robertogreco + bookmarks   108

Jacob Sam-La Rose on Twitter: "Spent part of the week on a research dive into platforms for collaborative research, networked learning and collective intelligence. Changed my thinking on the way I use the web (w/ thanks to @rogre and @nomadpoet). (Faceboo
Spent part of the week on a research dive into platforms for collaborative research, networked learning and collective intelligence. Changed my thinking on the way I use the web (w/ thanks to @rogre and @nomadpoet).

(Facebook: Twitter link = full thread)
#alt_springbreak

One of the outcomes: it took me a while to see it, but http://Are.na (@AREdotNA) is now and the future for this kind of effort. I needed to shift my thinking around tagging and categorisation of items.

This blows my mind, and I'm keen to play with it further:
http://pilgrim.are.na/

...and: https://github.com/hxrts/spider is something I've been trying to figure out how to do with my own personal knowledge management system in order to be able to visualise links between notes/ideas. Exciting stuff.

Put simply, I'm thinking of http://Are.na as the publicly accessible place I go to synthesise meaning from a range of sources, and collaborate with others in doing so.

I think my jetpack just arrived.

From https://www.are.na/blog/hello%20world/2017/12/21/to-2018.html "
jacobsam-larose  2018  are.na  learning  cv  howwelearn  collectiveintelligence  friends  collaboration  collaborativeresearch  research  web  online  socialbookmaking  bookmarks  bookmarking  constructivism  ideas  api  meaning  meaningmaking 
june 2018 by robertogreco
The Garden and the Stream: A Technopastoral | Hapgood
[Brought back to my attention thanks to Allen:
"@rogre Read this and thought of you and your bookmarks & tumblr:"
https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/720121133102710784 ]

[See also:
https://hapgood.us/2014/06/04/smallest-federated-wiki-as-an-alternate-vision-of-the-web/
https://hapgood.us/2014/11/06/federated-education-new-directions-in-digital-collaboration/
https://hapgood.us/2015/01/08/the-fedwiki-user-innovation-toolkit/
https://hapgood.us/2016/03/03/pre-stocking-the-library/
https://hapgood.us/2016/03/04/bring-your-bookmarks-into-the-hypertext-age/
https://hapgood.us/2016/03/26/intentionally-finding-knowledge-gaps/
https://hapgood.us/2016/04/09/answer-to-leigh-blackall/
http://rainystreets.wikity.cc/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Gi9SRsRrE4

https://github.com/federated-wiki
http://fed.wiki.org/
http://journal.hapgood.net/view/federated-wiki
http://wikity.net/
http://wikity.net/?p=link-word&s=journal.hapgood.net ]

"The Garden is an old metaphor associated with hypertext. Those familiar with the history will recognize this. The Garden of Forking Paths from the mid-20th century. The concept of the Wiki Gardener from the 1990s. Mark Bernstein’s 1998 essay Hypertext Gardens.

The Garden is the web as topology. The web as space. It’s the integrative web, the iterative web, the web as an arrangement and rearrangement of things to one another.

Things in the Garden don’t collapse to a single set of relations or canonical sequence, and that’s part of what we mean when we say “the web as topology” or the “web as space”. Every walk through the garden creates new paths, new meanings, and when we add things to the garden we add them in a way that allows many future, unpredicted relationships

We can see this here in this collage of photos of a bridge in Portland’s Japanese Garden. I don’t know if you can see this, but this is the same bridge from different views at different times of year.

The bridge is a bridge is a bridge — a defined thing with given boundaries and a stated purpose. But the multi-linear nature of the garden means that there is no one right view of the bridge, no one correct approach. The architect creates the bridge, but it is the visitors to the park which create the bridge’s meaning. A good bridge supports many approaches, many views, many seasons, maybe many uses, and the meaning of that bridge will even evolve for the architect over time.

In the Garden, to ask what happened first is trivial at best. The question “Did the bridge come after these trees” in a well-designed garden is meaningless historical trivia. The bridge doesn’t reply to the trees or the trees to the bridge. They are related to one another in a relatively timeless way.

This is true of everything in the garden. Each flower, tree, and vine is seen in relation to the whole by the gardener so that the visitors can have unique yet coherent experiences as they find their own paths through the garden. We create the garden as a sort of experience generator, capable of infinite expression and meaning.

The Garden is what I was doing in the wiki as I added the Gun Control articles, building out a network of often conflicting information into a web that can generate insights, iterating it, allowing that to grow into something bigger than a single event, a single narrative, or single meaning.

The Stream is a newer metaphor with old roots. We can think of the”event stream” of programming, the “lifestream” proposed by researchers in the 1990s. More recently, the term stream has been applied to the never ending parade of twitter, news alerts, and Facebook feeds.

In the stream metaphor you don’t experience the Stream by walking around it and looking at it, or following it to its end. You jump in and let it flow past. You feel the force of it hit you as things float by.

It’s not that you are passive in the Stream. You can be active. But your actions in there — your blog posts, @ mentions, forum comments — exist in a context that is collapsed down to a simple timeline of events that together form a narrative.

In other words, the Stream replaces topology with serialization. Rather than imagine a timeless world of connection and multiple paths, the Stream presents us with a single, time ordered path with our experience (and only our experience) at the center.

In many ways the Stream is best seen through the lens of Bakhtin’s idea of the utterance. Bakhtin saw the utterance, the conversational turn of speech, as inextricably tied to context. To understand a statement you must go back to things before, you must find out what it was replying to, you must know the person who wrote it and their speech context. To understand your statement I must reconstruct your entire stream.

And of course since I can’t do that for random utterances, I mostly just stay in the streams I know. If the Garden is exposition, the stream is conversation and rhetoric, for better and worse.

You see this most clearly in things like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. But it’s also the notifications panel of your smartphone, it’s also email, it’s also to a large extent blogging. Frankly, it’s everything now.

Whereas the garden is integrative, the Stream is self-assertive. It’s persuasion, it’s argument, it’s advocacy. It’s personal and personalized and immediate. It’s invigorating. And as we may see in a minute it’s also profoundly unsuited to some of the uses we put it to.

The stream is what I do on Twitter and blogging platforms. I take a fact and project it out as another brick in an argument or narrative or persona that I build over time, and recapitulate instead of iterate."



"So what’s the big picture here? Why am I so obsessed with the integrative garden over the personal and self-assertive stream? Blogs killed hypertext — but who cares, Mike?

I think we’ve been stuck in some unuseful binaries over the past years. Or perhaps binaries that have outlived their use.

So what I’m asking you all to do is put aside your favorite binaries for a moment and try out the garden vs. the stream. All binaries are fictions of course, but I think you’ll find the garden vs. the stream is a particularly useful fiction for our present moment.

OER

Let’s start with OER. I’ve been involved with Open Educational Resources many years, and I have to say that I’m shocked and amazed that we still struggle to find materials.

We announced an open textbook initiative at my school the other day, and one of the first people to email me said she taught State and Local Government and she’d love to ditch the textbook.

So I go look for a textbook on State and Local Government. Doesn’t exist. So I grab the syllabus and look at what sorts of things need explaining.

It’s stuff like influence of local subsidies on development. Now if you Google that term, how many sites in the top 50 will you find just offering a clear and balanced treatment of what it is, what the recent trends are with it, and what seems to be driving the trends?

The answer is none. The closest you’ll find is an article from something called the Encyclopedia of Earth which talks about the environmental economics of local energy subsidies.

