank You For Coming
LAURA NOGUERA, JONATHAN ROBERT, JENN SU TAOHAN, AND CYNTHIA SU TAOPIN
LOS ANGELES

Thank You For Coming is an experimental space that pairs a permanent restaurant serving simple weekend brunches with a series of creative residencies, as well as playing host… [more]
berlin  losangeles  sanfrancisco  art  artists  coffee  food  restaurants  gordonmatta-clark  2016  london  nyc  brooklyn  chicago  pittsburgh  brettwalker  lauranoguera  jonathanrobert  jennsutaohan  cynthiasutaopin  theastergates  dawnweleski  jonrubin  conflictkitchen  willstewart  raphaellyon  damienhirst  ulrichkrauss  127princestreet  carolgoodden  tinagirouard  cafes  openstudioproject  coffeeshops  matta-clark 
may 2017 by robertogreco
The Alternative Art School Fair Radio | Clocktower
"The Alternative Art School Fair at Pioneer Works presents an introduction to alternative art schools from around the US and the world, November 19-20, 2016. The entire event, including workshops, discussions, and keynote presentations by Carol Becker, Luis Camnitzer, Craig Wilkins and Dorothea Rockburne, will be streamed live and archived on clocktower.org.

See the radio schedule below to plan your listening party. The live listening link can be found HERE.

Art education is a reflection of social and cultural evolution; it engages with structures of meaning-making and considers different frameworks for experience. The impetus to create an alternative art school is rooted not only in a desire to create “better” art, but to create the conditions for greater freedom of expression. Often run as free, artist-run initiatives, the values and visions of alternative art schools vary widely in methodology, mission and governance. But even when they are relatively small in scale they provide vital models of cultural critique and experimentation.

Listening Schedule:
November 19
Keynote panel -- 12:00-1:30PM
Carol Becker
Luis Camnitzer
Dorothea Rockburne
Victoria Sobel
Interviewer/Moderator: Catherine Despont

How can alternative systems impact traditional arts education? -- 2-3:30PM
Ox-Bow
Daniel Bozhkov
School of the Future
Interviewer/Moderator: Regine Basha

Art and Democracy -- 3:45-5:15PM
UNIDEE
The Black Mountain School
UOIEA (Anna Craycroft)
Interviewer/Moderator: Provisions Library

Self-Governance as Pedagogy: Of Other Spaces -- 5:30-7:30PM
Art and Law Program
Interviewer/Moderator: Associate Director Lauren van Haaften-Schick
Art & Law Program Fellows: Abram Coetsee & Alex Strada (Fall 2016), Damien Davis (Spring 2016)

November 20
Keynote -- 12:00-1:30PM
Dr. Craig L. Wilkins, PhD, RA

Hybrid Practice -- 2:00-3:30PM
SFPC
Zz School of Print Media
Southland Institute
Interviewer/Moderator: Archeworks

Responsive Programming: A Conversation Between The Ventriloquist Summerschool and Sheila Levrant de Bretteville -- 3:45-5:15PM
The Ventriloquist Summerschool
Sheila Levrant de Bretteville

(Re)incorporating Art in Everyday Life -- 5:30-7:00PM
Chad Laird (Sunview Luncheonette)
Tal Beery (School of Apocalypse)
Tatfoo Tan (NERTM)
Moderator/Interviewer: Grizedale Arts"
tolisten  education  altgdp  openstudioproject  lcproject  sfsh  schools  artschools  2016  radio  art  pioneerworks  alternative  diy  small  democracy  local  play  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  architecture  nyc  brooklyn  chicago  uk  guatemala  london  egypt  puertorico  sanjuan  northcarolina  portonovo  benin  statenisland  design  michigan  saugatuck  curriculum  pedagogy  learning  howelearn  organizations  cooperatives  publishing  networks  fairfax  virginia  losangeles  oslo  accrá  edinburgh  making  craft  mexicocity  mexicodf  df  mexico  noray  stavanger  paris  france  brussels  mutlidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  kansascity  missouri  seoul  biella  italia  italy  systemsthinking  socialjustice  independence  carolbecker  victoriasobel  reginebasha  transart  marywallingblackburn  craigwilkins  sheilalevrantdebretteville  michaelnewton  shannonharvey  hragvartanian  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  communication  technology  socialnetworks  artschool 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Alternative Art School Fair | Pioneer Works
[See also: The Alternative Art School Fair Radio
http://clocktower.org/series/the-alternative-art-school-fair-radio ]

"The Alternative Art School Fair
November 19-20, 2016

The Alternative Art School Fair presents an introduction to alternative art schools from around the US and the world.

Art education is a reflection of social and cultural evolution; it engages with structures of meaning-making and considers different frameworks for experience. The impetus to create an alternative art school is rooted not only in a desire to create “better” art, but to create the conditions for greater freedom of expression. Often run as free, artist-run initiatives, the values and visions of alternative art schools vary widely in methodology, mission and governance. But even when they are relatively small in scale they provide vital models of cultural critique and experimentation.

The Alternative Art School Fair event, including workshops, discussions, and keynote presentations by Carol Becker, Luis Camnitzer, Craig Wilkins and Dorothea Rockburne, will be streamed live and archived by Clocktower Productions on clocktower.org.

Media Sponsor:
Hyperallergic

Participating Schools

AAPG – Alternative Art Program Guatemala • AltMFA • Anhoek School • Archeworks • Arts Letters & Numbers • ASCII Project • Beta-Local • Black Mountain School • Brooklyn Institute for Social Research • Center for Art Analysis • COLLABOR • école de Hogbonu • Enroll Yourself • Free School of Architecture • Islington Mill Art Academy • Grizedale Arts • Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists' Residency • NERTM - New Earth Resiliency Training Module • Nomad/9 • Pioneer Works • School of Apocalypse • School of Critical Engagement - SoCE • School of the Future • School for Poetic Computation • SOMA • Sommerskolen • Spring Sessions • Sunview Luncheonette • The Art & Law Program • The Black School • The Other MA - TOMA • The Public School • The School of Making Thinking • The Southland Institute • The Ventriloquist Summerschool • The Zz School of Print Media • Thinker Space • Transart Institute • Uncertainty School • UNIDEE - University of Ideas • Utopia School

Presses, Libraries, Resources

Arthur Fournier Fine and Rare • Booklyn • Brooklyn Art Library • Common Field • Inventory Press • OSSAI - Open Source and Space Administration Institute for Alternative Research • Provisions Library • Sketchbook • Project Zone Books

Saturday Schedule … [with session descriptions]

Sunday Schedule … [with session descriptions]

Schools [and a few other things, as noted, website links to descriptions, and to each school’s site if there is one]

AltMFA
London, United Kingdom

Alternative Art College
United Kingdom

Alternative Art Program
Guatemala

Anhoek School
Brooklyn, New York, USA

Antiuniversity Now
London, United Kingdom

Archeworks
Chicago, Illinois, USA

Arts Letters & Numbers
New York, USA

ASCII Project
Mohansein Giza, Egypt

Beta-Local
San Juan, Puerto Rico

Black Mountain School
Black Mountain, North Carolina, USA

GALLERY
Booklyn
Brooklyn, New York, USA

LIBRARY
Brooklyn Art Library
Brooklyn, New York, USA

SCHOOL
Brooklyn Institute for Social Research
Brooklyn, NY, USA

NETWORK
Common Field
National

école de Hogbonu
Porto Novo, Bénin

Enrol Yourself
London, United Kingdom

BOOKSTORE
Fournier Fine & Rare
Brooklyn, New York, USA

Grizedale Arts
Coniston, Lake District, UK

PRESS
Inventory Press
New York, New York, USA

New Earth Resiliency Training Module [NERTM]
Staten Island, NY, USA

Nomad/9 MFA
Hartford, Connecticut, USA

RESOURCE
Open Source and Space Administration Institute for Alternative Research [OSSAI]
nomadic

Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency
Saugatuck, Michigan, USA

Pioneer Works
Brooklyn, New York, USA

LIBRARY
Provisions Library
Fairfax, Virginia, USA

Ricean School of Dance
Hydra Island, Greece

School of Apocalypse
Brooklyn, New York, USA

School of Critical Engagement [SoCE]
Los Angeles / Oslo / Accra

School of the Future
Brooklyn, New York, USA

School for Poetic Computation
New York, NY, USA

Shift/Work
Edinburgh, Scotland

Spring Sessions
Amman, Jordan

SOMA
Mexico City, Mexico

Sommerskolen
Stavanger, Norway

Southland Institute
Los Angeles, California, USA

Sunview Luncheonette
Brooklyn, New York, USA

The Art & Law Program
New York, New York, USA

The Black School
Brooklyn, New York, USA

The Cheapest University
Paris, France

The Free School of Architecture
Los Angeles, California, USA

The Public School
Brussels, New York City, Los Angeles, and elsewhere

The School of Making Thinking
Brooklyn, New York, USA

The School of the Damned
London, United Kingdom

The Ventriloquist Summerschool
Oslo, Norway

The Zz School of Print Media
Kansas City, Missouri, USA

ThinkerSpace
Brussels, New York City, Los Angeles, and elsewhere

TOMA
Southend-on-Sea, United Kingdom

Transart Institute
Berlin, Germany, and New York, New York, USA

Uncertainty School
Seoul, New York, International

UNIDEE-University Of Ideas
Biella, Italy

Union of Initiatives for Educational Assembly (UOIEA)
Sites vary

PRESS
Zone Books
Brooklyn, NY, USA"
altgdp  art  artschools  pioneerworks  2016  alternative  diy  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  small  democracy  local  play  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  architecture  nyc  brooklyn  chicago  uk  guatemala  london  egypt  puertorico  sanjuan  northcarolina  portonovo  benin  statenisland  design  michigan  saugatuck  curriculum  pedagogy  learning  howelearn  organizations  cooperatives  publishing  networks  fairfax  virginia  losangeles  oslo  accrá  edinburgh  making  craft  mexicocity  mexicodf  df  mexico  noray  stavanger  paris  france  brussels  mutlidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  kansascity  missouri  seoul  biella  italia  italy  systemsthinking  socialjustice  independence  carolbecker  victoriasobel  reginebasha  transart  marywallingblackburn  craigwilkins  sheilalevrantdebretteville  michaelnewton  shannonharvey  hragvartanian  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  communication  technology  socialnetworks  artschool 
december 2016 by robertogreco
When Silicon Valley Takes on Elementary School - Note to Self - WNYC
""We have an opportunity to do what we want - choose our path instead of the teachers making a choice for us."

Meet Piper, a blond, freckled 9-year-old from Brooklyn who talks like a seasoned grownup. She used to go to public school with Manoush's son but now - with the help of financial aid - she's enrolled in a new experimental school in her neighborhood: AltSchool.

AltSchool is not your typical private school. Its founder is Max Ventilla, a former Google executive with a vision to reform education. Ventilla's company, with over 100 million dollars from investors like Mark Zuckerberg and Marc Andreesen, uses tech to teach and track students' social and academic skills. Ventilla's idea is that over time, that data can build a more thorough picture of each student and determine how she is taught. This method of "personalized learning" (think Montessori 2.0) is being prototyped in eight "micro-schools" in Palo Alto, San Francisco, and New York City, with the goal of applying it to schools everywhere. Manoush went to visit one in Brooklyn.

NPR's education reporter Anya Kamanetz is skeptical of Ventilla's goal to optimize education for the masses, and she's concerned about Silicon Valley's foray into education. "They have a giant promise, which is that the right software system, the right operating system, is going to transform teaching and learning... and, what it ultimately means is that they have shareholders to satisfy."

This week: can a tech startup engineer a better system for learning everywhere and make money doing it? And would these two tech reporters/mothers send their own kids there?"
altschool  manoushxomorodi  education  2016  maxventilla  technology  schools  microschools  brooklyn  anyakamanetz 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Choosing a School for My Daughter in a Segregated City - The New York Times
"Integration was transformative for my husband and me. Yet the idea of placing our daughter in one of the small number of integrated schools troubled me. These schools are disproportionately white and serve the middle and upper middle classes, with a smattering of poor black and Latino students to create “diversity.”