Everything else is either journal articles or blog posts making an argument about local subsidies. Replying to someone. Building rapport with their audience. Making a specific point about a specific policy. Embedded in specific conversations, specific contexts.

Everybody wants to play in the Stream, but no one wants to build the Garden.

Our traditional binary here is “open vs. closed”. But honestly that’s not the most interesting question to me anymore. I know why textbook companies are closed. They want to make money.

What is harder to understand is how in nearly 25 years of the web, when people have told us what they THINK about local subsidies approximately one kajillion times we can’t find one — ONE! — syllabus-ready treatment of the issue.

You want ethics of networked knowledge? Think about that for a minute — how much time we’ve all spent arguing, promoting our ideas, and how little time we’ve spent contributing to the general pool of knowledge.

Why? Because we’re infatuated with the stream, infatuated with our own voice, with the argument we’re in, the point we’re trying to make, the people in our circle we’re talking to.

People say, well yes, but Wikipedia! Look at Wikipedia!

Yes, let’s talk about Wikipedia. There’s a billion people posting what they think about crap on Facebook.

There’s about 31,000 active wikipedians that hold English Wikipedia together. That’s about the population of Stanford University, students, faculty and staff combined, for the entire English speaking world.

We should be ashamed. We really should."



"And so we come to the question of whether we are at a turning point. Do we see a rebirth of garden technologies in the present day? That’s always a tough call, asking an activist like me to provide a forecast of the future. But let me respond while trying not to slip into wishful analysis.

I think maybe we’re starting to see a shift. In 2015, out of nowhere, we saw web annotation break into the mainstream. This is a garden technology that has risen and fallen so many times, and suddenly people just get it. Suddenly web annotation, which used to be hard to explain, makes sense to people. When that sort of thing happens culturally it’s worth looking closely at.

Github has taught a generation of programmers that copies are good, not bad, and as we noted, it’s copies that are essential to the Garden.

The Wikimedia Education project has been convincing teachers there’s a life beyond student blogging.

David Wiley has outlined a scheme whereby students could create the textbooks of the future, and you can imagine that rather than create discrete textbooks we could engage students in building a grand web of knowledge that could, like Bush’s trails, be reconfigured and duplicated to serve specific classes … [more]
mikecaufield  federatedwiki  web  hypertext  oer  education  edtech  technology  learning  vannevarbush  katebowles  davecormier  wikipedia  memex  dynabook  davidwiley  textbooks  streams  gardens  internet  cv  curation  online  open  dlrn2015  canon  wikis  markbernstein  networks  collaboration  narrative  serialization  context  tumblr  facebook  twitter  pinboard  instagram  blogs  blogging  networkedknowledge  google  search  github  wardcunningham  mikhailbakhtin  ethics  bookmarks  bookmarking 
april 2016 by robertogreco
6, 19: Favorites
"One of my favorite things on the web is favorites. Twitter, of course, but also bookmarks on Pinboard and everything else. I like browsing my own every few months. On Flickr – photos I starred because they remind me of a place. Because of a place I was reading about. Of a food I was reading about. Only because of the caption. Only despite the caption. Things by friends that I starred long before they were friends or I even recognized their names. Good examples of techniques I’ve doodled with – kite aerial photography, cyanotype, infrared, slitscan, …. Stars meaning “listen, I see what you were going for”. Stars on pictures of children I babysat. Stars meaning “yes, you caught what that friend looks like”. On photos of wonderful memories. On photos of me goofing with friends. On events I wish I’d been at. On friends doing brave, difficult, or beautiful things. On niche celebrities – just Bruno Latour or Robert Bringhurst being a person. Tricky satellite images starred as a kind of solidarity. This photo. Things starred because they exemplify something I dislike. Undistinguished snapshots of things I feel strongly about. A famous harbor seal, now passed, whom I hung out with sometimes. Things I starred as a side channel while conversing with their taker. Awfully clichéed shots for reasons other than the cliché. Photos, especially, that surprised me – that used a technique I dislike or a subject that bores me in a way that held my attention. And this is just Flickr, where I’m not particularly active or fast to star – my Twitter favorites are full of star-to-thank, star-to-bookmark, ….

(My one rule for starring things on Flickr is: it should be difficult to work out anything about my sexuality from my favorites page. Likewise: when considering whether to follow a stranger, I check their favorites. Certain kinds of creepth show up there before anywhere else.)

But of course better than my own favorites are my friends’ favorites. There’s a distinct and powerful joy in finding that a new friend long ago starred something that I did too. It’s such a splash: You noticed that one! But that’s only a small part of it. Mostly, for me, the fun is in scrolling past things that they care about more than I do, the things they starred as thanks, their cousin’s Etsy pictures, a whole series of something that they starred every single one of, not impatient, just moving along, but sometimes finding big troves of the most amazing stuff, things I never imagined, whole genres and esthetics that they must have obsessed over for a week, inside jokes, people they’re trying to help, parts of the world I’d never heard of, ambiguous things where I can’t tell at all how it’s being taken, new social vocabularies, communities whose names I knew but which I’d never seen in action.

Sometimes for me favorites are about the difficulty of defining what’s good. Sometimes it’s more just a worn-out metaphor but one I like: surfing."



"I’m at the edge of an important subculture that seems badly over-yelled and under-discussed. Hyperloop is too often either the tragic hero idea, martyred by a public that lacks imagination anymore, or the so-awful-we-don’t-even-have-to-discuss-why idea, and too rarely an “okay, let’s think about what this tells us about where we are today, beyond any eye-rolling” idea.

Regarding SV as a homogenous, historyless alien colony is useless whether you love it or hate it, and indeed is one of the reasons people think they need to choose between loving it or hating it.

[Deleted sentence: The greatest minds of my generation are repeating “The greatest minds of my generation are working on ways to make people click ads” like it’s clever.]

I’m reminded of an essay that @debcha mentioned in reply to the newsletter before last(?), The Distress of the Privileged. It connects with my tired argument that if you want to dismantle something, vigorously othering it is probably counterproductive. Cultivating precisely the empathy that it hasn’t earned tends to work because you learn where to put the knife. I think this holds whether the other is a small-time criminal, MRAs as a group, an invading nation – it’s scale-invariant. Treating people as people is not the same as complicity in their reprehensible decisions. It helps you stop them. “It’s not my responsibility to understand, it’s their responsibility to stop, and I’ll make them if I have to” is of course always valid response to injury, never to be silenced or scolded. But as a long-term strategy against something bigger than you are? It lacks. Or so I think, from a pretty insular point of view.

(Cf., for a very clear e.g., the appalling idea in recent American historiography/pedagogy that the Montgomery bus boycott was one cool lady’s random impulse rather than a brilliantly strategized campaign. It’s almost like the status quo has an interest in downplaying the value of careful tactics and solidarity, and likes to valorize exactly the kind of awful one-passionate-hero narrative that’s Ommatokoita’ed onto the eyes of our culture.)

Okay, one more angle on this and then I’ll stop: treating worrying companies (and agencies, and nonprofits) as pathological humans is something to be done carefully, not by default. They are at least as different from people as dogs are, and maybe as different as whales. I think a scary amount of work diverts its own force by uncritically accepting the identity metaphor, the #brand, of what it’s trying to attack. (There is certainly work that does it critically, for example @lifewinning’s astrological readings of surveillance agencies.) (This is connected to the above in that assholes, by making you treat them as assholes, can distract you from more effective methods of dispatching them.)"
favorites  email  charlieloyd  favoriting  flickr  stellar.io  twitter  pinboard  bookmarks  bookmarking  communication  2014  empathy  complexity  subcultures  privilege  siliconvalley  faving 
july 2014 by robertogreco
ownCloud.org | Your Cloud, Your Data, Your Way!
"ownCloud provides universal access to your files via the web, your computer or your mobile devices — wherever you are.

It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web."



"ownCloud gives you universal access to your files through a web interface or WebDAV. It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web. Installation has minimal server requirements, doesn’t need special permissions and is quick. ownCloud is extendable via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins.

ownCloud started with a keynote by Frank Karlitschek at Camp KDE’10 where he talked about the need of a self-controlled free and open source cloud."
cloud  dropbox  opensource  php  sync  storage  bookmarks  calendars  onlinetoolkit  rollyourown 
january 2014 by robertogreco
All In Favor - Anil Dash
"In short, favoriting or liking things for me is a performative act, but one that's accessible to me with the low threshold of a simple gesture. It's the sort of thing that can only happen online, but if I could smile at a person in the real world in a way that would radically increase the likelihood that others would smile at that person, too, then I'd be doing that all day long."
anildash  2013  favoriting  liking  appreciation  accessibility  gestures  twitter  flickr  youtube  vimeo  facebook  stellar.io  bookmarks  bookmarking  sharing  social  socialmedia  online  behavior  favorites  faving 
july 2013 by robertogreco
The Little Mystical - Notes on “The Structure of Collaborative Tagging System”
"I stumbled across a 2005 research paper on Delicious tagging, which studied tag usage across users and time. Here are some highlights:"

[Allen's commentary between highlighted screenshots:]

"This is perhaps the single greatest challenge with archival (personal or institutional) and systems for returning – your sensibilities in how to divide and categorize things change and throws off all your previous taxonomic efforts. These two articles on channel drift and decay theory may be worth revisiting."

"I wrote an overview of my Pinboard tagging structure [http://tanmade.com/writing/2012/05/05/tagging-structures.html ] back in 2012, which hasn’t changed very much – and is remarkably similar to this."
allentan  2013  pinboard  tagging  folgsonomy  tags  taxonomy  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  retrieval  social  socialbookmarks 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Tagging Structures – Allen Tan is…writing
"Tags have cascading levels of specificity: publishing > journalism > reading > narrative, for example, letting me jump in at whatever scale that I can remember. A useful rule-of-thumb is to name these tags what I’m likely to search for later, which sometimes feels like future sight."



"As fallback, I have 10 tags at the top level: technology, education, life, publishing, political, society, design, history, art, and food. Some of these things overlap, and that’s ok: they reflect the way I mentally sort what I find and read. Everything should be tagged at least one of these lead tags, and they are the starting points when I remember almost nothing about what I’m looking for.

This gives me a naming framework at the moment of tagging, too: I start with the lead tag and then describe the bookmark with broad categories, gradually getting more specific (the same way one would carve at sculpture), and then I skim through the article and my highlights again to add any individual triggers: names and highly specific concepts tend to be dropped in here. Specific uses (say, shopping) or projects also come at the end.



"This is a continuously evolving system: my bookmarks from even half a year ago looks different from my bookmarks now. This sometimes gives me trouble when I get confused by things tagged out of order, or by outdated naming conventions (I try to tag all people names as firstname-lastname now). So, careful and diligent pruning is necessary to keep this system coherent."

[See also: http://tealtan.tumblr.com/post/54105931916/notes-on-the-structure-of-collaborative-tagging that references http://www.citeulike.org/user/zelig/article/305755 + http://arxiv.org/pdf/cs.DL/0508082.pdf ]
allentan  2012  tagging  folksonomy  pinboard  del.icio.us  granularity  tags  bookmarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialbookmarks  taxonomy 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Varsity Bookmarking
"Varsity Bookmarking is a weekly interview magazine, where questions are answered with links."
interviews  weekly  benpieratt  varsitybookmarking  cv  links  bookmarks  bookmarking 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Pinboard: bookmarks for robertogreco
WARNING: This is the last bookmark I making here on Delicious which has struggled under the weight of the tags I've accumulated. I'm now adding bookmarks to Pinboard only, but will keep this here as an archive. If anyone is looking to follow my newer bookmarks, find them at: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco Find the RSS feed at: http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:21105788b81ab834ef57/u:robertogreco/
bookmarks  pinboard  del.icio.us  from delicious
march 2013 by robertogreco
Tagging is broken - Kippt Blog
[This makes no sense to me. The argument sounds like: tagging is broken because tags don't have a purpose, but if you use hashtags instead they all of a sudden have a purpose.]
via:caseygollan  tags  tagging  del.icio.us  pinboard  hashtags  kippt  2012  socialboomarks  socialboomarking  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Links are a Contract | Moovweb Blog
The truth is that the links to and from your website are a contract. If a user has bookmarked page X, then they expect that link to keep working. Even if you are just making changes to your desktop site, it’s critical that your links remain backwards compatible. I’m a convert. In fact, my blog still honors link structures from a decade ago! Why? Because there are blog entries and twitter links and documentation and bookmarks people have made to those URLs and I won’t dare break my contract with them.
archival  mobile  design  internet  waggledance  linkrot  bookmarks  bookmarking  links  linking  persistence  longevity  referencing  via:tealtan 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Pinboard: bookmarks for jannon tagged 'tokyo'
[For future reference, 'jannon' has a nice collection of Tokyo references.]
tokyo  bookmarks  japan 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Varsity Bookmarking Transparency in the evolution of technology
"As a society, we’ve had 10,000 years to choose to be open and honest with each other, and we have generally chosen not to. But now we’re at a point where new technology plays a critical role in our lives, and technology has no use for our half-truths and doublespeak. They are disruptions in the flow of information. As we are all becoming parts of the machine, our relationships with each other are being ground down to purer, more efficient forms so that they can be put to better use.

We are becoming more honest because it increases the speed at which information can travel. We are becoming less private because to withhold valuable knowledge from the rest of the network is to act selfishly. We are becoming more transparent because that is what the evolution of technology asks of us."
listening  integrity  lies  conversation  purity  society  relationships  openbooks  sharing  cv  bookmarks  bookmarking  thenextweb  technology  flow  information  2012  benpieratt  web  online  honesty  transparency  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
A search engine for unknown future queries · rogre · Storify
Bookmarking myself:

"Among many other topics, we discussed collections, loose tools (like Pinboard and Sagashitemiyo (something related to that, I think), or a simple tin box like the one that is featured in Amélie), pristineness (for lack of a better term), and clutter.

Dieter Rams' house came up (we only liked his workshop*), as did Scandinavian design, the desks of Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein, and Mark Twain (with a semblance of a system with what appears to be a mess), and Path (as mentioned here and by Frank Chimero).