In a city where white children are only 15 percent of the more than one million public-school students, half of them are clustered in just 11 percent of the schools, which not coincidentally include many of the city’s top performers. Part of what makes those schools desirable to white parents, aside from the academics, is that they have some students of color, but not too many. This carefully curated integration, the kind that allows many white parents to boast that their children’s public schools look like the United Nations, comes at a steep cost for the rest of the city’s black and Latino children."



"It was hard not to be skeptical about the department’s plan. New York, like many deeply segregated cities, has a terrible track record of maintaining racial balance in formerly underenrolled segregated schools once white families come in. Schools like P.S. 321 in Brooklyn’s Park Slope neighborhood and the Academy of Arts and Letters in Fort Greene tend to go through a brief period of transitional integration, in which significant numbers of white students enroll, and then the numbers of Latino and black students dwindle. In fact, that’s exactly what happened at P.S. 8.

A decade ago, P.S. 8 was P.S. 307’s mirror image. Predominantly filled with low-income black and Latino students from surrounding neighborhoods, P.S. 8, with its low test scores and low enrollment, languished amid a community of affluence because white parents in the neighborhood refused to send their children there. A group of parents worked hard with school administrators to turn the school around, writing grants to start programs for art and other enrichment activities. Then more white and Asian parents started to enroll their children. One of them was David Goldsmith, who later became president of the community education council tasked with considering the rezoning of P.S. 8 and P.S. 307. Goldsmith is white and, at the time, lived in Vinegar Hill with his Filipino wife and their daughter.

As P.S. 8 improved, more and more white families from Brooklyn Heights, Dumbo and Vinegar Hill enrolled their children, and the classrooms in the lower grades became majority white. The whitening of the school had unintended consequences. Some of the black and Latino parents whose children had been in the school from the beginning felt as if they were being marginalized. The white parents were able to raise large sums at fund-raisers and could be dismissive of the much smaller fund-raising efforts that had come before. Then, Goldsmith says, the new parents started seeking to separate their children from their poorer classmates. “There were kids in the school that were really high-risk kids, kids who were homeless, living in temporary shelters, you know, poverty can be really brutal,” Goldsmith says. “The school was really committed to helping all children, but we had white middle-class parents saying, ‘I don’t want my child in the same class with the kid who has emotional issues.’ ”

The parents who had helped build P.S. 8, black, Latino, white and Asian, feared they were losing something important, a truly diverse school that nurtured its neediest students, where families held equal value no matter the size of their paychecks. They asked for a plan to help the school maintain its black and Latino population by setting aside a percentage of seats for low-income children, but they didn’t get approval.

P.S. 8’s transformation to a school where only one in four students are black or Latino and only 14 percent are low-income began during the administration of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, known for its indifference toward efforts to integrate schools. But integration advocates say that they’ve also been deeply disappointed by the de Blasio administration’s stance on the issue. In October 2014, after the release of the U.C.L.A. study pointing to the extreme segregation in the city’s schools, and nearly a year after de Blasio was elected, Councilmen Ritchie Torres and Brad Lander moved to force the administration to address segregation, introducing what became the School Diversity Accountability Act, which would require the Department of Education to release school-segregation figures and report what it was doing to alleviate the problem. “It was always right in front of our faces,” says Lander, a representative from Brooklyn, whose own children attend heavily white public schools. “Then the U.C.L.A. report hit, and the segregation in the city became urgent.”"
education  nyc  race  racism  us  brooklyn  segregation  desegregation  resegregation  schools  publicschools  policy  power  diversity  parenting  children  gentrification  nikolehannah-jones 
july 2016 by robertogreco
McDonald's: you can sneer, but it's the glue that holds communities together | Business | The Guardian
[Tweeted previously:
"“Unlike community centers, it is also free of bureaucracy.” When our public institutions no longer serve the public."
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/742821334476951554

and noting
"Same with other chains (like Starbucks, KFC) in my neighborhood. Places for youth to assemble too, when programs come with too many strings."
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/742821897553874944

"When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s.

Walk into any McDonald’s in the morning and you will find a group of mostly retired people clustering in a corner, drinking coffee, eating and talking. They are drawn to the McDonald’s because it has inexpensive good coffee, clean bathrooms, space to sprawl. Unlike community centers, it is also free of bureaucracy."



"In almost every franchise, there are tables with people like Betty escaping from the streets for a short bit. They prefer McDonald’s to shelters and to non-profits, because McDonald’s are safer, provide more freedom, and most importantly, the chance to be social, restoring a small amount of normalcy.

In the Bronx, many of my friends who live on the streets are regulars. Steve, who has been homeless for 20 years, uses the internet to check up on sports, find discarded papers to do the crossword puzzle, and generally escape for a while. He and his wife Takeesha will turn a McDonald’s meal into an evening out. Beauty, who has been homeless for five years, uses the internet to check up on her family back in Oklahoma when she can find a computer to borrow.

Most importantly though, McDonald’s provide many with the chance to make real and valuable connections. When faced with the greatest challenges, with a personal loss, wealthier Americans turn to expensive therapists, others without the resources or the availability, turn to each other.

In Sulfur Springs, Texas, in the late morning, Lew Mannon, 76, and Gerald Pinkham, 78, were sitting alone at a table, the last of the morning regulars to leave. She was needling him about politics. (“I like to tease the men who come, get them all riled up, tell them they just don’t want a female as president.”) Both are retired, Gerald from working for an airfreight company, and Lew after 28 years as a bank teller.

When I asked Lew about her life, she started to tear up, stopped for a second, and composed herself. “Life is hard. Very hard. Seven years ago I lost my husband to leukemia. Then three years ago I lost one of my sons. Health complications from diabetes. When my son died, I had nobody to help me, emotionally, except this community here. Gerald lost his wife three years ago, and we have helped support each other through that.”

She stopped again, unable to speak from tears. After a moment of silence: “I look composed on the outside. Many of us do. But I struggle a lot on the inside. This community here gives me the support to get by.”"

[Update: Kenyatta Cheese blogged this with the following notes:
http://finalbossform.com/post/145925082985/mcdonalds-you-can-sneer-but-its-the-glue-that

I’ve learned through @triciawang that spaces like these are known as third places in sociology. Third places are neutral, accessible spaces where people can meet with old friends and be exposed to possible new ones.

Tricia spent a decade living in, mapping, and understanding third places in Beijing, Wuhan, Brooklyn, Bangalore, and Oaxaca. (She’s badass that way.)

She taught me that Starbucks and Pizza Hut serve a similar role among young folks in China, especially for people who don’t necessarily feel comfortable sleeping in the third places that are internet cafes.

Small note on how this connects to @everybodyatonce: tv networks and creators sometimes ask us if they should create a dedicated app or website for their fandoms to which we almost always say no.

Much like the government-run community center, a dedicated app creates an unnecessary barrier to entry for new fans and requires you to program the space in the same way that you need to program and organize physical space. By meeting fans in neutral spaces (tumblr, twitter, IG, LJ, even reddit), you build bigger community by supporting the culture that already exists. ]
2016  chrisarnade  community  cities  mcdonalds  poverty  society  inequality  elitism  us  bureaucracy  elderly  aging  economics  civics  lowerclass  precarity  classism  thirdspaces  kenyattacheese  triciawang  beijing  starbucks  china  brooklyn  wuhan  bangalore  oaxaca  pizzahut  kfc  everybodyatonce  fandom  socialmedia 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Camilo Jose Vergara
[via: http://kottke.org/16/04/tracking-time

"Camilo Jose Vergara's Tracking Time project is a collection of photos of locations around the US (LA, Harlem, Detroit, South Bronx) photographed repeatedly over the years, from the 70s to the present day."]
architecture  art  cities  photography  camilojosévergara  harlem  nyc  chicago  gary  camden  losangeles  newark  brooklyn  southbronx  bronx  chile  time  history  change 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Learn Different - The New Yorker
"Students at AltSchool are issued a tablet in pre-K and switch to a laptop in later years. (For now, AltSchool ends at the equivalent of eighth grade.) When I visited a mixed classroom for second and third graders, most of the children were sunk into their laptops. All were engaged in bespoke activities that had been assigned to them through a “playlist”—software that displays a series of digital “cards” containing instructions for a task to be completed. Sometimes it was an online task. Two children were doing keyboarding drills on a typing Web site. Their results would be uploaded for a teacher’s assessment and added to the student’s online Learning Progression—software developed by AltSchool which captures, in minute detail, a student’s progress.

The curriculum is roughly aligned with the Common Core, the government standards that establish topics which students should master by the end of each grade. But AltSchool’s ethos is fundamentally opposed to the paradigm of standardization that has dominated public education in recent decades, and reflects a growing shift in emphasis among theorists toward “personalized learning.” This approach acknowledges and adapts to the differences among students: their abilities, their interests, their cultural backgrounds.

A girl in the class was completing an offline task—reading a book about polar bears. A boy lay on his stomach on the carpeted floor, headphones on, using a Web site called BrainPOP to learn how to calculate the perimeters of basic shapes. “Two out of five!” he shouted at one point, as oblivious of those around him as a subway rider wearing earbuds and singing along to Drake.

Not all the activities were solitary. Two girls sat together, laptops before them, using Google Images to scroll through pictures of seals for a social-studies assignment; occasionally, they paused to compare notes. Every so often, a student spoke with the teacher, a young woman in jeans and a loose top, her iPhone tucked under her thigh as she sat on the carpet. One girl had been using her laptop to research castles—an area of sustained interest. She and the teacher discussed princesses and castles, and whether they always went together. “That’s a good question,” the teacher said, and then asked, “Does America have princesses?”"



"At the same time, educators at AltSchool are discussing whether children really need to attain certain skills at particular stages of their educational development, as the Common Core implies. Seyfert thinks that it might be more useful to think of learning not as linear but as scrambled, like a torrent file on a computer: “You can imagine all the things you need to learn, and you could learn it all out of order so long as you can zip it up at the end, and you are good to go.”

Like other AltSchool teachers, Seyfert was drawn to the startup because of its ambition to make systemic change. Two or three times a week, she told me, she gives colleagues feedback about the school’s digital tools. The Learner Profile, Stream app, and other tools are only about a year old, and AltSchool’s personalization still requires considerable human intervention. Software is updated every day. Carolyn Wilson, AltSchool’s director of education, told me, “We encourage staff members to express their pain points, step up with their ideas, take a risk, fail forward, and fail fast, because we know we are going to iterate quickly. Other schools tend to move in geologic time.” (Ventilla may question the utility of foreign-language acquisition, but fluency in the jargon of Silicon Valley—English 2.0—is required at AltSchool.)

Ventilla told me that these tools were central to a revised conception of what a teacher might be: “We are really shifting the role of an educator to someone who is more of a data-enabled detective.” He defined a traditional teacher as an “artisanal lesson planner on one hand and disciplinary babysitter on the other hand.” Educators are stakeholders in AltSchool’s eventual success: equity has been offered to all full-time teachers."



"Some education advocates are wary about potential privacy violations that might result from data collection on the scale intended by AltSchool, particularly given that AltSchool is a for-profit company. (Most independent schools are not-for-profit institutions.) These concerns could complicate the adoption of AltSchool software by public school systems. Ventilla says that there is no intention to use AltSchool data for commercial purposes, and that AltSchool can gather data in a way that will respect a student’s anonymity. Only salient moments in the classroom videos are saved, he says, and most are not even stored. “I would never want to record all the things a kid says and keep them around,” he said. But he added that looking at vocabulary-acquisition patterns in aggregate could provide teachers with valuable information that will help them teach each individual more effectively. “The collection of any kind of data is not free,” Ventilla acknowledged. “But the alternative is the incredibly invasive, inaccurate standardized-testing regimen that we have now, which comes at a lot of cost, psychic and otherwise, and doesn’t provide nearly the amount of benefit that we want.”

Daniel Willingham, an education scholar at the University of Virginia, told me that adopting technology in schools can be maddeningly inefficient. “The most common thing I hear is that when you adopt technology you have to write twice the lesson plans,” he told me. “You have the one you use with the technology, and you have the backup one you use when the technology doesn’t work that day.” Willingham also notes that the most crucial thing about educational software isn’t the code that assesses student performance; it’s the worthiness of the readings and the clarity of the math questions being presented onscreen. “People are very focussed on the algorithm,” he said. “But equally important is the quality of the materials.”