Eventually, we made the connection to a scene in Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter, in which Ray's office is discussed. She essentially uses it as storage. No one else dares enter because it is overflowing with stuff. But, then, whenever something seems to be missing from a project that the office is working on, Ray mentions that she has just the right thing, disappears into her office, and returns with exactly the perfect object."
georgedyson  scandinavia  cv  onlinetoolkit  tools  play  containers  tinboxes  sagashitemiyo  amélie  frankchimero  path  alberteinstein  marktwain  stevejobs  dieterrams  googlereader  duckduckgo  learning  teaching  2837university  2011  2012  pinboard  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  search  audiencesofone  stephendavis  allentan  eames  rayeames  storify  comments  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco
Remember the web? [.pdf]
"Advance talk notes from a presentation at Personal Archiving 2012 by Maciej Cegłowski."
pda12  2012  bookmarking  bookmarks  online  caching  linkrot  web  internet  archiving  archives  personaldigitalarchives  pinboard  maciejceglowski  maciejcegłowski  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
A Geologic Evening in the Geologic City « FOP
"The bookmark reframes the NYC MetroCard through its geologic constitution. The MetroCard’s “intelligence” pre-dates the Earth. Tiny iron bars within the card’s magnetic strip are arranged to point up or down, storing transit data (when a card was purchased, how many rides remain etc.). The MetroCard’s iron was born of supernovae, billions of years ago. Ironically, the geologic intelligence of this material, traveling through incomprehensible spans of time  and distance, is what facilitates passage into and throughout New York City’s subways today. Yet, hydrocarbons that have been brewing since periods such as the Devonian and Permian are what fuel the production and compose the substance of the plastic of the card itself.  With each MetroCard swipe, Pre-Earthian iron, transformed primordial life forms that arrive to us as crude oil, and Anthropocene plastic, assemble intimately to become a tool of urban transit."
smudgestudio  geologiccity  nyc  metrocard  fop  friendsofthepleistocene  geology  urban  earth  history  time  perspective  longonow  bighere  materials  brooklyn  bookmarks  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
A Whole Lotta Nothing: SendTab: a great simple app for managing screens
"Sendtab is a pretty simple thing, you just click a bookmarklet or copy a URL to an iOS app and you can save a URL to your pile to view later on other devices… Why is this useful? For me, I can move anything interesting from my iPhone to my desktop computer and view it hours later. I've also got a GoogleTV attached to my living room TV so when someone points out an hour long lecture worth watching or a hilarious YouTube video I want to show my family, I save those to SendTab as well, pulling them up on my TV via GoogleTV's home screen bookmarks.

I know Instapaper is a good app for tracking articles among many devices, and Boxee enables you to "watch later" any video you find online, but I find SendTab is a nice simple silo for tossing everything interesting I want to check out on some other device. It's also handy for "I'm going out the door to the airport and want to keep reading that NYT article I'm halfway through" by letting you send links to specific named devices."
matthaughey  sendtab  ios  iphone  applications  bookmarks  syncing  bookmarking  extensions  plugins  browsers  watchlater  readlater  seelater  bookmarklets  browser  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
The Fans Are All Right (Pinboard Blog)
"I learned a lot about fandom couple of years ago in conversations with my friend Britta, who was working at the time as community manager for Delicious. She taught me that fans were among the heaviest users of the bookmarking site, and had constructed an edifice of incredibly elaborate tagging conventions, plugins, and scripts to organize their output along a bewildering number of dimensions. If you wanted to read a 3000 word fic where Picard forces Gandalf into sexual bondage, and it seems unconsensual but secretly both want it, and it's R-explicit but not NC-17 explicit, all you had to do was search along the appropriate combination of tags (and if you couldn't find it, someone would probably write it for you). By 2008 a whole suite of theoretical ideas about folksonomy, crowdsourcing, faceted infomation retrieval, collaborative editing and emergent ontology had been implemented by a bunch of friendly people so that they could read about Kirk drilling Spock."
pinboard  2011  fanfiction  taxonomy  folksonomy  brittagustafson  del.icio.us  avos  bookmarking  bookmarks  tags  tagging  collaboration  collaborative  crowdsourcing  fans  from delicious
october 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero’s Blog - Sorting a Mass
"Right now, chronological ordering is the default way to arrange content online, & I wonder how that blanket presumption affects curation on the web. Does it make sense, because people check in frequently, or is it odd, like sorting a stack of photographs alphabetically by who is in them? There are indeed instances where sorting by time is the correct path, but it will be exciting over the next few months and years to see what happens to the web as we recognize the instances where the newest thing is not necessarily the most important thing. (And, as always, the additional problem on top of this: can this sorting process be automated?)

But can you curate on the web? Most curation comes to a point through narrative, and is narrative possible on the web? Stories require a certain amount of linearity, and we all know how the web disrupts that. Maybe it is the same problem that video games have, where interactivity subverts storytelling…"

[This article is now here: http://frankchimero.com/writing/2011/sorting-a-mass/ ]
web  curation  collecting  curating  sorting  frankchimero  storytelling  scrolling  2011  collections  bookmarks  bookmarking  flickr  interactivity  location  alphabet  hierarchy  categorization  time  chronology  chronoogical  pagination  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Unschooling Media: Participatory Practices among Progressive Homeschoolers [.pdf]
Just reencountered Vanessa Bertozzi's 2006 thesis through a post by Sandra Dodd, commented by David Friedman: http://unschooling.blogspot.com/2011/06/unschooling-media-participatory.html

"On the flipside of the technology debate, I experienced a moment of great academic pleasure when I received an email from Rob, an unschooling dad in California. He explained that he’d come across my links tagged “unschooling” in del.icio.us and he was curious about my research. We then went on to have a very fruitful interview."
vanessabertozzi  unschooling  homeschool  networking  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  2006  lizettegreco  glvo  education  learning  networkedlearning  participatory  participatoryculture  grassroots  ego  cv  filetype:pdf  media:document 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Open Bookmarks
"More and more people are reading books electronically, on computers, on mobile phones, and on dedicated ereading devices.

Ereading allows people to make bookmarks, write notes in the margins, select extracts, and measure their progress through the book. This is the reading experience, and for the first time it's possible to save and share this experience directly. (Find out more about social reading...)

Open Bookmarks wants to make sure that this experience belongs to readers: that they can save it for the future in ways that are useful to them, and share their progress and annotations in the way that they want, however and wherever they read."
books  social  community  culture  reading  jamesbridle  bookmarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialboomarks  persistence  socialreading  sharing  marginalia  ebooks  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Text Patterns: curators and imitators
"So I’d suggest this as the beginnings of a taxonomy:

1) The Linker: That’s what most of us are. We just link to things we’re interested in, without any particular agenda or system at work…my Pinboard page…page of links.

2) The Coolhunter: People who strive to find the unusual, the striking, the amazing — the very, very cool, often within certain topical boundaries, but widely & loosely defined ones…Kottke & Maria Popova…

3) The Curator: There are some. Not many…tends to have a clear & strict focus…some particular area of interest…finds things that other people can’t find…easily…having access to stuff that is not fully public…putting stuff online for the first time…having a unique take on public material…Bibliodyssey is a genuinely curated site; also, just because of its highly distinctive sensibility, Things magazine.

…not saying that one of these categories is superior to the others. They’re just all different, and the difference is worth noting."
alanjacobs  via:lukeneff  curation  curating  online  web  blogging  kottke  mariapopova  taxonomy  links  bookmarks  del.icio.us  pinboard  blogs  tumblr  bibliodyssey  coolhunters  2011  language  sharing  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Send to Kindle - Chrome Web Store
"Send to Kindle is a Browser extension for Kindle owners who prefer reading web content on their devices. It’s designed to offer a quick way for pushing web content to Kindle, so you can read articles or news later on your device."
iphone  software  google  chrome  extensions  web  reading  kindle  online  instapaper  evernote  wikipedia  quora  stackoverflow  sendlater  safari  opera  firefox  everread  android  mobile  applications  bookmarks  bookmarking  ios  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
The social life of marginalia - Bobulate
"Even if we can capture intention and overcome sharing, we might come back to consider what was formerly known as the commonplace book. How might new book designers — of any format — replicate its sense of wholeness and real-time cataloging online? Do we need to?

It’s critical that the new book designer consider how and where these marks might be shared. I’m not suggesting that all annotations be social lest we become self-conscious in our book-relationships. One of the principal pleasures of taking notes is the intimacy with a passage, the outright honesty with which one might scribble, “Gasp!” or “Hogwash,” or “True that,” for later reminding. But there will need to be equal consideration given to what to keep personal as to what to make shareable.

After all, some sentiments are best left between you and your margins."
books  annotation  reading  notetaking  marginalrevolution  commonplacebooks  via:russelldavies  sharing  lizdanzico  robinsloan  jamesbridle  cv  memory  organization  notes  bookmarks  kindle  amazon  meaning  makingmeaning  meaningmaking  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
delicious blog » YouTube Founders Acquire Delicious
"Today, we’re pleased to announce that Delicious has been acquired by the founders of YouTube, Chad Hurley and Steve Chen. As creators of the largest online video platform, they have firsthand experience enabling millions of users to share their experiences with the world. They are committed to running and improving Delicious going forward.<br />
<br />
Providing a seamless transition for users is incredibly important for both companies. Yahoo! will continue to operate Delicious until approximately July 2011. When the transition period is complete, your information will be moved over to Delicious’ new owner.<br />
<br />
Starting today, we will ask you to login to Delicious again and agree to let Yahoo! transfer your bookmarks to the new owner. That way, you’ll enjoy uninterrupted use of the service and will keep your account and all of your bookmarks when we make the transition. For more information on the Delicious transition, please refer to this FAQ."
del.icio.us  avos  2011  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Pinboard Safari extensions: save tabs
"This Safari extension lets you quickly save all your open tabs to Pinboard for later viewing.

The extension adds a single button to your toolbar:

Clicking the button will take you to a Pinboard page where you can save all your open tabs for later viewing:

Once you've saved a tab set, you'll see a 'tabs' link on your user page.

You can save multiple tab sets, and open them anytime in any browser by visiting your tabs page on Pinboard."
safari  extensions  pinboard  bookmarks  bookmarking  tools  tabs  browsers  browser  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Pinboard - antisocial bookmarking
"This is a rough outline of what we have planned for the site. Things in gray haven't been implemented yet; things in black are live on the site."<br />
<br />
Final item: "Get acquired by Yahoo and slowly grow useless"
pinboard  bookmarking  bookmarks  tagging  roadmap  todo  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Anatomy of a Crushing (Pinboard Blog)
"A number of people asked about the technical aspects of the great Delicious exodus of 2010, and I've finally had some time to write it up."
pinboard  scaling  performance  infrastructure  servers  del.icio.us  migration  yahoo  2010  2011  maciejceglowski  bookmarks  bookmarking  maciejcegłowski  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
Google Unveils Delicious Bookmark Importer
"Google has just rolled out a convenient new tool for importing your Delicious bookmarks to Google Bookmarks.<br />
The simple importer takes your Delicious login credentials (or lets you use a one-click OAuth button) and imports all your bookmarks, preserving labels or tags.<br />
Considering Google’s rather broad reach as a company, the importer is likely more than just a friendly bid for more Google Bookmarks users.<br />
Bookmarks was launched in 2005, but it’s never been a huge hit — or a money maker — for the company. Last year, Google launched Lists for Bookmarks, a more social feature for bookmarking that put the product into direct competition with Yahoo’s Delicious. At the time, Delicious founder Joshua Schachter was still a Google employee."
google  bookmarking  bookmarks  yahoo  del.icio.us  utilities  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Is Mobile Affecting When We Read? « Read It Later Blog
"When a reader is given a choice about how to consume their content, a major shift in behavior occurs.  They no longer consume the majority of their content during the day, on their computer.  Instead they shift that content to prime time and onto a device better suited for consumption.

Initially, it appears that the devices users prefer for reading are mobile devices, most notably the iPad.  It’s the iPad leading the jailbreak from consuming content in our desk chairs.

As better mobile experiences become more accessible to more readers, this movement will continue to grow.  Readers want to consume content in a comfortable place, on their own time and mobile devices are making it possible for readers to take control once more."

[via: http://www.preoccupations.org/2011/01/delicious-i.html ]
ipad  mobile  reading  statistics  research  2011  readitlater  instapaper  timeshifting  timeshiftedreading  via:preoccupations  bookmarks  bookmarking  trends  mobilecomputing  kindle  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Delicious (I) - Preoccupations
"I’ve been more struck in the last few months with how I’m storing material up in Instapaper, going back to it, archiving things that once I would have bookmarked straightaway in Delicious, ruminating over others and then, finally, sending myself an email reminder to bookmark X later. And later frequently, now, means Saturday — when I have the time to deal with what has become a sizeable backlog. More filtering happens at that stage, too.

Delicious (backed up locally and in Pinboard) has assumed a different role in my life. No longer the bank of preference for instant notes, it’s where I’m putting things that I’ve generally sifted or gone back to (sometimes a number of times)… I’m much more interested now, much more able now, to use Delicious as a repository for things which I’ve had the time, and the perspective, to weigh.

All of which makes Delicious, or something like it, even more important. And I haven’t even begun to talk about the network."
davidsmith  del.icio.us  pinboard  networks  bookmarks  bookmarking  reading  instapaper  community  commuting  attention  memory  commonplacebooks  blogs  digitallife  ipad  timeshifting  timeshiftedreading  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
notes.husk.org. Sticking With Delicious.
"I still find its pared-down interface slightly too minimal, & the ability to pull in feeds from Twitter and Instapaper has led to some people falling foul of link pollution. [Huge point.]

Frankly, despite the burst of migrations, my delicious network is still more full of good links, although it’s been starved of some of the most interesting posters…

(As a side note, I think this also proves beyond all doubt how important the social aspect of any service is. For all that individuals can download their links, the value I get out of the site is not my 3,500 bookmarks, but the 345,681 in my network. The continued utility of that is what’s most at risk.)

Anyway, since Pinboard can mirror from Delicious but not vice versa, I’m going to keep using the latter as my primary service. Pinboard can carry on being what it’s been for the last eighteen months: a hot spare, but not the service I really want to be using."
del.icio.us  pinboard  paulmison  discovery  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking  aggregation  twitter  linkpollution  social  networks  internet  2010  research  socialnetworking  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Title Junk
"That’s a good rule of thumb for designing and writing page titles: pick a name (and, for CMS templates, a pattern) that makes sense as the name of a bookmark for that page. Most bookmarking tools — the ones built into web browsers, and bookmarklets for third-party apps — do use the page title as the default bookmark name. Tools that help people tweet links to articles use the page title as the default description. So make titles useful. Write them for humans, not search engine spiders. Putting SEO keywords in the page title (a) doesn’t actually help your page’s rank in search engine indexes, and (b) makes things harder for people trying to tweet a link, bookmark your page, or scan it from a list of currently open windows and tabs in their browser. Trust the Googlebot to figure it out."
seo  web  html  webdesign  johngruber  daringfireball  titles  standards  consistency  usability  bookmarks  bookmarking  del.icio.us  webdev  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Smart Automatic Bookmarks - favbot
"Imagine never having to meticulously bookmark and label your favorite websites. Favbot saves and organizes your browsing history. It figures out the best labels to use for each web page. It understands what websites are important to you. It predicts what other websites you will be interested in. It puts you fully in control. It provides analytics to improve your productivity. Powerful machine-learning algorithms at work. Start using it now."
bookmarking  firefox  onlinetoolkit  favbot  del.icio.us  bookmarks  search  memory  tags  tagging  browsinghistory  automation  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
I am Thankful for Roberto Greco | Rush the Iceberg
"Roberto, I am thankful for you because, like Edna Sackson, you have opened my eyes to what a truly global education looks like.