The gap between AltSchool’s ambitions for technology and the reality of the classroom was painfully obvious the morning that I spent in the Brooklyn school. One kindergartner grew increasingly frustrated with his tablet as he tried to take a photograph of interlocking cubes that he had snapped into a strip of ten. (He was supposed to upload the image to his playlist.) He shook the unresponsive tablet, then stabbed repeatedly at the screen, like an exhausted passenger in a cab after an overnight flight, unable to quell the Taxi TV.

Even when AltSchool’s methods worked as intended, there were sometimes questionable results. The two girls whom I watched searching for seals on Google Images found plenty of suitable photographs. But the same search term called up a news photo of the corpse of a porpoise, its blood blossoming in the water after being rent almost in half by a seal attack. It also called up an image in which the head of Seal, the singer, had been Photoshopped onto a sea lion’s body—an object of much fascination to the students. To the extent that this exercise was preparing them for the workplace of the future, it was also dispiritingly familiar from the workplace of the present, where the rabbit holes of the Internet offer perpetual temptation."



"There had been some bumpy moments for the Palo Alto school, which opened last fall. One family left after concluding that there wasn’t enough homework. Other parents wanted to know the curriculum in advance—an impossible demand in a school dedicated to following children’s interests. A look around the classrooms confirmed that for some children the ability to follow their own passions reaped rich dividends. I observed the kindergarten-and-first-grade classroom during afternoon “choice time,” and saw two children separately involved in complicated long-term projects. A seven-year-old boy with an avid interest in American history had built a dining-table-sized model of Fort Sumter out of cardboard—he was painting black-splotch windows on its perimeter. He had also composed a storybook about Paul Revere, which was vibrantly written, if impressionistically spelled. Another seven-year-old boy had undertaken a physics experiment, building two styles of catapult out of tongue depressors and tape. He was measuring their power with the help of a yardstick affixed to the wall, and recording the data in a notebook. The AltSchool environment—and an inspiring young teacher named Paul France—had liberated these children’s individual creativity and intellectual curiosity in just the way that the parents of a potential Elon Musk might hope.

The boys’ classmates, however, had made less demanding use of their choice time, and this had apparently allowed the teaching staff to provide the necessary support for the more ambitious projects. Four boys were seated on the floor making primitive catapults with Jenga blocks. Half a dozen girls had chosen “art creation,” and were sitting around a table affixing stickers to paper and chatting. One girl had opted to work in clay. But no students had chosen to engage in dramatic play, or to work at the light table, or to do jigsaw puzzles—options that were displayed on a wall chart. The remaining eight children—six boys and two girls—had selected “tablet time.” They were sitting around a table, each with headphones on, expertly swiping and clicking their way through word or number games. Their quiet immersion would be recognizable to any parent who has ever bought herself a moment’s peace from the demands of interacting with her child by opening Angry Birds on her phone."



"When the AltSchool technologists who participated in the December hackathon shared their discoveries at the end of the session, the team that had focussed on bookmarking video seemed particularly pleased with its innovations. The team had decided to try to find a “fun route” to help … [more]
altschool  education  schools  2016  children  learning  pedagogy  amplify  teachtoone  brooklyn  paloalto  maxventilla  surveillance  standardization  blendedlearning  howweteach  howwelearn  automation  technology  edtech  sanfrancisco  gender  siliconvalley  commoncore  standards  brainpop 
march 2016 by robertogreco
The Octavia Project | Indiegogo
[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gZnUlB0uz4 ]

"We use sci-fi to encourage Brooklyn girls to dream big and empower them to design their own futures.
“Hard times are coming when we will be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now.” —Ursula K. Le Guin at the National Book Awards

Young people are already envisioning, writing, and creating alternative ways of living, but they need to be given the space, the encouragement, the platform, and the tools to make it happen. With your help, the Octavia Project will bring this opportunity to young women from Brooklyn's under-served neighborhoods. These girls have important, world-altering stories living inside them, but without the support and space to flesh them out, these narratives may languish away in the purgatory of good ideas.

We want to use girls’ passion in sci-fi, fantasy, and fan-fiction to teach them skills in science, technology, art, and writing, equipping them with skills to dream and build new futures for themselves and their communities. Our inspiration and namesake is Octavia E. Butler, who broke barriers in writing and science fiction to become an award-winning and internationally recognized author (Kindred, Lilith's Brood). We are inspired by her visions of possible futures and commitment to social justice.

Twelve girls, ages 13-18, will participate in this free summer program. In the first workshop a girl might develop her story set two thousand years in the future. In the next workshop, she works with a professional architect to engineer a physical model of her own imaginary future city. In another workshop, girls might learn to code a simple program that morphs their names into strange aliases that inspire fictional adventures. Or they’ll learn the basics of circuits and light up the pages of their work with LEDs. They might even use Twine, an interactive storytelling platform, to share their narratives with the world.

No matter the final curriculum, our girls will have access to women working in science and tech, internship and online publishing opportunities, and college-aged mentors.

The Octavia Project is the brainchild of a robotics teacher, Meghan McNamara, and a science fiction author, Chana Porter."
scifi  sciencefiction  octaviabutler  girls  stem  education  octaviaproject  dreaming  thinking  futurism  dreams  children  youth  brooklyn  nyc  lcproject  openstudioproject  learning  imagination  fantasy  fanfiction  maghanmcnamara  chanaporter  teaching  howwelearn  ursulaleguin 
may 2015 by robertogreco
FACETS
"An interdisciplinary creative coding, interactive art, and videogames un-conference.

FACETS is a conversational based creative un-conference with a focus on underrepresented voices and demographics in STEM and art."



"MISSION STATEMENT

FACETS grew out out of a need for a new type of conference and a new type of conversation. Art, interactive technology, new media and game design are making innovative, beautiful things and are using similar tools and having similar, ground breaking discoveries and conversations but not with each other. What can a game designer learn from the linear mathematics used from procedurally generated music? What can the new media academic teach the creative technologist? How does technology inform storytelling, and how will video game design change cinema? The aim of FACETS is to create a cross disciplinary conference that facilitates conversation, mentorship, innovation, and ideation across these disciplines. We all make amazing things, let's make them together.

Organized by Caroline Sinders and created by Caroline Sinders, Mohini Freya Dutta, Phoenix Perry, and Jane Friedhoff, FACETS started out of a frustration with a lack of places to discuss interactive art, media, and game design, particularly with talented and underrepresented demographics in STEM."
facets  events  nyc  brooklyn  2015  coding  art  videogames  unconferences  carolinesinders  janefriedhoff  phoenixperry  mohinidutta  rachelbinx  sarahjaffe  paoolopedercini  ingridburrington  joannemcneil 
april 2015 by robertogreco
In Brooklyn, gentrification wipes out pigeons and chickens to make room for cats and dogs | Money | The Guardian
"Gentrification of inner-city neighborhoods into pseudo-suburbs have created a line between the haves and the have-nots"

[See also: http://gothamist.com/2015/03/21/photos_lamb.php ]
brooklyn  animals  cats  dogs  chickens  pigeons  birds  2014  pets  nyc 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Lamb Spotted Lunching with Diners at Greenpoint Restaurant - Greenpoint - DNAinfo.com New York
"Hopefully they didn't order the lamb.

A man and woman were spotted by a local resident bringing a lamb to lunch at Greenpoint restaurant Five Leaves Tuesday afternoon.

Animals technically aren't allowed inside the popular eatery, but the diners kept the baby sheep outside on their laps, said Five Leaves employee Peter Demos.

People sometimes bring in their dogs, but it's the first time Demo has seen something like this at the 18 Bedford Ave. restaurant, he said.

Other diners "ooed" and "awed" at the little guy, which didn't make noise and didn't eat, Demos explained.

"They were like, 'Wow it's a lamb'," he said. "It was like a baby."

The customer who brought the lamb with him used to be a regular at the restaurant, but he hadn't come in for a long time and had never brought a lamb with him before, Demos said.

Greenpoint resident Nick Ramsey, 34, tweeted a photo of the furry fella when he spotted it on the way to work on Tuesday. His first thought was, "Doesn't this restaurant also serve lamb?"

The eatery does dish up a lamb pho dip sandwich, which features roasted lamb leg, rillettes, pickled jicama and an orange-anise consomme dip, but it was unclear if the man ordered the item, according to Demos.

"Just, also, 'why do you have a lamb?'" asked Ramsey, who noted that this type of sighting didn't surprise him in Brooklyn.

He and other locals joked about the possibility of eating the creature, though his friends and co-workers later pointed out that perhaps it was being used for knitting.

"Maybe there’s an artisanal yarn movement that I’m not aware of," Ramsey said.

It's not unheard of for New Yorkers to bring unusual animals to restaurants. A goat was spotted with a couple at Famous Famiglia restaurant in Midtown in 2012, munching on a spinach slice.

Still, Demos wasn't that impressed with the lamb.

"I was just like, 'It's a lamb.' I don't really care," he said. "Someone in Brooklyn has this f----ng thing they're doing.""
sheep  lambs  animals  pets  brooklyn  2015  greenpoint  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations  multispecies 
march 2015 by robertogreco
ruby amanze
"ruby onyinyechi amanze is a Brooklyn based artist of Nigerian birth 
and British upbringing. her drawings and works on paper have been influenced greatly by this cultural hybridity, as well as textile design, photography, print-making and architecture.
 amanze graduated Summa Cum Laude from Tyler School of Art, Temple University in Philadelphia. she then went on to pursue a M.F.A at Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.



amanze has exhibited her work in numerous exhibitions in New York,
 London, Ghana, Lagos, Philadelphia and Amsterdam. most recently, amanze was
 awarded a 2012-13 Fulbright Scholars Award, to join the 
Department of Fine and Applied Arts at the University of Nigeria, 
Nsukka. she currently resides in Brooklyn where she maintains a full time studio practice."



"In a once conflicted space of neither here not there, ada the Alien and her cohort of kindred creatures [including audre the Leopard, Pidgin, Twin, Oyibo the Merman, ofunne & the Ghosts…] now find solace and empowerment in their self constructed, chimeric universe of hybridity and freedom. Exhibiting human, alien and animal characteristics, they navigate effortlessly through an intergalactic space and time. Ranging in size from hand held to immersive, these drawings reflect the layered experiences of a growing population of “in-betweeners” and global citizens, whose fluid identity is not grounded in a monolithic geography or permanence based, notion of home. Aliens, hybrids and ghosts is a non-linear narrative that celebrates the labyrinth of national, ethnic and sexual identities that exist somewhere between constructed reality, fantasy, memory and imagination. In this world, creatures find authenticity and wholeness in their ability to simultaneously belong nowhere and everywhere."

[See also:
http://www.okayafrica.com/news/no-such-place-edward-tyler-nahem-fine-art-new-york-city/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvhZLbdjRvQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RexNXjrzrKI
https://vimeo.com/70056081 ]
rubyonyinyechiamanze  art  artists  africa  nigeria  nyc  brooklyn  space  aliens  in-betweeners  permanence  geography  home  hybrids  authenticity  wholeness  belonging  identity  memory  fantasy  globalcitizens  ghosts  rubyamanze 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Laundromat Project
"Mission & Vision

We amplify the creativity that already exists within communities by using arts and culture to build community networks, solve problems, and enhance our sense of ownership in the places where we live, work, and grow.

We envision a world in which artists are understood as valuable assets in every community and everyday people know the power of their own creative capacity to transform their lives, their relationships, and their surroundings.

Theory of Change

The Laundromat Project believes art, culture, and engaged imaginations can change the way people see their world, open them up to new ideas, and connect them with their neighbors. When artists have the opportunity to build and contribute their unique skills and perspectives to the needs of their neighborhoods, they can be invaluable assets in furthering community wellbeing. When the skills and strategies for igniting creativity are made broadly available to everyday people and purposefully applied as tools for visioning a new and better world, these can be powerful forces for positive, transformative change. We know we have been successful when, over time, our neighbors—artists and everyday people, newcomers and old-timers, individually and collectively—become more involved in the civic and cultural affairs of their communities, feel more deeply connected to the places and people where they live and work, and bring a sense of creativity to community concerns.