I appreciate your views on unschooling and that you are showing that there are other ways to educate children.

I have learned much from your tweets and bookmarks – I like that much of your resources bring a different perspective and much needed nuance to not only education, but what it means to be a human.

I hope to meet you in person soon and enjoy a drink or two and look forward to having a conversation with you!  (So close, yet so far away…)

You can find all things Roberto Greco HERE."
ego  cv  stephendavis  unschooling  del.icio.us  bookmarking  bookmarks  edcuation  learning  children  schools  teaching  friends  education  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: By providing us with new ways to share what we’re...
"brings us full circle back to “Web 2.0’s” origins in what Delicious creator Joshua Schachter has called a “memory platform.” …there are some powerful social memory experiences possible that aren’t yet appreciated by an industry (and public) preoccupied with “The Now.” The immediacy of services like Twitter, Foursquare, and Instagram is a powerful incentive for average people to fit journaling into their daily lives. But, as Matt Jones points out, in many ways “The Now” is the least interesting part of the spacetime light cone. Without deep access to archives, and compelling ways to navigate them, real time services are falling short of their true potential."
buzzandersen  mattjones  now  hereandnow  realtime  realtimeweb  memory  memoryplatforms  joshuaschachter  2010  twitter  del.icio.us  web2.0  archives  archiving  commonplacebooks  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
10 Alternatives To Delicious.com Bookmarking
"There are several alternatives available and, if you’re like me, you’re going to have to test some of them out until you find the one that best fits how you like to save bookmarks and later search for them. You’ll also want to export your existing delicious.com bookmarks and, if possible, import them into the new service you choose. Instructions on that are below, but first, here’s a list of options for your post-Delicious.com bookmarking."
bookmarking  bookmarks  internet  onlinetoolkit  evernote  diigo  instapaper  blinklist  connotea  2010  socialbookmarking  del.icio.us  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
R.I.P. Delicious: You Were So Beautiful to Me
"It was beautiful. And now it's gone.<br />
<br />
The Library of Congress should have bought it, similar to the way it has now archived every Tweet ever tweeted.<br />
<br />
So much value. So unappreciated. So tragically lost. Where will we all gather next, where our bookmarks can be centralized for maximum network effect? Perhaps this story demonstrates that's not the right question to ask."
del.icio.us  social  yahoo  2010  readwriteweb  tags  tagging  value  cv  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Bridges  |  BridgeURL
"BridgeURL<br />
Want an easy way to share a bunch of URLs? Simply list down all the URLs you want to share in the box below (one link per line, including http://) and we will create a single link to share."
bridgeurl  slideshow  sharing  compilations  onlinetoolkit  bookmarking  webanthologies  links  urls  bookmarks  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Only Collect; that is to say, collect everything,... | Coldbrain.
"I differ slightly from Rachel in terms of where it all lives. She uses DEVONthink, a program with which I’m admittedly not completely familiar. I’ve played a lot with Evernote, and whilst it kinda did what I wanted it to, there was always something vaguely uncomfortable about the mass of different types of information in there. Notes, screengrabs, clipped web pages, links, photos. It was all in once place, but it all seemed a bit disorganised, which was the opposite of what I wanted.

Instead, I try and use one piece of software for each task.1 I stick my bookmarks in Delicious, my lists and notes as plain text in Simplenote (by way of Notational Velocity), my photos in iPhoto and occasionally Flickr, &c. In short, one thing well."

[Something similar to this works for me too, though I'm not really sure whether it's because that's best for me or if it's because I've invested so much time in specialized buckets. And the "Only Collect" article is a gem — glad to see it pop up again.]

[Points to http://idlethink.wordpress.com/2008/11/26/only-collect/ AND http://al3x.net/2009/01/31/against-everything-buckets.html]
matthewculnane  everythingbuckets  collecting  bookmarks  bookmarking  del.icio.us  commonplacebooks  cv  notes  notetaking  devonthink  evernote  information  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Delibar, Delicious Mac client
"Delibar is a full featured Delicious and Pinboard Mac client. Delibar focuses on giving Mac OS X users an easy and quick tool for searching, managing and sharing their bookmarks. Delibar will be your best friend while using Delicious or Pinboard!"
delibar  del.icio.us  applications  osx  macosx  mac  software  pinboard  bookmarking  bookmarks  socialnetworking  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Walter Benjamin’s Aura: Open Bookmarks and the future eBook | booktwo.org
"Everyone is going to be bookmarking & annotating more…your bookmarks, your reading experience should – must – belong to you & not to Apple or Amazon or whoever. This information should be open & available so we can create…ecosystems…Benjamin writes about the aura of a work, & how that aura is diminished by the process of copying, because the highest quality of art is its place in the here and now. But I think that, 80 years on, we are building the tools to reclaim that aura and make it more valuable again. Business models, even social models, get broken all the time, and they get broken before we figure out how to replace them. Likewise, the aura model of art got broken 80 years ago, but we just might be figuring out how to fix it. What kills industries now is the same storm out of paradise that broke businesses before – but might just fix them in the future…The long-form text is not dead, but the physical book is, and the digital copy does not have value in the same way."
bookmarks  books  ebooks  history  literature  publishing  openbookmarks  reading  social  ipad  iphone  walterbenjamin  etexts  bookmarking  annotation  notetaking  amazon  kindle  apple  via:preoccupations  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Your Bookmarklets, On Steroids – Quix
"Quix is an extensible bookmarklet, that allows you to easily access all your bookmarks and bookmarklets, across all your browsers, while maintaining them in only one spot. All you have to do is remember the shortcut for the bookmarklet, so, basically, it’s like a command line for your browser!
bookmarks  bookmarking  browser  bookmarklets  onlinetoolkit  browsers 
april 2010 by robertogreco
tcsnmy7 - An open letter to those in attendance at The Children’s School Board of Trustees pre-board forum on Monday, January 25
Follow-up to a presentation about the NMY program and Q&A with students including reference to articles mentioned and an introduction to others not mentioned during the talk. Topics include progressive education, one-to-one laptop programs, transparency, high scool and college admissions, and the purpose or 'big meaning' of education. Also posted at: http://tcsnmy6.tumblr.com/post/358630658/an-open-letter-to-those-in-attendance-at-the-childrens
cv  comments  tcsnmy  school  schooling  putpose  1to1  laptops  technology  philosophy  meaning  why  del.icio.us  bookmarks  transparency  hollandchristian  ap  future  appreciation  admissions  highereducation  highschool  colleges  universities  reflection  1:1 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Want To Give Pinboard A Try? You’ll Have To Pay $2.84
"This is a side project for Ceglowski, so charging a fee for new users certainly isn’t a dumb business move. And if enough people pay to use the service, maybe it will signal to him to move this front and center on his priority list. I would have done things a little differently, though - let people in for free and charge them after a week or so or shut down their account. That lets people try it out before they open their wallet."
maciejceglowski  pinup  bookmarks  bookmarking  sideprojects  money  business  businessmodels  maciejcegłowski 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Pinboard - antisocial bookmarking
"The site is now open for beta testing (which means bookmarks are backed up and features are less likely to break). Give it a try if you find delicious too slow for your needs." ... "Social bookmarking for introverts
maciejceglowski  tagging  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  maciejcegłowski 
july 2009 by robertogreco
DeliciousSafari
"Use and create Delicious bookmarks from the Safari web browser"
via:preoccupations  safari  bookmarks  bookmarking  del.icio.us  extension  browser  browsers  macosx  extensions  mac  osx  freeware  plugin 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Twitmark – Social bookmarking 140 characters at a time
"Twitmark is a social bookmarking service which fetches links sent on Twitter by you and your friends, bookmarks them and republishes them to your favourite bookmarking service."
twitter  del.icio.us  diigo  bookmarks  bookmarking  mashup  socialnetworking  via:javierarbona 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Smub.it: Dead Simple Link-Sharing Via Mobile - ReadWriteWeb
"Smub.it offers a drop-dead simple social sharing and bookmarking tool that proves especially useful for iPhone and other smart phone users.
del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  iphone  mobile  phones 
april 2009 by robertogreco
The Daily Clique
"Every weekday, I use this space to share the best links from a select group of 21 people in my network on delicious.com. The membership of this select group (listed in the right-hand column above) is subject to change. That's where you come in."
del.icio.us  bookmarks  socialbookmarking  aggregator  socialmedia  lists  links  curation 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Where data goes when it dies and other musings | FactoryCity
"There’s a lot of history in my bookmarks, no doubt. In some ways, it’s a record of all the things that I’ve read that I thought might be worth someone else reading (hence why my bookmarks are public), and clearly is a list of things that have affected and informed my thinking on a broad array of topics. But, the beauty of bookmarks is that they’re secondary references to other things. The payload is elsewhere and distributed. So in some ways, yeah, I mean, there’s a lot of good data there that’s been lost (at least for the moment). But, the reality is that the legacy of my bookmarks are forever imbued in my brain as changes in how my synapses fire. The things that I can’t remember, well, perhaps they weren’t that important to begin with." + "somehow buying a new machine wasn’t just about better performance, but about giving myself license to forget and to start over and to make new mistakes."
bookmarks  bookmarking  microformats  productivity  openness  data  memory  learning  longevity  backup  via:preoccupations 
february 2009 by robertogreco
100 Powerful Web Tools to Organize Your Thoughts and Ideas | Online College Blog and School Reviews
"Whether you are a busy executive, a single parent, a freelancer working from home, a student, or a combination of these, you have probably found yourself needing help when it comes to organizing all your thoughts and ideas that occur throughout your busy day. Now you can turn to these tools found on the Internet that will help you with tasks such as note-taking, bookmarking websites, highlighting important text during online research, creating mind maps, tracking time, keeping up with appointments, collaborating with others, managing projects, and much more."
onlinetoolkit  online  organization  gtd  bookmarking  bookmarks  annotation  research  internet  learning  education  productivity  software  mindmapping  notetaking  wikis  todolists  collaboration  calendars  timetrackers 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Welcome to the Course! « Blogs, Wikis, and New Media
"This course is designed to help you understand and effectively use a variety of “web 2.0″ technologies including blogs, RSS, wikis, social bookmarking tools, photo sharing tools, mapping tools, audio and video podcasts, and screencasts."
web2.0  e-learning  elearning  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  tutorials  courses  curriculum  edtech  education  wikis  training  podcasts  podcasting  socialsoftware  howto 
june 2008 by robertogreco
fabric of folly: Virtual moonbeams: the impossible task of capturing the web
"So, how do you solve a problem like archiving the web? The two most likely solutions to my mind are 1.) a massive, open, SETI@home-style distributed networking approach 2.) Google does it."
archives  archiving  google  web  internet  bookmarks  boomarking  images  dynamic 
june 2008 by robertogreco
iterasi [via: http://www.fabricoffolly.com/2008/05/virtual-moonbeams-impossible-task-of.html]
all of that dynamic personalization makes it extremely difficult to save pages for future use...to help, we've created a simple browser-based tool for saving any Web page—dynamically generated or otherwise—with the click of a button.
bookmarking  archiving  web  online  internet  tools  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  tagging 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Remember everything. | Evernote Corporation
"Evernote allows you to easily capture information in any environment using whatever device or platform you find most convenient, and makes this information accessible and searchable at anytime, from anywhere."
software  productivity  evernote  memory  web  online  internet  search  bookmarks  bookmarking  aggregator  semanticweb  webapps  notetaking  mindmapping  gtd  memex  database  onlinetoolkit  iphone  notebooks  notes 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Three Uses of Diigo in the History and Language Arts Classroom | Beyond School
"I’m a fairly quiet person who tends to be happy roaming solo in his own flow...Schooliness is Web 1.0 (if it’s web at all), and our students seem to prefer schooliness over anything new every bit as much as their teachers do. A word to the wise."
diigo  clayburell  teaching  learning  education  schools  online  web  annotation  bookmarks  highlighting  classes  literature  socialstudies  history 
march 2008 by robertogreco
the Awesome Highlighter - be nice, highlight
"The Awesome Highlighter lets you highlight text on web pages and then gives you a link to the highlighted page."
highlighter  web2.0  sharing  collaboration  web  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  bookmarking  browser  blogging  services  webservice  socialbookmarking  annotation  browsers 
march 2008 by robertogreco
SHIFD - Contact Us
"Shifd easily allows you to shifd content including notes, places, links between multiple devices."
mobile  phones  sync  sharing  bookmarks  bookmakring  utilities  iphone  content  maps  news  service  bookmarking 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Howard Rheingold's Vlog: Introduction to Social Bookmarking
"The third in a series of videos documenting my use of social media in my personal and professional life. This installment introduces social bookmarking. My del.icio.us account is hrheingold."
socialbookmarking  tagging  howardrheingold  education  del.icio.us  bookmarking  bookmarks  socialmedia  socialsoftware 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Software over the rainbow » Blog Archive » Mess up, dig for context, scatter… and find your stuff
"scattering could inject some healthy variety to our experience of digital information, giving us a richer context in which to manage our own data...we might be making our storage less efficient, but we’d be improving our memory of it."
storage  memory  data  bookmarks  tumblr  del.icio.us  bookmarking  digital  archiving  recall  search  context  scattering 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Instapaper
"1. You find something you want to read, but you don't have time now. You click . 2. When you have time to read, you come here on your computer or phone and get whatever you wanted to read."
bookmarking  bookmarklet  bookmarklets  bookmarks  del.icio.us  iphone  applications  mobile  productivity  reading  informationmanagement  instapaper  webapp  news  ios 
january 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] del.icio.us maps
"marker can dragged around map to correct location...double-click the marker - loads the del.icio.us posting interface in iframe passing geocoded + lat/lon data...In addition it sends some extra marker tags, notably del:bookmark=geo."
mapping  maps  python  webapps  del.icio.us  bookmarks  geotagging  geography  location  location-based  nokia  mashup 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Jiglu: Tags that think
"Jiglu is a super-smart engine that pieces your site together, intelligently tagging and linking your web content"
tagging  tags  blogging  blogs  bookmarks  collaboration  datamining  sharing  web2.0  semantics  automation  generator  widgets  webdesign  services  networking  webdev 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Laurent Haug’s blog » Blog Archive » How to exist online if you are lazy?
"how to maintain an effective online existence with very little efforts...Capture latent content, Augment others content and bring traffic back to your site (feed reader and comment), microblog (Twitter/Jaiku), linkblog (del.icio.us/tumbr)
tips  web2.0  presence  online  internet  lazyweb  simplicity  del.icio.us  flickr  identity  twitter  jaiku  tumblr  blogging  blogs  comments  content  bookmarks  bookmarking  business  community  traffic 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Scripted Re-Mark: Batch Editing Your Bookmarks - Freshblog
"The service is dubbed Scripted Re-Mark, since you use a script to "re-mark" your bookmarks. It grew out of my earlier experiments with automatic tagging and frustrations with migrating a blog."
del.icio.us  bookmarks  editing  hacks  javascript  rules  share  tagging  tags 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Blogger Migration for Delicious and FreshTags - Freshblog
"Hitch #1. Delicious does not support batch delete. Hitch #2. Delicious will block you if you generate requests too quickly. Hitch #3. Delicious imports are compulsorily marked "not shared"."
del.icio.us  hacks  javascript  bookmarks  bookmarklets  automation  tagging 
october 2007 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