Values

The Laundromat Project achieves its mission by bringing socially relevant and socially engaged arts programming to laundromats and other everyday community spaces in order to reach as many of our neighbors as possible. We are particularly committed to long-term and sustained investment in communities of color as well as those living on modest incomes.

As we strive to achieve our mission and embody our vision, the following values infuse all of our work. We are:

Creative Catalysts
We see artists as unique connectors who build bridges among disparate ideas, cultures, and points of view. Their ability to bring unconventional perspectives and creative solutions to challenges and situations makes artists dynamic and powerful assets in our communities.

Community-Centered
We believe that creativity is best activated where people already are—such as their local laundromat and other everyday spaces—and while addressing the issues we care about most.

Neighborly
We believe arts, culture, and creative expression are powerful engines for turning strangers into neighbors. A community of neighbors helps make the strong, resilient communities in which we all deserve to live. We strive to be good neighbors always.

People Powered
We are inspired by the diverse, creative, passionate people with whom we work. Even when we face the challenges of inequity or injustice—be they driven by race, class, gender, education, or geography/environment—we believe in the inherent, creative capacity of us all to dream a new world and bring it into being.

Active Listeners and Learners
We do our best work when we listen to understand and learn, not just to hear or recite. Furthermore, learning, like creativity, requires a willingness to experiment, reconsider, and refine. These two skills are cornerstones for creating positive, transformative change.

Collaborative and Cross-Pollinating by Design
We believe in the full creative force of our communities to solve challenges and envision new ways of being. This is powered by working collectively and leveraging the wide-spectrum of experiences, knowledge, and skills each community member brings to and across the table.

Propelled by Love
Our work is fueled by a love of our communities, the principles of justice, and a joy powerful enough to help shape the world we dream of together. Love is a radical and essential tool of power and protest. We embrace it."
art  nyc  brooklyn  bed-stuy  laundry  socialpracticeart  public  lcproject  openstudioproject  everyday  laundromats  community  collaboration  workinginpublic 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Library as Infrastructure
"For millennia libraries have acquired resources, organized them, preserved them and made them accessible (or not) to patrons. But the forms of those resources have changed — from scrolls and codices; to LPs and LaserDiscs; to e-books, electronic databases and open data sets. Libraries have had at least to comprehend, if not become a key node within, evolving systems of media production and distribution. Consider the medieval scriptoria where manuscripts were produced; the evolution of the publishing industry and book trade after Gutenberg; the rise of information technology and its webs of wires, protocols and regulations. 1 At every stage, the contexts — spatial, political, economic, cultural — in which libraries function have shifted; so they are continuously reinventing themselves and the means by which they provide those vital information services.

Libraries have also assumed a host of ever-changing social and symbolic functions. They have been expected to symbolize the eminence of a ruler or state, to integrally link “knowledge” and “power” — and, more recently, to serve as “community centers,” “public squares” or “think tanks.” Even those seemingly modern metaphors have deep histories. The ancient Library of Alexandria was a prototypical think tank, 2 and the early Carnegie buildings of the 1880s were community centers with swimming pools and public baths, bowling alleys, billiard rooms, even rifle ranges, as well as book stacks. 3 As the Carnegie funding program expanded internationally — to more than 2,500 libraries worldwide — secretary James Bertram standardized the design in his 1911 pamphlet “Notes on the Erection of Library Buildings,” which offered grantees a choice of six models, believed to be the work of architect Edward Tilton. Notably, they all included a lecture room.

In short, the library has always been a place where informational and social infrastructures intersect within a physical infrastructure that (ideally) supports that program.

Now we are seeing the rise of a new metaphor: the library as “platform” — a buzzy word that refers to a base upon which developers create new applications, technologies and processes. In an influential 2012 article in Library Journal, David Weinberger proposed that we think of libraries as “open platforms” — not only for the creation of software, but also for the development of knowledge and community. 4 Weinberger argued that libraries should open up their entire collections, all their metadata, and any technologies they’ve created, and allow anyone to build new products and services on top of that foundation. The platform model, he wrote, “focuses our attention away from the provisioning of resources to the foment” — the “messy, rich networks of people and ideas” — that “those resources engender.” Thus the ancient Library of Alexandria, part of a larger museum with botanical gardens, laboratories, living quarters and dining halls, was a platform not only for the translation and copying of myriad texts and the compilation of a magnificent collection, but also for the launch of works by Euclid, Archimedes, Eratosthenes and their peers."



"Partly because of their skill in reaching populations that others miss, libraries have recently reported record circulation and visitation, despite severe budget cuts, decreased hours and the threatened closure or sale of “underperforming” branches. 9 Meanwhile the Pew Research Center has released a series of studies about the materials and services Americans want their libraries to provide. Among the findings: 90 percent of respondents say the closure of their local public library would have an impact on their community, and 63 percent describe that impact as “major.”"



"Again, we need to look to the infrastructural ecology — the larger network of public services and knowledge institutions of which each library is a part. How might towns, cities and regions assess what their various public (and private) institutions are uniquely qualified and sufficiently resourced to do, and then deploy those resources most effectively? Should we regard the library as the territory of the civic mind and ask other social services to attend to the civic body? The assignment of social responsibility isn’t so black and white — nor are the boundaries between mind and body, cognition and affect — but libraries do need to collaborate with other institutions to determine how they leverage the resources of the infrastructural ecology to serve their publics, with each institution and organization contributing what it’s best equipped to contribute — and each operating with a clear sense of its mission and obligation."



"Libraries need to stay focused on their long-term cultural goals — which should hold true regardless of what Google decides to do tomorrow — and on their place within the larger infrastructural ecology. They also need to consider how their various infrastructural identities map onto each other, or don’t. Can an institution whose technical and physical infrastructure is governed by the pursuit of innovation also fulfill its obligations as a social infrastructure serving the disenfranchised? What ethics are embodied in the single-minded pursuit of “the latest” technologies, or the equation of learning with entrepreneurialism?

As Zadie Smith argued beautifully in the New York Review of Books, we risk losing the library’s role as a “different kind of social reality (of the three dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal.” Barbara Fister, a librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, offered an equally eloquent plea for the library as a space of exception:
Libraries are not, or at least should not be, engines of productivity. If anything, they should slow people down and seduce them with the unexpected, the irrelevant, the odd and the unexplainable. Productivity is a destructive way to justify the individual’s value in a system that is naturally communal, not an individualistic or entrepreneurial zero-sum game to be won by the most industrious.


Libraries, she argued, “will always be at a disadvantage” to Google and Amazon because they value privacy; they refuse to exploit users’ private data to improve the search experience. Yet libraries’ failure to compete in efficiency is what affords them the opportunity to offer a “different kind of social reality.” I’d venture that there is room for entrepreneurial learning in the library, but there also has to be room for that alternate reality where knowledge needn’t have monetary value, where learning isn’t driven by a profit motive. We can accommodate both spaces for entrepreneurship and spaces of exception, provided the institution has a strong epistemic framing that encompasses both. This means that the library needs to know how to read itself as a social-technical-intellectual infrastructure."



"In libraries like BiblioTech — and the Digital Public Library of America — the collection itself is off-site. Do patrons wonder where, exactly, all those books and periodicals and cloud-based materials live? What’s under, or floating above, the “platform”? Do they think about the algorithms that lead them to particular library materials, and the conduits and protocols through which they access them? Do they consider what it means to supplant bookstacks with server stacks — whose metal racks we can’t kick, lights we can’t adjust, knobs we can’t fiddle with? Do they think about the librarians negotiating access licenses and adding metadata to “digital assets,” or the engineers maintaining the servers? With the increasing recession of these technical infrastructures — and the human labor that supports them — further off-site, behind the interface, deeper inside the black box, how can we understand the ways in which those structures structure our intellect and sociality?

We need to develop — both among library patrons and librarians themselves — new critical capacities to understand the distributed physical, technical and social architectures that scaffold our institutions of knowledge and program our values. And we must consider where those infrastructures intersect — where they should be, and perhaps aren’t, mutually reinforcing one another. When do our social obligations compromise our intellectual aspirations, or vice versa? And when do those social or intellectual aspirations for the library exceed — or fail to fully exploit — the capacities of our architectural and technological infrastructures? Ultimately, we need to ensure that we have a strong epistemological framework — a narrative that explains how the library promotes learning and stewards knowledge — so that everything hangs together, so there’s some institutional coherence. We need to sync the library’s intersecting infrastructures so that they work together to support our shared intellectual and ethical goals."
shannonmattern  2014  libraries  infrastructure  access  accessibility  services  government  civics  librarians  information  ethics  community  makerspaces  privacy  safety  learning  openstudioproject  education  lcproject  zadiesmith  barbarafister  seattle  nyc  pittsburgh  culture  google  neoliberalism  knowledge  diversity  inequality  coworking  brooklyn  nypl  washingtondc  architecture  design  hackerlabs  hackerspaces  annebalsamo  technology  chicago  ncsu  books  mexicocity  mexicodf  davidadjaye  social  socialinfrastructure  ala  intellectualfreedom  freedom  democracy  publicgood  public  lifelonglearning  saltlakecity  marellusturner  partnerships  toyoito  refuge  cities  ericklinenberg  economics  amazon  disparity  mediaproduction  readwrite  melvildewey  df 
december 2014 by robertogreco
The Good School | Animating Art Education
"The Good School is a mobile arts education school that cultivates commercial and traditional art making skills and technological understanding via stop motion animation filmmaking.

Our classes range from customized stop motion animation workshops to New Method Master Classes taught by working artist professionals. Integrating drawing, painting, sculpting, and design with technology, students learn by doing in a collaborative environment. TGS brings all necessary equipment and supplies to each lesson, enabling us to accomplish any project within varied spaces and flexible time frames.

We are committed to working with our clients to provide customized, personal animation workshop experiences that meet the artistic and educational goals of everyone with which we work.

The Good School believes in a wholistic art making experience that utilizes the cooperative process of stop motion animation film making. This allows participants of all ages to experience the roles of artist, teacher and professional.

Not only do we celebrate art education as a means of teaching traditional art making skills but we also emphasize its ability to impart creative thinking and strategic problem solving skills needed to participate, collaborate and innovate in the global community today and tomorrow.

Our clients include children, ages 5 to 18, students with special needs, home school co-ops, educators, creative agers and veterans. Scroll down to meet The Good School’s founders and teaching artists!"
art  education  learning  nyc  brooklyn  lcproject  openstudioproject 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Beam Center
"Beam Center is a Brooklyn-based community of learning where artists guide young creators aged 6 to 18. Our hands-on programs in technology, imagination and craft help young people build their character, courage to think for themselves, and capacity for collaboration and invention.

The Beam Center grew out of the Inventgenuity Festival, which we first held in 2010 at Brooklyn's Invisible Dog Art Center to introduce families to Beam Camp. The popularity of that event led us to build a set of interconnected programs in New York that all share the basic philosophy of Beam, which celebrates the special alchemy between instructors who are passionate experts in their craft and young people who are given space and encouragement to invent and create.

Beam Center's core programs are Inventgenuity Workshops, after-school programs for young people in grades 2-6; BeamWorks, in which teams of high school students collaborate with master practitioners of design, craft and engineering; and the WindowShop Residency, which offers artists both a high-visibility storefront space and an opportunity to share how they make things with the kids of the Beam Center community. We also host community events where kids and artists learn from each other.

Most programs take place at our large street-level space at 47 Bergen Street in Brooklyn, between Smith and Boerum Streets. We're half a block from the F and G at Bergen Street, and a ten-minute walk from the 2/3/4/5/N/R at Borough Hall."

[See also: http://www.beamcamp.com/

"Beam Camp is a place where kids collaborate, build, and engage with adults who are passionate about their craft, and it has since inspired their founding of the Beam Center and BeamWorks. Brian now devotes his full energies to the running of all things Beam, including overseeing the Center’s strategic vision with Danny, fostering community partnerships, and directing the BeamWorks Internship Program." ]
brooklyn  nyc  lcproject  openstudioproject  art  design  beamcenter  colearning  invention  learning  education  makers  via:blubirding 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The Hunt for Brooklyn's Hidden Creeks | Motherboard
"The morning's goal is get pictures of the whole lawn and then to look at the vegetation. Nature can be built over, but it can't be stopped, and the long-buried waterways are still written on the surface in grass. The type of grass growing reveals the soil below, where the patterns of the historic streams persist. Although unseen, they're still adding to the Gowanus watershed through combined sewers, much to the detriment of the water and the health of those who would enjoy it.

“Combined sewers have limited capacities, and when it rains, they overflow poop and condoms into our Canal where we canoe,” he says. “By getting clean stream water out of the sewers, and diverting them to parks, and Street Creeks, we can improve the water quality.”

So Eymund has been mapping Brooklyn's cryptocreeks upstream from the canal, a David Livingstone venturing into the past. Instead of working for the crown, he's working with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, helping them find places to implement their Green Infrastructure Plan. He wants to bridge the local expertise, which in this case is property owners whose basements are always flooding, with the EPA's clean-up efforts in Gowanus. As the canal is paying for the whole borough, the clean-up has to involve the whole borough, creating a more sustainable, greener Brooklyn."



"That day's plan is to send the balloon aloft carrying two regular point-and-shoot digital cameras, like everyone had before smartphones, that are hacked to take pictures every 10 seconds. Though the whole endeavor is designed to be both cheap and sustainable—the eight- and 12-megapixel cameras were ten-buck rescues from the e-waste warehouse on Nevin Street, by the canal—Eymund excitedly tells us we'll be using a new balloon to look for where the creeks were buried."
maps  mapping  nature  urban  urbanism  2014  brooklyn  gowanus  aerialphotography  balloons  classideas  projectideas  nyc 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Snarkitecture
"Snarkitecture is a collaborative practice operating in territories between the disciplines of art and architecture. Working within existing spaces or in collaboration with other artists and designers, the practice focuses on the investigation of structure, material and program and how these elements can be manipulated to serve new and imaginative purposes. Searching for sites within architecture with the possibility for confusion or misuse, Snarkitecture aims to make architecture perform the unexpected.

Snarkitecture was established by Alex Mustonen and Daniel Arsham."
architecture  art  design  snarkitecture  alexmustonen  danielarsham  brooklyn  nyc 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Workspace of: Makeshift Society in NYC | VSCO
"Makeshift Society provides multi-faceted workspaces in both San Francisco and New York City that are geared towards entrepreneurs, creatives, and freelancers. A little while back, we featured Makeshift Society’s San Francisco location on the Journal, which you can view here. Since then, they successfully funded a Kickstarter of $30,000 for seeding a New York coworking space, and just recently, they finished building out the gorgeous 4,000 square foot workspace, which is located in a hundred year old pencil factory in Brooklyn.

For the configuration of their New York workspace, Makeshift Society created an open, airy, and bright layout that utilizes the large warehouse windows and vaulted ceilings. There are plenty of cozy corners, quiet areas, and meeting rooms where members can discuss privately with clients and collaborators. A range of options for membership, from a single day pass up to a full-time, 5 day a week plan, allows for individuals to create a schedule suitable to their needs.

In celebration of the completion of their New York workspace, Makeshift Society is throwing an open house with refreshments, demos, and talks on Wednesday, June 4th from 9am - 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. If you would like to attend the event, make sure to reserve a spot here as spaces are limited.

We were very excited to interview Makeshift Society regarding their beautiful and functional new space. Read on below to learn more about the differences between their New York and San Francisco spaces and the types of creatives they house. All of the wonderful images documenting their simple, inspiring, and warm workspace were taken by Noah Sahady and processed using VSCO Film 04."
makeschiftsociety  nyc  brooklyn  coworking  workplace  design  interiors  lcproject  openstudioproject  2014  via:nicolefenton  furniture  workspace  workspaces 
june 2014 by robertogreco
The peril of hipster economics - Opinion - Al Jazeera English
"In a sweeping analysis of displacement in San Francisco and its increasingly impoverished suburbs, journalist Adam Hudson notes that "gentrification is trickle-down economics applied to urban development: the idea being that as long as a neighbourhood is made suitable for rich and predominantly white people, the benefits will trickle down to everyone else". Like trickle-down economics itself, this theory does not play out in practice.

Rich cities such as New York and San Francisco have become what journalist Simon Kuper calls gated citadels: "Vast gated communities where the one percent reproduces itself."

Struggling US cities of the rust belt and heartland lack the investment of coastal contemporaries, but have in turn been spared the rapid displacement of hipster economics. Buffered by their eternal uncoolness, these slow-changing cities have a chance to make better choices - choices that value the lives of people over the aesthetics of place.

In an April blog post, Umar Lee, a St Louis writer and full-time taxi driver, bemoaned the economic model of rideshare services, which are trying to establish themselves in the city. Noting that they hurt not only taxi drivers but poor residents who have neither cars nor public transport and thus depend on taxis willing to serve dangerous neighbourhoods, he dismisses Uber and Lyft as hipster elitists masquerading as innovators:

"I've heard several young hipsters tell me they're socially-liberal and economic-conservative, a popular trend in American politics," he writes. "Well, I hate to break it to you buddy, but it's economics and the role of the state that defines politics. If you're an economic conservative, despite how ironic and sarcastic you may be or how tight your jeans are, you, my friend, are a conservative …"

Lee tells me he has his own plan to try to mitigate the negative effects of gentrification, which he calls "50-50-20-15". All employers who launch businesses in gentrifying neighbourhoods should have a workforce that is at least 50 percent minorities, 50 percent people from the local neighbourhood, and 20 percent ex-offenders. The employees should be paid at least $15 per hour.

Gentrification spreads the myth of native incompetence: That people need to be imported to be important, that a sign of a neighbourhood's "success" is the removal of its poorest residents. True success lies in giving those residents the services and opportunities they have long been denied.

When neighbourhoods experience business development, priority in hiring should go to locals who have long struggled to find nearby jobs that pay a decent wage. Let us learn from the mistakes of New York and San Francisco, and build cities that reflect more than surface values."
cities  class  gentrification  hipsters  race  economics  inequality  redevelopment  sanfrancisco  nyc  brooklyn  poverty  adamhudson  sarahkendzior  spikelee  katharinagrosse  whitewashing  simonkuper  segregation  rustbelt 
may 2014 by robertogreco
In His Words | Stillness in the Move
"I love dancing, and I especially love being in a club at 2 a.m., when one or three drinks, good company and a gifted D.J. collectively liberate me into my body. The place could be Barbès in Park Slope, where old-school Guinean grooves silver the air, or perhaps I’m at Windfall in Midtown, enjoying the latest Nigerian Afrobeats and Congolese ndombolo. Wherever it is, I stop my habitual overthinking and become, quite simply, a body in the half-dark.

But this is not the highlight of such evenings, for afterward is the journey home to Brooklyn. From the back seat of a taxi, the city unfurls before me as a series of illuminated sights. If we go down the West Side Highway, we’ll pass by the apparition of One World Trade and enter the Tarkovsky-like glow of the Battery Tunnel. If we take the F.D.R., there’s the jeweler’s display of the bridges: Williamsburg, Manhattan, Brooklyn, all those dreamy rows of diamonds. At such moments, the city is mine alone: its immensity, its beauty, its clear streets, its silent waterways. It is open in a way daylight would never permit. I lose myself in it and belong to it, a happiness no less real for being so fleeting."
2014  tejucole  happiness  music  nyc  brooklyn  night  thinking  overthinking  slow  ephemeral  ephemerality 
february 2014 by robertogreco
DJ Ushka | deejay, global bass, one half of iBomba (Brooklyn), Dutty Artz
"Ushka is a Sri Lankan-born, Thailand-raised, Brooklyn-living migrant. She is an activist, cultural organizer, and deejay re-defining the boundaries between global bass music, culture, and organizing.

As an organizer and cultural activist, she put together the Beyond the Block festival as part of Dutty Artz in 2012, which brought together community leaders, youth, immigrant organizations, artists and DJs in a block party-style vibe in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. In a months-long process, Ushka facilitated the creation of a space difficult to find in immigrant neighborhoods often ignored by New York City, providing a means for some of Brooklyn’s Sunset Park and Bayridge residents (Chinese, Arab, Mexican, and more) to access important information around current immigration policies, as well as know-your-rights and housing resources while at the same time creating an artistic and musical environment for cross-community interaction.

As a deejay, she is one half of iBomba – one of NYC’s premiere destinations for global bass every second Thursday of the month at Bembe (81 South 6th St, Brooklyn). She is also a part of the Dutty Artz label + crew, a collective of djs + producers creating sonic cultural production and events in NYC. Having grown up in several parts of the world, her musical influences are as transnational as she is. She deejays from the perspective of a dancer, blending a wide range of music from soca to cumbia, hip hop to south asian rhythms, kuduro and other african styles to samba, for a wide audience. She does so with the philosophy that global genre-blending connects cross-cultural struggles and tells important stories between communities but most importantly, she translates this onto dancefloors.
Her debut mixtape, entitled ‘Foreign Brown‘ was well received, reaching over 6,300 listens in a few months. It was profiled in Sounds and Colours reaching audiences in North America, South America, and the United Kingdom.

Ushka has deejayed at iBomba at Bembe, Dutty Artz Change the Mood at Glasslands Gallery, Azucar at One Last Shag, Anthology of Booty’s Backdoor party at Tropicalia, D.C. and Que Bajo at Tammany Hall. She was also an opening DJ for Q-Tip at SRB Brooklyn. Other venues she has deejayed at include SOBs in Manhattan, Gallery Bar in the Lower East Side, Public Assembly in Williamburgs, and Caracas Arepas Bar in the Rockaways. She is expected to perform in Boston and Chicago in the coming months."

[See also:
https://twitter.com/ty_ushka
https://soundcloud.com/djushka
http://djushka.tumblr.com/
http://opencitymag.com/always-foreign-always-brown/
http://www.duttyartz.com/blog/mixes/6-years-deep-what-edward-said-ep-mix/ ]
djushka  music  nyc  ibomba  brooklyn 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Ellie Irons
"I am an interdisciplinary artist exploring the interplay of humanity and ecology through drawings, environmental sculpture, and electronic media. Born in rural Northern California, I went to college in Los Angeles, where I studied art and environmental science. After falling in love with biology field work, I began combining ecology with art. I relocated to New York City in 2005, and completed my MFA at Hunter College in fall 2009. I now teach and keep a studio in Bushwick, Brooklyn."
art  artists  biology  ecology  brooklyn  interdisciplinary 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Duke Riley :: Artist + Patriot
"My work addresses the prospect of residual but forgotten unclaimed frontiers on the edge and inside overdeveloped urban areas, and their unsuspected autonomy. I am interested in the struggle of marginal peoples to sustain independent spaces within all-encompassing societies, the tension between individual and collective behavior, the conflict with institutional power. I pursue an alternative view of hidden borderlands and their inhabitants through drawing, printmaking, mosaic, sculpture, performative interventions, and video structured as complex multimedia installations.

I often work in the tradition of field naturalists, seeking and gathering data, artifacts, and specimens outdoors, transporting them inside for closer observation and study, displaying them in museum-like diorama settings. I combine populist myths and reinvented historical obscurities with contemporary social dilemmas, connecting past and present, drawing attention to unsolved issues. Throughout my projects I profile the space where water meets the land, traditionally marking the periphery of urban society, what lies beyond rigid moral constructs, a sense of danger and possibility."

[via: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/17/arts/design/avian-artistry-with-smuggled-cigars.html ]
art  artists  brooklyn  dukeriley  outdoors  frontiers  borders  urban  autonomy  margins  macollectivebehavior  borderlands 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Occupational Art School • Please join us Wednesday, September 26th at...
"Occupational Art School (OAS) is a start up art school in Bushwick, Brooklyn, born out of the arts and culture committee at the hieght of  the occupy movement. The overall approach is to combine a self-educational salon with some of the sustainable urban strategies expressed in the Buckminster Fuller Challenge. After doing a visioning process and researching similar endeavors like Black Mountain College, 3rd Ward, Eyebeam and Bruce High Quality, it became clear that there is no single place that allows one to develop a holistic approach to being an artist in the city in the way we are envisioning. You do your urban farming in one neighborhood, showcase and sell your handmade wares in another and go back to your studio to produce your artwork for a gallery showing, all disconnected. OAS is a one-stop shop for integrating art practice and a sustainable lifestyle in such a way that is regenerative – an artist centric enterprise with a strong educational component provided by its members/participants. Influencing projects from the Buckminster Fuller Challenge include Plant Chicago, Brooklyn Farm Yards and Santa Fe Innovation Park. Courses started in August 2012."

[See also: http://occupationalartschool.com/post/32344560754/oas-conference-call-notes-september2012 ]
oas  occupationalartschool  ows  occupywallstreet  altgdp  arteducation  nyc  brooklyn  jenjoyroybal  bmc  blackmountaincollege 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Progressive Elementary and Middle School | Brooklyn, NY | Greene Hill School
"Founded in 2009, Greene Hill School is an independent elementary and middle school serving the need of the Fort Greene/Clinton Hill and surrounding Brooklyn communities for progressive and affordable education."
schools  brooklyn  fortgreen  clintonhill  education  via:maryannreilly  progressive  nyc 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Interference Archive
"Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. This work manifests in public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements by the participants themselves: posters, flyers, publications, photographs, books, T-shirts and buttons, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation. As an archive from below, we are a collectively run space that stresses the use of our collection over its preservation, offers open stacks and accessibility for all, works in collaboration with like-minded projects, and encourages critical as well as creative engagements with our own histories.

The archive is all volunteer and relies on the help of many people. We welcome you to get involved.

Core collective:
Kevin Caplicki, Molly Fair, Josh MacPhee, Cindy Milstein, and Blithe Riley"

[Profiled in the NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/21/nyregion/the-activism-files.html?pagewanted=all ]
interferencearchive  posters  archives  resistance  socialmovements  activism  gowanus  brooklyn  kavincaplicki  mollyfair  joshmacphee  cindymilstein  blitheriley  culture 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Hive NYC Learning Network
[From the about page, which also includes a great directory of organizations.]

"Hive NYC Learning Network is a Mozilla project that was founded through The MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative to fuel collaborations between cultural organizations to create new learning pathways and innovative education practices together. Hive NYC is composed of fifty-six non-profit organizations—museums, libraries, after-school clubs and informal learning spaces—that create Connected Learning opportunities for youth. Network members have access to funding to support this work through The Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust.

Core Beliefs:
• School is not the sole provider in a community’s educational system
• Youth need to be both sophisticated consumers and active producers of digital media
• Learning should be driven by youth’s interests
• Digital media and technology are the glue and amplifier for connected learning experiences
• Out-of-school time spaces are fertile grounds for learning innovation
• Organizations must collaborate to thrive

Hive NYC operates as a city-based learning lab, where members network with each other, share best practices and pedagogies, learn about and play with new technologies, participate in events, and most importantly, collaborate to create learning opportunities for NYC youth. As part of the network, members have access to the following support and services:

• Strategic guidance in seeking funding through the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in the New York Community Trust
• Brokered connections between member organizations based on shared ideas and potential programs
• Participation in events in and beyond New York City that illustrate the work of network members and promote Connected Learning principles, digital literacy AND webmaking skills
• Access to involvement with the NYC Department of Education and others seeking to build experimental and/or sustainable partnerships with Hive NYC
• Opportunity to promote new, programs and events through Hive NYC communications channels (blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc.), as well as youth and volunteer recruitment
• A knowledge exchange for members to share models, ideas, content, tools and best-practices with each other
• Professional Development sessions that develop staff through network peer mentoring, modeling and sharing
• Monthly, in-person meet-ups and conference calls that allow for members to share program updates, best practices, and learn about new opportunities
• Additional seed funding for technology development, research, etc.

Each year, more than 6,000 tweens and teens across NYC directly engage with Hive NYC. These youth take part in projects funded by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust, private and community events, and programs resulting from network partnerships. Another 330,000 youth are indirectly impacted by these efforts, and through the broad dissemination of innovations and programs developed within the network."

[See also: http://hiveresearchlab.org/ ]
nyc  hivenyclearning  mozilla  informallearning  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  learning  youth  openstudioproject  lcproject  macarthurfoundation  homago  museums  ncmideas  afterschool  clubs  learningspaces  funding  professionaldevelopment  bestpractices  digitalliteracy  networkedlearning  networks  collaboration  digitalmedia  newmedia  technology  interestdriven  amnh  bankstreetcollege  beamcenter  brooklynmuseum  brooklynpubliclibrary  carnegiehall  centerforurbanpedagogy  citylore  children'smuseumofthearts  coderjojo  dreamyard  exposurecamp  eyebeam  facinghistoryandourselves  glovbalkids  grilswritenow  maketheroad  thelamp  nycsalt  parsons  reelworks  wagnercollege  worldup  wnyc  wnycradiorookies  urbanword  toked  thepoint  rubinmuseum  momi  nypl  moma  iridescentlearning  habitatmap  cooper-hewitt  commonsensemedia  brooklyn  bronx  manhattan  groundswell  mouse  downtowncommunitytelevision  globalactionproject  globalkids  instituteofplay  joanganzcooneycenter  people'sproductionhouse  radiorookies  stoked  queens  statenisland 
july 2013 by robertogreco
We Find Wildness
"Particularly interested in myths about gender and ethnicity that have long circulated in Africa and the West, WANGECHI MUTU has adopted the medium of collage — which by its nature evokes rupture and collision — to depict the monstrous, the exotic, and the feminine.

Manipulating ink and acrylic paint into pools of colour she carefully applies to her surfaces imagery sampled from disparate sources- Vogue, National Geographic, hunting, motorbike and porn magazines. The resulting works process mimics amputation, transplant operations and torturous prosthetics. Her figures become parody mutilations, their forms grotesquely marred through perverse modification, echoing the atrocities of war or self-inflicted improvements of plastic surgery.

She also uses materials which make reference to African identity and political strife: her dazzling black glitter is an abyss of western desire, which allude to the illegal diamond trade and its consequences of oppression and war.

WANGECHI MUTU (b.1972, Nairobi, Kenya) is an artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. On February 23, 2010 she was honored by Deutsche Bank as their first Artist of the Year. The prize included a solo exhibition at the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin. Titled My Dirty Little Heaven, the show traveled in June 2010 to Wiels Center for Contemporary Art in Brussels, Belgium. Her first one person show at Barbara Gladstone Gallery opens October 29, 2010."

[via: http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/silence-is-a-woman/ ]
art  artists  brooklyn  wangechimutu  kenya  nyc  collage  rupture  collision  gender  ethnicity  prosthetics 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Guild
"In the beginning it was a welder, a wood buringin stove and fifteen hundred bucks.

FRANKLY, WE COULDN'T EVEN AFFORD A PROPER COMPUTER OR SAW. We picked up the phone and called everyone we knew and told them we could make stuff.

Some stuff turned into more stuff. More stuff turned into our first employee. Our first employee got a graphic novel book deal and left us which led us to our second employee. Don't worry Sarah, we still love you a ton and own all your books!

From there we have grown bit by painstaking bit. We work through the nights and ask the people who love us to understand that it won't always be like this. There are days we don't get to go home for days. We take comfort in a cup of strong coffee with a splash of pride in a job well done.

Our generous and creative clients give us opportunities to prove ourselves. They continue to believe in our good thoughts and hard work, and we continue to think well and work hard for them.

Today the Guild is a broad collection of artists, designers, architects, project managers, developers, carpenters and painters. We come together to lend our talents to making dynamic environments and unique experiences.

There are changes we would make if we had to do it again. The learning curve is sharp at times and the growing pains hurt like hell. In spite of proverbial skinned knees, we absolutely love what we do and are glad that it shows. "
design  theguild  losangeles  brooklyn  miami  making  environmentaldesign  projectmanagement  architecture  art  construction  portland  oregon 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Jimmy McBride's Interstellar Quilts | American Craft Council
"Jimmy McBride's art quilts are really out of this world. Made from salvaged textiles (collected while working for a salt and vinegar shipping company called Intergalactic Transport), the quilts are hand-stitched and hand-quilted. As McBride puts it: "There's no log cabins or poinsettias around, so I just stare out the window until something catches my eye."

Back on Earth, McBride is based in Brooklyn, and also recently launched a line of Roycroft Quilts. If you'd like to see him talk more about his intergalactic travels, make sure to check out this video."

[See also: http://jimmymcbride.com/home.html
http://intergalactictransport.blogspot.co.nz/search/label/quilt
http://www.etsy.com/blog/en/2011/handmade-portraits-stellarquilts/
https://vimeo.com/18669372 ]

[Related: "1876 Ellen Harding Baker's "Solar System" Quilt" http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_556183 ]
via:annegalloway  2013  quilts  quilting  sewing  glvo  astronomy  space  art  textiles  brooklyn  sciencefiction  video 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Fort Makers
"Fort Makers is a Brooklyn based collaborative art group that aims to launch emerging artists’ careers through unconventional means of exposure. We are a gang of friends who are also artists. We travel, play, explore and make art together. We learn from each other and push each other forward as artists. Fort Makers was founded in Brooklyn during the summer of 2008."

[via: http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/28/fort-makers/ via @sldistin ]
art  brooklyn  artists  collectives  collaborative  collaboration  cv  interdisciplinary  elizabethwhitcomb  nanaspears  noahjamesspencer  naomiclark  fabric  textiles 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The Extrapolation Factory & 99¢ Futures
"..is an imagination-based assembly line for developing snapshots of future scenarios- embodied as artifacts for sale in a local store. In this 'workshop,' participants use our future-scope to cast present-day news, statistics and developments into future products to be exhibited in these nearby stores."
extrapolationfactory  chriswoebken  nyc  brooklyn  futures  rapidprototyping  elliottmontgomery  studio-x 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Red Baraat: A Bhangra-Powered Party Starter : NPR
"Red Baraat is wild — and loud. It's also a genre unto itself. The Brooklyn ensemble self-identifies as "dhol 'n' brass," a hybrid of Indian bhangra and New Orleans big-band music.

The group has played everywhere from the White House to the Bonnaroo festival, and its marathon live shows have become the kind of sweaty sensation that packs rock clubs. Limited to horns and percussion, Red Baraat is led by Sunny Jain on the dhol, a barrel-shaped Punjabi drum that's played on both sides. Jain says he's never found himself wishing for a guitar solo to fill space."
tolisten  music  2013  bigband  bhangra  nyc  redbaraat  brooklyn  from delicious
january 2013 by robertogreco
Cobble Hill Think Tank
"Our philosophy and approach is student-centered. We believe that if we develop self-confident and self-motivated students, everything else will fall into place.

Our priorities:
student confidence
a solid understanding of the academic material
providing tools with which student will thrive and grow
We have assembled a diverse team of specialists in a wide variety of subjects and skills. All of our staff has passed a Dept of Education background check, as well as regular in-house training."
workshops  tutoring  testprep  lcproject  nyc  brooklyn  education  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
The Brooklyn Strategist - Game Center, Cafe, Social Club - New York
"At The Brooklyn Strategist, we love games! Our unique atmosphere is a great place to enjoy strategy, community and competition through interactive board- and card-games. It is a place to play, learn, think creatively, socialize and strategize against an opponent or with team members. We are pleased to offer afternoon clubs to kids (7+ years old), tweens, teens and adults and look forward to providing our community with a space that promotes fun, interaction and learning."
strategy  learning  nyc  gaming  boardgames  games  brooklyn  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
Brooklyn Writers Space
"All spaces provide writers with a desk, a lamp and a chair on a first come first serve basis. Coffee is always on hand, as well as provide your own paper printing, wi-fi(but if you are trying to get away from the internet we can help you with that too), storage ($30 per quarter), and kitchenette lounge areas for socializing.

Each space is unique by location and by services, the Garfield location has a roof deck with monster tomato plants, Room 58 has a beautiful art gallery and a lounge with really comfy couches, and the Court Street location has plenty of books and very comfy reading area. All spaces are accessible 24/7."
writers  coworking  community  nyc  brooklyn  writing  from delicious
december 2012 by robertogreco
No Reservations | Brooklyn
"On the last leg of his final No Reservations tour, Tony travels just across the river to Brooklyn, a part of New York that he's barely visited. Tony explores the cutting edge food, music, and people that the area offers, but also meets the nostalgic characters and stalwarts of the old days who co-exist with the new Brooklyn."
noreservations  2012  food  nyc  brooklyn  anthonybourdain  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Beginners – New Greenpoint Gallery | Greenpointers
"The members leased the space for a year when the storefront on Meserole became vacant, and are ready to see where it takes them. The first exhibition was a group show aptly titled “The Beginning”—each of the seven curators picked several artists (29 total) that they wanted to show. With no unifying theme or concept and a widespread array of mediums, including but not limited to painting, drawings, “marks on paper and cloth,” and 3D installations, the show was a chance to brainstorm onto the empty walls and invite the public in to make of it what they would."

“A big part of the process is figuring out what an art gallery can be –the excitement of showing art and what that means,” said Lee Coates IV “I want to figure it out by doing it.”
2012  emergingartists  art  nyc  andyjenkins  greenpoint  beginners  brooklyn  galleries 
november 2012 by robertogreco
LDBA ART SCHOOL by Sara Moffat — Kickstarter
"I want to start a school where adults and children can take classes taught by professional artists, musicians, and innovators."

[See also: http://www.ldbabrooklyn.com/xoxo/ ]

"Although there are many components to LDBA, the concept is simple:

WE PROVIDE TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS TO ALLOW PEOPLE TO EXCEL IN THEIR MEDIUM."
craft  arts  art  agesegregation  adults  children  saramoffat  2012  schools  education  learning  openstudioproject  lcproject  brooklyn  nyc  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Photo by sgoralnick • Instagram [Same station that I got gas at the night before Sandy.]
"Here are a few things that I've never considered: New York is a harbor. Makes sense. We get a lot of stuff on boats. Especially big imported tanks of stuff. Like... gas. With that harbor closed due to a crippling storm that churned up the water and left all sorts of debris, deliveries get much more difficult. And a city normally so dependent on public transportation turns to cars as the main (and sometimes only) way to get around since the subway is flooded. In combination, these two simple factors have led to a massive problem: there is now a gas shortage in New York. This Hess station in my neighborhood seems like one of the few left where you can still get any. An entire lane of McGuiness Boulevard is now devoted to the line of cars waiting for their turn at the pump. Another is devoted to people arriving on foot with gas cans, hoping it will be faster or easier than clogging the road by waiting in their car. Side streets have been barricaded off by police so that people do…"
2012  deliveries  harbors  order  waiting  queues  lines  fuelshortage  shortage  greenpoint  brooklyn  nyc  gasstations  glvo  via:robinsloan  fuel  gas  sandy  hurricanesandy  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Loove Music
"LOOVE LIVE
Curatorial Series

Curated by some of the best musical minds of our generation, the Loove hosts live performances with world-class ensembles and cutting-edge artists.

LOOVE LAB
A/V Magic

We operate a state of the art recording studio and soundstage, tweaked to capture pristine audio and high resolution video and suitable for any size ensemble.

LOOVE LABEL
Profitshare Distro

At the heart of our operations is a vision for an uncomplicated and artist-centric approach to distribution—digital and beyond."

[via: http://artsinstitute.stanford.edu/aida/Srinivasan.html ]
srinijasrinivasan  nyc  music  brooklyn  loove  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
We Will Be Close | Photos by Jesse Ragan
"Words and letters catch my eye pretty much everywhere I go. Some are ugly, some are beautiful, and some are simply bizarre. All are working hard to communicate something, but sometimes they communicate more than they mean to: humor, irony, poetry, or even something mysteriously poignant. That’s when I take out my camera.
We will be close... staring from now into forever."
vernaculartypography  quickfixes  hand-paintedsigns  hand-letteredsigns  brooklyn  handmade  via:litherland  irony  humor  words  letters  photography  nyc  signs  typography  jesseragan  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
The Newtown Creek Armada by The Newtown Creek Armada — Kickstarter
"The Newtown Creek Armada is an artist-created model boat pond that will be installed on the Newtown Creek in September 2012. Located on the border between Brooklyn and Queens, the Newtown Creek is one of America's most polluted waterways and a recently designated federal Superfund Site. Visitors to the Newtown Creek Armada will be invited to pilot a fleet of miniature, radio-controlled boats along the creek’s surface while at the same time documenting the hidden world beneath its waters.

Each boat in The Newtown Creek Armada will represent a different aspect of the creek’s unusual past, present and future, and will be equipped with a waterproof camera, allowing participants to record a unique voyage along the creek. Video from these explorations will be on view at the boat pond, giving visitors a chance to virtually immerse themselves its toxic waters, home to the largest urban oil spill in the United States."

[via: https://twitter.com/MatthewBattles/status/257170813424377858 ]
2012  publicart  art  armadas  newtowncreekarmada  superfundsite  superfundsites  newtowncreek  environment  pollution  waterways  boatbuilding  boats  nyc  queens  brooklyn 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Mare Liberum | thefreeseas.org
"The Free Seas / Mare Liberum is a freeform publishing, boatbuilding and waterfront art collective, based in the Gowanus, Brooklyn. Finding its roots in centuries-old stories of urban water squatters and haphazard water craft builders, Mare Liberum is a collaborative exploration of what it takes to make viable aquatic craft as an alternative to life on land. The project draws from sources as diverse as ocean-crossing raft assemblages, improvised refugee boats built in Senegal and Cuba, and modern stitch-and-ply construction methods which make complex, classic boat designs approachable by novice builders.

We are currently building a fleet of Liberum Dories, a design that we based on the historic 15′ Banks Dory. The frame of this boat can be constructed over the course of a single afternoon using minimal tools and basic building skills…"

[via: https://twitter.com/MatthewBattles/status/257171302991949824 ]
water  environment  boats  liberumdories  dories  cuba  refugees  senegal  mareliberum  brooklyn  collective  art  gowanus  gowanuscanal  nyc  waterways  boatbuilding 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Tom La Farge, fabulist
"Reading and travel — twin vectors of escape — have formed me as a writer by exciting a love of strangeness and an impatience with exclusive concepts (adult/​child, male/​female, human/​animal) and proprietary domains (realism/​fantasy, serious fiction/​genre fiction). I have always written to readers as a reader."
reading  travel  strangeness  books  constraints  oulipo  writers  writing  nyc  brooklyn  tomlafarge  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
WENDY WALKER
"I was born in 1951 in New York City where I still live with my husband, the writer Tom La Farge. Major influences are world travel and the visual arts. I have been a teacher of studio art, art history and creative writing. I have also worked as visual consultant, advisor and curator with a number of galleries, including Art Awareness in Lexington, New York, the Kentler International Drawing Space in Brooklyn and at the Grady Alexis Gallery at El Taller Latino Americano in Manhattan. I am now a core collaborator at Proteus Gowanus in Brooklyn, where I edit Proteotypes, books which grow out of Proteus Gowanus initiatives.

I am working on a poetic non-fiction about the origins of the Gothic novel in Jamaica and Haiti. This book is called SEXUAL STEALING."
proteotypes  proteusgowanus  brooklyn  nyc  tomlafarge  writing  writers  wendywalker  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Reanimation Library
"The Reanimation Library is a small, independent Presence Library* open to the public. It is a collection of books that have fallen out of routine circulation and been acquired for their visual content. Outdated and discarded, they have been culled from thrift stores, stoop sales, and throw-away piles, and given new life as a resource for artists, writers, cultural archeologists, and other interested parties."

[See also: http://www.libraryasincubatorproject.org/?p=6629 ]

[Previously bookmarked: http://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:07c60a1b1f47 ]
andrewbeccone  nyc  reanimationlibrary  presencelibraries  culture  images  archive  photography  brooklyn  libraries  books  library  art  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
The Invisible Dog Art Center
"The Invisible Dog Art Center opened in October, 2009, a raw space in a vast converted factory building with a charmed history and an open-ended mission: to create, from the ground up, a new kind of interdisciplinary arts center. Over the last two years, over 50,000 people have attended our events: visual art exhibits; dance, theater, and music performances; film screenings; literary arts and poetry readings; lectures; community events; and more.

Long-term collaborations with artists are integral to The Invisible Dog’s mission, which is to create not only a new kind of art center, but also a new kind of artistic community.

The Invisible Dog brings together artists of all career stages, offering them unique opportunities for involvement. Over the last two years, the art center has evolved organically, developing with and alongside its diverse roster of collaborators… "
interdisciplinary  art  invisibledog  glvo  nyc  studios  coworking  arts  brooklyn  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Micro Museum
"Micro Museum small venue BIG ART in Downtown Brooklyn is dedicated to interactive, media, visual and performing arts.  A 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, a Registered Trademark with the US Patent and Trademark Office, a Registered Charity for the State of NY.
Micro Museum, was founded in 1986 as the original inter-disciplinary art center for Kathleen & William Laziza and their collaborators. Micro Museum has the longest running kinetic sculpture in the Tri-State Area. A Solar Powered artwork called AC/DC Window can be seen running daily in the second floor window as it has since 1994."
museums  glvo  williamlaziza  kathleenlaziza  micromuseum  galleries  nyc  art  brooklyn  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Mapping the World's Most Seductive Shrines to Coffee - Claire Cottrell - The Atlantic
"We've rounded up some of the most beautiful purveyors of coffee around the world in virtual guide form, meaning not only have we included the eye candy you know and love, but we've also added addresses and handy links to Google Maps."

[Little Nap Coffee Stand - Tokyo, Japan]
2012  toronto  switzerland  basel  porto  portugal  silverlake  hungary  busapest  brooklyn  bluebottlecoffee  sanfrancisco  oregon  portland  tokyo  sweden  denmark  telaviv  paris  poland  nyc  losangeles  us  japan  architecture  design  intreriors  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  coffee  cafes  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Madagascar Institute | Fear is Never Boring
"The Madagascar Institute is an art combine in Brooklyn that specializes in large-scale sculptures and rides, live performances, and guerilla art events.

We have an open membership workshop, with monthly and yearly subscriptions. For those of you who want to learn to be ArtStars, or just smell like one, and can not or will not just plunge in and show up and suffer abuse and work, we have classes. To find out about classes, check the current schedule."
jeffstark  madagascarinstitute  collective  art  performance  nyc  diy  brooklyn  from delicious
october 2012 by robertogreco
Field Trip Day | Events in Six Cities on September 29, 2012
"Field Trip day is a series of explorations in six cities on Saturday, September 29th.

Find hidden places, and learn skills long forgotten. There are no right choices, no wrong turns - but there are wonders to be uncovered. Tickets are limited. Register below.

NEW YORK • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • CHICAGO • MINNEAPOLIS • BOSTON"
discovery  fieldtrips  fieldtripday  urbanexploration  urbanism  urban  boston  chicago  greenpoint  brooklyn  minneapolis  nyc  losangeles  sanfrancisco  cities  2012  atlasobscura 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Beginnings
"Beginnings is a small storefront gallery for art in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, with seven different curators presenting a program of contemporary work in a welcoming environment.

We are independent in politics and philosophy, not aesthetics or business. We are dedicated to exploring all the right ways that art can serve and support its audience and its creators—with thoughtful curation, best design practices and financial transparency."
transparency  glvo  art  via:maxfenton  beginnings  galleries  greenpoint  brooklyn  nyc 
september 2012 by robertogreco
matthew gallaway - A Few Notes On Overgentrification
"The piece also fails to address the problems that really afflict neighborhoods in NYC and elsewhere around the world undergoing similar transformations. In West Chelsea, the problem is clearly not the High Line, but rather the effects of an unfettered system — at local and federal levels — that has allowed an arguably unprecedented concentration of wealth in our country, which (yes) makes it all but impossible for those without millions of dollars to afford to live (or at least buy) in those neighborhoods now being populated by those who have — let’s just call it — too much money. At the same time, however, the solution is not to stop the development of parks or to whine about gas-station/auto-shop leases not being renewed; the solution is rather (and this is hardly revolutionary or at least revelatory) to tax the rich, both individuals and corporations, and to distribute the money to the less-than-rich, in ways that are reasonably fair and equitable. That’s what government is for…"
society  urbanplanning  wealthdistribution  policy  taxes  us  wealth  highline  manhattan  brooklyn  nyc  2012  gentrification  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
But the city has, to its credit, lavished money on... - more than 95 theses
"The greening of New York, and to a far lesser extent other cities, has indeed been wonderful to see. But a city can’t “lavish money” it doesn’t have. Bruni needs to acknowledge that all this beautification has resulted from (a) the concentration of more and more wealth in the hands of fewer and fewer people, and (b) the increasing preference for urban living among the super-rich. Again, I love the new New York, but more than ever before it’s a city run by rich people for rich people."
beautification  urbanism  urban  cities  disparity  wealthdistribution  2012  wealth  power  green  brooklyn  nyc  alanjacobs  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Games in the street « Snarkmarket
"We didn’t play stickball out in the second-ring suburbs of Detroit, but we did play with sticks. We ran in the street until dark and we built forts in the mud down by the creek. Most importantly, we made up new games on the spot.

That’s just about my favorite thing about kids: their willingness to transform anything, instantly, at any time, into a game. And I do mean a game: a system with rules. It can be as simple as I slap your knee, you slap mine but it’s a game.

I was lucky to fall in with a neotenous crew in college, and we spent long afternoons inventing games at Michigan State, too: coming up with new configurations of ground and body and frisbee out on the big quad around the clock tower.

Anyway, Spike Lee shouldn’t lament cocolevio (?!) because it’s in the nature of kids’ culture to change, eventually beyond recognition, but I’m with him when it comes to games in the street. I’m sure there are still some kids playing this way in Cobble Hill, but definitely not as many as before. I mean, there’s just no way, right? There are so many other games already invented for them now—all these other games waiting indoors on bright screens big and small.

Stickball never looked like much fun to me, but you can carry a stick into a sword battle, too. Those were more our style. And at a certain time of day, with the sun low in the sky, a neat lawn could truly become a battlefield. You got tired after just a few tussles, really desperately tired, and maybe your knuckles got a little bloody too, but you had to keep going, had to keep fighting—at least until your mom called you home for dinner.

Snarkmatrix, you know me: I am not a Luddite (no way) and not a techno-triumphalist, either. So I hope you’ll take it not as a nostalgic yawlp but rather a considered statement about the nature of the mind and the body when I say: Raw unselfconscious imagination is the best graphics engine that has ever existed, and the street will forever be the arena in which all the best games are played."
snarkmarket  play  games  neoteny  comments  edg  srg  minecraft  sticks  children  creativity  spikelee  imagination  cocolevio  stickball  rules  robinsloan  2012  brooklyn  interviews  timcarmody 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Gowanus Ballroom – An Alternative Art Space in Brooklyn New York
"The Gowanus Ballroom is an alternative exhibition space located along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, NY.

Once operated as a steel mill in the 1800′s, this 12,000-square-foot space sits beneath 50-foot cathedral ceilings with a 4,000-square-foot mezzanine overlooking the lower gallery. In 2010, Josh Young of Serett Metal retooled the space and founded Gowanus Ballroom.

The space now serves both as a metal fabrication shop that frequently opens its doors to artists and assists or teaches them to build, and as a creative exhibition space that showcases the talents of emerging artists and designers in the Brooklyn area."
performances  music  lcproject  openstudios  education  design  fabrication  metal  metalfabrication  venues  galleries  studios  glvo  architecture  engineering  gowanuscanal  gowanus  studiospace  nyc  art  brooklyn  via:maxfenton  from delicious
july 2012 by robertogreco
Soapbox Gallery
"Soapbox Gallery is dedicated to providing a forum for visual artists to engage in the issues of our time and express themselves publicly without censorship. In the tradition of the humble yet mighty soapbox that encouraged free speech and played a role in the development of our social contract, provocative work can stir public debate, raise consciousness, and even spur social evolution. Too many of us despair at the lack of content in work celebrated by the ART world. Soapbox Gallery challenges artists to speak out and be relevant."
via:salrandolph  nyc  galleries  art  brooklyn  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
Brooklyn Skillshare
"The Brooklyn Skillshare is a community-based, community-led, & community-building learning events organized and taught by Brooklyn residents.

MISSION STATEMENT

Education is a right, not a commodity. We are all students and teachers, and we believe that everyone has something to teach and to learn from each other. The Brooklyn Skillshare is a communal, hands-on, learning experience that aims to serve as a jumping-off point in the construction of an autonomous, nonexclusive, reciprocal learning community."
skillshare  brooklynskillshare  events  classes  learning  diy  design  education  art  community  nyc  brooklyn  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
taylor!
"Taylor Levy is a Canadian artist currently based in New York…

With her partner Che-Wei Wang, Levy co-runs the design studio CW&T.;…"

"I turn everyday technologies inside out.

Value emerges when design reveals the evolution of human logic and thinking embedded within technology. Really, it makes us feel better.

My work is about recovering the human gesture within the context of technology.

Sometimes I make sculpture, sometimes I build machines, sometimes I write code. Often I draw and write words with a black pen on paper.

I begin by breaking apart an opaque technology. Once it is in pieces, I play and explore in a way that is personally intuitive. Regaining my own gesture within what was once an impenetrable system. I begin to reconstruct. Extracting any unnecessary complexities, my reconstructions are simple, ordered and transparent.

love,
taylor"
everydaytechnology  opaquetechnology  sculpture  technology  taylorlevy  prototyping  artists  brooklyn  nyc  design  art  cw  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
CW&T; is an art and design studio.
"At CW&T;, we create multidisciplinary work in collaborative environments where we leverage technology and computing. With the latest tools and processes, we imagine near future possibilities and build them into reality.

Our design approach is to create lasting designs while questioning conventional thinking. In our quest to fulfill our goals, we favor minimal aesthetics, intuitive interfaces and over-engineered construction.

Che-Wei Wang is an artist, designer and architect. His work involves a wide range of disciplines and skills ranging from architecture, exhibition design, web design, interactive installations, robotics, sculpture and product design…

Taylor Levy is an artist and designer who works with various technologies. In her work, technology is broken apart and reconstructed to expose its otherwise opaque inner workings…

Many projects call for unique talents, so we assemble the best from our community of close collaborators that love working together."
glvo  javascript  java  openframeworks  processing  arduino  brooklyn  taylorlevy  che-weiwang  industrialdesign  id  architecture  design  art  nyc  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
marclafia
"Marc's work explores the histories of the photographic, cinema, embodied space and the event of art as they are remade in network and social media to produce new subjectivities, new ways of going in the world. His work emerges in the context of net art, in the condition of the global network and how new technologies and computation bring forward new processes, new metaphors, new social arrangements that refigure our sense of ourselves.

His varied online works include, 'This Battle of Algiers' a commissioned work from The Tate Modern and The Whitney Museum of American Art, 'The Memex Engine, or Lara Croft Striped Bare by her Assassins Even' exhibited at The Walker Art Center and Georges Pompidou, 'Ambient Machines' which premiered at the Rotterdam Film Festival and the SFMoMA and 'Variable Montage' exhibited at the Beijing Art Academy."

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Lafia ]
social  networks  computation  technology  documentaries  nyc  brooklyn  film  marclafia  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
The New Yorker - In this week’s New Yorker, the Journeys Issue,...
"In this week’s New Yorker, the Journeys Issue, Teju Cole writes about coming to America. Here Cole takes in the skyline from the roof of his apartment building in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, and reflects on his American citizenship and Nigerian upbringing."

[video also here: http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid897219300001 ]
citizenship  sunsetpark  brooklyn  nigeria  nyc  2011  memory  place  belonging  tejucole  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
brooklyn spaces | a compendium of brooklyn culture & creativity
"Hey, I’m Oriana, and I love Brooklyn. I love the creativity, the drive, the bizarre and beautiful ideas, the thrilling unique energy of the people who live here. This project tracks Brooklyn space by space, in the words of those who make it all happen. I hope you’ll check back often! (You can get email notifications of new profiles by signing up at the right.)

If you know of a space I should cover, have a correction for anything I’ve written, or just want to talk about amazing Brooklyn, email me at brooklynspacesproject@gmail.com."
glvo  printing  places  community  culture  art  nyc  brooklyn  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
Time after time
"I notice the intersection of cities and timepieces when I’m running — in New York and elsewhere. I always head out first thing in the morning before commuters stir, the time a city betrays its secrets, bare with honesty, without its citizens clothing it with attitude. When I do, the relationship of that city with time stands apparent. Run through Brooklyn on a given morning, and you’ll go no further than eight blocks before a church tower, park clock, or intersection reveals the time. Yet other cities are void of public reveals. Time dissipates into the pockets of citizens, and the absence and presence of time and timepieces is just as tangible and meaningful as the time itself."
life  cities  time  via:tealtan  brooklyn  timepieces  watches  nyc  place  timespace 
may 2012 by robertogreco
A Cabin in a Loft
"A Cabin in a Loft is a one-room bed & breakfast in the vibrant artists’ neighborhood of Bushwick, Brooklyn. It is envisioned as an alternative to hotels and hostels and is available for short-term rental. The Cabin is run out of my workshop and studio, where I also live. Many of the artworks, furniture, and objects in the space were made by me or fellow artists and are for sale. By staying here, you are supporting my work as an artist, architect, and designer. You are also becoming part of a vast community of global travelers who open their homes to guests curious in engaging a local’s experience of the place they are visiting.

Conceived of as houses within houses, the cabin (available for rental) and treehouse (where I live) serve as private sleeping cabins, each with its own semi-private garden set off from the shared living space."
lcproject  openstudioproject  cabins  artists  studios  glvo  b&b  brooklyn  architecture  rentals  nyc  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
Brooklyn Institute for Social Research | "… just may represent the future of higher education…" – New York Magazine
"The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research provides liberal arts educational opportunities to local communities. At the same time it provides material and intellectual support and space for young scholars to teach, write, research, publish and, put simply, work.

Although consciously modeled after the famous Institute for Social Research in Frankfurt, Germany – especially in its heyday under the directorship of Max Horkheimer – we are not all scholars in that tradition, nor is any intellectual, literary or artistic tradition unwelcome in our Institute. As we honor and build upon their extraordinary contributions to human thought and social commitments, we strive to engage the worlds of philosophy, literature, science, the arts and social sciences with the world at large and people everywhere. At a time when the price of traditional higher education reaches ever higher, even as support for scholars and scholarship has substantially diminished…"
socialresearch  classes  nyc  local  brooklyninstituteforsocialresearch  maxhorkheimer  learning  education  deschooling  unschooling  brooklyn  lcproject  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
BBC News - 'Biology hackers' create laboratory in New York City
"A group of researchers has created the first community-run biology laboratory in New York City.

The lab is an effort to provide a home for amateur scientists, as well as professionals looking for a space away from academia and business.

The co-founder of Genspace says it is "crucial that this lab exists" in order to foster creativity in the sciences.

The BBC's Matt Danzico visited the Brooklyn facility, which originally opened in late 2010, at a building home to a range of professionals ranging from designers to pastry chefs."

[See also: http://www.genspace.org/ and http://twitter.com/genspacenyc ]
brooklyn  science  research  biopolitics  biometrics  biotechnology  biotech  mattdanzico  nyc  2012  hackerspaces  diy  hackers  biology  genspace  from delicious
march 2012 by robertogreco
Don’t Mock the Artisanal-Pickle Makers - NYTimes.com
"When it comes to profit and satisfaction, craft business is showing how American manufacturing can compete in the global economy. Many of the manufacturers who are thriving in the United States (they exist, I swear!) have done so by avoiding direct competition with low-cost commodity producers in low-wage nations. Instead, they have scrutinized the market and created customized products for less price-sensitive customers. Facebook and Apple, Starbucks and the Boston Beer Company (which makes Sam Adams lager) show that people who identify and meet untapped needs can create thousands of jobs and billions in wealth. As our economy recovers, there will be nearly infinite ways to meet custom needs at premium prices."

[See also in Japan: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204542404577157290201608630.html?mod=WSJ_Magazine_LEFTSecondStories ]
detail  2012  quality  generalists  specialists  handmade  glvo  nyc  food  crafteconomy  small  scale  bespoke  brooklyn  entrepreneurship  craft  specialization  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
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