1:1  1to1  2837university  academia  accessibility  administration  admissions  aggregation  aggregator  alanjacobs  alberteinstein  allentan  alphabet  amazon  amélie  android  anildash  annotation  ap  api  apple  applications  appreciation  architecture  archival  archives  archiving  are.na  art  attention  audiencesofone  audio  automation  avos  backup  batchedits  behavior  benpieratt  bibliodyssey  bibliography  bighere  blinklist  blogging  blogs  bookmakring  bookmarking  bookmarklet  bookmarklets  bookmarks  books  boomarking  bridgeurl  brittagustafson  brooklyn  browser  browsers  browsing  browsinghistory  business  businessmodels  buzzandersen  caching  calculator  calendar  calendars  canon  carenlitherland  categorization  charlieloyd  children  chrome  chronology  chronoogical  citation  cities  classes  classideas  classification  clayburell  cloud  collaboration  collaborative  collaborativeresearch  collecting  collections  collective  collectiveintelligence  colleges  commentary  comments  commonplacebooks  commons  communication  community  commuting  compilations  complexity  connotea  consistency  constraints  constructivism  containers  content  context  conversation  coolhunters  courses  crafts  creativity  crowdsourcing  culture  curating  curation  curriculum  cv  daily  daringfireball  data  database  databases  datamining  davecormier  davidsmith  davidwiley  del.icio.us  delibar  design  desktop  devonthink  dieterrams  digg  digital  digitallife  diigo  directory  discovery  dlrn2015  documentation  documents  dropbox  duckduckgo  dynabook  dynamic  e-learning  eames  earth  ebooks  edcuation  editing  edtech  education  ego  elearning  email  empathy  entertainment  etexts  ethics  evernote  everread  everythingbuckets  extension  extensions  facebook  fanfiction  fans  favbot  faving  favorites  favoriting  federatedwiki  feeds  files  filetype:pdf  firefox  flickr  flow  folgsonomy  folksonomy  fop  frankchimero  free  freeware  friends  friendsofthepleistocene  fun  future  gardens  generator  geocoding  geography  geologiccity  geology  georgedyson  geotagging  gestures  github  glvo  google  googlemaps  googlereader  granularity  graphics  grassroots  groups  gtd  gui  hacks  hashtags  hereandnow  hierarchy  highereducation  highlighter  highlighting  highschool  history  hollandchristian  homeschool  homework  honesty  howardrheingold  howiwork  howto  howwelearn  howwework  html  hypertext  ideas  identity  illustration  images  information  informationmanagement  infrastructure  instagram  instapaper  integrity  intelligence  interactivity  interface  internet  interviews  ios  ipad  iphone  jacobsam-larose  jaiku  jamesbridle  japan  javascript  johngruber  joshuaschachter  journals  katebowles  keyboard  kindle  kippt  knowledge  kottke  labels  language  laptops  last.fm  lastfm  lazyweb  learning  libraries  lies  lifehacks  lifestreams  liking  linking  linkpollution  linkrot  links  listening  lists  literacy  literature  lizdanzico  lizettegreco  location  location-based  longevity  longonow  mac  maciejceglowski  maciejcegłowski  macosx  makingmeaning  management  mapping  maps  marginalia  marginalrevolution  mariapopova  markbernstein  marktwain  markup  mashup  materials  matthaughey  matthewculnane  mattjones  meaning  meaningmaking  media  media:document  memex  memory  memoryplatforms  messiness  metrocard  microblogging  microformats  migration  mikecaufield  mikhailbakhtin  mindmapping  mobile  mobilecomputing  money  movies  mp3  music  narrative  nearfield  networkedknowledge  networkedlearning  networking  networks  news  nfc  nokia  notebooks  notes  notetaking  now  nyc  oer  online  onlinetoolkit  open  openbookmarks  openbooks  openness  opensource  opera  organization  organizations  osx  pagination  participatory  participatoryculture  path  paulmison  pda12  pechakucha  pedagogy  performance  persistence  personaldigitalarchives  perspective  philosophy  phones  photography  php  pinboard  pinup  play  plugin  plugins  pockets  podcasting  podcasts  popular  portal  portfolio  presence  presentations  privilege  process  productivity  programs  projects  publishing  purity  putpose  python  quora  rayeames  reading  readitlater  readlater  readmill  readwriteweb  realtime  realtimeweb  recall  reference  referencing  reflection  relationships  reputation  research  resources  retrieval  reviews  rgreco  roadmap  robinsloan  rollyourown  rss  rules  russelldavies  safari  sagashitemiyo  sandiego  scaling  scandinavia  scattering  school  schooling  schools  scrolling  search  seelater  semantic  semantics  semanticweb  sendlater  sendtab  seo  serendipity  serialization  servers  service  services  shaing  share  sharing  sideprojects  siliconvalley  simplicity  skyscrapers  slideshow  smudgestudio  social  socialbookmaking  socialbookmarking  socialbookmarks  socialboomarking  socialboomarks  socialgraph  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialreading  socialsoftware  socialstudies  society  software  sorting  space  stackoverflow  standards  statistics  stellar.io  stephendavis  stevejobs  storage  storify  storytelling  streams  study  subcultures  sync  syncing  systems  tabs  tagclouds  tagging  tags  taxonomy  tcsnmy  teaching  technology  textbooks  thenextweb  thinglink  time  timelines  timeshiftedreading  timeshifting  timetrackers  tinboxes  tips  titles  todo  todolists  tokyo  toolbox  tools  tracking  traffic  training  transparency  trends  truth-telling  tumblr  tutorials  tv  twitter  universities  unschooling  urban  urls  usability  user  utilities  value  vanessabertozzi  vannevarbush  varsitybookmarking  via:caseygollan  via:javierarbona  via:lukeneff  via:preoccupations  via:rodcorp  via:russelldavies  via:tealtan  video  vimeo  visualization  waggledance  walterbenjamin  wardcunningham  watchlater  web  web2.0  webanthologies  webapp  webapps  webdesign  webdev  webservice  website  weekly  why  widgets  wiki  wikipedia  wikis  work  yahoo  youtube 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: